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Panama Silver, Asian Gold : Migration, Money, and the Making of the Modern Caribbean ( Digital Humanities Course Syllabu...

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Panama Silver, Asian Gold : Migration, Money, and the Making of the Modern Caribbean ( Digital Humanities Course Syllabus for the University of Florida )
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Syllabus
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English
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Rosenberg, Leah
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Department of English, University of Florida
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Gainesville, FL
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Digital Humanities
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Distributed Online Collaborative Course ( DOCC )
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Abstract:
Course description from the syllabus: This seminar considers two overlooked labor migrations that have profoundly affected the emergence of modern Caribbean literature: The immigration of indentured laborers from India and China into the West Indies and the emigration and return of the Afro-Caribbean workers who built the Panama Canal. Both groups worked under difficult conditions for exploitative wages. However, both used their savings to bankroll their entry into the educated middle class, thereby fostering the conditions that produced the first generation of nationalist politicians, as well as the first generation of Caribbean writers to achieve international acclaim. In this course, students will learn how to use archival material related to these nineteenth and twentieth century migrations, including photos, court cases, newspaper reports, popular songs, and first person accounts of the migrants’ experiences, to enrich their understanding of Caribbean literature. This course is a PILOT course for inter-collegiate collaborative learning and instruction in digital humanities. It will be taught in collaboration with Professor Rhonda Cobham-Sander at Amherst College and Dr. Donette Francis at the University of Miami and we will be assisted by librarians at each institution. The course makes extensive use of the Digital Library of the Caribbean (www.dloc.com), which open-access digital archive of Caribbean materials, whose technical hub is at UF. Students will have an opportunity to add their annotations to the finding aids in the DLOC collection; some class discussions will be held via video conference; and some assignments will be researched collaboratively or posted online. We hope our initial experiment will sow the seed for future collaborative courses involving students at other institutions, in the United States and abroad. We are counting on the resources you help us develop module to ground such future collaborations. Your level of commitment and participation will matter for students beyond this class. So be prepared to complete a significant amount of the work through independent research and in cross campus collaboration.
General Note:
Digital Humanities graduate course. Course description for Fall 2013 course at UF, LIT 6236. The course is being taught simultaneously at UF, the University of Miami, and Amherst College, and has been designed by faculty and librarians at the three institutions.
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Updated draft from May 23, 2013 loaded on May 29, 2013. Another updated draft loaded on June 21, 2013, and another version on June 23, 2013.

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LIT 6236/ Fall 2013 Panama Silver, Asian Gold: Migration, Money, and the Making of the Modern Caribbean The seminar will meet Tuesdays 12:50 3:50 in Turlington 4112 Instructor: Leah Rosenberg Office: Turlington 4346 Email: rosenber@ufl.edu ; phone: (352) 294 2848) Office Hours: Wednesday 1 3; Thusday 11 12 To register : Send your name and UF ID to rosenber@ufl.edu COURSE DESCRIPTION: This semin ar considers two overlooked labor migrations that have profoundly affected the emergence of modern Caribbean literature: The immigration of indentured laborers from India and China into the West Indies and the emigration and return of the Afro Caribbean wo rkers who built the Panama Canal. Both groups worked under difficult conditions for exploitative wages. However, both used their savings to bankroll their entry into the educated middle class, thereby fostering the conditions that produced the first genera tion of nationalist politicians, as well as the first generation of Caribbean writers to achieve international acclaim. In this course, students will learn how to use archival material related to these nineteenth and twentieth century migrations, including photos, court cases, newspaper reports, popular literature. This course is a PILOT course for inter collegiate collaborative learning and instructi on in digital humanities. It will be taught in collaboration with Professor Rhonda Cobham Sander at Amherst College and Dr. Donette Francis at the University of Miami and we will be assisted by librarians at each institution. The course makes extensive us e of the Digital Library of the Caribbean (www.dloc.com), which open access digital archive of Caribbean materials, whose technical hub is at UF. Students will have an opportunity to add their annotations to the finding aids in the DLOC collection; some c lass discussions will be held via video conference; and some assignments will be researched collaboratively or posted online. We hope our initial experiment will sow the seed for future collaborative courses involving students at other institutions, in the United States and abroad. We are counting on the resources you help us develop module to ground such future collaborations. Your level of commitment and participation will matter for students beyond this class. So be prepared to complete a significant am ount of the work through independent research and in cross campus collaboration. LEARNING OBJECTIVES To understand key concepts, themes, tropes, styles, and aesthetic concerns of Caribbean literary discourse through examining literary representations of the two migrations under study. To analyze creative texts in relation to historical events, as well as other disciplinary modes of inquiry such as history, anthropology, sociology. To develop and hone skills of literary analysis and research such as archival practice, close reading, critical argumentation, critical synthesis, and thesis writing.

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To illuminate some of the limitations of the colonial archive records of subaltern and disenfranchised people and the stakes involved in articulating the his tory of the majority of Caribbean people for literary writers and scholars. To introduce students to the technology used in digital archiving (producing metadata, exhibit labels, finding guides) and digital humanities (e.g. Omeka, PBworks, timelines, Zot ero) and explore challenges posed by digital archiving (how can we not reproduce the colonial structure of existing historical archival materials?). Students are encouraged to produce and publish digital research projects (such as finding guides, curated e xhibits, times lines) that will be included in the Digital Library of the Caribbean ( www.dloc.com ) and when appropriate the conference and exhibits celebrating the Centennial of the completion of the Panama Canal to b e held at UF in spring 2014. REQUIREMENTS: Attendance and Participation (in class discussion and responses to wiki postings beyond the required contributions) 15% Weekly Reading and Writing Assignments #1 6 45% of the grade Assignment # 7 Meta Data assignment 10% Assignment # 8 Final Research Project 30% Attendance and active participation are mandatory. Twenty percent (20%) of your grade will be based on your active listening, your reading your engagement in class discussions and your attendance of office hours. Readings Assigned readings are listed in the syllabus for each week. On most days there will be a literary text as well as an article or two meant to help you with your a ssignment. Exercises and Assignments Students will complete weekly assignments during the first half of the course, parts of which they will share online with other students at the three campuses. In the second half of the course you will complete a meta data project, and a final research project. Details about each of your assignments are laid out in the syllabus. Class Attendance and Punctuality. I expect you to come to class on time, and to attend regularly. Failure to do either will affect your final grade. Class Participation. This class is a seminar. All students are expected to come to class having read the assigned materials and having prepared for in defined here as participating in discussion generat ed by the class leader, as well as paying attention to and offering respectful critiques of in class and online presentations by other students. Office Hours. Since this class meets only once a week, you should plan to see me, singly or with a classmate, at least three times in the semester I have scheduled regular office hours for Wednesdays and Thursdays and I will be checking in at the beginning of the semes ter to make sure that everyone in the class can make one of the posted times.

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Week 1 August 27 Introduction Readings: Haunted by Empire: Geographies of Intimacy in North American History Ed. Ann Laura Stoler Duke UP, 2006. Trouillot, Ralph Silencing the Past (Boston,: Beacon P ress, 1995), 1 30. in They Came in Ships: An Anthology of Indo Guyanese Prose and Poetry (Lee ds: Peepal Tree Press, 1998) Turning Christian Claude McKay Poem in James, Winston, A Fierce Hatred of Injustice: Claude McKay's Jamaica and His Poetry of Rebellion Verso, 2001) My Gardening Book pp. 143 152 Collected Poems pp.100 102 Technology and Library Unit: (with Laurie Taylor) Introduction to PBWorks Week 2 SEEING THE ARCHIVE IN THE TEXT September 3 Reading: Black labor on a white canal: Panama, 1904 1981 ASSIGNMENT 1 SE EING THE ARCHIVE IN THE TEXT Technology and Library Unit 1 : (with Laurie Taylor and Missy Roser) PBWorks basics & Zotero Week 3 Indentured Women in the Archive September 10 Readings: Saidiya Lose Your Mother Verene Shepherd, They Came in Ships: An Anthology of Indo Guyanese Prose and Poetry (Leeds: Peepal Tree Press, 1998) ASSIGNMENT 2 : READING THE COLONIAL ARCHIVE

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Guest lecture via Skype: Verene Shepherd Technology and Library Unit: Introduction to dLOC (individual accounts) and other relevant digital resources for the class. Week 4 The Panama Canal Enters Modern West Indian Literature September 17 Rhonda Frederick, Caribbean. Oxford: Macmillan Press Warwick Univ ersity Caribbean Studies, 2003. pp. 43 76. Herbert de Lisser Susan Proudleigh (Methuen & Co., 1915) available in The Colon People: Part I, Jamaica Journal 11, nos. 3 and 4 (1977):62 70 Week 5 The Construction of identity and Migration in Newspapers September 24 Readings: Eric Walrond Tropic Death The Palm Porch, The Wharf Rats, Discerner of Hearts Guest Lecture : Rhonda Frederick The Colon People: Part II Jamaica Journal 42 (1978):87 102 ASSIGNMENT 3: REPRESENTING WEST INDIANS IN THE PANAMA CANAL ZONE Week 6 Indo Caribbeans enter Modern Caribbean literature October 1 Edgar Mittelholzer, Corentyne Thunder (Guyana) (1941) Miguel Street pp36 45 Indentured Coolies in the Nineteenth American Studies 10:3 (October 2007): 283 311. ASSIGNMENT 4: Working with Newspapers Week 7 Chinese Caribbean October 8 Readings: Chang, Victor. small axe, No. 2 (1997), pp.103

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108. (fiction) Lee Loy, Anne The Chinese Shop as Nation Theatre in West Indian Fiction, Anthurium 5:1 (Spring 2007). Richard Fung (Video 1990) Albert Chong A Negro Nurse with Chinese Children The West Indies; painted by A.S. Forrest (1900) Photography: Imag(in)ing Race and Place. London: Routledge, 2002. pp.. ASSIGNMENT 5: Visualizing the Archives Week 8 Listening in the Archive October 15 Brodber, Erna. "Oral Sources and the Creation of a Social History in the Caribbean" Jamaica Journal Digital Library of the Caribbean Bridget Brereton, some Texts by Women on t he English speaking Caribbean, from the 1770s to Bailey. Engendering History : Caribbean Women in Historical Perspective. Kingston: Ian Randle, 1995: 63 93 Mahase, Anna. My mother's daughter: the autobiography of Anna Mahase Snr., 1899 1978 Union Village, Claxton Bay, Trinidad : Royard Pub. Co., 1992 Roman, Fortune Diggers (Film) Nwankwo, Ifeoma. Introduction: Making Sense, Making Selves. Afro Latin Americans of British Caribbean Descent Latin American and Caribbean Ethnic Studies Volume 4, Issue 3, 2009. pages 221 230 ---Voices from Our America: Interview with Emiliana Bernard Stephenson pages 331 341 Other /alternative sources: resources: Panama Canal Museum oral histories Voices from Our America. Oral Histories of Afro Panamanians Persaud, Alice Persaud (1892 1952) Autobiography

