Older volunteers in the Peace Corps

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Material Information

Title:
Older volunteers in the Peace Corps
Physical Description:
6 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Peace Corps (U.S.)
Publisher:
Peace Corps
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Technical assistance, American   ( lcsh )
Voluntarism -- United States   ( lcsh )
Older volunteers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 027591197
oclc - 660014857
System ID:
AA00013773:00001


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(Cover) Volunteer June Reed, 69, of Portland, Ore., teaches
English at a secondary school in Belize, British Honduras.
A widow, Mrs. Reed is the oldest volunteer in the project.




WHAT AGE RETIREMENT?

In 1879 Bismarck set the age for retirement of
German workers at 65. During the last 84 years the
median life span of man has increased 13 years, but
his retirement age has remained static.
Outstanding economists and the American Medical
Association are both in agreement that compulsory
retirement at a set age, when many people are at,
or are near, the peak of their vocational or professional
skills constitutes an incredible waste of talent.
Skilled personnel over 50 in most trades, vocations
and professions are desired by Peace Corps IF they
possess the additional qualities of physical vitality,
emotional maturity, tact, ability to share, to improvise,
to lead. In a recent TV address Peace Corps Director
Sargent Shriver said:
In addition to the expertness that experience
brings, age gives a Volunteer a status of authority
that is denied a younger person We now
have about 350 people over 50 years of age who
are serving successfully in the Peace Corps. I
recently visited a 70-year-old Volunteer in Tunisia
who is working in a tractor plant, a 76-year-old
engineer in Pakistan, and two ladies, one 65 and
the other 64, who are teaching in Ethiopia. We
are happy that these older citizens have joined
the Peace Corps. We want as many of them as
we can possibly get.
"A man is only retired when he decides to be retired,"
says Chester Wiggins, 65, Peace Corps Volunteer,
who has "retired" after 20 years as a supervisor for
United Airlines. "As I told my boss, you can retire
me, but I'm on my own now so I'm not retired."
Chet and his wife Barbara, 62, in anticipation of that
fateful spring day, had applied for service with the
Peace Corps several months earlier.
"You know a lot of people have the idea the Peace
Corps is only for young people just out of school.

























Charles H. Pell, 52, of Grand Rapids, Mich., is a Volunteer
Leader in charge of a 4-H project in Venezuela. He is
shown visiting a carpentry class taught by his wife, Hazel.

But there are those of us on the other end of life,
whose families are grown and who are finishing
careers. We've had a lot of varied experience and are
as free now as the young people. It seemed to me
there are a lot of places in the world where we could
help out."


SERVICE OPPORTUNITIES
Approximately 350 Volunteers who are over 50
are now serving in 44 countries in Latin America,
Africa, Southeast Asia and the Near East. They are
people like:
TAEKO and ERWIN L. S. WONG, 54, Honolulu, Hawaii.
Wong was formerly principal of a 40-teacher school
in Honolulu. Both he and his wife have masters
degrees in education, plus additional graduate work
at Columbia University. They are now Peace Corps
teachers in British Honduras.
BEULAH D. BARTLETT, 65, and BLYTHE MONROE, 66,
South Laguna, Calif. "We're a team," they told Presi-
dent Kennedy. They have taught in California public
schools, at Fresno State College, Whittier State
College, and at the American Dependents School in
Japan. They are now Peace Corps teachers in Ethiopia.




OSCAR HAUGEN, 69, Argyle, Minn. Hatgen is an
expert on heavy road machinery and construction.
He has had experience in Alaska, Iceland and New-
foundland. He is now serving as a Peace Corps
mechanic in Tunisia.
ARAM ZAKARIAN, 55, Washington, D. C. Zakarian was
a legislative researcher at the Library of Congress.
Holder of a B.A. and an M.A. in political science
from George Washington University, he speaks
Armenian, French, Spanish and Swahili. He is now a
Peace Corps teacher in Ethiopia.
RALPH COLE, 76, Dallas, Tex. A water supply engineer,
Cole is now working on a public works project in
Pakistan.

JOHN, 58, and MIRIAM KENNEDY, 54, Oberlin, Ohio,
where he was former administrative official at Oberlin
College. The Kennedys are now teaching in the
Philippines.

SUE SADOW, 66, San Francisco, Calif. She is teaching
in the only government secondary school for girls in
Sierra Leone. "This teaching is for me one of the
great challenges of my total experience. I believe
implicitly in the effectiveness of the 'people to people'
aspect which the Peace Corps makes possible."

MADGE SHIPP, 56, Detroit, Mich. A teacher for over
20 years, Miss Shipp writes from St. Lucia: "I am
part and parcel of all community activities when the
purpose is the establishment of respect for human
dignity through united action on the part of citizens
of this Isle of Enchantment, St. Lucia, W.I."

President Kennedy with PCVs from 60 to 76. Left to right: Beuli
Alfred Pond, the President, Frances Cunha, Melissa Moore, Ge




CHARLES C. JONES, 53, West Medway, Mass. A former
elementary teacher, Jones holds an M.A. in education
from Boston University. While teaching he also
coached the swimming team. Jones is now in Ethiopia
as a Peace Corps teacher.

FROM PRESIDENT KENNEDY
"I hope that their desire to serve will not only inspire
others to join the Peace Corps but also will indicate
to many of our Americans who are getting older, as
we all are, that life really is unlimited. Here we have
people in their sixties and seventies who are going
to serve the cause of mankind all around the world.
We are very glad to have you and your presence
inspires all of us."
August 30, 1962, White House

WHY VOLUNTEER?
Why should a retired person want to leave his home
and go to a strange country as a Peace Corps
Volunteer?
(1) Because he is needed. The skills he has accumu-
lated over a lifetime of experience are invaluable to
developing nations.
(2) Because arbitrary retirement at a certain age
leaves many vital people in the prime of their voca-
tional and/or professional careers.
(3) Because Peace Corps offers an opportunity to
make a significant contribution toward solving some
of the world's problems.

irtlett, Blythe Monroe, Barbara Wiggins, Ralph Cole, Cora Parrish,
le Becker, William Darracott, Lina Walden and Chester Wiggins.

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Taeko and Erwin Wong, Volunteers from Honolulu, are
teacher-trainers in British Honduras. They visit rural schools
showing teachers how to improve their class-room techniques.


QUALIFICATIONS

GENERAL QUALIFICATIONS for Volunteers include a skill
needed by the host country, a minimum age of 18, sound
health, emotional stability, maturity, willingness to work with
other people initiative and a desire to serve.
There is no upper age limit. Married couples are eligible
if they both qualify for the same project and have no de-
pendent children under 18. (Married couples are never
separated.)
INTENSIVE TRAINING is provided Volunteers both in the U.S.
and in the host countries. Some assignments require foreign
language ability. But in most instances, you need not know
a foreign language before applying for service. Language
instruction is included in the training, along with studies in
the history and culture of the country to which you are
assigned.
LENGTH OF SERVICE is two years, including training. Volun-
teers receive allowances to cover food, clothing, housing,
medical care and incidentals plus a readjustment
allowance of $1,800, based on $75 for each month of
service.
PENSIONS NOT AFFECTED-Persons serving as Volunteers for
the Peace Corps may continue to receive the full amount
of any pension to which they may be entitled. The pension
is not reduced by reason of any remuneration received from
the Peace Corps, although the Volunteers will be expected
to live overseas on the adequate living allowances provided
by the Peace Corps.
HOW DO YOU APPLY? By filling out a Peace Corps Volunteer
Questionnaire, available from your Post Office, Congressman







or Senator, Peace Corps Liaison Officers at colleges and
universities, or by writing Senior Manpower Recruitment,
Peace Corps, Washington 25, D. C.
WHEN SHOULD YOU APPLY? Now! The need is urgent .
the opportunities immediate. Scan the following list of
opportunities and the countries where projects are under-
way or planned. There will be many other projects to meet
the increasing requests for Volunteers.



OPPORTUNITIES


The following types
area indicated.
AFRICA
EDUCATION
Nursery
Elementary
Secondary
Art
Biology
English Language
English Literature
French Language
General Science
Industrial Arts
Mathematics
Music
Physics
Physical Ed.
Coaches
Recreators
AGRICULTURE
Ag. Engineers
Agronomists
Animal Husbandry
Auto Mechanics
Carpenters
Conservationists
Extensionists
Farm Mechanics
General Farmers
4-H Work
Fishermen
Home Economists
Irrigationists
Horticulturalist
Land Surveyor
Poultrymen
Vegetable Farmer
PROFESSIONAL SKILLS
Construction Foreman
Draftsmen
Geologists
Medical Technologists
Registered Nurses
Sanitarians
Surveyors


of skills have been requested by the

LATIN AMERICA
(All African skills, except
French, plus the following)
EDUCATION
Adult Education
Arts & Crafts
Educational TV
AGRICULTURE & SKILL TRADES
Agriculture Co-ops
Plumbers
Well Drillers
PROFESSIONAL SKILLS
Civil Engineers
Co-op Organizers
Construction Engineers
Community Development
Dental Hygienists
Dentists
Foresters
Licensed Practical Nurses
Nutritionist
Physician
Sanitarian
Savings & Loan Specialist
Social Workers
ASIA-Near & Far East
(All Latin American skills
plus the following)
EDUCATION
Teacher Training
University Level-Science
Visual Aid Specialists
Industrial Designers
AGRICULTURE
Heavy Duty Diesel Operators
and Mechanics
Hog Raising
Village Industries
PROFESSIONAL SKILLS
Engineers, Architectural
Engineers, Chemical
Engineers, Electrical
Physiotherapists
Social Anthropologists




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

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For further infornauul LuIIIIVcL un L11 unnII dlu li ll LU:
PEACE CORPS, Washington 25, D. C.
Attn: Senior Manpower Recruitment


Name


(Last) (First) (Middle or maiden)


Address
Date of Birth U.S. citizen O Non-citizen
Weight Height
[ Male E Female E[ Single E Married
E No dependents dependents uider-,18.____

Years Degree or
Schooling Attended Major Subject Minor Certificate


High School


College
-Voc/Tech or Special School


Have you studied O French E Spanish El Other
SFOR years
Have you grown up on a farm or had agricultural experience?
]
El No E Yes __________
a,


E Currently employed OPart-time employed
What skills or job experience do you have?


O Retired


When could you enter training for a Peace Corps assignment?
What area or country do you prefer?
What would you like to do in the Peace Corps?


PEACE CORPS


WASHINGTON 25, D. C.


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