Apprentice training

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Title:
Apprentice training sure way to skilled craft
Physical Description:
8 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Labor. -- Manpower Administration
United States -- Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training
Publisher:
The Administration
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Apprentices -- United States   ( lcsh )
Employees -- Training of -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

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Statement of Responsibility:
U.S. Department of Labor, Manpower Administration.
General Note:
Cover title.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 027782086
oclc - 320210039
System ID:
AA00013775:00001


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,APPRENTICE
TRAINING

Sure Way to a
Skilled Craft































t-i Q'I DEPARTMENT OF LABOR / Manpower Administration
















































































For sale by the Superintendent of Documents
U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D.C. 20402 Price 15 cents








You, an apprentice? How about that!
Four thousand years ago apprenticeship was
recognized as the best way to train someone
as a skilled craftsman.
Today, 4,000 years later, it still is.
APPRENTICESHIP helped build this country--
bridges, skyscrapers, factories, superhigh-
ways, aircraft, autos, ships, TV, beer cans,
houses, your wrist watch, your shoes, the
works--you name it.
APPRENTICESHIP is a training system, based
upon a written agreement between the appren-
tice and the employer, by which a worker
learns a skilled craft or trade on the job.
APPRENTICESHIP programs include 2 or more
years of on-the-job training under the guidance
of an experienced craftsman, who was once an
apprentice himself.
APPRENTICESHIP also means a few hours in
the classroom each week to help explain the
reasons why certain things are done in a cer-
tain way on the job.
APPRENTICESHIP is a no-nonsense system.
Detailed work and study records are kept, and
the training progress of the apprentice is eval-
uated frequently.

HOW IT OPERATES
Apprenticeship programs are conducted by
the voluntary cooperation of labor, management,
schools, and government throughout the country.
In many local areas the principal crafts have
joint apprenticeship committees of six mem-
bers, three from management and three from
labor. These committee members are respon-
sible for conducting and supervising their craft's
local apprenticeship program.
They test, select, and sign up (indenture) the
apprentice and register him with the U.S. De-
partment of Labor's Bureau of Apprenticeship
and Training, or with the State Apprenticeship
Agency, if there is one.
They supervise and evaluate the variety and
the quality of the apprentice's work experience.
They certify the apprentice as a journeyman
after he has satisfactorily completed the ap-
prenticeship program.

WHO QUALIFIES
The requirements for apprenticeship vary
somewhat from place to place. Generally, you
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should be between the ages of 17 and 26. (Vet-
erans may add their years of service to the 26-
year limit.)
You must be able to work with head and
hands, and be good at both. You've got to be
in good physical shape, capable of performing
the work of the trade.
Some trades require a high school diploma or
its equivalent. Other trades prefer this, but do
not insist on it.
Assistance to help pass entrance tests is
being offered to those who may not have al I the
requirements to enter an apprenticeship pro-
gram.
This help is being offered in most of the big
cities through such organizations as the local
AFL-CIO building and construction trades coun-
cil, the Urban League, Workers'Defense League,
or other Community Action agency.
If you want to be an electrician, for instance,
and you figure your high school studies are not
enough to let you pass the mathematics and
physics questions, check with the building
trades council or the Urban League or the Ap-
prenticeship Information Center at the local
employment service office.
They will have information about attending
one of the special 4-week courses which are
conducted to prepare applicants for apprentice-
ship tests as openings for electrician appren-
tices become available.
THE OPPORTUNITIES
There are about 350 apprenticeable trades.
You will find 79 major occupations listed in the
back of this pamphlet.
The number of years apprentices must serve
is shown beside each occupation.
MONEY TALK
One of the nicest things about apprenticeship
is that you are paid whi le learning. Starting
pay is usually 40 to 50 percent of the journey-
man's going rate. In most areas, it will vary
from $2 to $3 an hour.
More than that, the apprentice making satis-
factory progress gets a raise in pay every 6
months, until he is earning about 90 percent of
the journeyman's current rate during the last
6-month apprenticeship period.
And then, of course, there are fringe benefits
like paid vacations, paid holidays, insurance,
hospitalization, and retirement pension plans.
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MORE MONEY TALK
How would you like to earn $28,000 over a
period of 4 years while learning a skilled trade
through apprenticeship?
Fantasy? By no means.
Let's just suppose you are a construction
trades apprentice in the Milwaukee area. The
lowest starting wage rate for apprentices in
these trades is $2.50 an hour.
Let's say you have selected a trade which
pays $5 an hour to the finished craftsman. The
apprenticeship requires 4 years. The following
table shows what you could be earning during
each 6-month period as you move ahead:

Training Period Weekly Pay 6-month total
First 6 months $100 $ 2,600
Second 6 months 110 2,860
Third 6 months 120 3,120
Fourth 6 months 130 3,380
Fifth 6 months 140 3,640
Sixth 6 months 150 3,900
Seventh 6 months 160 4,160
Eighth 6 months 180 4,680
$28,340
Now, $28,000 is not a small sum to earn while
you learn in a 4-year apprenticeship program.
This figures out to $7,000 a year.
For eligible veterans there is an additional
pleasant financial twist. The Veterans' Edu-
cation and Training Amendments Act of 1970
provides the following:
Regardless of the wages paid by the em-
ployer, VA's monthly training assistance allow-
ance to a veteran pursuing a full-time approved
apprenticeship is as follows:
No One Two or
Periods of depend- depend- more
training ents ent depend-
ents
First 6 months $108 $120 $133
Second 6 months 81 92 105
Third 6 months 54 66 79
Fourth and any suc-
ceeding 6-month
period 27 39 52
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After completing a 4-year construction trades
apprenticeship, you could be making a minimum
of $200 a week as a journeyman at present rates
of pay, not including overtime and not counting
other fringe benefits.
The national average journeyman rate for 30
trades (building and construction, metal, found-
ry, printing, and automotive) comes to $8,500 a
year.
For example, an apprentice starting out now
with one of the Nation's largest automobile
manufacturers in any one of eight major occu-
pational categories (mostly metal trades) would
earn an average of $9,800 as a journeyman.

THE MEN AND THE BOYS
This is where we separate the two. If you're
looking for a soft touch, forget it. This isn't
it. Apprenticeship is no snap. It demands hard
work and has tough competition.
You've got to have the will to see it through.
This takes ambition. It takes drive. It takes
courage.
Many an apprentice has fallen by the wayside
because he sees his buddies making more money
right now in jobs with little future.
Don't let this happen to you. The temptation
will be to drop out of an apprenticeship program
and get some kind of job that pays more money
now.


FMA






























But you don't want just some kind of job.
So, don't settle for one.
What you want is a career.
So, get one.
Start with apprenticeship. After your appren-
ticeship term, and for the rest of your life, you'll
have a skill. You'll be a highly respected
craftsman, and your buddy will still have '"some
kind of job."

WHERE TO BEGIN
If you're interested in an apprenticeship
get in touch with:
The Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training
regional offices (listed in the back of this
pamphlet). For local offices near you, con-
sult your telephone book.
The Apprenticeship Information Center
near you (also listed).
The nearest State employment service
office (consult your telephone book).
The Urban League in your city.
A firm that has workers in the trade in
which you are interested.
The local union that represents the trade
in which you are interested.

AAA









HERE ARE JUST A FEW JOBS WHICH
REQUIRE APPRENTICESHIP

The 79 jobs listed below have training periods of at
least 2 years and some as many as 6 years. Some of
the occupations are broken down into more special-
ized jobs, so that the total number of apprenticeable
occupations is close to 350. Numbers in parentheses
indicate the number of years of training required.


Aircraft fabricator (3-4)
Airplane mechanic (3-4)
Arborist (3)
Asbestos worker (4)
Automotive body
repairman (3-4)
Automotive mechanic (3-4)
Baker (3)
Barber (2)
Blacksmith (4)
Boilermaker (4)
Bookbinder (2-4)
Brewer (2-3)
Bricklayer (3)
Butcher-meat cutter (3)
Cabinetmaker-mi I Iman (2-4)
Candy maker (3-4)
Canvas worker (3)
Carman (4)
Carpenter (4)
Cement mason (3)
Cook (3)
Cosmetician (2)
Dairy products maker (2-3)
Draftsman-designer (3-5)
Electrical worker (4-5)
Electroplater (3-4)
Electrotyper (5-6)
Engraver (4-5)
Fabric cutter (3-4)
Farm-equ ipment
mechanic (3-4)
Floor coverer (3-4)
Foundryman (2-4)
Furrier (3-4)
Glazier-glass worker (2-4)
Heat treater (4)
Ironworker (2-4)
Jeweler (2-4)
Lather (2-3)
Lead burner (5)
Leatherworker (3-4)
Lithographer (4-5)