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Week 9 Contemporary Indo Caribbean W omen Negotiate the Archive October 22 Ramabai Espinet, Swinging Bridge -----Indian Literature', World Literature Written in English 29,2: 116 26 ASSIGNMENT 6: Listening in the Archives Week 10 Contemporary Afro Caribbean Novelist negotiates the archive on Panama October 29 Maryse Conde Tree of Life US Senate hearing (starts about halfway down the page). Thi s series includes several Senate hearings about Panama Canal Matters Week 11 Digital Archiving and the Construction of Knowledge Nov 5 Guest Lecture: Laurie Taylor on Metadata and digital archiving and the Construction of Knowledge Reading: F amiliarize yourself with the citations in dLOC 3 sources you have found important. Also look at examples : News Flash: Vodou Not Voodoo Consider the information included and not i ncluded and terms used. Week 12 Digital Archiving and the Construction of Knowledge Nov 12 ASSIGNMENT 7 : Collaborative Guides and Annotations Due Week 13 Planning Week for Collaborative Digital Project November 19 Assignment for 19 November: Explore the digital projects linked in assignment 8 and consider what project you would like to undertake. You may explore other digital humanities projects and introduce them to the class via the wiki and class discussion. Week 14 Collaborate Project Continued: First proposal due November 26 ASSIGNMENT 8 Part 1: Write a proposal for your project (250 words) which includes: a title, tentative thesis, and list of sources. Week 15 Joan Flores Guest Presentation on Primary Research on the Panama Canal December 3 Guest Lecture: Joan Flores Report on progess towards part 2 of project (proposal explaining the use of technology) due Friday 6 December

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EXPLANATION OF ASSIGNMENTS The first draft or effort towards toward each assignment is due at 9 a.m. on the morning of the class. The final version should be uploaded to the wiki by noon the Friday of that week. Drafts should be posted on your home page and the final version on bot h your page and the wiki page for the assignment. ASSIGNMENT 1: SE EING THE ARCHIVE IN THE TEXT [due 3 /6 September] This assignment helps you understand how and why scholars use archival sources. Choose a book of interest from LINK. Read and analyze its introduction and bibliography using the reading form Post a paragraph about your findings to LINK. ASSIGNMENT 2: READING THE COLONIAL ARCHIVE [Due 10 / 13 September] This assignment introduces you to how scholars negotiate the colonial archive in making meaning. 1. Focus on 1 witness' testimony from Verene Shepherd's Maharani's Misery. How do you evaluate the significance of this testimony? How do you use other testimoni es to qualify (e.g., verify, contradict, etc.) this version? 2. What other conditions influence how we read these sources (e.g., additional historical contexts, the acknowledged absence of information, etc.)? 3. Document your reasoning and analysis (500 words) and post to the Wiki page for this assignment. 4. Using Hartman as your model, imagine your version of events (500 words) and post to the Wiki page for this assignment. ASSIGNMENT 3: RE PRESENTING WEST INDIANS IN THE PANAMA CANAL Zone [ Due 24/27 September] This assignment examines how literary texts transform the historical record. 1. Choose 1 scene from Susan Proudleigh that represents a specific historical event e.g., reasons for migrating to Panama, passage to Panama, encounters with Americans, living conditions, industrial accidents, etc.). 2. Choose 2 related historical sources. Final project due 13 December

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3. How are the West Indian characters represented (e.g., body, race, color class, gender, skills, profession, and an individual's reasons for migration, etc.)? In the novel? In the 2 historical sources? For each, examine what the author includes and excludes. 4. What do these selections and intepretive cho ices tell you (500 750 words)? Suggested sources listed in assignment page in PBworks ASSIGNMENT 4: WORKING WITH N EWSPAPERS (Due 1 October ) This assignment allows you to think about how newspapers create historical meaning. You may focus on any aspect of Panama or Asian migration for this assignment. Browse the newspapers assigned for your campus. Select a news item related to the migrants. Read the entire issue of the newspaper in which the article appears. What kind of items does this newspaper carry (e.g. ads, editorials, letters, news, literary pieces, cartoons)? What can you tell about the newspaper's readership and political orientation? Write (500 750 words) for the Wiki characterizing the newspaper, and post to the Wiki page for this assignment. ASSIGNMENT 5: VISUALIZING THE ARCHIVES (Due 8 October) This assignment asks you to examine how photography historically has constructed the raced subject. Choose 1 image from the photo gallery. LINK Examine the photo and consider the following: Note the gender of the subjects; their position vis vis, machines, animals, vegetation, buildings or other racial subjects. What do you know about the photographer or what do you imagine he/she was like? Is the photogr aph dated? Is there a caption? What do these selections and interpretive choices tell you?

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Write (500 750 words) on the provenance of the photograph and the way it constructs its subject. Paste the photo from the photo gallery into your Wiki entry. AS SIGNMENT 6: LISTENING IN THE ARCHIVES (Due October 22) This assignment introduces students to oral histories, memoirs, and personal accounts. Choose 1 oral account or memoir. Who is speaking? How do they characterize their relationship to the event the y describe? What do these narrative choices tell you Relate (500 750 words) your observations to some aspect of a text you've read so far in the course. ASSIGNMENT 7: COLLABORATIVE GUIDES AND ANNOTATIONS (Due 12 November) This assignment teaches you basic skills in digital archiving, and helps you understand how the digital archive constructs knowledge. Choose 1 primary source relevant to your final project from dLOC. Consider what's included and what's missing in the citation (the citation includes the record information or metadata). For example: See citations for any items by Herbert G. de Lisser, ethnically Jewish and was editor of The Gleaner for nearly 40 years, but there is nothing in the citation to make that known. Letters from th e Isthmian Canal Construction Workers, which does not exist in any known online library catalog and is only listed in the bibliography of Rhonda Frederick's In the source you selected, what additional information do you think should be included to make the source more useful for scholars? Complete the form for your selected item, and post to the Wiki. ASSIGNMENT 8: BUILDING A COLLABORATIVE DIGITAL PROJECT This assignment demonstrates how Caribbean Literature engages the archives. Thi s will be a Digital Humanities project (a project for the humanities in the digital age). You may work individually or in a group. For this assignment, you should create a digital project to explicate how Caribbean Literature engages the archives. This digital project should use dLOC, along with any other technologies as appropriate and dictated by the academic intent, to make a contribution to scholarly conversations. For example, your response could be thematic, theoretical, and/or it can use any co mbination of sources, media, and technologies.

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Your assignment should draw on any of the assignments created for this course. Please remember to cite all sources properly including your classmates. Components: Part 1: Write a proposal for your proje ct (250 words) which includes: a title, tentative thesis, and list of sources. (Due November 26) Part 2: Review and select an appropriate technology for delivering the project. Write a proposal explaining how the selected technology supports the project. (Due 6 December) Part 3: Design and deliver a digital project. (Due 13 December) Possible examples: Wendy Ewald class work from 2012 Diaries of a Prolific Professor Journal created from class papers (example with Haitian Creole) TimelineJS (simple ex ample, for use with larger projects) Historical book reception (reading of a book with responses to book, and critical analysis) Teaching materials Online exhibits About Face Online exhibits by the University of Miami Online exhibits by the University of Florida Digital scholarship projects As far as the eye/I can see: Caribbean Art & Visual Culture Slave Resistance: A Caribbean Story



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LIT 6236/ Fall 2013 Panama Silver, Asian Gold: Migration, Money, and the Making of the Modern Caribbean The seminar will meet Tuesdays 12:50 3:50 in Turlington 4112 Instructor: Leah Rosenberg Office: Turlington 4346 Email: rosenber@ufl.edu ; phone: (352) 294 2848) Office Hours: Wednesday 1 3; Thusday 11 12 To register : Send your name and UF ID to rosenber@ufl.edu COURSE DESCRIPTION: This semin ar considers two overlooked labor migrations that have profoundly affected the emergence of modern Caribbean literature: The immigration of indentured laborers from India and China into the West Indies and the emigration and return of the Afro Caribbean wo rkers who built the Panama Canal. Both groups worked under difficult conditions for exploitative wages. However, both used their savings to bankroll their entry into the educated middle class, thereby fostering the conditions that produced the first genera tion of nationalist politicians, as well as the first generation of Caribbean writers to achieve international acclaim. In this course, students will learn how to use archival material related to these nineteenth and twentieth century migrations, including photos, court cases, newspaper reports, popular literature. This course is a PILOT course for inter collegiate collaborative learning and instructi on in digital humanities. It will be taught in collaboration with Professor Rhonda Cobham Sander at Amherst College and Dr. Donette Francis at the University of Miami and we will be assisted by librarians at each institution. The course makes extensive us e of the Digital Library of the Caribbean (www.dloc.com), which open access digital archive of Caribbean materials, whose technical hub is at UF. Students will have an opportunity to add their annotations to the finding aids in the DLOC collection; some c lass discussions will be held via video conference; and some assignments will be researched collaboratively or posted online. We hope our initial experiment will sow the seed for future collaborative courses involving students at other institutions, in the United States and abroad. We are counting on the resources you help us develop module to ground such future collaborations. Your level of commitment and participation will matter for students beyond this class. So be prepared to complete a significant am ount of the work through independent research and in cross campus collaboration. LEARNING OBJECTIVES To understand key concepts, themes, tropes, styles, and aesthetic concerns of Caribbean literary discourse through examining literary representations of the two migrations under study. To analyze creative texts in relation to historical events, as well as other disciplinary modes of inquiry such as history, anthropology, sociology. To develop and hone skills of literary analysis and research such as archival practice, close reading, critical argumentation, critical synthesis, and thesis writing.

