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List of publications
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Forest Products Laboratory (U.S.)
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Ceased with: Jan. 1/June 30, 1967.
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Description based on: July 1/Dec. 31, 1928; title from caption.

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FOREST PRODUCTS LABORATORY
FOREST SERVICE
U.S.DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
MADISON,WIS.,53705


LIST OF PUBLICATIONS
JANUARY 1 TO JUNE 30, 1965


UNIV. OF. FL LHI.




U.S. DE PO ATORY


iS





















CONTENTS





Chemistry of Wood
and Derived Products .
Fire Properties .
Glues, Glued Stock,
Plywood, and Veneer .
Mechanical Properties .
Packaging ..... .
Paints and Finishes .
Sandwich ..... .
Seasoning .. .
Wood in Construction .
Wood Fiber Products ..
Wood Preservation .
Wood Structure
and Growth Conditions
Miscellaneous .


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LIST OF PUBLICATIONS


JANUARY 1 TO JUNE 30, 1965


In this semiannual list of publications, items
marked with a number are available free at the
Forest Products Laboratory while the supply
lasts. To request publications simply circle the
number of the item desired on the accompanying
postcard and mail to the Laboratory. Blanket
requests for publications cannot be filled. Publica-
tions not marked with a number are unavailable
at the Forest Products Laboratory. They may be
consulted at most public and college libraries.
Reports of slight interest to the layman are listed
under the caption "Highly Technical."


Chemistry of Wood and Derived Products


Highly Technical

1. The acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of glyco-
pyranosides, by M. S. Feather and
J. F. Harris. Jour, Org. Chem. 30: 153-
157, Jan. 1965.
An interpretive review of the factors
affecting the rate of hydrolysis of glyco-
pyranosides. Conformational analysis indi-
cates that the stereochemistry of the glyco-
side is extremely important. The orien-
tation of the aglycone and the resistance to
rotation about the C-2-C-3 and C-4-C-5
bonds appear to be major rate-determining
factors.








2. Differentiating phenols from certain inor-
ganic ions by paper chromatography, by
C. Steelink, M. K. Seikel, and F. H. Downes.
Nature 206(4984): 614, May 1965.
Difficulties a r i s e in differentiating
phenols from transition metal ions by
paper chromatography. Many commonphe-
nolic spray reagents give color reactions
with iron, nickel, and cobalt salts. Ultra-
violet absorption spectra and R values of

aquocomplexes of metal ions may resemble
those of certain phenols. Deionization is
recommended as a prior step to examina-
tion of phenolic samples.

3. Furfural yield and decomposition in
sodium 2,4-dimethylbenzene-s u f o n at e-
sulfuric acid-water solutions, by
J. M. Smuk and L. L. Zoch. U.S. Forest
Serv. Res. Paper FPL 32, 11 pp., June
1965.
Presents experimental data on the yield
of furfural from aqueous, acidified xylose
solutions containing sodium xylene-
sulfonate. It was found that the presence
of the salt did not affect the quantity of
furfural produced, but greatly increased
the rate of formation.

4. Modification of cellulose fine structure--
effect of thermal and electron irradiation
pretreatments, by M. A. Millett and
V. L. Goedken, Tappi 48: 367-371, June
1965.
An evaluation of two pretreatments for
modifying cellulose fine structure to
accomplish a favorable change in kinetics









of the saccharification process, bothtreat-
ments being made at potentially economic
dosage levels. While the hydrolysis rate
of cellulose was measurably enhanced, the
magnitude of improvement in sugar yields
was of borderline significance.

5. A new type of glycoflavonoid from Vitex
lucens, by AI. K. Seikel and T. J. M abry.
Tetrahedron Letters No. 16, pp. 1105-
1109, 1965.
The first known di-C-glycosyl derivative
of a flavonoid compound has been isolated
from the wood of Vitex lucens. It is a
derivative of the flavone luteolin.

6. Polyphenols of pine pollens, A survey, by
M. J. Strohl and M. K. Seikel. Phvto-
chemistry (4): 383-399, 1965.
Pine pollens contain an array of poly-
phenolic compounds. Six common phenolic
acids were identified, as well as the
flavonoids dihydrokaempferol, dihydro-
quercetin, and narigenin. A series of esters
of p-coumaric acid, however, constituted
the principal phenolic type. The flavonoid
fraction showed the most variation between
the eight species studied.


