Solar energy system performance evaluation : Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., house lot 8, Escondido, California

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Title:
Solar energy system performance evaluation : Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., house lot 8, Escondido, California
Series Title:
SOLAR ; 1087-79/14
Added title page title:
Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., lot 8 single-family residence, Escondido, California
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Fontaine, Donald C
United States -- Dept. of Energy. -- Office of Conservation and Solar Applications
International Business Machines Corporation
Publisher:
Dept. of Energy, Office of Conservation and Solar Applications
National Technical Information Service
Place of Publication:
Washington
Springfield, Va
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Solar houses -- California -- Escondido   ( lcsh )
Solar energy -- California -- Escondido   ( lcsh )
Genre:
bibliography   ( marcgt )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
General Note:
October 1978 through March 1979.
General Note:
National solar data program.
General Note:
National solar heating and cooling demonstration program.
General Note:
IBM Corporation.
General Note:
Prepared for Dept. of Energy Office of Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Solar Applications under contract EG-77-C-01-4049.
General Note:
On cover: Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., lot 8 single-family residence, Escondido, California.
General Note:
MONTHLY CATALOG NUMBER: gp 80007783
Statement of Responsibility:
Donald C. Fontaine.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 022612690
oclc - 05970270
System ID:
AA00013789:00001

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page i
    Table of Contents
        Page ii
    List of Illustrations
        Page iii
    List of Tables
        Page iv
    National solar data program reports
        Page v
        Page vi
    Foreword
        Page 1-1
        Page 1-2
    Summary and conclusions
        Page 2-1
        Page 2-2
    System description
        Page 3-1
        Page 3-2
        Page 3-3
        Page 3-4
    Performance evaluation techniques
        Page 4-1
        Page 4-2
    Performance assessment
        Page 5-1
        Page 5-2
        Page 5-3
        Page 5-4
        Page 5-5
        Page 5-6
        Page 5-7
        Page 5-8
        Page 5-9
        Page 5-10
        Page 5-11
        Page 5-12
        Page 5-13
        Page 5-14
        Page 5-15
        Page 5-16
        Page 5-17
        Page 5-18
        Page 5-19
        Page 5-20
        Page 5-21
        Page 5-22
    References
        Page 6-1
        Page 6-2
    Bibliography
        Page 7-1
        Page 7-2
    Appendix A. Definitions of performance factors and solar terms
        Page A-1
        Page A-2
        Page A-3
        Page A-4
    Appendix B. Solar energy system performance equations
        Page B-1
        Page B-2
        Page B-3
        Page B-4
        Page B-5
        Page B-6
        Page B-7
        Page B-8
    Appendix C. Long-term average weather conditions
        Page C-1
        Page C-2
    Appendix D. Monthly solar energy distribution flowcharts
        Page D-1
        Page D-2
        Page D-3
        Page D-4
        Page D-5
        Page D-6
        Page D-7
        Page D-8
    Appendix E. Monthly solar energy distributions
        Page E-1
        Page E-2
        Page E-3
        Page E-4
        Page E-5
        Page E-6
        Page E-7
        Page E-8
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text
$OLAR/1 087-79/14




Solar Energy System
Performance Evaluation


OTIZ & EILL DEVELOPERS, INC., LOT 8
SNGLE-FAMILY RESIDENCE

Octber1978 TruhMrh17












U.S.Deprtmnt of Energy

Natioa Soar Heating and
























NOTICE

This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. Neither the United States nor the United States Department of Energy, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights.



This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy.



Available from the National Technical Information Service, U. S. Department of Commerce, Springfield, Virginia 22161.


Price: Paper Copy $5.25
Microfiche $3.00






SOLAR/087-79/]4
Distribution Category UC-59


SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE EVALUATION








ORTIZ & REILL DEVELOPERS, INC., HOUSE LOT 8
ESCONDIDO, CALIFORNIA





OCTOBER 1978 THROUGH MARCH 1979





DONALD C. FONTAINE, PRINCIPAL AUTHOR
JONATHON M. NASH, MANAGER OF SOLAR ENERGY ANALYSIS
LARRY J. MURPHY, IBM PROGRAM MANAGER












IBM CORPORATION
18100 FREDERICK PIKE
GAITHERSBURG, MARYLAND 20760



PREPARED FOR
THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY
OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR CONSERVATION AND SOLAR APPLICATION
UNDER CONTRACT EG-77-C-O1-4049
H. JACKSON HALE, PROGRAM MANAGER









TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

1. FOREWORD . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1

2. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS . . . . . . . . . 2-1

2.1 Performance Summary . . . . . . . . . 2-1

2.2 Conclusions . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2

3. SYSTEM DESCRIPTION . . . . . . . . . . 3-1

4. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION TECHNIQUES . . . . . . 4-1

5. PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT . . . . . . . . . 5-1

5.1 Weather Conditions . . . . . . . . . 5-2

5.2 System Thermal Performance . . . . . . . 5-4

5.3 Subsystem Performance . . . . . . . . 5-9

5.3.1 Collector Array and Storage Subsystem . . . 5-9

5.3.1.1 Collector Array . . . . . . 5-9

5.3.1.2 Storage . . . . . . . . 5-12

5.3.2 Domestic Hot Water (DHW) Subsystem . . . 5-16 5.3.3 Space Heating Subsystem . . . . . . 5-16

5.4 Operating Energy . . . . . . . . . . 5-19

5.5 Energy Savings . . . . . . . . . . 5-19

6. REFERENCES . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1

7. BIBLIOGRAPHY . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1

APPENDIX A DEFINITIONS OF PERFORMANCE FACTORS AND SOLAR TERMS A-1 APPENDIX B SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE EQUATIONS B-1

APPENDIX C LONG-TERM AVERAGE WEATHER CONDITIONS C-1

APPENDIX D MONTHLY SOLAR ENERGY DISTRIBUTION FLOWCHARTS D-1

APPENDIX E MONTHLY SOLAR ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS E-1



ii










LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS


FIGURES TITLE PAGE

3-1 Solar Energy System Schematic 3-2

5-1 Solar Energy Distribution Flowchart Summary 5-6

D-1 Solar Energy Distribution Flowchart
October 1978 D-2

D-2 Solar Energy Distribution Flowchart
November 1978 D-3

D-3 Solar Energy Distribution Flowchart
December 1978 D-4

D-4 Solar Energy Distribution Flowchart
January 1979 D-5

D-5 Solar Energy Distribution Flowchart
February 1979 0-6

D-6 Solar Energy Distribution Flowchart
March 1979 D-7









LIST OF TABLES


TABLES TITLE PAGE

5-1 Weather Conditions 5-3

5-2 System Thermal Performance Summary 5-5

5-3 Solar Energy Distribution Summary 5-7

5-4 Solar Energy System Coefficient of Performance 5-8

5-5 Collector Array Performance 5-10

5-6 Storage Performance 5-13

5-7 Solar Energy Losses Storage and Transport 5-14

5-8 Domestic Hot Water Subsystem Performance 5-17

5-9 Space Heating Subsystem Performance 5-18

5-10 Operating Energy 5-20

5-11 Energy Savings 5-21

E-1 Solar Energy Distribution
October 1978 E-2

E-2 Solar Energy Distribution
November 1978 E-3

E-3 Solar Energy Distribution
December 1978 E-4

E-4 Solar Energy Distribution
January 1979 E-5

E-5 Solar Energy Distribution
February 1979 E-6

E-6 Solar Energy Distribution
March 1979 E-7









iv










NATIONAL SOLAR DATA PROGRAM REPORTS



Reports prepared for the National Solar Data Program are numbered under specific format. For example, this report for the Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8 project site is designated as SOLAR/1087-79/14. The elements of this designation are explained in the following illustration.



SO AR/1087- 9/14



Prepared for the Report Type
National Solar Designation
Data Program

Demonstration Site Year



0 Demonstration Site Number:

Each project site has its own discrete number 1000 through 1999 for
residential sites and 2000 through 2999 for commercial sites.

0 Report Type Designation:

This number identifies the type of report, e.g.,

Monthly Performance Reports are designated by the numbers 01 (for
January) through 12 (for December).

Solar Energy System Performance Evaluations are designated by the
number 14.




V










Solar Project Descriptions are designated by the number 50.


Solar Project Cost Reports are designated by the number 60.


These reports are disseminated through the U. S. Department of Energy Technical Information Center, P. 0. Box 62, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830.










































vi










1. FOREWORD


The National Program for Solar Heating and Cooling is being conducted by the Department of Energy under the Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration Act of 1974. The overall goal of this activity is to accelerate the establishment of a viable solar energy industry and to stimulate its growth to achieve a substantial reduction in nonrenewable energy resource consumption through widespread applications of solar heating and cooling technology.

Information gathered through the Demonstration Program is disseminated in a series of site-specific reports. These reports are issued as appropriate and may include such topics as:

0 Solar Project Description
0 Design/Construction Report
0 Project Costs
0 Maintenance and Reliability
0 Operational Experience
0 Monthly Performance
0 System Performance Evaluation

The International Business Machines (IBM) Corporation is contributing to the overall goal of the Demonstration Act by monitoring, analyzing, and reporting the thermal performance of solar energy systems through analysis of measurements obtained by the National Solar Data Program.