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To illuminate some of the limitations of the colonial archive records of subaltern and disenfranchised people and the stakes involved in articulating the his tory of the majority of Caribbean people for literary writers and scholars. To introduce students to the technology used in digital archiving (producing metadata, exhibit labels, finding guides) and digital humanities (e.g. Omeka, PBworks, timelines, Zot ero) and explore challenges posed by digital archiving (how can we not reproduce the colonial structure of existing historical archival materials?). T o produce and publish digital research projects (such as finding guides, curated exhibits, times lines) that will be included in the Digital Library of the Caribbean ( www.dloc.com ). REQUIREMENTS: Attendance and Participation 15% Weekly Reading and Writing Assignments #1 9 45% Finding Guide (Assignment #10) 10% Final Research Project (Assignment # 11) 30% EXPLANATIONS Attendance and active participation a re mandatory. Twenty percent (15 %) of your grade will be based on your active listening, your reading your engagement in class discussions and your responses to wiki postings. Readings Assigned readings are listed in the syllabus for each week. On most days there will be a literary text as well as an article or two meant to help you with your as signment. Zotero and PBworks To facilitate collaborative work within the class and across the three campuses, we will be sharing a wiki (through PBworks) and a group in the open source bibliographic program Zotero All students will be required to have Zotero and PBworks accounts and contribute to both as part of the class. The specifics will be detailed in assignments and explained in class. Exercises and Assignments Students will complete weekly assignments duri ng roughly the first half of the course designed to actively engage students in specific research methods and archival materials (newspapers, memoirs, colonial government records, photographs, oral history) as well as to help students develop ideas and sou rces their final project. Parts of the assignments will be shared e online with other students at the three campuses. In the second half of the course you will complete a metadata project, and a final research project. Details about each of your assignmen ts are laid out in the syllabus.

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Office Hours. Since this class meets only once a week, you should plan to see me, singly or with a classmate, at least three times in the semester I have scheduled regular office hours for Wednesdays and Thursdays and I will be checking in at the beginning of the semester to make sure that everyone in the class can make one of the posted times.

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August 27 Introduction to the History and Literature of Migration in the Caribbean Objectives: To introduce the colonial history of migration, ethnicity, and race in the Caribbean (Lowe) To illuminate some of the limitations of the colonial archive records of subaltern and disenfranchised people and the great stakes inv olved in articulating the history of the majority of Caribbean people (Trouillot) To introduce the literary representations of two migrations under study in this course To introduce students to the technology used in th e course and to Amherst class and give students a sense of the possibilities for their final projects. Readings: Haunted by Empire: Geographies of Intimacy in North American History Ed. Ann Laura Stoler Du ke UP, 2006. Trouillot, Ralph Silencing the Past (Boston,: Beacon Press, 1995), 1 30. Black labor on a white canal: Panama, 1904 1981 available through University of Pittsburgh Digital Editions : http://digital.library.pitt.edu/cgi bin/t/text/text idx?c=pittpress;cc=pittpress;q1=Latin%20 America;rgn=works;rgn1=topic;view=toc ;idno=31735057893350 in They Came in Ships: An Anthology of Indo Guyanese Prose and Poetry. Leeds: Peepal Tree Press, 1998 : 263 267. Claude McKay Poem Ed. William J. Maxwell. Complete Poems Claude McKay University of Illinoir Press,Urbana:, 2004: 9 12. Technology and Library Unit: (with Laurie Taylor) Introduction to PBWorks T

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Week 2 Seeing the Archive in the Text September 3 Readings: Turning Christian. Jahaji Bhai : an anthology of Indo Caribbean l iterature Toronto : TSAR, 1988:15 21. Discerner of Hearts Toronto : McClelland & Stewart, 1995. 57 74. ASSIGNMENT 1 Evaluating archival sources used in scholarly works Technology and Library Unit: (with Laurie Taylor and Missy Roser) PBWorks basics Zotero introduction Overview of technology and digital humanities assignments for the course Overview of projects, project planning, and working in teams for class Review of list of tools for projects, examples of good projects with each Week 3 Indentured Women in the Archive September 10 Readings: Saidiya Lose Your Mother Verene Shepherd, They Came in Ships: An Anthology of Indo Guyanese Prose and Poetry (Leeds: Peepal Tree Press, 1998 cover They Came in Ships: An Anthology of Indo Guyanese Prose and Poetry (Leeds: Peepal Tree Press, 1998) in 189 191. ASSIGNMENT 2: Reading the Colonial Archive Guest lecture via Skype: Verene Shepherd Technology and Library Unit: Introduction to dLOC (individual accounts) and other relevant digital resources for the class. Week 4 The Panama Canal E nters Modern West Indian Literature : the Work of Herbert de Lisser September 17 Col Migration Lanham, Md: Lexington Books, 2005. Introduction Pp 197 214. Jamaica Journal 11, nos. 3 and 4 (1977):62 70 http://www.dloc.com/UF00090030/00032/3?search=jamaica+%3djournal

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Herbert de Lisser Susan Prou dleigh (Methuen & Co., 1915) available in http://dloc.com/UF00081174/00001 ASSIGNMENT 3: Indians in the Panama Canal Zone Week 5 Panama and Modernity: Competing Caribbean and U.S. Visions September 24 Readings: Eric Walrond Tropic Death ( The Palm Porch, The Wharf Rats, G uest Lecture : Rhonda Frederick Jamaica Journal 42 (1978):87 102 ( http://www.dloc.com/UF00090030/00033/89j?search=jamaica+%3djou rnal ) ASSIGNMENT 4: Working with N ewspapers Week 6 Indo Caribbeans enter Modern Caribbean literature October 1 Edgar Mittelholzer, Corentyne Thunder (Guyana) (1941) V.S.Naipaul Miguel Street pp36 45 Representations of Indentured Coolies in the Nineteenth Century British West 3 311. ASSIGNMENT 5: SITUATING LITERARY REPRESENTATION IN RESPECT TO THE ARCHIVE. Taking material you or your colleagues have found in primary sources in the scholarly work, s ituate and discuss the significance of ion of Indo Trinidadians in the context of this colonial stereotypes and debates about Indians in the Caribbean. Week 7 Chinese Caribbeans Enter Modern Caribbean Literature October 8 Readings: Chang, Victor. small axe, No. 2 (1997), pp.103 108. (fiction)

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Lee Loy, Anne Marie, The Chinese Shop as Nation Theatre in West Indian Fiction Anthurium 5:1 (Spring 2007). http://anthurium.miami.edu/volume_5/issue_1/leeloy chineseshop.html Kerry Young, Pao: A Novel Guest Lecture: Victor Chang Assignment 6 : Portray a scene from the perspective of the Objectified person Week 8 Oral History Resources October 15 Readings: Brodber, Erna. "Oral Sources and the Creation of a Social History in the Caribbean" Jamaica Journal Digital Library of the Caribbean Memorial Lecture Mahase, Anna. My mother's daughter : the autobiography of Anna Mahase Snr ., 1899 1978 : with the autobiography of Kenneth E. Mahase Snr., 1893 1955Published: Union Village, Claxton Bay, Trinidad : Royard Pub. Co., 1992 Roman, Fortune Diggers (Film) Nwankwo, Ifeoma Introduction: Making Sense, Making Selves. Afro Latin Ameri cans of British Caribbean Descent Latin American and Caribbean Ethnic Studies Volume 4, Issue 3, 2009. pages 221 230 ---Voices from Our America: Interview with Emiliana Bernard Stephenson pages 331 341 Assignment 7 : Oral History and Colonial representations Choose one passage or event described in one of the oral histories or memoir you read or watched for today and contrast it with a parallel passage from a colonial or literary account. Compare, contrast, and assess the significance of the d ifferences and similarities. Speak to the significance of oral history in this instance. Post your Other /alternative sources: resources: Cramer, Louise. California Folklore Quar terly 5(1964) 243 72

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Persaud, Alice Persaud (1892 1952) Autobiography (at the University of Guyana). http://mosessite.blogspot.com/2011/05/autobiography of alice bhagwandy sital.html (oral history) Voices from Our America. Oral Histories of Afro Panamanians http://voicesamerica.library.vanderbilt.edu/VfOA/voices_ATrym.php Ines Sealy interview http://voicesamerica.library.vanderbilt.edu/diglib.php?record=9 Panama Canal Museum O ral histories. DLOC oral histories, they are located in Panama and the Canal collection and can be found with a search of that collection with term: oral history or from the direct collection link, http://dloc.com/ ohpcm/all (there are @ 41 oral histories of members of the Panama Canal Museum Community in dLOC. These are probably all of white, U.S. employees and their descendants.) Week 9 Contemporary Indo Caribbean women Negotiate the Archive October 22 Ramabai Espinet, Swinging Bridge -----West Indian Literature', World Literature Written in English 29,2: 116 26 Preliminary work for assignment #8. R ead Assignment # 8 Collaborat ive Guide and if you would like to work on the guide on The Swinging Bridge begin to pick out which historical or cultural references you would like to identify and explicate. Week 10 Contemporary Afro Caribbean Novelist negotiates the archive on Panama October 29 Maryse Conde Tree of Life Hearings Before Senate Committee on Interoceanic Canals, 11 January 1906: US Senate hearing (starts about halfway down the page). Section tba. Preliminary work for assignment #8. Read Assignment # 8 Collaborative Guide and if you would like to work on the guide on The Swinging Bridge begin to pick out which historical or cultural references you would like to identify and explicate. Week 11 Wiki Guides to The Swinging Bridge and Tree of Life Nov 5 ASSIGNMENT 8 due: Collaborative Guides to Historical and Cultural References in The Swinging Bridge or Tree of Life Objective: Students from all three campuses wil l contribute to making a guide to the historical and cultural refer ences in these novels. Contributions will be posted on the wiki and then converted to a pdf file and added to the dLOC pedagogy