Machinist (4)
Mailer (4-5)
Maintenance mechanic
repairman (3-6)
Metal polisher and
buffer (3-4)
Millwright (4)
Model maker (4)
Musical instrument
mechanic (3-4)
Operating engineer (3-4)
Optical technician (4)
Orthopedic prosthetic
technician (3-4)
Painter-decorator (2-3)
Patternmaker (5)
Photoengraver (5-6)
Photographer (3)
Plasterer (3-4)
Plate printer (4)
Plumber-pipe fitter (4-5)
Printer (4)
Printing pressman (4)
Rigger (2-4)
Roofer (2-3)
Rotogravure engraver (5-6)
Sheetmetal worker (3-4)
Sign, scene, and pictorial
artist (3-4)
Silversmith (3-4)
Stationary engineer (3-4)
Stereotyper (5-6)
Stoneworker (2-4)
Stonemason (3)
Tailor (4)
Telephone worker (4)
Terrazzo worker (3)
Textile technician (2-4)
Tile setter (3)
Tool and die maker (4-5)
Upholsterer (3-4)
Wallpaper craftsman (4-5)
Wire weaver (3-4)


AAA










REGIONAL OFFICES Bureau of Apprentice-
ship and Training


REGION I


John F. Kennedy Fed. Bldg.
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203

REGION II
341 Ninth Avenue, Rm. 906
New York, N. Y. 10001

REGION III
5000 Wissonhickon Avenue
Philadelphia, Pa. 19101


Connecticut
Maine
Massachusetts


New Jersey
New York


Delaware
Maryland


REGION IV


1371 Peachtree St., NE. Rm. 729
Atlanta, Ga. 30309



REGION V
219 South Dearborn Street
Room 854
Chicago, III. 60604

REGION VI
411 North Akard Street
Room 312
Dallas, Texas 75201

REGION VII
911 Walnut Street, Rm. 2107
Federal Office Bldg.
Kansas City, Mo. 64106

REGION VIII
New Custom House Rm 314
721 19th Street
Denver, Colo. 80202


REGION IX
450 Golden Gate Avenue
Room 10451
San Francisco, Calif. 94102


Alabama
Florida
Georgia
Kentucky


Illinois
Indiana
Michigan


Arkansas
Louisiana


Iowa
Kansas


Colorado
Montana
North Dakota


Arizona
California


New Hampshire
Rhode Island
Vermont


Puerto Rico
Virgin Islands


Pennsylvania
Virginia
West Virginia


Mississippi
North Carolina
South Carolina
Tennessee


Minnesota
Ohio
Wisconsin


New Mexico
Oklahoma
Texas


Missouri
Nebraska


South Dakota
Utah
Wyoming


Nevada
Hawaii


REGION X


506 Second Avenue
1809 Smith Tower
Seattle, Wash. 98104


Alaska
Idaho


Oregon
Washington


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APPRENTICESHIP INFORMATION CENTERS

ALABAMA
Birmingham 1816 Eighth Avenue, North

ARIZONA
Phoenix 438 West Adam Street

CONNECTICUT
Bridgeport 753 Fairfield Avenue
New Haven 634 Chapel Street

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 555 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW.

ILLINOIS
Chicago 321 South State Street

INDIANA
Gary 1200 Broadway
Indianapolis 145 West Washington Street

IOWA
Des Moines 150 Des Moines Street

KANSAS
Topeka 1301 Topeka Boulevard
Wichita 402 E. Second Street

MARYLAND
Baltimore 1100 North Eutaw Street

MASSACHUSETTS
Boston 408 South Huntington Avenue

MICHIGAN
Detroit 8600 Woodward Avenue

MINNESOTA
Minneapolis 1629 Hennepin Avenue
St. Paul 1058 University Avenue

MISSOURI
Kansas City 1411 Main Street
St. Louis 505 Washington Avenue

NEW JERSEY
Camden 519 Federal Street
Newark 1004 Broad Street
Paterson 301 Graham Avenue

NEW YORK
Buffalo 119 West Chippewa Street
New York 255 West 54th Street

OHIO
Cincinnati 108 E. Seventh Street
Cleveland 779 Rockwell Avenue
Columbus 239 South Fourth Street

OREGON
Portland 1030 NE. Couch Street

PENNSYLVANIA
Philadelphia 1221 North Broad Street
Pittsburgh 915 Penn Avenue

TENNESSEE
Memphis 43 North Cleveland Street
Nashville 1802 Hayes Street

TEXAS
Houston 2800 Travis Street

VIRGINIA
Norfolk \904 Granby Street
Richmond 609 East Main Street

WASHINGTON
Seattle 1933 Fifth Avenue


L A*- U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1970-0-383-213







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
II 3 1111111111111111111111111111111111111 1111262 08858 565
3 1262 08858 5657


JULY 1970 (Rev.)




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