The Solar Energy System Performance Evaluation Report is a product of the National Solar Data Program. Reports are issued periodically to document the results of analysis of specific solar energy system operational performance. This report includes system description, operational characteristics and capabilities, and an evaluation of actual versus expected performance. The Monthly Performance Report, which is the basis for the Solar Energy System Performance Evaluation Report, is published on a regular basis. Each parameter presented in these reports as characteristic of system performance represents


1-1









over 8,000 discrete measurements obtained each month by the National Solar Data Network (NSDN). Documents referenced in this report are listed in Section 6, "References." Numbers shown in brackets refer to reference numbers in Section 6. All other documents issued by the National Solar Data Program for the Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8 solar energy system are listed in Section 7, "Bibliography."

This Solar Energy System Performance Evaluation Report presents the results of a thermal performance analysis of the Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8 solar energy system. The analysis covers operation of the system from October 1978 through March 1979. The Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8 solar energy system provides domestic hot water and space heating to a single-family residence located in Escondido, California. Section 2 presents a summary of the overall system results. A system description is contained in Section 3. Analysis of the system thermal performance was accomplished using a system energy balance technique described in Section 4. Section 5 presents a detailed assessment of the individual subsystems applicable to the site.


The measurement data for the reporting period were collected by the NSDN [1]. System performance data are provided through the NSDN via an IBM-developed Central Data Processing System (CDPS) [2]. The CDPS supports the collection and analysis of solar data acquired from instrumented systems located throughout the country. This data is processed 'daily and summarized into monthly performance reports. These monthly reports form a common basis for system evaluation and are the source of the performance data used in this report.















1-2










2. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS

This section provides a summary of the performance of the solar energy system installed at the Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8. located in Escondido, California for the period October 1978 through March 1979. This solar energy system is designed to support the domestic hot water and space heating loads. A detailed description of the Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., Hoese Lot 8 solar energy system operation is presented in Section 3.



2.1 Performance Summary

The solar energy site was occupied from October 1978 through March 1979, and the solar energy system operated continuously during this reporting period. The total incident solar energy was 53.44 million Btu, of which 14.88 million Btu were collected by the solar energy system. Solar energy satisfied 73 percent of the DHW requirements and 26 percent of the space heating requirements. The solar energy system provided an electrical savings of 1.82 million Btu and a fossil fuel savings of 3.45 million Btu.

During October the DHW load was the only demand on the solar energy system, and solar energy satisfied 100 percent of this load. The solar energy system began supporting the combined DHW and space heating load during November and satisfied 77 percent of the demand.

In December the solar energy system satisfied 26 percent of the combined DHW and space heating demand. DH1W solar energy subsystem control problems became apparent. On several days during the month, the control system permitted operation in the storage-to-DHW mode when the storage temperature was low relative to the DHW tank temperature. Investigation a*nd improvement of the control system was undertaken by the grantee.

During January the solar energy system satisfied 34 percent of the combined DHW and space heating demand. For several hours during the month the control


2-1










system allowed simultaneous operation in the conventional space heating mode and the storage-to-space heating mode. This resulted in a small amount of fossil fuel energy being transferred to storage from the space heating subsystem. There were periods of erratic operation of the fireplace during January. The fireplace contribution was not significant. During February the solar energy system satisfied 42 percent of the combined DHW and space heating load and 32 percent of the combined load during March.


During the reporting period significant storage and transport losses (detailed in Table 5-7) were apparent.


2.2 Conclusions


The Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8 solar energy subsystem satisfied an average of 44 percent of the combined DHW and space heating load during the period October 1978 through March 1979. A 93 percent average was expected. Future development of the system should include minimization of thermal losses and improvements in the function and reliability of the solar energy control system.
























2-2











3. SYSTEM DESCRIPTION


Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8, is one of two instrumented single-family residences in Escondido, California. The home has approximately 1536 square feet of conditioned space. Solar energy is used for domestic-hot-water (DHW) heating and space heating. The solar energy system has an array of flat-plate collectors with a gross area of 192 square feet. The Array faces 29 degrees east of south at an angle of 45 degrees to the horizontal. Water is the transfer medium that delivers solar energy from the collector array to storage and to the space heating and hot water loads. Solar energy is stored in a 750-gallon tank located in the ground floor utility room. Heated city water is stored in a 66-gallon DHW tank. When solar energy is insufficient to satisfy the space heating load, a gas furnace provides auxiliary energy for the space heating system. Similarly, an electrical heating element in the DHW tank provides auxiliary energy for DHW heating. Energy from an hydronic fireplace radiates directly into the living space and supplements solar modes 1 and 2. The fireplace-to-storage mode activates if the fireplace is being used; the temperature difference between its water plenum and storage output is more than 9'F; and there is no demand for space heating. During operation, water is circulated from storage through the fireplace heat exchanger. The system, shown schematically in Figure 3-1, has four modes of solar operation.


Mode 1 Collector-to-Storage: This mode activates when the temperature at the outlet of the collector array exceeds the temperature at the bottom of the storage tank by more than 9'F. Water is circulated from the tank through the collectors until the temperature difference is less than 3'F.

Mode 2 Storage-to-Space Heating: This mode activates when the manually preset thermostat located in the heated space indicates a demand for space heating. Heated water is circulated from storage through a heat exchanger in the air-handling unit and returned to storage. If the demand cannot be satisfied by energy from storage, the gas furnace is activated to provide auxiliary heat. The fireplace can also add energy to the water circulating



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from storage before it enters the air-handling unit. If the fireplace is being used and the temperature difference between its water plenum and storage output is more than 9'F, valve D400 is activated and energy is added to the water from the fireplace heat exchanger.


Mode 3 Storage-to-DHW: This mode activates when there is a temperature difference exceeding a preset differential between storage and the DHW tank and there is no demand for space heating. Incoming city water enters the DHW tank, where it is heated by water circulating from storage through a heat exchanger in the tank.


Mode 4 Collector-to-DHW: This mode activates when the temperature in the DHW tank falls below 140'F and the collector output temperature exceeds the DHW tank temperature. Water circulates through the heat exchanger in the DHW tank and returns to the collectors.





























3-3














4. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION TECHNIQUES


The performance of the Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8 solar energy system is evaluated by calculating a set of primary performance factors which are based on those proposed in the intergovernmental agency report "Thermal Data Requirements and Performance Evaluation Procedures for the National Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration Program" [3]. These performance factors quantify the thermal performance of the system by measuring the amount of energies that are being transferred between the components of the system. The performance of the system can then be evaluated based on the efficiency of the system in transferring these energies. All performance factors and their definitions are listed in Appendix A.

Data from monitoring instrumentation located at key points within the solar energy system are collected by the National Solar Data Network. This data is first formed into factors showing the hourly performance of each system component, either by summation or averaging techniques, as appropriate. The hourly factors then serve as a basis for calculating the daily and monthly performance of each component subsystem. The performance factor equations for this site are listed in Appendix B.


Each month, as appropriate, a summary of overall performance of the Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8 site and a detailed subsystem analysis are published. These monthly reports for the period covered by this Solar Energy System Performance Evaluation (October 1978 through March 1979) are available from the Technical Information Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830.

In addition, data are included in this report for which monthly reports are not available. This data is included with the intention of making this report as comprehensive as possible. Months for which no published monthly reports exist are shown in parentheses in the tables and figures. In the tables and figures in this report, an asterisk indicates that the value is not available for that month; N.A. indicates that the value is not applicable for this site.




4-1












5. PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT

The performance of the Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8 solar energy system has been evaluated for the October 1978 through March 1979 time period. Two perspectives were taken in this assessment. The first views the overall system in which the total solar energy collected, the system load, the measured values for solar energy used, and system solar fraction are presented. Where applicable, the expected values for solar energy used and system solar fraction are also shown. The expected values have been derived from a modified f-chart analysis which uses measured weather and subsystem loads as input. The f-chart is a performance estimation technique used for designing solar heating systems. It was developed by the Solar Energy Laboratory, University of Wisconsin Madison. The system mode used in the analysis is based on manufacturer's data and other known system parameters. In addition, the solar energy system coefficient of performance (COP) at both the system and subsystem level has been presented.


The second view presents a more in-depth look at the performance of individual subsystems. Details relating to the performance of the collector array and storage subsystems are presented first, followed by details pertaining to the space heating and domestic hot water (DHW) subsystems. Included in this section are all parameters pertinent to the operation of each individual subsystem.

In addition to the overall system and subsystem analysis, this report also describes the equivalent energy savings contributed by the solar energy system. The overall system and individual subsystem energy savings are presented in Section 5.5.

The performance assessment of any solar energy system is highly dependent on the prevailing weather conditions at the site during the period of performance. The original design of the system is generally based on the long-term averages for available insulation and temperature. Deviations from these long-term averages can significantly affect the performance of the system. Therefore,


5-1









before beginning the discussion of actual system performance, a presentation of the measured and long-term averages for critical weather parameters has
been provided.

5.1 Weather Conditions


Monthly values of the total solar energy incident in the plane of the collector array and the average outdoor temperature measured at the Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8 site during the reporting period are presented in Table 5-1. Also presented in Table 5-1 are the corresponding long-term average monthly values of the measured weather parameters. These data are taken from Reference Monthly Environmental Data for Systems in the National Solar Data Network [4]. A complete yearly listing of these values for the site is given in Appendix C.


During the reporting period the average daily total incident solar energy on the collector array was 1532 Btu per square foot per day. This was below the estimated average daily solar radiation for this geographical area during the reporting period of 1637 Btu per square foot per day for a plane facing 29 degrees east of south with a tilt of 45 degrees to the horizontal. The average ambient temperature during the reporting period was 560F as compared with the long-term average for October through March of 590F. The number of heating degree-days for the same period (based on a 650F reference) was 1752, as compared with the summation of the long-term averages of 1210.