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resources ( http://dloc.com/teach ) There will be a signup sheet with a list of suggested references but students can also add an item not on the list. Choose 2 historical or literary references in The Swinging Bridge or Tree of Life (or one in each). Find secondary sources on that event and/or text. Identify a primary document relevant Massa Day Done and write an explication (250 500 words) that describes the event, circumstance, or document, and explains its significance in the text. Week 12 Introduction to Colonial Photography Nov 12 READING: Colonial Photography and Exhibitions Leicester University Press, 1999: Introduction (pp 1 14) and Chapter 2 (38 72). of the Anglophone Caribbean: The PhD Diss. Emory University, 2002. Abstract and P 151 ( esp. 142 147 ) ASSIGNMENTS: Assignment #9: Post a historical Photograph or other image (of West Indians in Panama, Indentured labor, or Asian Caribbeans) on the Wiki [due by class November 12] Browse the DLOC collections for photos of East Indians and/or Panama migrants and c hoose one photograph that you find particularly evocative. We will work on the analysis in class. Technology and Library Unit: (Laurie Taylor) Introduction to metadata, exhibit labels, and types of exhibit labels and the theoretical implications of metadata categories and exhibit labels. General overview: Archives hold collections of materials that are organized and structured for use and preservation. The seeming neutrality of archival organization is false. What is selected to collect and contain, and the descriptions by which those materials are organized create a world view and a history. Engaging with materials for research is a non ne utral process where the available information records and metadata present and create world structures and histories. Researchers engage with these concerns, and that engageme nt is better informed when underlying structures are exposed, and when researchers have sufficient knowledge to inform needed changes. Tasks/Goals: Edit metadata on 1 item in dLOC; or create record (with no digital files) in

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dLOC with descriptive informat ion or metadata See how metadata is created; see the technical standards; see the human control and expansiveness in choices all that meet seemingly objective standards; see the complexity of this for colonial materials where lack of description erases h istories Understand the role and importance of scholars in the identifying and describing materials so that the materials are known to exist and can function in culture and scholarly communications Resources: ( http://www.research.ucsb.edu/cbs/projects/haiti/kosanba/ ) Explanation of how exhibit labels, and that they are interpretive and tell stories: http://exhibits.uflib.ufl.edu/docs/labels.pdf Week 13 Research week// Finding/Enhanced M etadata November 19 Homework due: Assignment 10 Guide to a Primary Source/Metadata Exercise Objective: to teach students skills in metadata and digital archiving Identify a primary source (s) relevant to your research interests in this course. Supply the historical annotation and metadata. We encourage students to identify a source in dLOC (it can be a record only or standard item) but students can al so choose a traditional source or a source from another digital resource. Students are to post their homework on the wiki page and add the item to Zotero. historical Technology and Library Unit: (Laurie Taylor) Initial session on the final project: B rainstorming, planning, review of successful digital humanities projects (possible discussion of paper prototyping, wireframing, and other planning tools) Workshop on using Omeka (Students can use other technology for the final project, such as VoiceThrea d, Digital Storytelling, PowerPoint) Week 14 Project Proposals Due November 26 Presentations Assignment 11: Proposal for Final project Due. 1)Digital project plan for collaborative project due (abstract (argument/objectives), what will be included, what technology will be used and why) Considerations on where and how to present with venues (e.g., THATCamp UF,

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Assignments All assignments are due by 5pm on the Monday afternoon before class on Tuesday They are to be posted on your personal Wiki page and if appropriate also on another page for that day (usually the class page for that day) and/or in Zotero. The assignments are detailed below; if you would like to modify an assignment to facilitate yo ur research or interests, please contact the instructor and we most likely be able to out a modification. ASSIGNMENT 1 : SE EING THE ARCHIVE IN THE TEXT [due 2 September] This assignment is designed to help identify the types of archival sources scholars use in cultural and literary studies and their methods for using them. Choose from among the books distributed in class a work that you think may be of interest to you. Read and summarize its contents, using the Reading Form posted online and the method section of your book (if you can locate that) and answer the following questions: 1) Name three kinds of primary sources on which this study relies 2) Choose one such source and describe it. Where is it located? When was it created? What type of source is it (newspaper, memoir, interviews, deposit i ons, tables or registers, photos, sound archive etc) 3) Were there ways of describing the source in the bibliography or footnotes that you did not understand? How did you go about finding out what they meant? 4) Why do you think the author of you r study found this particular source useful? 5) argument or concerns? 6) If you could read through the source material yourself, what do you think you might want to look for? Possible Books: THATCamp Florida, traditional conferences, webinars,) Technology and Library Unit: (Laurie Taylor) How to Digital humanities projects and where to present: e.g., THATCamp UF; THATCamp Florida (at UCF); and try to organize panel for any relevant virtual conference, Webinars with libraries, etc. Week 15 Draft of Final Project Due December3 Presen tations Draft of final project/presentation

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Lee Loy, Anne Marie, Searching for Mr. Chin: Constructions of Nation and the Chinese in West Indian Literature (Philadelphia: Temple UP, 2010) (introduction available as pdf from press website) Putnam, Lara. Radical Move s: Caribbean Migrants and the Politics of Race in the Jazz Age (UNC Press, 2013) Szok, Peter Szok. Wolf Tracks: Popular Art and Re Africanization in Twentieth Century Panama Wolf Tracks: Popular Art and Re Africanization in Twentieth Century Panama Tejaswini Niranjana Mobilizing India: Women, Music, and Migration between India and Trinidad ASSIGNMENT 2: READING THE COLONIAL ARCHIVE [Due 9 September] This assignment is designed to help us further explore scholarly use of colonial archives by examining alongside the extensive of archival sources she includes in the appendices of her wor k. Write a wiki entry (500 750 words) related colonial report or memoir and compare the representation of indentured immigrants in both sources. 1. Consider the following questions : What is the narrative presented by the senior officers (the Captain and Surgeon General) of the death? How do individual testimonies from other officers, immigrants, and the crew cast doubt on their version? (choose one and explain.) What conclusions does Shepherd draw from the commission reports and other documents? Do you the colonial documents for evidence about colonized people? 2. Choose one of the following colonial sources and, focusing on one passage (or two passages), compare the representation of indentured immigrants in that source with the representation in the Commission hearings cited in Beaumont, Joseph. The New Slavery: An Account of the Indian and Chinese Immigrants in British Guiana in British Guiana. London 1871 DeVoeux, Sir George William. Experiences of a Demerara magistrate, 1863 1869. Georgetown, British Guiana, Daily Chronicle, 1948 (Florida International University has this) Jenkins, Edward 1871 The Coolie: His Rights and Wrongs London. http://dloc.com/AA00013942/00001 -----Lutchmee and Dilloo: a Study of West Indian Life. London Volumes 1 3: http://dloc.com/AA00013943/00001/allvolumes Kirke, Henry. Twenty Five Years in British Guiana. 1898 Reprint Westport, Negro U Press, 1970.

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Royal Gazette for British Guiana, which covered events concerning indentured Indians, such as runaways and petitions. ASSIGNMENT 3: WEST INDIANS IN THE PANAMA CANAL ZONE [September 1 6 ] Browse through the sources listed below; then choose one about which to answer the following questions 1) Identify three places where the writer describes an event similar to something you read about in the novel, S usan Proudleigh 2) How does the author interpret these events? Be sure to locate specific places in the text to support your claims 3) view? Again, be specific 4) How does the novel Susan Proudleigh corroborate or co ntradict that interpretation? 5) What other possible interpretations can you imagine for the event described? 6) What missing information do you wish you had about the events you identified? How might you go about finding a source for that missing inf ormation? If you had to make it up, what would you want it to be? Possible Sources: Avery, Ralph Emmett, et al. The Greatest Engineering Feat in the World at Panama : Authentic and Complete Story of the Building and Operation of the Great Waterway ... New York: Leslie Judge Co, 1915 (available as pdf and free ebook through google books) Susie Pearl Core, Susie Pearl. Jean Heald,. Picturesque Panama: The Panama Railroad, the Panama Canal ( 1928) ----Panama's trails of progress: or, The story of Panama and its canald:New York : North River Press, 1941, c1925. de Lisser Herbert G. In Jamaica and Cuba (preface, v and Chapter 10, pp 153 162) ; Isthmian Historical society Letters from Isthmian Canal Construction Worker. Edited and introduced by Ruth C. Stuhl. Balboa Heights, C.Z., 1963 Young, Sidney A/., ed. Isthmian echoes, a selection of the literary endeavors of the West Indian colony in the republic of Panama. From articles contributed to the West Indian section.... Panama, 1928. ASSIGNMENT 4: WORKING WITH N EWSPAPERS [ Due 24 September ] Choose a contemporaneous news item about either West Indians in Panama or Asian indentured immigrants in the Caribbean. You can start either by identifying a newspaper source in a footnote OR by leafing your way through one of the newspapers we have identi fied as often carrying news about Canal Zone or indentured workers. Some of these newspaper are available through DLOC but through proprietary online newspaper collections that librarians can help you to access or in old fashioned

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microfilm in the Latin A worth of issues surrounding the article(s) on which you decide to focus. Write a wiki entry characterizing the publication (one paragraph) and the specific news item (one paragraph) that pays attention to the following kinds of details: What kinds of news reports, advertisements/editorials/letters to the editors/literary piece s/cartoons does it carry? (Give examples of the trends you identify) Does the newspaper have a particular political bias or readership base? How can you tell? Is reporting about Panama/East Indian migration a major focus or just an event? What kind of back ground information does the news item give us about the issue reported? What kind of knowledge does it assume its readers already possess? Can you tell what kind of response the news item elicited or was meant to elicit? Cut and paste your news item into y our WIKI entry then do something creative with it. You might decide, for example, to create a cartoon about it in the style of the publication; write your own letter to the editor; juxtapose passages from the article with passages from the creative texts w with ads in the paper or with modern day news reports or with photos from DLOC; write a letter from someone involved in the reported incident to someone back home, etc. The point of this exercise is to help your reader to see something the new s item may have left implicit and to think In class assignment : Compare and contrast the representation of West Indians in Panama in the newspaper with the representation of West Indians in the literature of de Lisser and/or Walrond who both worked as journalists. In fact, we might even ask students to look for repr esentations of West Indians in Panama in the Gleaner which de Lisser edited or in the Negro World or another paper for which Walrond wrote. Students could present their data and analysis about West Indians and then students at the other campuses could al so make use of the information in their inclass assignment. Students who chose to focus on West Indians in Panama would present their findings this week and then the following week, students who chose to focus on Indo Caribbeans or indentured laborers woul d present their work the following week. ASSIGNMENT 5: SITUATING LITERARY REPRESENTATION IN RESPECT TO THE ARCHIVE. [Due 1 October] Taking material you or your colleagues have found in primary sources in the scholarly work, situate and discuss the signi Indo Trinidadians in the context of this colonial stereotypes and debates about Indians in the Caribbean.

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ASSIGNMENT 6 : A SCENE FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF THE OBJECTIFIED PERSON [October 7] Using Ke rry Y Pao as your point of departure and relying on the perspectives offered in the other reading s for this week, go back through your readings so far in the course and write a paragraph (or produce an image or other text) that portrays a scene that objectified an immigrant in Panama or an indentured worker the Caribbean from the perspective of the objectified person ASSIGNMENT 7: ORAL HISTORY AND COLONIAL REPRESENTATIONS [Due October 14] Choose one passage or event described in one of th e oral histories or memoir you read or watched for today and contrast it with a parallel passage from a colonial or literary account. Compare, contrast, and assess the significance of the differences and similarities. Speak to the significance of oral his ASSIGNMENT 8 : COLLABORATIVE GUIDES TO HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL REFERENCES in The Swinging Bridge or Tree of Life [Final draft due 11 November but begin work by 5 November] Objective: Students from all three campuses will contribute to making a guide to the historical and cultural references in these novels. Choose 2 historical or literary references in The Swinging Bridge or Tree of Life (or one in each). Find secondary s ources on that event and/or text. Massa Day Done and write an explication (250 500 words) that describes the event, circumstance, or document, and explains its signif icance in the text. There will be a signup sheet with a list of suggested references but students can also add an item not on the list. Contributions will be posted on the wiki and then converted to a pdf file and added to the dLOC pedagogy resources. ASSIGNMENT9: POST A HISTORICAL PHOTOGRAPH ON THE CLASS WIKI [due in class November 12] Browse the DLOC collections for photos of East Indians and/or Panama migrants and c hoose one photograph that you find particularly evocative and post it on the class wiki In class Assignment: you will work with a partner and sketch a paragraph that considers the following to present to class. Note the gender of the subjects; their position vis vis, machines, animals, vegetation, buildings or other racial subjects. Who took the photograph? What do you know about the photographer or what do you imagine he/she was like? Is the photograph dated? paragraph connecti ng it to some aspect of our reading this semester in whatever way you imagine would be useful to your classmates. Post on the wiki after class. List of photographic resources on Asians and Panama in DLOC or instructions to students about how to find them Duperly, Picturesque Jamaica http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00103316/00001 Johnston J. Jamaica: The New Riviera http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00011910/00001 Caribbean Photoarchive Sources: http://www.caribbeanphotoarchive.com/

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Photographs and annotations about Grant and Morton co founders of Naparima College can be website http://www.naparima.org/ncever2.htm National Archives UK Caribbean through a Lens Project http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/caribbean/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/nationalarchives/collections/72157630635006206/ ASSIGNMENT 10 FINDING GUIDE/ ANNOTATIO N OF PRIMARY SOURCE (Due 18 November) n b You may be able to use the photograph that you identified for assignment #9 as your object for Assignment #10. The objective of this assignment is to familiarize students with basic skills in digital archiving invo lving metadata and captions as well as to give them data for their final project. Each student will produce a finding Guide or Annotation for a primary source that identifies as much about item as possible in regard to historical aspects (author, item port rayed, historical context). Each student should choose an primary source relevant to his or her final research project and consider the implications of that item for the final project. We encourage students to choose an item in dLOC that lacks adequate a nnotation, but students may pick items from other digital or traditional archives. The objective is to give students skills in digital archiving (about metadata, captions, exhibit labels, and types of exhibit labels) and the conceptual ramifications of la bels and captions. Notes: Archives hold collections of materials that are organized and structured for use and preservation. The seeming neutrality of archival organization is false. What is selected to collect and contain, and the descriptions by which those materials are organized create a world view and a history. Engaging with materials for research is a non neutral process where the available information must always be considered data present and create world structures and histories. Researchers engage with these concerns, and that engagement is better informed when underlying structures are exposed, and when researchers have sufficient knowledge to inform needed changes. Tasks/G oals: Edit metadata on 1 item in dLOC; or create record (with no digital files) in dLOC with descriptive information or metadata See how metadata is created; see the technical standards; see the human control and expansiveness in choices all that meet se emingly objective standards; see the complexity of this for colonial materials where lack of description erases histories Understand the role and importance of scholars in the identifying and describing materials so that the materials are known to exist an d can function in culture and scholarly communications Resources: http://www.research.ucsb.edu/cbs/projects/haiti/kosanba/ ) Explanation of how exhibit labels, and that they are interpretive and tell stories: http://exhibits.uflib.ufl.edu/docs/labels.pdf ASSIGNMENT #11 DIGITAL PROJECT [Final project due 10 December ] A Collaborative or individual Digital Project on a literary text(s) or Issue concerning the history or construction of West Indians in Panama or Asians in the Caribbean. Students will work together to design a project in which each student makes a substa ntial contribution. Focusing on one (or a few) literary texts

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or theoretical question, this collaborative project will explore how primary sources have influenced modern Caribbean literature or how modern Caribbean literature employs primary sources and e ngages withthe colonial archive in representing the Caribbean. It will include primary sources, explications of those sources, and an overall analysis that synthesizes the project. Students are free to choose an appropriate technology, including PowerPoin t. The assignment includes a project plan due 11/26 and presentation of the project in class on 12/3; final version due 12/10 nb.Students in other disciplines can fashion as a topic



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LIT 6236/ Fall 2013 Panama Silver, Asian Gold: Migration, Money, and the Making of the Modern Caribbean The seminar will meet Tuesdays 12:50 3:50 in Turlington 4112 Instructor: Leah Rosenberg Office: Turlington 4346 Email: rosenber@ufl.edu ; phone: (352) 294 2848) Office Hours: Wednesday 1 3; Thusday 11 12 To register : Send your name and UF ID to rosenber@ufl.edu COURSE DESCRIPTION: This semin ar considers two overlooked labor migrations that have profoundly affected the emergence of modern Caribbean literature: The immigration of indentured laborers from India and China into the West Indies and the emigration and return of the Afro Caribbean wo rkers who built the Panama Canal. Both groups worked under difficult conditions for exploitative wages. However, both used their savings to bankroll their entry into the educated middle class, thereby fostering the conditions that produced the first genera tion of nationalist politicians, as well as the first generation of Caribbean writers to achieve international acclaim. In this course, students will learn how to use archival material related to these nineteenth and twentieth century migrations, including photos, court cases, newspaper reports, popular literature. This course is a PILOT course for inter collegiate collaborative learning and instructi on in digital humanities. It will be taught in collaboration with Professor Rhonda Cobham Sander at Amherst College and Dr. Donette Francis at the University of Miami and we will be assisted by librarians at each institution. The course makes extensive us e of the Digital Library of the Caribbean (www.dloc.com), which open access digital archive of Caribbean materials, whose technical hub is at UF. Students will have an opportunity to add their annotations to the finding aids in the DLOC collection; some c lass discussions will be held via video conference; and some assignments will be researched collaboratively or posted online. We hope our initial experiment will sow the seed for future collaborative courses involving students at other institutions, in the United States and abroad. We are counting on the resources you help us develop module to ground such future collaborations. Your level of commitment and participation will matter for students beyond this class. So be prepared to complete a significant am ount of the work through independent research and in cross campus collaboration. LEARNING OBJECTIVES To understand key concepts, themes, tropes, styles, and aesthetic concerns of Caribbean literary discourse through examining literary representations of the two migrations under study. To analyze creative texts in relation to historical events, as well as other disciplinary modes of inquiry such as history, anthropology, sociology. To develop and hone skills of literary analysis and research such as archival practice, close reading, critical argumentation, critical synthesis, and thesis writing.

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To illuminate some of the limitations of the colonial archive records of subaltern and disenfranchised people and the stakes involved in articulating the his tory of the majority of Caribbean people for literary writers and scholars. To introduce students to the technology used in digital archiving (producing metadata, exhibit labels, finding guides) and digital humanities (e.g. Omeka, PBworks, timelines, Zot ero) and explore challenges posed by digital archiving (how can we not reproduce the colonial structure of existing historical archival materials?). Students are encouraged to produce and publish digital research projects (such as finding guides, curated e xhibits, times lines) that will be included in the Digital Library of the Caribbean ( www.dloc.com ) and when appropriate the conference and exhibits celebrating the Centennial of the completion of the Panama Canal to b e held at UF in spring 2014. REQUIREMENTS: Attendance and Participation (in class discussion and responses to wiki postings beyond the required contributions) 15% Weekly Reading and Writing Assignments #1 9 45% of the grade Assignment #10 Finding Guide 10% Assignment # 11 Final Research Project 30% Attendance and active participation are mandatory. Twenty percent (20%) of your grade will be based on your active listening, your reading your engagement in class discussions and your attendance of office hours. Readings Assigned readings are listed in the syllabus for each week. On most days there will be a literary text as well as an article or two meant to help you with your a ssignment. Exercises and Assignments Students will complete weekly assignments during the first half of the course, parts of which they will share online with other students at the three campuses. In the second half of the course you will complete a meta data project, and a final research project. Details about each of your assignments are laid out in the syllabus. Class Attendance and Punctuality. I expect you to come to class on time, and to attend regularly. Failure to do either will affect your final grade. Class Participation. This class is a seminar. All students are expected to come to class having read the assigned materials and having prepared for in defined here as participating in discussion generat ed by the class leader, as well as paying attention to and offering respectful critiques of in class and online presentations by other students. Office Hours. Since this class meets only once a week, you should plan to see me, singly or with a classmate, at least three times in the semester I have scheduled regular office hours for Wednesdays and Thursdays and I will be checking in at the beginning of the semester to make sure that everyone in the class can make one of the posted times.

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August 27 Obje ctives: To introduce the colonial history of migration, ethnicity, and race in the Caribbean (Lowe) To illuminate some of the limitations of the colonial archive records of subaltern and disenfranchised people and the great stakes involved in articulating the history of the majority of Caribbean people (Trouillot) To introduce the literary representations of two migrations under study in this course To introduce students to the technology used in the course and to Amherst class and give students a sense of the possibilities for their final projects. Rea dings: Haunted by Empire: Geographies of Intimacy in North American History Ed. Ann Laura Stoler Duke UP, 2006. Trouillot, Ralph Silencing the Past (Boston,: Beacon Press, 1995), 1 30. in They Came in Ships: An Anthology of Indo Guyanese Prose and Poetry (Leeds: Peepal Tree Press, 1998) Claude McKay Poem in Jam es, Winston, A Fierce Hatred of Injustice: Claude McKay's Jamaica and His Poetry of Rebellion Verso, 2001) Discerner of Hearts Jamaica Journal 11, n os. 3 and 4 (1977):62 70 http://www.dloc.com/UF00090030/00032/3?search=jamaica+%3djournal Technology and Library Unit: (with Laurie Taylor) Introduction to PBWorks T Week 2 Seeing the Archive in the Text September 3 Reading: Coniff, Black labor on a white canal: Panama, 1904 1981 available through University of Pittsburgh Digital Editions : http://digital.library.pitt.edu/cgi bin/t/text/text idx?c=pittpress;cc=pittpress;q1=Latin%20 America;rgn=works;rgn1=topic;view=

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toc;idno=31735057893350 ASSIGNMENT 1 Evaluating archival sources used in scholarly works Technology and Library Unit: (with Laurie Taylor and Missy Roser) PBWorks basics Zotero introduction Overview of technology and digital humanities assignments for the course Overview of projects, project planning, and working in teams for class Review of list of tools for projects, examples of good projects with each Week 3 Indentured Women in the Archive September 10 Readings: Lose Your Mother Verene Shepherd, They Came in Ships: An Anthology of Indo Guyanese Prose and Poetry (Leeds: Peepal Tree Press, 1998) ASSIGNMENT 2: Reading the Colonial Archive Guest lecture via Skype: Verene Shepherd Technology and Library Unit: Introduction to dLOC (individual accou nts) and other relevant digital resources for the class. Week 4 The Panama Canal E nters Modern West Indian Literature : the Work of Herbert de Lisser September 17 Col Lanham, Md: Lexington Books, 2005. Introduction 214. Herbert de Lisser Susan Proudleigh (Methuen & Co., 1915) available in http://dloc.com/UF00081174/00001 ASSIGNMENT 3: Indians in the Panama Canal Zone Week 5 The Construction of identity and Migration in Newspapers September 24 Readings: Eric Walrond Tropic Death ( The Palm Porch, The Wharf Rats, Guest Lecture : Rhonda Frederick Jamaica Journal 42 (1978):87 102

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( http://www.dloc.com/UF00090030/00033/89j?search=jamaica+%3djournal ) ASSIGNMENT 4: Working with N ewspapers Week 6 Indo Caribbeans enter Modern Caribbean literature October 1 Edgar Mittelholzer, Corentyne Thunder (Guyana) (1941) Miguel Street pp36 45 Indentured Coolies in the Nineteenth Asian American Studies 10:3 (October 2007): 283 311. ASSIGNMENT 5: SITUATING LITERARY REPRESENTATION IN RESPECT TO THE ARCHIVE. Taking material you or your colleagues have found in primary sources in the scholarly work, s ituate and discuss the significa nce of representation of Indo Trinidadians in the context of this colonial stereotypes and debates about Indians in the Caribbean. OR propose an alternative assignment. Week 7 Chinese Caribbean October 8 Readings: Chang, Victor. small axe, No. 2 (1997), pp.103 108. (fiction) Lee Loy, Anne Marie, The Chinese Shop as Nation Theatre in West Indian Fiction Anthurium 5:1 (Spring 2007). http://anthurium.miami.edu/volume_5/issue_1/leeloy chineseshop.html Richard Fung (Video 1990) Albert Chong Artwork http://artasiamerica.org/works/454/51 with Chinese The West Indies; painted by A.S. Forrest (1900) http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00081361/00001 Assignment 6 R elying on the perspectives offered in the other reading s for this week, go back through your readings so far in the course and write a paragraph (or produce an image or other text) that portrays a scene that objectified an immigrant in Panama or an indentured worker the Caribbean from the per spective of the objectified person

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Week 8 Oral History Resources October 15 Brodber, Erna. "Oral Sources and the Creation of a Social History in the Caribbean" Jamaica Journal Digital Library of the Caribbean Lecture Mahase, Anna. My mother's daughter : the autobiography of Anna Mahase Snr., 1899 1978 : with th e autobiography of Kenneth E. Mahase Snr., 1893 1955Published: Union Village, Claxton Bay, Trinidad : Royard Pub. Co., 1992 Roman, Fortune Diggers ( Film ) Nwankwo, Ifeoma. Voices from Our America. Oral Histories of Afro Panamanians Speech at Nashvil le Public Library http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2VFJEcOTomI ------Introduction: Making Sense, Making Selves. Afro Latin Americans of British Caribbean Descent Latin American and Caribbean Ethnic Studies Volume 4, Issue 3, 2009. pages 221 230 ---Voices from Our America: Interview with Emiliana Bernard Stephenson pages 331 341 Assignment 7 : Oral History and Colonial representations Choose one passage or event described in one of the oral histories or memoir you read or watched for today and contrast it with a parallel passage from a colonial or literary account. Compare, contrast, and assess the significance of the differences and similarities. Speak to the significance of oral history in this instance. Post your entry on Other /alternative sources: resources: DLOC oral histories, they are located in Panama and the Canal collection and can be found with a search of that collection with term: oral history or from the direct collection link, http://dloc.com/ohpcm/all (there are @ 41 oral histories of members of the Panama Canal Museum Community in dLOC. These are probably all of white, U.S. employees and their descendants.) Voices from Our America. Oral Histories of Afro Panamanians http://voicesamerica.library.vanderbilt.edu/VfOA/voices_ATrym.php Ines Sealy interview http://voicesamerica.library.vanderbilt.edu/diglib.php?record=9 Comment [l1]: Screening needs to be scheduled for the film

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Persaud, Alice Persaud (1892 1952) Autobiography (at the University of Guyana). http://mosessite.blogspot.com/2011/05/autobiography of alice bhagwandy sital.html (oral history) Week9 Contemporary Indo Caribbean women Negotiate the Archive October 22 Ramabai Espinet, Swinging Bridge -----Indian Literature', World Literature Written in English 29,2: 116 26 Read Assignment # 8 Collaborative Guide and if you would like to work on the guide on The Swinging Bridge begin to pick out which historical or cultural references you would like to identify and explicate. Week 10 Contemporary Afro Caribbean Novelist negotiates the archiv e on Panama October 29 Maryse Conde Tree of Life US Senate hearing (starts about halfway down the page ). This series includes several Senate hearings about Panama Canal Matters Read Assignment # 8 Collaborative Guide and if you would like to work on the guide on The Swinging Bridge begin to pick out which historical or cultural references you would like to identify and explicate. Week 11 Wiki Guides to the Novel -Nov 5 Assignment 8 Collaborative Guides to Historical and Cultural References in The Swinging Bridge or Tree of Life Indian Literature', World Literature Written in English 29,2: 116 26 Objective: Students from all three campuses wil l contribute to making a guide to the historical and cultural references in these novels. Contributions will be posted on the wiki and then converted to a pdf file and added to the dLOC pedagogy resources ( http://dloc.com/teach ) There will be a signup sheet with a list of suggested references but students can also add an item not on the list. Choose 2 historical or literary references in The Swinging Bridge or Tree of Life (or one in each). Find secondary sources on that even t and/or text. Identify a primary document Massa Day Done and write an explication (250 500 words) that describes the event, circumstance, or document, and explains its significance in the text.

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Week 12 Research week Nov 12 Colonial Photography Colonial Photography and Exhibitions Introduction and Chapter 2 of the Anglophone Caribbean: The 132 161 (we could even cut this down as it is divided into sections and we want the beginning sections about photographs and the short section on photographs of Indians as shaped by the idea of black laziness @ p.142) Home work: Bring to class on your laptop or tablet: a historical photograph image from West Indians in the Panama Canal Zone or Chinese or Indian immigrants Assignment #9: Post a historical Photograph or other image (of West Indians in Panama, Indentured l abor, or Asian Caribbeans) on the Wiki [due by class November 12] Browse the DLOC collections for photos of East Indians and/or Panama migrants and c hoose one photograph that you find particularly evocative. We will work on the analysis in class. Assignment 8 DUE 11/12 editing wiki entries on the for the guides the novels, and preparing the project for dLOC. Technology and Library Unit: (Laurie Taylor) Introduction to metadata, exhibit labels, and types of exhibit labels and the theoretical impli cations of metadata categories and exhibit labels. General overview: Archives hold collections of materials that are organized and structured for use and preservation. The seeming neutrality of archival organization is false. What is selected to collect and contain, and the descriptions by which those materials are organized create a world view and a history. Engaging with materials for research is a non neutral process where the available information must always be and what it does. Catalog records and metadata present and create world structures and histories. Researchers engage with these concerns, and that engagement is better informed when underlying structures are exposed, and when researchers have sufficient k nowledge to inform needed changes. Tasks/Goals: Edit metadata on 1 item in dLOC; or create record (with no digital files) in dLOC with descriptive information or metadata See how metadata is created; see the technical standards; see the human control an d expansiveness in choices all that meet seemingly objective standards; see the complexity of this for colonial materials where lack of description erases histories

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Understand the role and importance of scholars in the identifying and describing materials so that the materials are known to exist and can function in culture and scholarly communications Resources: ( http://www.research.ucsb.edu/cbs/project s/haiti/kosanba/ ) Explanation of how exhibit labels, and that they are interpretive and tell stories: http://exhibits.uflib.ufl.edu/docs/labels.pdf Week 13 Research week// Finding/Enhanced metadata week November 19 Homework due: Assignment 10 Guide to a Primary Source/Metadata Exercise Objective: to teach students skills in metadata and digital archiving Identify a primary source (s) relevant to your research interests in this course. Supply the historical annotation and metadata. We encourage students to identify a source in dLOC (it can be a record only or standard item) but students can also choose a traditional source or a source from another digital resource. Students are to po st their homework on the wiki page and add the item to Zotero. historical Technology and Library Unit: (Laurie Taylor) Initial session on the final project: Brainstorming, planning, review of successful digital humanities projects (possible discussion o f paper prototyping, wireframing, and other planning tools) Workshop on using Omeka (Students can use other technology for the final project, such as VoiceThread, Digital Storytelling, PowerPoint) Week 14 November 26 Assignment 11: Plan for Final project Due. 1)Digital project plan for collaborative project due (abstract (argument/objectives), what will be included, what technology will be used and why) Considerations on where and how to present with venues (e.g., THATCamp UF, THATCamp Florida, t raditional conferences, webinars, digital poster sessions) Technology and Library Unit: (Laurie Taylor) How to Digital humanities projects and where to present: e.g., THATCamp UF;

