American labor in the Peace Corps

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
American labor in the Peace Corps
Physical Description:
8 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Peace Corps (U.S.)
Publisher:
Peace Corps
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Voluntarism -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 027371529
oclc - 55155180
System ID:
AA00013765:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text






11TI


![,

i ;iji :
:: i


oj


p '1

I..


... ... ": :EEE: .. .... ::::"





















I 1 i
.p .. ::: .. .. : .. :::. :::. .::::
..: ::'.. :. :::" .: .. :.. ":::. .... ...::: ...::E E .


....f .:.. .. .



.. .. .. .. :
: ...;i :: ... .:.. .. ii.;ii::i.i
S .. .::. .. .. .






.. ....i...
,..: .. .. iiiiiii.
,i .......

.:i....., :i. .;i ... .... ....
: ... ..: :...... .
i .
.......' ....... ... iiii
ii


I


1-


S. .....:: ".
.......: ..": ....


--~
.,


.01


r r~






(COVER. Carpenters serving as Peace Corps Volun-
teers demonstrate modern building methods and help
create pools of trained manpower in 50 nations.)
S~_ :__.. :- ...... .' ,, ': b.... .. 1 .. .. ::.'. IB



aI B R IN THE
L',,,, ':.I



From the ranks of organized labor have come hundreds
of American Peace Corps Volunteers who are now at
work in the world-wide struggle against poverty, dis-
ease and illiteracy. More are needed now to serve in
50 developing nations of the world.
The combination of an urgently needed skill and the
leadership abilities developed through trade union
association provides special qualifications for Peace
Corps service. The union member has been a partici-
pant in the struggle to achieve a better way of life for
himself and his fellow workers. As a Peace Corps Vol-
unteer, he can demonstrate the results of this partici-
pation to his co-workers overseas.
Nations of Africa, the Far East, Latin America, the
Near East and South Asia look to the United States
to help them achieve their economic, social and educa-
tional goals. These countries are asking the Peace
Corps for trained manpower to teach their citizens -
to work with them in doing important jobs while
developing a national pool of skilled personnel.
Members of the American labor movement are respond-
ing to this challenge, and having a unique personal
experience as they help people to help themselves.
They are learning a new culture, a new language, a
new people. They will return to the United States with
a better understanding of their own culture. And they
will have broadened their career opportunities as a
result of their experience.
Here's how some Peace Corps Volunteers from organ-
ized labor's ranks are using their skills:
In Jamaica, Ronald Ludin of Flushing, N.Y., teaches
classes in basic electricity. He served a 5-year ap-
prenticeship in construction and electrical installation
and became a member of Local 3, International
Brotherhood of Electrical Workers.
In Malaya, James W. Neder of Mt. Savage, Md., teaches
machine shop skills. He is a member of Lodge 174,


























Peace Corps classes in basic electricity help ease
the shortage of technicians in developing countries
which are trying to improve their living standards.

International Association of Machinists, Washington,
D.C., and has had extensive machinist experience in
government and industry.
In the Dominican Republic, Edward E. Brand of Man-
hattan Beach, Calif., works in a community develop-
ment program, organizing community groups to define
and meet their own needs. He was a shop steward
for the International Retail Clerks Association, Local
1442.
In Peru, several Volunteers with union experience
work in a large program of community development.
John M. Chiarella and Curtis Cherry are nutrition
experts. Their union experience helped give them the
leadership training needed to organize community
groups to mount a cooperative effort in improving
local diets. Chiarella was president of Local 2279,
United Steel Workers, Warren, Ohio. Cherry belongs
to the United Auto Workers and was steward of Local
72, Kenosha, Wis. John Coronado of Huachuca City,
Ariz., and his wife Mary work in an urban development
program which includes building low-cost housing
units. John is a construction craftsman who belongs
to the International Brotherhod of Carpenters and
Joiners, Local 2096. He had prior construction experi-
ence in Peru before joining the Peace Corps.
Bricklayer Albert Pagano of Vineland, N.J., also works
in a self-help housing program in Lima, Peru. A mem-





ber of Local 2, Bricklayers, Plasterers, Masons' Inter-
national Union, his specialty is teaching and demon-
strating the techniques of bricklaying.
Kathy Schultz, former financial secretary of the United
Auto Workers Local 438, is helping organize and
develop a Peru credit union project. Wayne and Evelyn
Denzler of Riverside, Calif., also work in the Peru
housing-community development program. He is a
member of Local 73, Operative Plasters and Cement
Masons' International.
In Morocco, George Eder, a member of Detroit Local
4000, Communications Workers of America, has been
trained as a surveyor for a rural community develop-
ment program.
In Bolivia, Ray Morris of Los Angeles, a member of
Local 78, United Association of Journeymen and Ap-
prentices of the Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry,
serves with teams of plumbers and well-diggers, help-
ing improve water and sanitation facilities. Morris was
an apprentice before joining the Peace Corps.
In Tunisia, Volunteer Robert Trumpler, former secre-
tary-treasurer of the California State Employees Asso-
ciation, Local 94, works as a mechanic, servicing heavy
earth-moving and road-building equipment. In Cali-
fornia he was a maintenance manager of a truck fleet
and has worked as a forester and maintenance
engineer.
In St. Lucia, Volunteer Madge Shipp, one of many Vol-
unteer members of the American Federation of Teach-
ers, teaches in a secondary school. She was a member

Skilled workmen serving as Peace Corps Volunteers
develop new type of brick from local materials and
train the people in modern construction techniques.





of the Michigan Federation of Teachers and worked
for the Oak Park Board of Education.
In Pakistan, Roger Herd of Portland, Ore., is training
masons and bricklayers to carry out plans for school
and housing construction. He is a third-generation
member of Local 1, Bricklayers, Masons and Plasterers'
International Union.