Monthly values of heating and cooling degree-days are derived from daily values of ambient temperature. They are useful indications of the system heating and cooling loads. Heating degree-days and cooling degree-days are computed as the difference between daily average temperature and 65'F. For example, if a day's average temperature was 600F, then five heating degreedays are accumulated. Similarly, if a day's average temperature was 800F, then 15 cooling degree-days are accumulated. The total number of heating and cooling degree-days is summed monthly.




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5.2 System Thermal Performance

The thermal performance of a solar energy system is a function of the total solar energy collected and applied to the system load. The total system load is the sum of the useful energy delivered to the loads (excluding losses in the system), both solar and auxiliary thermal energies. The portion of the total load provided by solar energy is defined as the solar fraction of the load.


The thermal performance of the Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8 solar energy system is presented in Table 5-2. This performance assessment is based on the 6-month period from October 1978 to March 1979. During the reporting period, a total of 14.88 million Btu of solar energy was collected and the total system load was 13.37 million Btu. The measured amount of solar energy delivered to the load subsYstem(s) was 6.13 million Btu or 6.32 million Btu less than the expected value. The measured system solar fraction was 46 percent as compared to an expected value of 93 percent.

Figure 5-1 illustrates the flow of solar energy from the point of collection to the various points of consumption and loss for the reporting period. The numerical values account for the quantity of energy corresponding with the transport, operation, and function of each major element in the Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8 solar energy system for the total reporting period.

Solar energy distribution flowcharts for each month of the reporting period are presented in Appendix D.

Table 5-3 summarizes solar energy distribution and provides a percentage breakdown. For the period October 1978 through March 1979, the load subsystem(s) consumed 41 percent of the energy collected and 59 percent was lost. Appendix E contains the monthly solar energy percentage distributions.

The solar energy coefficient of performance (COP) is indicated in Table 5-4. The COP simply provides a numerical value for the relationship of solar

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FIGURE 5-1. SOLAR ENERGY (MILLION BTU) DISTRIBUTION FLOWCHART -SUMMARY

I ncient ORTIZ & RE ILL DEVELOPERS, INC., HOUSE LOT 8 Solar Energy
Solar Energy Storage Losses

53.44 3.06

1 ~Change in7
Operational Transport Loss ES usse trdEeg
Incident Collector to Operating Energy
Solar Energy Storage-0 7

39.88 04


CollectedSoaEnrySlrneg
Solar Energy toStrgefomSorg



TranportLossTransport Loss Colletor t DHWStorage to DHW


Domestic Hot
Water Solar
Energy Used

2.60 1.46

I I Sbyse Domestic Hot
SubystiEemg Water Auxiliary Energy Thermal Used

1.561.5
Domestic Hot
Water Load


Transport Loss (1)TrnpotLos Collector to Soaet
Space HeatingSpcHetn N.A. _ _

Space Heating
Solar Energy Used


Spae Hati Space Heating
Subsystem Auxiliary Thermal
OeaigEnergy Used



Space Heating
Load


Transport Loss (1)TrnpotLos Col lector to Soaet
--- Space CoolingSpcColn

N A. N.____A.Space Cooling
__________________________________ Solar Energy Used

N.A. IN.A.
Spcoi~n Space Cooling
ISubsstemI Auxiliary Thermal
Oean Energy Used


(1ta Loss ~aj N.
Tota Los -Space Cooling Total Loss
Collector toLodSoaetLas
Storage and LoadsLodSraetLas


Denotes unavailable data
N.A. Denotes not applicable data
(1) May contribute to offset of space heating load (if known see text for discussion) 5-6







TABLE 5-3. SOLAR ENERGY DISTRIBUTION SUMMARY OCTOBER 1978 THROUGH MARCH 1979
ORTIZ & REILL DEVELOPERS, INC., HOUSE LOT 8

14,g8 million Btu TOTAL SOLAR ENERGY COLLECTED 100%

6.13 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY TO LOADS
41 %

4.06 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY TO DHW SUBSYSTEM
27 %
2.07 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY TO SPACE HEATING SUBSYSTEM
14 %

N.A. million Btu SOLAR ENERGY TO SPACE COOLING SUBSYSTEM
N.0
8.82 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY LOSSES
59 %
3.06 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY LOSS FROM STORAGE
20 %
5.76 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY LOSS IN TRANSPORT
39 %
4.56 million Btu COLLECTOR TO STORAGE LOSS 31 % PLUS

COLLECTOR TO LOAD LOSS

million Btu COLLECTOR TO DHW LOSS


N.A, million Btu COLLECTOR TO SPACE HEATING LOSS N.A.%
N.A. million Btu COLLECTOR TO SPACE COOLING LOSS N.A.%
i-2a million Btu STORAGE TO LOAD LOSS
8 %
1.20 million Btu STORAGE TO DHW LOSS
8 %
PLUS
STORAGE TO SPACE HEATING LOSS

-N.A. million Btu STORAGE TO SPACE COOLING LOSS N.A.%

-0.07 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY STORAGE CHANGE
0 %
Denotes unavailable data
N.A. Denotes not aDplicable data 5-7



















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5-8










energy collected or transported or used and the energy required to perform the transition. The greater the COP value, the more efficient the subsystem. The solar energy system at the Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8 functioned at a weighted average COP value of 2.60 for the reporting period October 1978 through March 1979.

5.3 Subsystem Performance

The Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8 solar energy installation may be divided into three subsystems:

1. Collector Array and Storage
2. Domestic Hot Water (DHW)
3. Space Heating

Each subsystem is evaluated and analyzed by the techniques defined in Section
4 to produce the monthly performance reports. This section presents the results of integrating the monthly data available on the three subsystems for the period October 1978 through March 1979.

5.3.1 Collector Array and Storage Subsystem

5.3.1.1 Collector Array

Collector array performance for the Oritz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8 site is presented in Table 5-5. The total incident solar radiation on the collector array for the period October 1978 through March 1979 was 53.44 million Btu. During the period the collector loop was operating, the total insulation amounted to 39.88 million Btu. The total collected solar energy for the period was 14.88 million Btu, resulting in a collector array efficiency of 37 percent, based on total incident insulation. Solar energy delivered from the collector array to storage was 7.72 million Btu, while solar energy delivered from the collector array directly to the loads amounted to 2.60 million Btu. Energy loss during transfer from the collector array to storage and loads was 4.56 million Btu. This loss represented 31 percent of

5-9




















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5-10










the energy collected. Operating energy required by the collector loop was
0.45 million Btu.

Collector array efficiency has been computed from two bases. The first assumes that the efficiency is based upon all available solar energy. This approach makes the operation of the control system part of array efficiency. For example, energy may be available at the collector, but the collector fluid temperature is below the control minimum; therefore, the energy is not collected. In this approach, collector array performance is described by comparing the collected solar energy to the incident solar energy. The ratio of these two energies represents the collector array efficiency which may be expressed as


n c = Qs/Qi


where: nc = collector array efficiency


QS = collected solar energy

Qj = incident solar energy


The monthly efficiency computed by this method is listed in the column entitled "Collector Array Efficiency" in Table 5-5.


The second approach assumes the efficiency is based upon the incident solar energy during the periods of collection only.


Evaluating collector efficiency using operational incident energy and compensating for the difference between gross collector array area and the gross collector area yield operational collector efficiency. Operational collector efficiency, nco, is computed as follows:

A
nco = QS/(Qoi X A a


where: QS = collected solar energy 5-11









Qoi = operational incident energy

Ap = gross collector area (product of the number of collectors and the total envelope area of one unit)

A a = gross collector array area (total area perpendicular to the solar flux vector, including all, mounting, connecting and transport hardware)

A
Note: The ratio A p is typically 1.0 for most collector array configurations.
a

The monthly efficiency computed by this method is listed in the column entitled "Operational Collector Array Efficiency" in Table 5-5. This latter efficiency term is not the same as collector efficiency as represented by the ASHRAE Standard 93-77 [5]. Both operational collector efficiency and the ASHRAE collector efficiency are defined as the ratio of actual useful energy collected to solar energy incident upon the collector and both use the same definition of collector area. However, the ASHRAE efficiency is determined from instantaneous evaluation under tightly controlled, steady-state test conditions, while the operational collector efficiency is determined from the actual conditions of daily solar energy system operation. Measured monthly values of operational incident energy and computed values of operational collector efficiency are presented in Table 5-5.


5.3.1.2 Storage

Storage performance data for the Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8 site for the reporting period is shown in Table 5-6. Results of analysis of solar energy losses during transport and storage are shown in Table 5-7. This table contains an evaluation of solar energy transport losses as a fraction of energy transported to subsystems.

During the reporting period, total solar energy delivered to storage was 7.72 million Btu and auxiliary energy from the fireplace contribution to storage

5-12

















N
8
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L)
LLJ LL M
U- 0 ULL W UJ
LUU)TOco




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LLI LU
0 (D (D
-i < < <
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U) 0 LU Ui 0 Cl Ch C)
F- >
0 cn <
uj

z

Cli
cr
W W w
0 CL 0 z
Z 0 < Lu
< -i cr 00 ON ON Lf) OD
w qd* co m Itt Lin LC) LC)
> 0cr- UJ LL
U) LL
00 w
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LAJ
0. LU
LLJ c(D 66 z cc -3
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LO (n
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0
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< r- co %0 m 00 ko f%%
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w Z w


CL

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cc= 0
uj 0 06 w
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w 4-)


w M


z co cl: F- m
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5-13













TABLE 5-7. SOLAR ENERGY LOSSES STORAGE AND TRANSPORT ORTIZ & REILL DEVELOPERS, INC., HOUSE LOT 8

MONTH

_________ ______________ OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR

1. SOLAR ENERGY (SE) COLLECTED 2.04 2.52 1.74 1.35 2.56 2.07
MINUS SE DIRECTLY TO LOADS
(mr~ilion Btu)

2. SE TO STORAGE 1.29 1.86 1.06 0.80 1.62 1.09
(million Btu)

3. LOSS -COLLECTOR TO STORAGE (%) 37 26 39 41 37 47 1-2
1

4. CHANGE-IN STORED ENERGY -0.20 -0.01 0.08 -0.02 0.15 -0.07
(million Btu)

5. SOLAR ENERGY -STORAGE TO DHW SUBSYSTEM
plus 0.82 1.66 0.33 0.46 0.80 0.66
6. SOLAR ENERGY -STORAGE TO SPACE HEATING SUBSYSTEM
(million Btu)

7. SOLAR ENERGY -STORAGE TO N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A.
SPACE COOLING SUBSYSTEM
(million Btu)

8. LOSS FROM STORAGE(% 2- (4+(5+6)+7)
2

9. HOT WATER SOLAR ENERGY (HWSE) FROM STORAGE (million Btu) 0.31 1.17 0.26 0.46 0.79 0.54
plus
10. HEATING SOLAR ENERGY (HSE)
FROM STORAGE
(million Btu)

11. LOSS-STORAGE TO (HSE + HWSE)(%) 62 30 21 0 1 18
(5+6)-(9+11)
(5+6)




1 I ~-- I--I I

N.A. D 9rnotes not applicable data S0



5-14











was 0.29 million Btu. There were 4.73 million Btu delivered from storage to the DHW and space heating subsystems. Energy loss from storage was 3.35 million Btu. This loss represented 42 percent of the energy delivered to storage. The storage efficiency was 58 percent: This is calculated as the ratio of the sum of the energy removed from storage and the change in stored energy, to the energy delivered to storage. The average storage temperature for the period was 108'F.


Storage subsystem performance is evaluated by comparison of energy to storage, energy from storage, and the change in stored energy. The ratio of.the sum of energy from storage and the change in stored energy, to the energy to storage is defined as storage efficiency, n S* This relationship is expressed in the equation


ns = (AQ + QSO)/Qsi

where:


AQ = change in stored energy. This is the difference in
the estimated stored energy during the specified
reporting period, as indicated by the relative
temperature of the storage medium (either positive
or negative value)


Qso = energy from storage. This is the amount of energy
extracted by the load subsystem from the primary
storage medium


Qsi= energy to storage. This is the amount of energy
(both solar and auxiliary) delivered to the primary
storage medium







5-15










5.3.2 Domestic Hot Water (DHW) Subsystem


The DHW subsystem performance for the Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8 site for the reporting period is shown in Table 5-8. The DHW subsystem consumed 4.06 million Btu of solar energy and 1.54 million Btu of auxiliary electrical energy to satisfy a hot water load of 5.33 million Btu. The solar fraction of this load was 73 percent.


The performance of the DHW subsystem is described by comparing the amount of solar energy supplied to the subsystem with the total energy required by the subsystem. The total energy required by the subsystem consists of both solar energy and auxiliary thermal energy. The DHW load is defined as the amount of energy required to raise the mass of water delivered by the DHW subsystem between the temperature at which it entered the subsystem and its delivery temperature. The DHW solar fraction is defined as the portion of the DHW load which is supported by solar energy.


5.3.3 Space Heating Subsystem


The space heating subsystem performance for the Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8 site for the reporting period is shown in Table 5-9. The space heating subsystem consumed 2.07 million Btu of solar energy and 9.72 million Btu of auxiliary fossil fuel energy to satisfy a space heating load of 8.04 million Btu. The solar fraction of this load was 26 percent, which is a weighted average based on the load for the months November 1978 through March 1979.

The performance of the space heating subsystem is described by comparing the amount of solar energy supplied to the subsystem with the energy required to satisfy the total space heating load. The energy required to satisfy the total load consists of both solar energy and auxiliary thermal energy. The ratio of solar energy supplied to the load to the total load is defined as the heating solar fraction.






5-16

















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5-17






















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5-18










5.4 Operating Energy

Measured values of the Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8 solar energy system and subsystem operating energy for the reporting period are presented in Table 5-10. A total of 3.08 million Btu of operating energy was consumed by the entire system during the reporting period.


Operating energy for a solar energy system is defined as the amount of electrical energy required to support the subsystems without affecting their thermal state.


Total system operating energy for the Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8 is the energy required to support the energy collection and storage subsystem (ECSS), the DHW subsystem, and the space heating subsystem. With reference to the system schematic (Figure 3-1), the ECCS operating energy includes pump P1 (EPlOO) during collector loop operation and pumps P2 and P3 (EP200) during operation in the fireplace-to-storage mode. The DHW subsystem operating energy consists of pumps P2 and P3 (EP200) if the system is operating in the storage-to-DHW mode. The space heating subsystem operating energy consists of pumps P2 and P3 (EP200) when operating in the storage-to-space heating mode and also fan EP400.


5.5 Energy Savings


Energy savings for the Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8 site for the reporting period are presented in Table 5-11. For this period the total savings on electrical energy were 1.82 million Btu, for a monthly average of 0.30 million Btu; total savings of fossil fuel energy were 3.45 million Btu, for a monthly average of 0.58 million Btu. An electrical energy expense of
0.39 million Btu was incurred during the reporting period for the operation of solar energy transportation pumps.


Solar energy system savings are realized whenever energy provided by the solar energy system is used to meet system demands which would otherwise be met by auxiliary energy sources. The operating energy required to provide solar

5-19


















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5-20



















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m c1r) Cj U") m rCL LLI C.) C) C) Cl CD C) r- C) CL
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< CC uj c 00 CD C) C) 4)
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5-21










energy to the load subsystems is subtracted from the solar energy contribution to determine net savings.

The auxiliary sources at Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8 consist of an electrical heater for DHW (EP300) and a fireplace and gas furnace (F400)
for space heating.










































5-22










6. REFERENCES

1. U.S. Department of Energy, National Solar Data Network, prepared
under contract number EG-77-C-4049 by IBM Corporation,
December 1977.

2. J. T. Smok, V. S. Sohoni, J. M. Nash, "Processing of Instrumented
Data for the National Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration Program," Conference on Performance Monitoring Techniques for
Evaluation of Solar Heating and Cooling Systems, Washington, D.C.,
April 1978.

3. E. Streed, et. al., Thermal Data Requirements and Performance
Evaluation Procedures for the National Solar Heating and Cooling
Demonstration Program, NBSIR-76-1137, National Bureau of Standards,
Washington, D.C., 1976.

4. Mears, J. C. Reference Monthly Environmental Data for Systems in
the National Solar Data Network. Department of Energy report
SOLAR/0019-79/36. Washington, D.C., 1979.

5. ASHRAE Standard 93-77, Methods of Testing to Determine the Thermal
Performance of Solar Collectors, The American Society of Heating,
Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers, Inc., New York, N.Y.,
1977.

6. ASHRAE Standard 94-77, Methods of Testing Thermal Storage Devices
Based on Thermal Performance, The American Society of Heating,
Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers, Inc., New York, N.Y.,
1977.

7.W Monthly Performance Report, Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8,
SOLAR/1087-78/1O, Department of Energy, Washington, D.C., (October 1978).

8.# Monthly Performance Report, Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8,
SOLAR/1087-78/II, Department of Energy, Washington, D.C., (November 1978).

9.# Monthly Performance Report, Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8,
SOLAR/1087-78/12, Department of Energy, Washington, D.C., (December 1978).

10.# Monthly Performance Report, Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8,
SOLAR/1087-79/O1, Department of Energy, Washington, D.C., (January 1979).

l1.# Monthly Performance Report, Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8,
SOLAR/1087-79/02, Department of Energy, Washington, D.C., (February 1979).

12.# Monthly Performance Report, Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8,
SOLAR/1087-79/03, Department of Energy, Washington, D.C., (March 1979).


#Copies of these reports may be obtained from Technical Information Center,
P. 0. Box 62, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830.

6-1














7. BIBLIOGRAPHY

1. Monthly Performance Report, Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8,
SOLAR/1087-78/08, Department of Energy, Washington, D.C., (August 1978).

2. Monthly Performance Report, Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8,
SOLAR/1087-78/09, Department of Energy, Washington, D.C., (September 1978).

Copies of these reports may be obtained from Technical Information Center,
P. 0. Box 62, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830.








































7-1














APPENDIX A

DEFINITIONS OF PERFORMANCE FACTORS AND SOLAR TERMS

COLLECTOR ARRAY PERFORMANCE

The collector array performance is characterized by the amount of solar energy collected with respect to the energy available to be collected.

0 INCIDENT SOLAR ENERGY (SEA) is the total insulation available
on the gross collector array area. This is the area of the
collector array energy-receiving aperture, including the
framework which is an integral part of the collector structure.

0 OPERATIONAL INCIDENT ENERGY (SEOP) is the amount of solar energy
incident on the collector array during the time that the collector loop is active (attempting to collect energy).

0 COLLECTED SOLAR ENERGY (SECA) is the thermal energy removed
from the collector array by the energy transport medium.

0 COLLECTOR ARRAY EFFICIENCY (CAREF) is the ratio of the energy
collected to the total solar energy incident on the collector array. It should be emphasized that this efficiency factor is
for the collector array, and available energy includes the
energy incident on the array when the collector loop is inactive. This efficiency must not be confused with the more
common collector efficiency figures which are determined from instantaneous test data obtained during steady-state operation
of a single collector unit. These efficiency figures are often
provided by collector manufacturers or presented in technical
journals to characterize the functional capability of a particular collector design. In general, the collector panel maximum
efficiency factor will be significantly higher than the collector array efficiency reported here.

STORAGE PERFORMANCE

The storage performance is characterized by the relationships among the energy delivered to storage, removed from storage, and the subsequent change in the amount of stored energy.

0 ENERGY TO STORAGE (STEI) is the amount of energy, both solar
and auxiliary, delivered to the primary storage medium.

0 ENERGY FROM STORAGE (STEO) is the amount of energy extracted
by the load subs stem's from the primary storage medium.




A-1










o CHANGE IN STORED ENERGY (STECH) is the difference in the estimated
stored energy during the specified reporting period, as indicated
by the relative temperature of the storage medium (either positive or negative value).

0 STORAGE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE (TST) is the mass-weighted average
temperature of the primary storage medium.

0 STORAGE EFFICIENCY (STEFF) is the ratio of the sum of the energy
removed from storage and the change in stored energy to the
energy delivered to storage.

ENERGY COLLECTION AND STORAGE SUBSYSTEM

The Energy Collection and Storage Subsystem (ECSS) is composed of the collector array, the primary storage medium, the transport loops between these, and other components in the system design which are necessary to mechanize-the collector and storage equipment.

0 INCIDENT SOLAR ENERGY (SEA) is the total insolation available
on the gross collector array area. This is the area of the
collector array energy-receiving aperture, including the framework which is an integral part of the collector structure.

0 AMBIENT TEMPERATURE (TA) is the average temperature of the outdoor environment at the site.

0 ENERGY TO LOADS (SEL) is the total thermal energy transported
from the ECSS to all load subsystems.

0 AUXILIARY THERMAL ENERGY TO ECSS (CSAUX) is the total auxiliary
energy supplied to the ECSS, including auxiliary energy added to
the storage tank, heating devices on the collectors for freezeprotection, etc.

0 ECSS OPERATING ENERGY (CSOPE) is the critical operating energy
required to support the ECSS heat transfer loops.

HOT WATER SUBSYSTEM

The hot water subsystem is characterized by a complete accounting of the energy flow into and from the subsystem, as well as an accounting of internal energy. The energy into the subsystem is composed of auxiliary fossil fuel,, and electrical auxiliary thermal energy, and the operating energy for the subsystem.

0 HOT WATER LOAD (HWL) is the amount of energy required to heat
the amount of7 hot water demanded at the site from the incoming
temperature to the desired outlet temperature.



A- 2











0 SOLAR FRACTION OF LOAD (HWSFR) is the percentage of the load
demand which is supported by solar energy.

0 SOLAR ENERGY USED (HWSE) is the amount of solar energy supplied
to the hot water subsystem.

0 OPERATING ENERGY (HWOPE) is the amount of electrical energy
required to support the subsystem, (e.g., fans, pumps, etc.)
and which is not intended to directly affect the thermal state
of the subsystem.

0 AUXILIARY THERMAL USED (HWAT) is the amount of energy supplied
to the major components of the subsystem in the form of thermal energy in a heat transfer fluid, or its equivalent. This term
also includes the converted electrical and fossil fuel energy
supplied to the subsystem.

0 AUXILIARY FOSSIL FUEL (HWAF) is the amount of fossil fuel energy
supplied directly to the subsystem.

0 ELECTRICAL ENERGY SAVINGS (HWSVE) is the estimated difference
between the electrical energy requirements of an alternative
conventional system (carrying the full load) and the actual
electrical energy required by the subsystem.

0 FOSSIL FUEL SAVINGS (HWSVF) is the estimated difference between
the fossil fuel energy requirements of the alternative conventional system (carrying the full load) and the actual fossil
fuel energy requirements of the subsystem.

SPACE HEATING SUBSYSTEM

The space heating subsystem is characterized by performance factors accounting for the complete energy flow into the subsystem. The average building temperature is tabulated to indicate the relative performance of the subsystem in satisfying the space heating load and in controlling the temperature of the conditioned space.

0 SPACE HEATING LOAD (HL) is the sensible energy added to the
air in the building.

0 SOLAR FRACTION OF LOAD (HSFR) is the fraction of the sensible
energy added to the air in the building derived from the solar
energy system.

0 SOLAR ENERGY USED (HSE) is the amount of solar energy supplied
to the space heating subsystem.




A-3











0 OPERATING ENERGY (HOPE) is the amount of electrical energy
required to support the subsystem, (e.g., fans, pumps, etc.)
and which is not intended to directly affect the thermal state
of the system.

0 AUXILIARY THERMAL USED (HAT) is the amount of energy supplied
to the major components of the subsystem in the form of thermal
energy in a heat transfer fluid or its equivalent. This term also includes the converted electrical and fossil fuel energy
supplied to the subsystem.

0 AUXILIARY ELECTRICAL FUEL (HAE) is the amount of electrical
energy supplied directly to the subsystem.

0 ELECTRICAL ENERGY SAVINGS (HSVE) is the estimated difference
between the electrical energy requirements of an alternative
conventional system (carrying the full load) and the actual
electrical energy required by the subsystem.

0 BUILDING TEMPERATURE (TB) is the average heated space dry bulb
temperature.




























A-4










APPENDIX B

SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE EQUATIONS

ORTIZ & REILL DEVELOPERS, INC., HOUSE LOT 8


INTRODUCTION

Solar energy system performance is evaluated by performing energy balance calculations on the system and its major subsystems. These calculations are based ot. physical measurement data taken from each sensor every 320 second. This data is then mathematically combined to determine the hourly, daily, and monthly performance of the system. This appendix describes the general computational methods and the specific energy balance equations used for this site.

Data samples from the system measurements are integrated to provide discrete approximations of the continuous functions which characterize the system's dynamic behavior. This integration is performed by summnation of the product of the measured rate of the appropriate performance parameters and the sampling interval over the total time period of interest.

There are several general forms of integration equations which are applied to each site. These general forms are exemplified as follows: The total solar energy available to the collector array is given by

SOLAR ENERGY AVAILABLE = (1/60) E [1001 x AREA] x AT

where I001 is the solar radiation measurement provided by the pyranometer in Btu per square foot per hour, AREA is the area of the collector array in square feet, AT is the sampling interval in minutes, and the factor (1/60) is included to correct the solar radiation "rate" to the proper units of time.
Similarly, the energy flow within a system is given typically by

COLLECTED SOLAR ENERGY = E [MlOO x AH] X AT

where M100 is the mass flow rate of the heat transfer fluid in lb /min and AH is the enthalpy change, in Btu/lbm, of the fluid as it passes Through the heat exchanging component.m

For a liquid system AH is generally given by

AH = C pAT

where C isthe average specific heat, in Btu/(lb -F), of the heat transfer flu~diand AT, in OF, is the temperature differential across the heat exchanging component.



B-1









For an air system AH is generally given by

AH = H a (T out ) H a (T in)

where H (T) is the enthalpy, in Btu/lb of the transport air evaluated at the Inlet and outlet temperatures Xthe heat exchanging component.

H (T) can have various forms, depending on whether or not the humidity ratio of the transport air remains constant as it passes through the heat exchanging component.

For electrical power, a general example is

ECSS OPERATING ENERGY = (3413/60) E [EP100] X AT

where EP100 is the power required by electrical equipment in kilowatts and the two factors (1/60) and 3413 correct the data to Btu/min.

These equations are comparable to those specified in "Thermal Data Requirements and Performance Evaluation Procedures for the National Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration Program." This document was prepared by an interagency committee of the Government, and presents guidelines for thermal performance evaluation.

Performance factors are computed for each hour of the day. Each integration process, therefore, is performed over a period of one hour. Since long-term performance data is desired, it is necessary to build these hourly performance factors to daily values. This is accomplished, for energy parameters, by summing the 24 hourly values. For temperatures, the hourly values are averaged. Certain special factors, such as efficiencies, require appropriate handling to properly weight each hourly sample for the daily value computation. Similar procedures are required to convert daily values to monthly values.



















B-2











EQUATIONS USED TO GENERATE MONTHLY PERFORMANCE VALUES

NOTE: SENSOR IDENTIFICATION (MEASUREMENT) NUMBERS REFERENCE SYSTEM
SCHEMATIC FIGURE 3-1


AVERAGE AMBIENT TEMPERATURE (OF)

TA = (1/60) x z TOOl x AT

AVERAGE BUILDING TEMPERATURE (OF)

TA = (1/60) x z T600 x AT

DAYTIME AVERAGE AMBIENT TEMPERATURE (OF)

TDA = (1/360) x E TOOl x AT

FOR + 3 HOURS FROM SOLAR NOON

INCIDENT SOLAR ENERGY PER SQUARE FOOT (BTU/FT )

SE = (1/60) x E 1001 x AT

OPERATIONAL INCIDENT SOLAR ENERGY (BTU)

SEOP = (1/60) x E [I001 x CLAREA] x AT

WHEN THE COLLECTOR LOOP IS ACTIVE SOLAR ENERGY COLLECTED BY THE ARRAY (BTU)

SECA = E [MlO0 x (H(T125) H(T0))] x AT

WHERE H(TXXX) IS A FUNCTION WHICH CALCULATES THE ENTHALPY OF THE

TRANSPORT MEDIUM

SOLAR ENERGY TO STORAGE (BTU)

STEI = E [M0 x (H(T200) H(T225))] x AT

E[M400 (H(T425) H(T400))] x AT

IF IN COLLECTOR-TO-STORAGE MODE OR STORAGE AUXILIARY ENERGY

COLLECTION MODE





B-3










SOLAR ENERGY FROM STORAGE (BTU)
STEO = E [M400 x (H(T400) H(T425)) + M301 x (H(T400) H(T225))] x AT AVERAGE TEMPERATURE OF STORAGE (OF)
TST = (1/60) x E [(T201 + T202 + T203)/3] x AT ENERGY DELIVERED FROM ECSS TO LOAD SUBSYSTEMS (BTU)
CSEO = E [M400 x (H(T402) H(T427)) + M301 x (H(T301)) H(T326))] x AT ECSS OPERATING ENERGY (BTU)
CSOPE = CSOPE1 + CSOPE2
CSOPE1 = 56.8833 x E EP100 x AT
DURING COLLECTOR LOOP OPERATION
CSOPE2 = 56.8833 x z EP200 x AT
DURING STORAGE AUXILIARY ENERGY COLLECTION MODE SPACE HEATING SUBSYSTEM OPERATING ENERGY (BTU)
HOPE = 56.8833 x E (EP200 + EP400)x AT
WHEN SYSTEM IS IN THE SPACE HEATING MODE SOLAR ENERGY TO SPACE HEATING SYSTEM (BTIU)
HSE = E [M400 x (H(T402) H(T427))] x AT
SPACE HEATING SUBSYSTEM AUXILIARY FOSSIL FUEL ENERGY (BTU)
HAF = 1666 x E F400C x AT
SPACE HEATING SUBSYSTEM AUXILIARY THERMAL ENERGY (BTU)
HAT = 0.6 x HAF
SPACE HEATING SUBSYSTEM LOAD (BTU)
HL = HSE + HAT
SPACE HEATING SUBSYSTEM SOLAR FRACTION (PERCENT)
HSFR = 100 x HSE/HL




B-4










SPACE HEATING SUBSYSTEM ELECTRICAL ENERGY SAVINGS (BTU)

HSVE = -56.8833 x z EP200 x AT

WHEN OPERATING IN SOLAR SPACE HEATING MODE SPACE HEATING SUBSYSTEM FOSSIL ENERGY SAVINGS (BTU)

HSVF = HSE/O.6

HOT WATER CONSUMED (GALLONS)

HWCSM = E WD300 x AT

SOLAR ENERGY TO HOT WATER (BTU)

HWSE = E [M301 x (H(T301) H(T326))] x AT HOT WATER SUBSYSTEM OPERATING ENERGY (BTU)

HWOPE = 56.8833 x z EP200 x AT

WHEN OPERATING IN DHW ENERGY COLLECTION MODE HOT WATER AUXILIARY ELECTRIC ENERGY (BTU)

HWAE = 56.8833 x E EP300 x AT

HOT WATER AUXILIARY THERMAL ENERGY (BTU)

HWAT = HWAE

HOT WATER LOAD (BTU)

HWL = E [M300 x (H(T325) H(T300))] x AT HOT WATER SOLAR FRACTION (PERCENT)

HWSFR = FRACTION OF DELIVERED HOT WATER LOAD DERIVED FROM SOLAR SOURCES

AFTER PRORATING STORAGE LOSSES TO SOLAR AND AUXILIARY SOURCES HOT WATER ELECTRICAL ENERGY SAVINGS (BTU)

HWSVE = HWSE HWOPE

SERVICE SUPPLY WATER TEMPERATURE (OF)

TSW = (1/60) x E T300 x AT

WHEN WATER IS BEING DRAWN


B-5









SERVICE HOT WATER TEMPERATURE (OF)

THW = (1/60) x z T325 x AT

INCIDENT SOLAR ENERGY ON COLLECTOR ARRAY (BTU)
SEA = CLAREA x SE

COLLECTED SOLAR ENERGY (BTU)
SEC = SECA/CLAREA

COLLECTOR ARRAY EFFICIENCY

CAREF = SECA/SEA

CHANGE IN STORED ENERGY (BTU)

STECH = STECH1 STECHp
WHERE THE SUBSCRIPT REFERS TO A PRIOR REFERENCE VALUE STORAGE EFFICIENCY

STEFF = (STECH + STEO)/STEI

SOLAR ENERGY TO LOAD SUBSYSTEM (BTU)
SEL = HSE + HWSE

ECSS SOLAR CONVERSION EFFICIENCY

CSCEF = CSEO/SEA SYSTEM LOAD (BTU)

SYSL = HWL + HL

SOLAR FRACTION OF SYSTEM LOAD
SFR = (HWSFR x HWL + HSFR x HL)/SYSL AUXILIARY THERMAL ENERGY TO LOADS (BTU)

AXT = HAT + HWAT
AUXILIARY ELECTRICAL ENERGY TO LOADS (BTU)

AXE = HWAE




B-6









SYSTEM OPERATING ENERGY (BTU)

SYSOPE = CSOPE + HWOPE + HOPE TOTAL ENERGY CONSUMED (BTU)

TECSM = AXE + AXF + SYSOPE + SECA TOTAL ELECTRICAL ENERGY SAVINGS (BTU)

TSVE = HWSVE + HSVE CSOPE TOTAL FOSSIL ENERGY SAVINGS (BTU)

TSVF = HSVF

SYSTEM PERFORMANCE FACTOR

SYSPF = SYSL/((AXE + SYSOPE) x 3.33)
































B-7













APPENDIX C


LONG-TERM AVERAGE WEATHER CONDITIONS



This appendix contains a table which lists the long-term average weather conditions for each month of the year for this site.









































C-1















14
r-4
aw
2.






Ix

Ln Ln Lm o 10 %0 r r. r- 10 o Ln
F-4

0-4 AC
ca F-0 co
W .4 =
cis -C F-41-4
t!) 9z
C (3 a Lm 'o r- 3N In r- -t C3 N.
0 IF z r 0 z re: Ad
C)
Ad E4

-4 Dam

Md E-4
0 f 9% -Ip cyl -4 10 0 X) In 0 r -4 L-4 'A CO 1-4
0 --1 r n -r :t in '41 ow =50
t-4 CN En
Q as 04
m cli E-4 c in W u
0 (4 cr W H -C e:
u C E-4.4 (So 6.4
Ell m .30, ca W
tQ o E-4 " =
cm E4 H (A w
a,
cl: -C 6-4 M mm a as
m m 0 w Co 0 M Ln Lm 0% --r w %D Fn 00 Ln C3 ow 04
0 E-4 1-4 0 0 0 w w D o r- w w f- Ln --l' AC E-4 dld
1-4 ca u -C C4 m .4
1-4 Do W 0 0 H
-C .4 "N H H E-4 0
u m 4 z z z 94
0 a 0 0 0 M3
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0 r- 00 00 M 00 N E-4 ot m
-C M LM -T 0 (D Ln %0 cc (n 0 lz tz
to o en m w w W as C3N -r o w M4 64 04 w
z z M
2-0 0
W 1-4 .43C H M tn
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MC dc dd= OC C .0
9z ou H 0 a Cc
r. Ln Ln 0 N cr en CY, 0 CNI 0 E4 a dlC 0 CD
lz fn kn Ln r- Ln m Ln 0 --r m 00 WW oC W W E-4
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M r- ix oc= m = IX
w Ln LM o o o 0 %0 60 %D 0 kn >. >4 -C 0 0 0 114
.4 m WOW w w m
C; 8 C; C; 1 C 1 C; C; C; 6-4 0 -'- H 0 0 3c
-cw
02
o .4b. C-4
=m E-4 .3 m
=.CC lf 14 10 1 9 C4 U4 14 1; -C at rz E-4 = dC C
o m en 0 o 00 Ln I'l 1.0 c cz cz .4 Mtn w 63
02 cy' rq "o (7% C> 0 C> r- on 'o cy, bi w cm 0 W w u cc
to. 3C.4 3C
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OD Ik. 116-F-4
H Ln 0 om b" 63
.4 -C -It .4 .4 0 C3
04 E4 N 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 a 0 = C) ot4 b3 oc
H w cz N tn 0 0 0 N en 0% M M 0 E4 H H" t-4 m w
04 0 dC (7% C4 0 NO (7 --l' f- I' ON I" z E E-W m C W
m CA. .0 m %0 -r Ln 00 (N r- Ln 0 0 c Aco 0 = =
I I- m fn m rn en rn CN N r 3c m wx 3c W. m at

A A A A A A A A
w if 1# 11 It if # 11 It
0 0. it it 11 If 11 11 it It

M u AC gz ix M w
>4 w cm -d -4 Ac .4 Cl 0 49
DQ .4 .4 10 co ca a C3 to
.4 ic m in c4 c4 :.w M E- >- Nd ad u f-4
0 oc 43 -C I% w m m m w U 0
tn dg u 3C -4 W P1 1-3 -C Z .4




















C-2











APPENDIX D


MONTHLY SOLAR ENERGY DISTRIBUTION FLOWCHARTS



The flowcharts in this appendix depict the quantity of solar energy corresponding to each major component or characteristic of the Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8 solar energy system for 6 months of the reporting period. Each monthly flowchart represents a solar energy balance as the total input equals the total output.




































D-1














FIGURE D-1. SOLAR ENERGY (MILLION BTU) DISTRIBUTION FLOWCHART OCTOBER 1978

Incident ~ORTIZ & REILL DEVELOPERS, INC., HOUSE LOT 8 oaBEeg
Solar Energy Storage Losses

10.38 05



Operational Transport Loss
Incident Collector to ECSS Subsystem
Solar Energy Storage Operating Energy -.12

7.05 00


CollectedSoaEnrySlrneg Solar EnergytoSoaefmSorg







2.570 0.31



I I Domestic Hot
SubsystemWater Auxlary EnergyETermal Used



Domestic Hot



Water Load


Transport Loss ()0. 71 TasotLs
Collector to Soaet
eSpace HeatingSpcHetn

N. A. ______Space Heating
Solar Energy Used

N. A. 1z
SaeHeating Space Heating
ISubsystem I Auxiliary Thermal
Operating Energy Used

0 0
Space Heating
Load


Transport Loss (1)sor Ls
Collector to Soaet


SSpace Cooling


Solar Energy Used



Spae ooin Space Cooling
Enbyserg Auxiliary Thermal
Operaing Eergy Used (1 A.~Z N. A.
Total Loss Space Cooling Total Loss
Collector toLodSoaetLas
Storage and LoadsLodSraetLad

0.75 1- NA j 05

Denotes Unavailable Data
N.A. denotes not applicable data
(1) May contribute to offset of space heating Ipd (if known see text for discussion) D- 2















FIGURE D-2. SOLAR ENERGY (MILLION BTU) DISTRIBUTION FLOWCHART NOVEMBER 1978 ORTIZ & REILL DEVELOPERS, INC., HOUSE LOT 8 I
IncidentSolar Energy Solar Energy SoaeLse

8.96 0

change in
Operational Transport Loss (1)S StoredEnerm
Incident Collector to oeratin Sub gystm0
Solar EnergySt rgT

7.30 0



Sollrete~Y -oa nrySlrEeg





Solar ~~ ~ ~Energy UoStoaedfo trg





SubsstemDomestic Hot Operatin EnergyWater Auxlary Thermal Used


Domestic Hot



Water Load


Transport Loss0.8TasotLs
Collector to Soaet
SpmHaigSpace HeatingN-D Space Heating

Solar Energy Used


N.A.IEQiQ
SaeHeating Space Heating
ISubsystem I Auxiliary Thermal
OeaigEnergy Used
[ .28 0.27

Space Heating
Load


Transport Loss (1) 104TasotLs
Collector to Soaet
aSpace Cooling Space Cooling

N.A. ________Space Cooling
____ ___ ___ ___ ____ ___ ___ ___ ___ Solar Energy Used

N.A. T N.A.
Space Cooling Space Cooling ISubsystem I Auxiliary Thermel
OeaigEnergly Used


Total Loss Space Cooling Total Loss
Collector toLodSoaetLas
Storage and Lod0od trg4t od

0. 66L]N .04

Denotes Unavailable Data
N.A. denotes not applicable dataem
(1) May contribute to offset of space heating ad(if known see text for discussion) D- 3













FIGURE D-3. SOLAR ENERGY (MILLION BTU) DISTRIBUTION FLOWCHART DECEMBER 1978 ORTIZ & REILL DEVELOPERS, INC., HOUSE LOT 8 Incident Solar Energy
Solar nergyStorage Losses

9.1
change in
(1) Stored Energy
Operational Transport Loss ECSS Subsystem

Incident Collector to Operating Energy 00
Solar Energy StorageI1
5.43 *0.06


Collected Solar Energy Solar Energy
SlrEnergy to Storage from Storage


2.11 ~ ~~~Transport Loss 10 rnpr os03

Collector to DHW Soaet H



Domestic H-t
Water Solar
Energy Used
0.37 10.14
I I Domestic Not
DWSubsystem Water Auxiliary
OeaigEnergy Thermal Used


0 11I6 0.61
Domestic Hot
Water Load



Transport Loss ()1- 11 rnpr os
Collector to Soaet
Space HeatingSpcHetn

N. A. I______Space Heating
Solar Energy Used



Spceatin Space Heating
Subsystem Auxiliary Thermal
OeaigEnergy Used



Space Heating
Load


Transport Loss (1) 1- 12 ---j TasotLs
Collector to Soaet
Space Cooling Sa oln

N. A. N

Space Cooling
_________________________________ Soar Energy Used



Spac oln Space Cooling
Subsse Auxiliary Thermal
Operaing EergyUsed


Total 106s Space Cooling Total LOSS
Collector toLodSoaetLas
Storage and LoadsLodtranoLad
0.68 1- N.A .......0 7

Denotes Unavailable Data
N.A. denotes not applicable data
(1) May contribute to offset of space heating "Red (if known see text for discussion)

D-4














FIGURE D-4. SOLAR ENERGY (MILLION BTU) DISTRIBUTION FLOWCHART JANUARY 1979
ORTIZ& REILL DEVELOPERS, INC., HOUSE LOT 8 Solar Energy
Incident Storage Losses
Solar Energy

6.41 1 0.36


Operational Transport Loss ECSS Subsystem
Incident Cletrt
Solar Energy Storage Operating Energy

5.09 00



CollectedSoaEnrySlrneg Solar Energy toStrgefomSorg









Water Solar
Energy Used

0.35 F0.12
Domestic Hot
En S bsem Water Auxiliary
Operaing EergyThermal Used


Domestic Hot
Water Load


Transport Loss (1) 1 0.96 TasotLs
Collector to Soaet
--4.Space HeatingSpcHetn



Space Heating
Soar Energy Used



Space Heating Space Heating
ISubsystem Auxiliary Thermal
OeaigEnergy Used






Space Heoling




Space~Sac Coolingae ooin N.A.. N.A.

Space Cooling


ISubsystem I Auxiliary Thermal
Operatng Energy Used


Total Lost Space Cooling Total Loss
Collector toLodSoaetLas
rage and LoadsLadSogetLas

fS 0. 55 N. A.

Denotes Unavailabsle Data
N4 A denotes not applicable data
11) May contribute to offlot of space heating lpad (of known see text for discussion) D- 5













FIGURE D-5. SOLAR ENERGY (MILLION BTU) DISTRIBUTION FLOWCHART FEBRUARY 1979

InietORTIZ & REI LL DEVELOPERS, INC., HOUSE LOT 8 Soa1Eeg

Solar Energy Storage Losses


9.05 0 5


Operational Transport L6S ECSS Subsystem
Incident Collector to OeaigEeg
Solar Energy Storage nrtgEegy01

7.39 00


CollectedSoaEnrySlrneg Solar Energy toStrgefomSorg



TranportLossTransport Loss Colletor t DHWStorage to DHW


Domestic Hot
Water Solar
M, Energy Used

0.30E
Domestic Hot
DWSubsystem Water Auxiliary
Operating Energy Thermal Used



Domestic Hot
Water Load



Transport Loss (1) 1 0.76 TasotLs
Collector to Soaet
Space HeatingSpcHetn

N. A. I___*___I Space Heating
Solar Energy Used


N.iA 1i. 4
SaeHeating Space Heating
Subsystem Auxiliary Thermal
Operating Energy Used

0.19i W L-3
Space Heating
Load

1.81
Transport Loss Trnsor)Ls
Collector to Soaet
Space Cooling SaeCdn

N. A. ________Space Cooling
Solar Energy Used



SpceColin Space Cooling
Enbys erg Auxiliary Thermal



Total Loss Space Cooling Total Loss
Collector to Load Storage to Loads
Storage and Loads _________0.94 N-A*Denotes Unavailable Data
N.A. denotes not applicable data(1) May contribute to offset of space heating Ifad (if known see text for discussion) D-6













FIGURE D-6. SOLAR ENERGY (MILLION BTU) DISTRIBUTION FLOWCHART MARCH 1979

Incident ORTIZ & REILL DEVELOPERS, INC., HOUSE LOT 8 Solar Energy
Solar Energy Storage Losses

9.50 0s

I Change in Operational Transport Loss ECSS SubsystemStrdEeg
Incident Collector to
Solar Energy SoaeOeaigEeg 00

7.62 00











CoEnecgy ThaEerml UsedEnrg






Domestic Hot
Water Lolad




SlEnergy Used



H useagsc Ht SObeytgem g Wa Auxiliaryra Enheomgy Used



Dspac Ht
WrLoad


Transport Loss (10TrnprtLs
Collector to Soaet
Space CoolingSpcHetn

N. A.__ _ _

Space Cooling
Solar Energy Used


Space Cooling Space Cooling Subsystem I Auxiliary Thermal OeaigEnergy Used


Total oss -Space Cooling


Colletor to Soaet
Soage CongodsLa Soage tooadsg



0.8N. A. 7T

Snotae Unavalabl Dataooin
NASusyte denotesr notapliabmaatl
(1)~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~Oprtn MaEotiuet fsto aaehaigpd(fkonseefrg discusin N. 7.N.A












APPENDIX E


MONTHLY SOLAR ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS



The data tables provided in this appendix present an indication of solar energy distribution, intentional and unintentional, in the Ortiz & Reill Developers, Inc., House Lot 8 solar energy system. Tables are provided for
6 months of the reporting period.







































E-1






TABLE E-1. SOLAR ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OCTOBER 1978
ORTIZ & REILL DEVELOPERS, INC., HOUSE LOT 8

2.57 million Btu TOTAL SOLAR ENERGY COLLECTED 100%

0,84 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY TO LOADS
33 %
0,84 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY TO DHW SUBSYSTEM
33 %
0 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY-TO SPACE HEATING SUBSYSTEM
0 %

million Btu SOLAR ENERGY TO SPACE COOLING SUBSYSTEM
0 %

1.93 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY LOSSES
75%
0,67 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY LOSS FROM STORAGE
26 %
1.26 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY LOSS IN TRANSPORT
49%

0.75 million Btu COLLECTOR TO STORAGE LOSS 29 %
PLUS
COLLECTOR TO LOAD LOSS


% million Btu COLLECTOR TO DHW LOSS N.A. million Btu COLLECTOR TO SPACE HEATING LOSS


N.A. million Btu COLLECTOR TO SPACE COOLING LOSS


0.51 million Btu STORAGE TO LOAD LOSS 20%

0.51 million Btu STORAGE TO DHW LOSS 20%

0 million Btu STORAGE TO SPACE HEATING LOSS
0 %

N.A.- million Btu STORAGE TO SPACE COOLING LOSS N. A1

-0.20million Btu SOLAR ENERGY STORAGE CHANGE
-8%

Denotes unavailable data
N.A. Denotes not applicable data E-2






TABLE E-2. SOLAR ENERGY DISTRIBUTION NOVEMBER 1978
ORTIZ & REILL DEVELOPERS, INC., HOUSE LOT 8

3.08 million Btu TOTAL SOLAR ENERGY COLLECTED
100%

1.73 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY TO LOADS
56 %

0.76 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY TO DHW SUBSYSTEM
25 %

0.97 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY TO SPACE HEATING SUBSYSTEM
31 Tl,

N.A..million Btu SOLAR ENERGY TO SPACE COOLING SUBSYSTEM


1.36 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY LOSSES
44 %

0.21 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY LOSS FROM STORAGE
7 T

1.15 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY LOSS IN TRANSPORT
37 %
0.66 million Btu COLLECTOR TO STORAGE LOSS 21 %
PLUS
COLLECTOR TO LOAD LOSS

million Btu
% COLLECTOR TO DHW LOSS

N.A. million Btu COLLECTOR TO SPACE HEATING LOSS N.A.%

N.A. million Btu COLLECTOR TO SPACE COOLING LOSS N.A.%

0.49 million Btu STORAGE TO LOAD LOSS
76y

0.49 million Btu STORAGE TO DHW LOSS 16 %
PLUS
STORAGE TO SPACE HEATING LOSS

N.A. million Btu STORAGE TO SPACE COOLING LOSS N.A.%

-0-01 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY STORAGE CHANGE
0 %

Denotes unavailable data
N.A. Denotes not applicable data E-3





TABLE E-3. SOLAR ENERGY DISTRIBUTION DECEMBER 1978
ORTIZ & REILL DEVELOPERS, INC., HOUSE LOT 8
2.11 million Btu TOTAL SOLAR ENERGY COLLECTED
100%

0.63 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY TO LOADS
30 %

0.51 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY TO DHW SUBSYSTEM


0.12 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY TO SPACE HEATING SUBSYSTEM
6 %

N.A milo SOLAR ENERGY TO SPACE COOLING SUBSYSTEM

i.4o million Btu SOLAR ENERGY LOSSES
66 %

j2i million Btu SOLAR ENERGY LOSS FROM STORAGE
31 %
0.75 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY LOSS IN TRANSPORT
35 %

0.68 million Btu COLLECTOR TO STORAGE LOSS 32 %
PLUS
COLLECTOR TO LOAD LOSS

million Btu COLLECTOR TO DHW LOSS


N.A. million Btu COLLECTOR TO SPACE HEATING LOSS
N. A .%

N.A. million Btu COLLECTOR TO SPACE COOLING LOSS
N. A .%
0.07 million Btu STORAGE TO LOAD LOSS

0.07 million Btu STORAGE TO DHW LOSS
3 %
PLUS
STORAGE TO SPACE HEATING LOSS

NjA, million Btu STORAGE TO SPACE COOLING LOSS
N. A .%

Q0Qj8 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY STORAGE CHANGE
4%
Denotes unavailable data
N.A. Denotes not applicable data E-4






TABLE E-4. SOLAR ENERGY DISTRIBUTION JANUARY 1979
ORTIZ & REILL DEVELOPERS, INC., HOUSE LOT 8

1.70 million Btu TOTAL SOLAR ENERGY COLLECTED
100%

0.81 million BtuSOAENRYTLAD
48 %SOAENRYTLOD

0.47 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY TO DHW SUBSYSTEM
28 %

0.34 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY TO SPACE HEATING SUBSYSTEM
20 %
N.A. million Btu SOLAR ENERGY TO SPACE COOLING SUBSYSTEM


0.91 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY LOSSES
53 %0

0.36 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY LOSS FROM STORAGE
21 %

0.5 milo OLSOLAR ENERGY LOSS IN TRANSPORT

0.55-million Btu COLLECTOR TO STORAGE LOSS 32 %
PLUS
COLLECTOR TO LOAD LOSS

million Btu COLLECTOR TO DHW LOSS


N.A. million Btu COLLECTOR TO SPACE HEATING LOSS N A .%
N.A. million Btu COLLECTOR TO SPACE COOLING LOSS


O million Btu STORAGE TO LOAD LOSS
0 %

0 million Btu STORAGE TO DHW LOSS
0 %

O million Btu STORAGE TO SPACE HEATING LOSS
0 %

N.A.%mlio t STORAGE TO SPACE COOLING LOSS


-O.O2million Btu SOLAR ENERGY STORAGE CHANGE

Denotes unavailable data N.A. -Denotes not applicable data E-5





TABLE E-5. SOLAR ENERGY DISTRIBUTION FEBRUARY 1979
ORTIZ & REILL DEVELOPERS, INC., HOUSE LOT 8

2.86 million Btu TOTAL SOLAR ENERGY COLLECTED
100%

1.09 million BtuSOAENRYTLAD
38 %SOAENRYTLOD

_D~fg million Btu SOLAR ENERGY TO DHW SUBSYSTEM
23 %
0.42 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY TO SPACE HEATING SUBSYSTEM
15 %

N.A. million BtuSOLAR ENERGY TO SPACE COOLING SUBSYSTEM
N. A%
1.62 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY LOSSES
57 %
0.67 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY LOSS FROM STORAGE
24 %
0.95 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY LOSS IN TRANSPORT
33 %

0.94 million Btu COLLECTOR TO STORAGE LOSS 33 %
PLUS
COLLECTOR TO LOAD LOSS


% million Btu COLLECTOR TO DHW LOSS

N.A. 'million Btu COLLECTOR TO SPACE HEATING LOSS N. AY

N.A. million BtuCOLLECTOR TO SPACE COOLING LOSS

0.01 million Btu STORAGE TO LOAD LOSS
0 %

0.01. mill ion BtuSTORAGE TO DHW LOSS PLUS
STORAGE TO SPACE HEATING LOSS

NA million BtuSTORAGE TO SPACE COOLING LOSS
N.A. %

0.15 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY STORAGE CHANGE
5 %
Denotes unavailable data
N.A. Denotes not applicable data E-6





TABLE E-6. SOLAR ENERGY DISTRIBUTION MARCH 1979
ORTIZ & REILL DEVELOPERS, INC., HOUSE LOT 8

2.56 million Btu TOTAL SOLAR ENERGY COLLECTED 100%

1.03 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY TO LOADS
40 %

0,81 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY TO DHW SUBSYSTEM
32 T

0,22 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY TO SPACE HEATING SUBSYSTEM
8 %

N.A. million Btu SOLAR ENERGY TO SPACE COOLING SUBSYSTEM
N.A. 71.60 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY LOSSES
63%

0.50 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY LOSS FROM STORAGE
20 Y

1.10 million Btu SOLAR ENERGY LOSS IN TRANSPORT
43%

0.98 million Btu COLLECTOR TO STORAGE LOSS 38%
PLUS
COLLECTOR TO LOAD LOSS

million Btu COLLECTOR TO DHW LOSS


N.A. million Btu COLLECTOR TO SPACE HEATING LOSS N.A.%

N.A. million Btu COLLECTOR TO SPACE COOLING LOSS N.A.%

0.12 million Btu STORAGE TO LOAD LOSS
5 %

0.12 million Btu STORAGE TO DHW LOSS
5 %
PLUS
STORAGE TO SPACE HEATING LOSS

N.A. million Btu STORAGE TO SPACE COOLING LOSS N.A.%

-0.07 million Btu
-7-% SOLAR ENERGY STORAGE CHANGE

Denotes unavailable data
N.A. Denotes not applicable data E-7

*U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1980-640-189/4233. Region 4.














UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


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