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Assignments All assignments are due by 5pm on the Monday afternoon before class on Tuesday They are to be posted on your personal Wiki page and if appropriate also on another page for that day (usually the class page for that day) and/or in Zotero. ASSIGNMENT 1 : SE EING THE ARCHIVE IN THE TEXT [due 3 September] This assignment is designed to help identify the types of archival sources scholars use in cultural and literary studies and their methods for using them. Choose from among the books distributed in class a work that you think may be of interest to you. Read and summarize its contents, using the Reading Form posted online and the method section of your book (if you can locate that) and answer the following questions: 1) Name three kinds of primary sources on which this study relies 2) Choose one such source and describe it. Where is it located? When was it created? What type of source is it (newspaper, memoir, interviews, deposit i ons, tables or registers, photos, sound archive etc) 3) Were there ways of describing the source in the bibliography or footnotes that you did not understand? How did you go about finding out what they meant? 4) Why do you think the author of you r study found this particular source useful? 5) argument or concerns? 6) If you could read through the source material yourself, what do you think you might want to look for? Possible Books: Lee Loy, Anne Marie, Searching for Mr. Chin: Constructions of Nation and the Chinese in West Indian Literature (Philadelphia: Temple UP, 2010) (introduction available as pdf from press website) Putnam, Lara. Radical Move s: Caribbean Migrants and the Politics of Race in the Jazz Age (UNC Press, 2013) Szok, Peter Szok. Wolf Tracks: Popular Art and Re Africanization in Twentieth Century Panama Wolf Tracks: Popular Art and Re Africanization in Twentieth Century Panama THATCamp Florida (at UCF); and try to organize panel for any relevant virtual conference, Webinars with libraries, etc. Week 15 December 3 Draft of final project/presentation

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Tejaswini Niranjana Mobilizing India: Women, Music, and Migration between India and Trinidad ASSIGNMENT 2: Reading the Colonial Archive [Due 10 September] This assignment is designed to help us further explore scholarly use of colonial archives by e xamining alongside the extensive of archival sources she includes in the appendices of her work. Write a wiki entry (500 750 words) related colonial report or memoir and compare the representation of indentured immigrants in both sources. 1. Consider the following questions : What is the narrative presented by the senior off icers (the Captain and Surgeon General) of the death? How do individual testimonies from other officers, immigrants, and the crew cast doubt on their version? (choose one and explain.) What conclusions does Shepherd draw from the commission reports and oth er documents? Do you the colonial documents for evidence about colonized people? 2. Choose one of the following colonial sources and, focusing on one passage (or two passages), compare the representation of indentured immigrants in that source with the representation in the Commission hearings cited in Beaumont, Joseph. The New Slavery: An Account of the Indian and Chinese Immigrants in Brit ish Guiana in British Guiana. London 1871 DeVoeux, Sir George William. Experiences of a Demerara magistrate, 1863 1869. Georgetown, British Guiana, Daily Chronicle, 1948 (Florida International University has this) Jenkins, Edward 1871 The Coolie: His Rights and Wrongs London. http://dloc.com/AA00013942/00001 -----Lutchmee and Dilloo: a Study of West Indian Life. London Volumes 1 3: http://dloc.com/AA00013943/00001/allvolumes Kirke, Henry. Twenty Five Years in British Guiana. 1898 Reprint Westport, Negro U Press, 1970. Guiana, which covered events co ncerning indentured Indians, such as runaways and petitions. ASSIGNMENT 3: Panama Canal Zone [September 17]

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Browse through the sources listed below; then choose one about which to answer the following questions 1) Identify three places where the writer describes an event similar to something you read about in the novel, S usan Proudleigh 2) How does the author interpret these events? Be sure to locate specific places in the text to support your claims 3) view? Again, be specific 4) How does the novel Susan Proudleigh corroborate or contradict that interpretation? 5) What other possible i nterpretations can you imagine for the event described? 6) What missing information do you wish you had about the events you identified? How might you go about finding a source for that missing information? If you had to make it up, what would you want i t to be? : Avery, Ralph Emmett, et al. The Greatest Engineering Feat in the World at Panama : Authentic and Complete Story of the Building and Operation of the Great Waterway ... New York: Leslie Judge Co, 1915 (available as pdf and free ebook through google books) Susie Pearl Core, Susie Pearl. Jean Heald,. Picturesque Panama: The Panama Railroad, the Panama Canal ( 1928) ----Panama's trails of progress: or, The story of Panama and its canald:New York : North River Press, 1941, c1925. ). de Lisser Herbert G. In Jamaica and Cuba (preface, v and Chapter 10, pp 153 162) ; Isthmian Historical society Letters from Isthmian Canal Construction Worker. Edited and introduced by Ruth C. Stuhl. Balboa Heights, C.Z., 1963 Young, Sidney A/., ed. Isthmian echoes, a selection of the literary endeavors of the West Indian colony in the republic of Panama. From articles contributed to the West Indian section.... Panama, 1928. ASSIGNMENT 4: Working with N ewspapers (Due 24 September) ( Jamaica Times Papers, The Star and Herald ; Port of Spain Gazette 1825 1956 (UF Microfilm)Daily Chronicle (Guyana) DuBois Collection, UMass Amherst Royal Gazette, British Guiana (UF Microfilm) the Gleaner Choose a contemporaneous news item about either West Indians in Panama or Asian indentured immigrants in the Caribbean. You can start either by identifying a newspaper source in a footnote OR by leafing your way through one of the newspapers we have identi fied as often carrying news about Canal Zone or indentured workers. Some of these newspaper are available through DLOC but through proprietary online newspaper collections that librarians can help you to access or in old fashioned microfilm in the Latin A merican Collection. You should commit to sifting through at least

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Write a wiki entry characterizing the publication (one paragraph) and the specific news item (one paragrap h) that pays attention to the following kinds of details: What kinds of news reports, advertisements/editorials/letters to the editors/literary pieces/cartoons does it carry? (Give examples of the trends you identify) Does the newspaper have a particular political bias or readership base? How can you tell? Is reporting about Panama/East Indian migration a major focus or just an event? What kind of background information does the news item give us about the issue reported? What kind of knowledge does it ass ume its readers already possess? Can you tell what kind of response the news item elicited or was meant to elicit? Cut and paste your news item into your WIKI entry then do something creative with it. You might decide, for example, to create a cartoon abou t it in the style of the publication; write your own letter with ads in the paper or with modern day news reports or with photos from DLOC; write a lette r from someone involved in the reported incident to someone back home, etc. The point of this exercise is to help your reader to see something the news item may have left implicit and to think In class assignment : Compare and contrast the representation of West Indians in Panama in the newspaper with the representation of West Indians in the literature of de Lisser and/or Walrond who both worked as journalists. In fact, we might even ask students to look for representations of West Indians in Panama in the Gleaner which de Lisser edited or in the Negro World or another paper for which Walrond wrote. Students could present their data and analysis about West Indians and then students at the other campuses could also make use of the information in their inclass assignment. Students who chose to focus on West Indians in Panama would present their findings this week and then the foll owing week, students who chose to focus on Indo Caribbeans or indentured laborers would present their work the following week. ASSIGNMENT 5: SITUATING LITERARY REPRESENTATION IN RESPECT TO THE ARCHIVE. [Due 1 October] Taking material you or your coll eagues have found in primary sources in the scholarly work, situate and Trinidadians in the context of this colonial stereotypes and debates about Indians in the Caribbean.

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Assignment 6 [October 7] Using Kerry Y Pao as your point of departure and relying on the perspectives offered in the other reading s for this week, go back through your readings so far in the course and write a paragraph (or produce an image or other text) that portrays a scene that objectified an immigrant in Panama or an indentured worker the Caribbean from the perspective of the objectified person Assignment 7: Oral History and Colonial representations [Due October 14 ] Choose one passage or event described in one of the oral histories or memoir you read or watched for today and contrast it with a parallel passage from a colonial or literary account. Compare, contrast, and assess the significance of the differences and similarities. Speak to the significance of oral history in this Assignment # 8 : Collaborative Guides to Historical and Cultural References in The Swinging Bridge or Tree of Life [Final draft due 11 November but begin work by 5 November] Objective: Students from all three campuses will contribute to making a guide to the historical and cultural references in these novels. Choose 2 historical or literary references in The Swinging Bridge or Tree of Life (o r one in each). Find secondary sources on that event and/or text. Identify a primary Massa Day Done and write an explication (250 500 words) that describes the event, circumstance, or document, and explains its significance in the text. There will be a signup sheet with a list of suggested references but students can also add an item not on the list. Contributions will be posted on the wiki and then converted to a pdf file and added to the dLOC pedagogy resources. Assignment #9: Post a historical photograph on the Class Wiki i [due in class November 12] Browse the DLOC collections for photos of Ea st Indians and/or Panama migrants and c hoose one photograph that you find particularly evocative and post it on the class wiki In class Assignment: you will work with a partner and sketch a paragraph that considers the following to present to class. Note the gender of the subjects; their position vis vis, machines, animals, vegetation, buildings or other racial subjects. Who took the photograph? What do you know about the photographer or what do you imagine he/she was like? Is the photograph dated? paragraph connecting it to some aspect of our reading this semester in whatever way you imagine would be useful to your classmates. Post on the wiki after cl ass. List of photographic resources on Asians and Panama in DLOC or instructions to students about how to find them Duperly