.. :.
Why have these and other members of organized labor
volunteered for the Peace Corps?
They have been asked that question many times. One
Volunteer said: "I still can't provide a short, easy
answer. But every day I discover at least a dozen
reasons why I should have volunteered."
Here are the basic reasons a Volunteer generally gives:
First, because he sees the world around him changing
daily. He sees the great problems facing his genera-
tion. He wants to do something that has meaning.
Said one Volunteer: "If we Americans can live and
work overseas as equals, we can win friends by sin-
cere, honest work and by the exchange of ideas, thus
proving ourselves worthy to be their friends."
Second, because he has a deep appreciation for hard
work and achievement, and he has a well-developed
sense of social responsibility. These are qualities that
can be transmitted from one culture to another.
Third, because he knows that his investment in the
Peace Corps can make a strong impact on his future

The Peace Corps has many calls for bricklayers and
other skilled building tradesmen to help on school,
road and housing projects in developing countries.






career. He will have an increased knowledge of his
skill. He will know a foreign language. He will know
the people and culture of another country, and he will
have a real, basic understanding of the international
community. These factors will help him become a
valuable member of the American working force when
he comes home.


MIDr ; OSEMENT

The Executive Council of the AFL-CIO has urged that
"all AFL-CIO affiliates assist in making the Peace
Corps a successful and enduring program by encour-
aging the enlistment of Volunteers from labor's ranks
and by supporting the programs of the Peace Corps
whenever and wherever appropriate."


UNION TRADES:
Bricklayers
Carpenters
Cement Masons
Electricians
Painters
Pipefitters
Plasterers
Plumbers
Roofers
Sheet-metal Workers
Stone Masons
Structural Iron Workers
Operating Engineers
Auto Mechanics
Food Processors
Administrative Skills


SKILLS

Engineering Technicians
Diesel Mechanics
Heavy Equipment Mechanics
Vocational Teachers
Well Diggers
Radio & TV Technicians
Tailors
Electronics Technicians
Heavy Equipment Operators
Machinists
Welders
Surveyors
Air-conditioning Repairmen
Refrigerator Repairmen
Draftsmen
Teachers -All Levels
Printers


All Construction Trade Apprentices



LATIN AMERICA
Bolivia
Chile
Colombia
Dominican Republic
Guatemala
Brazil
El Salvador
Ecuador
Honduras
Venezuela
West Indies
Peru
Panama
Jamaica


AFRICA
Ghana
Sierra Leone
Tunisia
Togo
Cameroon
Morocco
Somalia
Senegal
Ethiopia
Gabon
Niger
FAR EAST
Ceylon


Thailand
Malaya
North Borneo
Sarawak
Philippines
Indonesia

NEAR EAST/
SOUTH ASIA
Iran
Nepal
Pakistan
Afghanistan
India
Cyprus


































Madge Shipp, a member of the American Federation
of Teachers, taught school in Detroit for 16 years
before joining the Peace Corps to teach in St. Lucia.


QUAUIFmeA
WHO MAY APPLY: Any American citizen over 18 may apply for
service with the Peace Corps. There is no upper age limit.
Married persons with no dependent children are eligible if
both can do needed Peace Corps jobs as Volunteers. Volun-
teers must be in excellent physical and mental health, emo-
tionally mature and upright in their personal conduct.
HOW DO I APPLY? By filling out a Peace Corps Volunteer
Questionnarie. Write to Division of Professional, Technical
and Labor Affairs, Peace Corps, Washington 25, D. C. Ask for
the Questionnaire and the Peace Corps information booklets.
Questionnaires are also available at Post Offices, through the
offices of your Senators and Congressmen, from any Bureau of
Employment Security Office and from union offices.
TRAINING: Once you have been selected as a Volunteer, you
will be invited to participate in a thorough, comprehensive
training program. You will receive language training, area
studies, refresher courses in American history along with
courses in the history and culture of your host country.
PAY AND ALLOWANCES: During training and overseas service,
all expenses--including travel, food, clothing, housing, medi-
cal care and incidentals--will be paid by the Peace Corps.
Upon completion of Peace Corps service, Volunteers will
receive a readjustment allowance equal to $75 a month for
each month of service.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
TRAVEL AND LEAVE: Volu 111lllllflllllllIIl|lllI IIliiiil| 1 I I|
allowances each year an( 3 1262 08851 7320
for travel from their duty stanons.
DISABILITY BENEFITS: Disability benefits, including medical
care, will be provided for Volunteers and any illness or
injury incurred in the line of duty will be covered.
MILITARY OBLIGATIONS: Military obligations are not met
through Peace Corps service, but Volunteers can be deferred
from the Selective Service and Reserve obligations for the
period of their Peace Corps service, at the discretion of local
Selective Service boards.
WHEN TO APPLY?: Now. Send your Questionnaire in today.




Dear Mr. Pagano:
Dear Mr. Pagano:


I am a


and would


(major skill)
appreciate receiving the following Peace Corps material.
[- The 28-page Peace Corps Fact Book
D Peace Corps Volunteer Questionnaire (application)
Name
Address
Union membership
Major field of experience


Graduate of Apprentice Program


I would be available to enter training for a Peace Corps


project on


(Date)
CLIP AND MAIL THIS COUPON TO:


PEACE


CORPS,


Washington 25, D. C.


Attention: Jules Pagano, Director
Professional & Technical Division

-llll J J -i 3 3 Ia Ei = E 3 E3 I I IM I


PEACE CORPS


25,


D.C.


co5


WASHINGTON




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E3CFWWW2D_JGS66Z INGEST_TIME 2013-04-08T23:03:18Z PACKAGE AA00013765_00001
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES