Engineering in the Peace Corps

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Material Information

Title:
Engineering in the Peace Corps
Physical Description:
6 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Peace Corps (U.S.)
Publisher:
Peace Corps
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Engineering -- Developing countries   ( lcsh )
Technical assistance, American -- Developing countries   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 027591863
oclc - 660025673
System ID:
AA00013779:00001


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ENGINEERING IN THE PEACE CORPS

"It is somewhat unlikely that a newly-graduated engi-
neer would be able to get such experience in the
United States."
So says a recent issue of the American Engineer, de-
scribing the work of Peace Corps Volunteers engaged
in engineering work in developing nations around the
world. These Volunteers are confronting challenges and
opportunities that offer far greater rewards than the
mere satisfaction of doing important jobs. They are
helping to build roads, bridges, schools and hospitals.
But, more importantly, they are helping to build nations.
Civil engineer Robert Saint of Bakersfield, California,
writes about his work in Pakistan:
"We don't need money. We need people people who
will be willing to face the difficulties of rural life, to
live and eat like their co-workers, to earn their approval
and respect to wait patiently for that precise mo-
ment to introduce a new concept.
"We in the United States are struggling for perfection.
They are struggling to live. And those who come must
come not in a high-level advisory capacity, but down-
to-earth, hard-working and patient."
American engineers formed one of the first Peace Corps
programs to begin work overseas. They were requested
by Tanganyika to help build farm-to-market roads deep
into the interior of the country. A recent issue of
Engineering News Record described the work of a Volun-
teer in this program:
"Among the civil engineers, 29-year-old Arthur Young, a
graduate from Pennsylvania State University, is proba-
bly involved in the most construction. He is the assist-
ant resident engineer on a 22-mile-long $750,000 road
project. Art terms it a 'third generation road.'
"The first road to be built along the same general align-
ment was a wagon trail constructed by the Germans
during their colonization of Tanganyika. This was a
dry-weather road, impassable during the rainy seasons.
When the British administered Tanganyika during the
League of Nations mandate, they rebuilt the road, add-
ing new low-level bridges, which were flooded only
occasionally during bad weather.
"Now the road is being rebuilt again by independent
Tanganyika to a much better alignment with high-level
bridges to provide fast year-round traffic. It is im-




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In Columbia, Volunteers are engaged ir, community
development. Steve Hrl-:cre 'Left) and M'ichael Lanigan
(Right) are helping in a bidge-building operation

portant because it leads to a very fertile valley which
has had only minor development in the past, but is
potentially a source of great wealth mainly in sugar.
"Art's day-to-day duties in his.resident engineer post
are comparable to what they would be in the States.
They include supervising soil, concrete and other mate-
rials testing; inspection of works; measurement of quan-
tities, laying out culverts and checking the accuracy of
plans and field layouts."
Other Peace Corps Volunteers are building bridges and
roads in Malaya, designing irrigation systems in Pakistan
and building water systems in Colombia. They are
not technical advisors, but common-sense pioneers, who
wish to share their knowledge and learn from others.
Volunteer Kenneth Clark, reports Mechanical Engineer,
is responsible for maintaining all the machinery that
serves 50 village-farm cooperatives in East Pakistan.
Clark, a mechanical engineer from Riverside, California,
has organized a repair shop to overhaul and procure
equipment, distribute spare parts, design and forge





minor implements and back-stop Peace Corps agricul-
tural teams in the field.
Thirty-three-year-old Clark has a still more important
job -developing training courses for Pakistani me-
chanics and supervisors so that they can take over
when his two-year tour is finished.
The American Engineer describes how Peace Corpsman
Arnold Deutchman of Bronx, New York, along with the
President of his University and one of the Malayan
Cabinet Ministers, has provided technical representation
for that country at international conferences.
"And, if this weren't enough," the magazine states, "the
same young engineer is trying to devise an inexpensive
way to pick up and relay broadcasts from Telstar."

Chemical and Engineering News relates the case history
of Peace Corps couple Carl and Jane Gibson, serving in
India. Carl, 28, from Middleton, Wisconsin, received his
B.S. and M.S. in chemical engineering from the University
of Wisconsin and Ph.D. from Stanford. Jane, 26, a
native of Paris, Texas, has a master's degree in physical
science from Stanford.
"They are part of a 50-member contingent to help expand
and teach science curricula.
The Gibsons are in India because, they say, "we would
like to be in a position to let people know what Ameri-
cans are like by being a good example. We will try
to win friends for ourselves and for our country."

Peace Corps Volunteer Pete Sigourney shows a young
technical student the art of operating machinist
equipment. Sigourney trains industrial workers.





Contractors and Engineers points up the initiative needed
by Volunteer engineers in their mission.
"In Colombia, a community development program is
underway One of the Volunteers, construction engi-
neer Bill Woudenberg of Cliffside, New Jersey, put his
ingenuity to work and designed and built a loom on which
long strips of bamboo are woven into mats; two of these
mats, wired to stay some three inches apart, are being
used as forms for wall sections."
Woudenberg's invention is now successfully used through-
out the area.
The February issue of The Tool and Manufacturing
Engineer tells of Pete Sigourney in Malaya who spends
long hours on his double assignment. Sigourney, a Volun-
teer machinist and engineer from Phoenix, Arizona,
shows what an engineering technician can do if he has
energy and imagination. Sigourney has organized the
machine shop at the Technical college at Kuala Lumpur
where he builds laboratory equipment by day and teaches
at night.
In Malaya also, an electrical engineer, currently teach-
ing, has been asked, because of his technical knowl-
edge, to advise the government on the best way to spend
roughly a quarter of a million dollars in foreign aid.