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Johnston Side Trips in Jamaica National Anthropological Archives Caribbean Photoarchive Sources: http://www.caribbeanphotoarchive.com/ Photographs and annotations about Grant and Morton co founders of Naparima College can be http:// www.naparima.org/ncever2.htm National Archives UK Caribbean through a Lens Project http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/caribbean/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/nationalarchives/collections/72157630635006206/ Assignment # 10 Finding Guide/ Annotation of Primary Source (Due Week 12/ 19 November at UF) n b You may be able to use the photograph that you identified for assignment #9 as your object for Assignment #10. The objective of this assignment is to familiarize students with basic skills in digital archiving involving metadata and captions as wel l as to give them data for their final project. Each student will produce a finding Guide or Annotation for a primary source that identifies as much about item as possible in regard to historical aspects (author, item portrayed, historical context). Each student should choose an primary source relevant to his or her final research project and consider the implications of that item for the final project. We encourage students to choose an item in dLOC that lacks adequate annotation, but students may pick i tems from other digital or traditional archives. The objective is to give students skills in digital archiving (about metadata, captions, exhibit labels, and types of exhibit labels) and the conceptual ramifications of labels and captions. (due November 1 8 ) Notes: Archives hold collections of materials that are organized and structured for use and preservation. The seeming neutrality of archival organization is false. What is selected to collect and contain, and the descriptions by which those materials are organized create a world view and a history. Engaging with materials for research is a non neutral process where the available information must always be considered create world structures and histories. Researchers engage with these concerns, and that engagement is better informed when underlying structures are exposed, and when researchers have sufficient knowledge to inform needed changes. Tasks/Goals: Edit metad ata on 1 item in dLOC; or create record (with no digital files) in dLOC with descriptive information or metadata See how metadata is created; see the technical standards; see the human control and expansiveness in choices all that meet seemingly objectiv e standards; see the complexity of this for colonial materials where lack of description erases histories Understand the role and importance of scholars in the identifying and describing materials so that the materials are known to exist and can function i n culture and scholarly communications Resources: http://www.research.ucsb.edu/cbs/projects/haiti/kosanba/ )

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Explanation of how exhibit labels, and that they are interpretive and tell stories: http://exhibits.uflib.ufl.edu/docs/labels.pdf Assignment #11 A Collaborative Digital Project A Collaborati ve Digital Project on a literary text(s) or Issue concerning the history or construction of West Indians in Panama or Asians in the Caribbean. Students will work together to design a project in which each student makes a substantial contribution. Focusing on one (or a few) literary texts or theoretical question, this collaborative project will explore how primary sources have influenced modern Caribbean literature or how modern Caribbean literature employs primary sources and engages withthe colonial archi ve in representing the Caribbean. It will include primary sources, explications of those sources, and an overall analysis that synthesizes the project. Students are free to choose an appropriate technology, including PowerPoint. The assignment includes a project plan due 11/26 and presentation of the project in class on 12/3; final version due 12/10 nb.Students in other disciplines can fashion as a topic



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Page 1 of 3 LIT 6236 Fall 2013 Leah Rosenberg ( rosenber@ufl.edu ; (352) 294 2848) Tuesdays 12:50 3:50 Turlington 4112 To register : Send your name and UF ID to rosenber@ufl.edu Panama Silver, Asian Gold: Migration, Money, and the Making of the Modern Caribbean This interdisciplinary, digital humanities course examines the intersecting material and cultural history of two mass migrations that fundamentally transformed the Carib bean and Latin America in the Caribbean to sustain its plantation economies and the emigration of Afro Caribbean workers to mainland Latin America to build the Panama Canal (and work on United Fruit Company plantations). The financial, cultural, and politi cal capital accumulated by these two groups of immigrants fueled the growth of the Caribbean middle class, the emergence of nationalism, trade unionism and national literatures. Yet, until the past two decades these migrations were often overlooked by h istorians, creative writers, and literary scholars. Now, however, historians and literary scholars are focusing their attention on these migrations as are creative writers As a result, a strong corpus of scholarship and contemporary literature about indenture and West Indian migration is emerging, while at the same time, a growing body of archival material from photographs to government reports and memoirs are becoming accessible, many digitally. This course originated out of the desire to e xamine the relationship between these histories and the literature they helped to produce as well as the desire to teach students how to combine historical research methods and literary analysis in the digital age. It explores the intersection of migration and labor history, ethnic and racial politics, and cultural production. It asks how everyday people experienced migration, indenture, and the challenges of life and work in the canal zone under Jim Crow A t the same time it considers how their cumulative experiences qua mass migrations transformed the political, economic, social, and cultural realities for the region. As importantly, it asks how their lives were recorded in official and private documents -in government records, newspapers, novels memo irs and memories (recorded in oral histories) and in the burgeoning photography industry of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centur ies And last but hardly least, we explore how creative writers have integrated modern literary tradition is fundamentally interdisciplinary. We therefore invite students from a wide range of disciplines such as literature, art history, museum studies, history, geography, gen der studies, and Latin American, American, African American, and Asian studies to enroll T he course engages the intersection of these fields and is designed to help students develop research skills and produce an independent research project in their are a of expertise. Digital projects will be included in the Digital Library of the Caribbean ( www.dloc.com ). Further, the University of Florida is celebrating the centennial of the completion of the Panama Canal in spring 2014 with an interdisciplinary conference and exhibits using materials from the recently acquired Panama Canal Museum. Students will have ac cess to materials from this new collection and the opportunity to contribute to contribute to exhibits commemorating the centennial. Course objectives: Introduce theoretical analyses of and practical approaches to using colonial archival sources (e.g. p hotographs, maps, commission reports, newspapers, memoirs, letters)

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Page 2 of 3 Examine how historians creative writers, and literary scholars make use of colonial archives to illuminate and imagine the experience of indentured Asians in the Caribbean and West Indians workers on the Panama Canal Explore challenges posed by digital archiving (how can we not reproduce the colonial structure of existi ng historical archival materials?) Teach skills in digital archiving (producing metadata, exhibit labels, finding guides) and digital humanities (e.g. Omeka, PBworks, timelines, Zotero) Produce and publish digital research projects (such as finding guid es, curated exhibits, times lines) to be included in the Digital Library of the Caribbean ( www.dloc.com ) and when appropriate the conference and exhibits celebrating the Centennial of the completion of the Panama Canal to be held at UF in spring 2014 This course is being taught simultaneously at UF with Dr. Leah Rosenberg the University of Miami with Dr. Donette Francis and Amherst College with Professor Rhonda Cobham and will include collaboration of students at th e three institutions. It has been designed by faculty and librarians at the three institutions. Selected Literary texts: Herbert de Lisser Susan Proudleigh (Methuen & Co., 1915) available in http://dloc.com/UF00081174/00001 Maryse Conde, The Tree of Life David Dabydeen They Came in Ships: An Anthology of Indo Guyanese Prose and Poetry (Leeds: Peepal Tree Press, 1998) Ramabai Espinet, The Swinging Bridge Claude McKay A Fie rce Hatred of Injustice: Claude McKay's Jamaica and His Poetry of Rebellion ( Verso, 2001) Edgar Mittelholzer, Corentyne Thunder (1941) Selected Historical and Critical Readings : Haunted by Empire: Geographies of Intimacy in North American History Ed. Ann Laura Stoler Duke UP, 2006. Trouillot, Ralph Silencing the Past (Boston,: Beacon Press, 1995), 1 30. Lose your moth er: a journey along the Atlantic slave route (2007 ) Verene Shepherd, (2002) Lisa Yun, The Coolie Speaks: Chinese Indentured Laborers and African Slaves in Cuba (2008) Tejaswini Niranjan a Mobilizing India: Women, Music, and Migration between India and Trinidad (2006) Peter Szok. Wolf Tracks: Popular Art and Re Africanization in Twentieth Century Panama (2012) Anne Maxwell, Colonial photography and exhibitions : representations of the "n ative" and the making of European identities (1999) Rhonda Frederick, (2005) Selected Primary Sources Ralph Emmett Avery, et al. The Greatest Engineering Feat in the World at Panama ( 1915 )

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Page 3 of 3 Beau mont, Joseph. The New Slavery: An Account of the Indian and Chinese Immigrants in British Guiana in British Guiana ( 1871 ) Laura Mabel Brooking Collection ( http://web.uflib.ufl.e du/spec/manuscript/guides/brooking.htm ) Leonard Carpenter Panama Canal Collection ( http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/manuscript/guides/panama_lc.htm ) S usie Pearl Core, Maid in Panama (1828) Isthmian Historical society. Letters from Isthmian Canal Construction Worker Edited and introduced by Ruth C. Stuhl. Balboa Heights, C.Z., 1963 Jenkins, Edward, 1871. The Coolie: His Rights and Wrongs London. http://dloc.com/AA00013942/0 0001 Kirke, Henry. Twenty Five Years in British Guiana 1898 Reprint Westport, Negro U Press, 1970. [We would need to find an original copy rather than the reprint.] Morton, Sarah. John Morton of Trinidad: pioneer missionary of the Presbyterian Church in Canada to the East Indians in the British West Indies: journals, letters and papers /Toronto : Westminster Co.,Microform version in archive.org http://www.dloc.com/AA00013940/00001



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Panama Silver, Asian Gold: Migration, Modernity, and the Birth of Caribbean Literature Power and resistance, indenture and migration, exploitation and sexploitation, nationalism in a colonized world Anglophone Caribbean nationalism and national literature developed under these conditions in the decades following emancipation in 1 838 as planters struggled to maintain their wealth and power by importing indentured labor from China and India and hundreds of thousands of Afro Caribbeans, denied land and decent wages at home migrated to Latin America to work on United Fruit Company plantations and the Panama Canal The abolition of slavery and the slave trade, thus brought two mass migrations, two new diasporas that not only reshaped the racial and ethnic composition of the Caribbean and Latin America but also contributed to modern capitalism and global trade by literally reshaping the environment of Latin America through building massive corporate plantations and cutting a canal between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. The experience and infl uence of West Indian immigrants to Panama, and of Indian and Chinese in the West Indies play a profound role in the work of writers, such as Claude McKay, Herbert de Lisser, Seepersad Naipaul, and George Lamming who founded and shaped the West Indian lite rary tradition. Yet, with the impe rative to understand slavery from the bottom up and to dismantle the colonial narrative of race and slavery the post emancipation period and its fundamental transformations ha ve often been overlooked by historians and l iterary scholars. However, t he past two decades has seen a radical change, with historians and literary writers turning their attention to the late nineteenth and early twentieth century and with the unearthing and digitization of both literature and hist orical documents by and about the Caribbean people. Students will contribute to th is new scholarship by producing finding guides and digital exhibitions to explicate and contextualize primary historical documents, and by incorporating this historical r esearch into their analyses of Caribbean literature. Students will also learn technology for analyzing and presenting historical sources, such as Omeka and VoiceThread and can contribute successful projects, particularly exhibits and finding guides to th e Digital Library of the Caribbean ( www.dloc.com ). This course is being taught simultaneously at UF, the University of Miami, and Amherst College, and has been designed by faculty and librarians at the three institution s.


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