7. Rate of D-xylose decomposition in sulfuric
acid-sodium 2,4 dimethylbenzene-
sulfonate-water solutions by J. M. Smuk,
J. F. Harris, and L. L. Zoch. U.S. Forest
Serv. Res. Paper FPL 20, 12pp., Jan. 1965.
Describes the results of a study under-
taken to evaluate the suitability of using
the decomposition rate of xylose as a
3








measure for characterizing the reactivity
of H SO sodium xylenesulfonate H20
24 2
solutions with regard to reactions involving
a proton and a neutral molecule.


8. Stable phenoxy radicals derived from phenols
related to lignin, by C. Steelink. Jour.
Amer. Chem. Soc. 87(9): 2056, May 1965.
The oxidation of alpha-carbonyl syringol
derivatives produces stable phenoxy rad-
icals in solution. Guaiacol derivatives do
not produce stable radicals. Electron spin
resonance analysis of the free radicals
reveals a high electron density on the
methoxyl groups. The implications of rad-
ical stability to the structures and reactions
of hardwood and softwood lignins are
discussed.

9. The sterols of pine bark, by J. W. Rowe.
Phytochemistry 4(1): 1-10, 1965.
The sterols of several pine barks have
been shown to consist predominantly of
3-sitosterol with about one-tenth as much
campesterol. The presence of traces of
various dihydrosterols, cholesterol, a-

3,5
sitosterol, triterpenoids, A3
4
stigmastadium-7-o n e, A -stigmasten-3-
one, and 7-keto-1 -sitosterol was indicated.
Possible e biosynthetic interrelationships
are discussed.









Fire Properties


Highly Technical

21. An approach to the mathematical prediction
of temperature rise within a semi-infinite
wood slab subjected to high-temperature
conditions, by E. L. Schaffer. Pyrody-
namics Vol. 2. pp. 117-132, 1965.
The paper derives an equation that
describes the temperature distribution in
thick wood slabs subjected to standard
fire exposure conditions on one face. Two
bases for the derivation are (1) a constant
temperature exists on the charred wood-
wood interface and (2) a constant rate of
char development occurs.

22. Effect of fire-retardant and other inorganic
salts on pyrolysis products of ponderosa
pine, by John J. Brenden. Forest Prod.
Jour. 15(2):69-72, Feb. 1965.
The effect of eight inorganic salts on
the major.pyrolysis products of ponderosa
pine at 3500 C. in a vacuum of 0.01 mm of
mercury was determined. The major pyrol-
ysis products consisted of a char residue
and three volatile fractions: flammable
tar, water, and "noncondensable" gases.

23. Possible applications of radiationpyrometry
in wood processing, by T. P. Laughren
and R. A. Hann. Forest Prod. Jour. 15(1):
31-32, Jan. 1965.
Pyrometers can be used to determine
temperature of veneer and lumber in dryers








or as sensing elements for automatic
controls in drying ovens or presses. Their
use as process-control tools can be espe-
cially valuable in production of factory-
finished or factory-overlaid panels and
other products.



Glues, Glued Stock, Plywood, and Veneer



24. Core evaluating apparatus is redesigned,
made portable, by B. G. Heebink. Plywood
Magazine 5(8): 36-37, Feb. 1965.
Describes how to make and use portable
apparatus for evaluating the show-through
of furniture panels, such as desk tops. An
accurate grid pattern is projected against
a 5 inch square area, and the reflection on
a translucent screen is photographed.

25. Free-close molding versus molding to stops
in wood-resin blend processing,by
C. J. Gatchell and B. G. Heebink. U.S.
Forest Serv. Res. Note FPL-0103, 16 pp.,
June 1965.
The influence of the degree of compres-
sion on physical and mechanical properties
of molded wood-resin blends was studied.
Along with resin content, the degree of
compression controls the formation of
glue bonds which, in turn, control the
properties of the molded product.

26. A look at new problems facing hardwood
plywood, by Robert L. Youngs. Wood and
Wood Products 70(5): 38-42, May 1965.









Briefly reviews growth of the softwood
plywood industry. The author predicts
that this industry is more likely to comple-
ment than compete with the hardwood
plywood industry, and that the stimulant to
construction provided by southern pine
plywood should increase markets for hard-
wood plywood.