WHERE ENGINEERS ARE NEEDED

Civil engineers will build roads and bridges in Malaya,
North Borneo, Peru and Brazil. They will construct
irrigation systems in Ecuador. They will assist in public
works in Tunisia and housing and school construction
in Somalia, Gabon, Nepal and East Pakistan. Electrical
engineers will work on new power systems in Ghana,
Ecuador, Peru, Brazil; teach in India and be a part of
vocational education projects around the world.
Chemical engineers will teach courses in chemistry and
allied fields on the university level in Nigeria and Peru.
Mechanical and agricultural engineers are urgently
needed in a score of developing countries.
From every new nation come requests for Volunteers
who can teach engineering fundamentals- math,
physics, chemistry, surveying and other technical
courses.
Training for these projects will begin in the next few
months at leading American universities. Additional
instruction is provided at a host country institution.





OPPORTUNITIES AND REWARDS

The opportunities are enormous to use your training
and ingenuity to the fullest, to innovate, to create, to
assume greater responsibilities and, by making a per-
sonal contribution of your ability and imagination, to
help develop stable and equitable economies upon
which free, democratic institutions can be based.
The rewards are in self-growth which increased respon-
sibility demands. You will return with a sense of com-
mitment, prepared for leadership in whatever field of
engineering you choose. Leaders in industry will look
to the returning Volunteer to supply new skills and
experiences. They so value the benefits of Peace Corps
service that many firms are granting leaves of absence
to employees who wish to serve in the Peace Corps.
Many engineering firms have already indicated to the
Peace Corps their interest in interviewing returning
Volunteers for possible job placement.
The American Engineer points out that Peace Corps
experience would be extremely desirable to many com-
panies in this country, particularly those firms with
overseas operations The first few years that an
engineer spends out of school are more a training
period than a time of great productivity. This, in effect,
would make the Peace Corps Volunteer something of a
bargain, in terms of saved training costs to the company."
Young engineers just out of college, seasoned men who
wish to embark on a new career, retired engineers who
wish to continue to use their years of professional
experience -all can find Peace Corps service a worthy
challenge.


QUALIFICATIONS

GENERAL QUALIFICATIONS for engineering opportunities
include a degree in engineering. Volunteers must be
American citizens. They must have sound health, emo-
tional stability, maturity, willingness to work with other
people, initiative and a desire to serve. There is no
upper age limit. Married couples are eligible if both
can qualify for the same project and have no dependents
under 18.
INTENSIVE TRAINING is provided Volunteers both in the
United States and in the host country. Some assign-
ments require foreign language ability, but in most
instances you do not need to know a foreign language





before applying. Language instruction is included in
the training, along with studies in the history and
culture of the country to which you are assigned.
LENGTH OF SERVICE is two years, including training.
Volunteers receive allowances to cover food, clothing,
housing and incidentals. Medical care and transporta-
tion are provided, plus a readjustment allowance of
$75 for each month of service.
MILITARY SERVICE is not met through Peace Corps
service, but Volunteers can be deferred for their over-
seas duty and, on returning home, could qualify for
further deferment, at the discretion of their local
Selective Service Boards.
HOW DO YOU APPLY? By filling out a Peace Corps
Questionnaire, available from your Post Office, Peace
Corps Liaison Officer at colleges and universities, or
from the Peace Corps, Professional and Technical Divi-
sion, Washington 25, D. C.
WHEN SHOULD YOU APPLY? Now! The requests from
abroad are urgent the opportunities are immediate.
Scan the following list of engineering opportunities and
the countries where projects are now underway or
planned. Other projects will be announced shortly to
meet the increasing requests for engineers.

Volunteer George Beetle and his co-worker check
blueprints for a construction project in Pakistan.
Engineers are needed for public works projects.
U i




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

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CIVIL ENGINEERS & SURVEYQRS


ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS


Malaya
Tunisia
Ecuador
Brazil
Peru
Tanganyika
Somalia
MECHANICAL
Ecuador
CHEMICAL E
Venezuela
India
Ethiopia


Liberia
Gabon
Philippines
East Pakistan
North Borneo
Sarawak
Nepal
ENGINEERS
Ghana
ENGINEERS
Ghana
Nigeria
Sierra Leone


Ghana
Peru '.
Brazil
Ecuador
Sierra Leone


Nigeria
India
Ethiopia
Liberia


CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERS


Somalia
Tunisia


Brazil
Malaya


AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERS


Philippines
India
Tunisia
Bolivia


Nepal
East Pakistan
Nigeria


m- m-m m m m ~
Dear Mr. Pagano:
I am a


engineer and would


appreciate receiving the following Peace Corps material:
E The 28-page Peace Corps Fact Book
D Peace Corps Volunteer Questionnaire (application)


I would be available to enter


training for a Peace Corps


project on
(Date)


Name
Address


College or University attended
Level at present time
etc.
Major field of experience outside of school: (jobs, farm back-


ground, hobbies, sports, etc.)


CLIP AND MAIL THIS COUPON TO:


PEACE CORPS,


Washington 25, D. C.


Attention: Jules Pagano, Director
Professional & Technical Division


PEACE CORPS


WASHINGTON 25,


D.C.




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