New products from low grade ponderosa
pine timber, by Roland L. Barger and
H. 0. Fleischer. U.S. Forest Serv. Res.
Paper RM-10, 55 pp., Dec. 1964.
Low-quality ponderosa pine sawtimber
poses severe economic problems for wood
product industries of the Southwest. An
intensive program of product research and
development is presented, and the results
evaluated. This study deals specifically
and in detail with the technical aspects of
production, not with economic aspects.



27. A proposed plug tension test for particle
board, by B. G. Heebink and C. J. Gatchell.
Forest Prod. Jour. 15(1): 28-30, Jan. 1965.
A quality control method for estimating
internal bond strength of particleboard
that is easier and faster than the conven-
tional is described. The method utilizes a
1/2-inch diameter plug, gripped by router
chucks and tested in tension. Statistical
methods for relating the plug method to
the conventional method are included.









28. Some factors affecting southern pine veneer
and plywood quality, by Robert L. Youngs.
South. Lbrman 210(2619): 22-25, June 1,
1965.
Reviews past and current research at
the Forest Products Laboratory on cutting,
drying, and gluing southern pine veneer
and also describes exposure tests on
overlaid pine lumber and plywood. Work
done at other research laboratories that
pertains to southern pine plywood is also
discussed.



Highly Technical

29. Behavior of an epoxy-polysulfide adhesive
in wood joints exposed to moisture content
changes, by Gordon P. Krueger. U.S. Forest
Serv. Res. Paper FPL 24, 25 pp., Apr. 1965.
Shear strains were measured in the
adhesive of a plywood to lumber joint
undergoing a moisture content change of
20 percent by photographically recording
deformations of a reference grid on the
adhesive film. Induced shear stresses
were calculated from a knowledge of the
mechanical behavior of the adhesive.

30. Experimental techniques for determining
mechanical behavior of flexible structural
adhesives in timber joints, by G. P. Krueger
and R. F. Blomquist. U.S. Forest Serv.
Res. Paper FPL 21, 16 pp., Jan. 1965.
Describes experimental techniques for
measuring stress relaxation, creep, and
shear modulus of an adhesive layer in a









joint. The technique utilizes a specially
designed specimen and load applicator to
obtain a pure shear stress and photographic
recording of the deformation in a reference
grid on the adhesive to obtain shear strain.


Mechanical Properties


41. Influences of modern physics on the proper-
ties of wood and their evaluation, by
R. L. Youngs. ASTM Spec. Tech. Pub.
No. 373, pp. 90-100, 1965.
Developments in several areas of nuclear
physics may provide a promising basis
for the more effective evaluation of wood
properties by nondestructive methods, a
significant step toward the more efficient
use of wood as an engineering material.

42. List of publications on mechanical properties
and structural uses of wood and wood
products. FPL Rpt. 65-026, 59 pp., June
1965.
Contents indicated by title.

43. Physical and mechanical properties of
saligna eucalyptus grown in Hawaii, by
C. C. Gerhards. U.S. Forest Serv. Res.
Paper FPL 23, 13 pp., Apr. 1965.
Describes properties determined for
saligna eucalyptus (Eucalyptus saligna,
Smith) grown in Hawaii, especially in
relation to the same species grown in
Australia. Results are also compared to
those for commercially important Mainland
species.








44. Proceedings of the symposium on needs for
nondestructive testing in the forest
products industries. U.S. Forest Serv. Res.
Note FPL-080, 98 pp., Apr. 1965.
A presentation and discussion of specific
nondestructive testing needs in several
major areas of the forest products indus-
tries, for the purpose of developing recom-
mendations regarding possible directions
of research aimed at providing information
with which to meet the expressed needs,

45. Strength and related properties of western
hemlock, by C. C. Gerhards. U.S. Forest
Serv. Res. Paper FPL 28, 10pp., May 1965.
New property estimates for western
hemlock grown in the United States show
them to be about equal to or higher than
the previous estimates, except that for
air-dry wood, work to proportional limit
in static bending, height of drop in impact
bending, and stress at proportional limit
in compression parallel to grain are lower.

46. Strength of wood joints made with nails,
staples, or screws, by John A. Scholten.
U.S. Forest Serv. Res. Note FPL-0100,
18 pp., Mar. 1965.
Discusses factors that affect the strength
of nailed joints in withdrawal resistance
and lateral resistance. Information is given
on the effect of the wood, the nail, and
conditions of use.









Highly Technical


47. Dielectric properties of Douglas-fir meas-
ured at microwave frequencies, by
W. L. James and D. W. Hamill. Forest
Prod. Jour. 15(2): 51-6, Feb. 1965.
Dielectric constant and loss tangent of
Douglas-fir, moisture range about 6 per-
cent to green, were measured at 1, 3, and
8.53 GHz. Dielectric content increased with
moisture, decreased with frequencies, and
was larger along the grain. Loss tangent
increased with frequency, was larger along
the grain, and was maximum near 30 per-
cent moisture.

48. Effect of pre-cyclic stresses on fatigue life
of RP laminates, by K. H. Boiler. Modern
Plastics 42(8): 162-173. Apr. 1965.
A special program of alternating
stresses on 5 constructions of unwoven
filaments, testing with 25 programs of
prescribed cycling first at one stress level
and then run out at another stress level,
showed that there was no effect for 22
programs but some improvement in fatigue
strength for 3 programs.

49. Wood beams prestressed withbonded tension
elements, by John Peterson. Jour. of the
Structural Div., ASCE Proc. Vol. 91,
Paper 4218, Feb. 1965, pp. 103-120.
A technique was developed by which
wood beams can be prestressed with flat
steel plate bonded to the tension face with-
out excessive stress concentrations. Com-
pared to controlbeams, prestressed beams
11








exhibited an average of 26 percent greater
bending stiffness, 76 percent greater
strength, and 71 percent lower variability
in strength.


Packaging


50. Dynamic tension t e s t ing equipment for
paperboard and corrugated fiberboard, by
W. D. Godshall. U.S. Forest Serv. Res.
Note FPL-081, 27 pp., Jan. 1965.
Methods and equipment were developed
to determine the dynamic tensile charac-
teristics of paperboard. Preliminary
investigations indicate that the tensile
strength of paperboard increases approx-
imately as a logarithmic function of the
loading rate.

51. Performance of container fasteners sub-
jected to static and dynamic withdrawal,
by R. S. Kurtenacker. U.S. Forest Serv.
Res. Paper FPL 29, 21 pp., June 1965.
Discusses static and impact withdrawal
tests applied to different fasteners after
various periods of storage up to a year.
Helically threaded nails and nylon-coated
staples retained their initial withdrawal
resistance better than the others which
exhibited a decrease 2 weeks after driving.
Dynamic loads exceeded corresponding
static withdrawal values.









52. Some observations of plywood pallets in
use, by T. B. Heebink. U.S. Forest Serv.
Res. Note FPL-096, 5 pp., Feb. 1965.
Surveys were conducted of plywood pal-
lets in use in 21 industrial plants at
Midwest and West Coast locations. No
particular problems with plywood pallets
were found that cannot be easily solved.
It would be helpful if requirements for
deck thickness, especially for post-type
pallets, were developed.

53. Suitability of seven West Coast species for
pallets, by T. B. Heebink. U.S. Forest
Serv. Res. Paper FPL 22, 18 pp., Mar.
1965.
Based on bending stiffness, free fall on
corner drop, and revolving drumperform-
ance, western hemlock pallets performed
at least as well as Douglas-fir. Red alder,
black cottonwood, and ponderosa pine com-
pared favorably to Douglas-fir except they
were less stiff in bending. Western larch
and tanoak pallets were inferior in all
respects.


Paints and Finishes


Highly Technical



Microscale changes in cell structure of
softwood surfaces during weathering, by
V. P. Miniutti. Jour. of Paint Tech. &
Engin. 37(485): 692-6, June 1965.








Softwood surfaces were examined with
a microscope after ultraviolet irradiation
and after natural weathering. Ultraviolet
irradiation caused microscopically visible
loss of wood substance from the surface of
unfinished wood. Weathering caused micro-
checks in individual tracheid walls and
between adjacent tracheid walls of finished
and unfinished wood surfaces.


Sandwich


Highly Technical

54. Buckling coefficients for flat, rectangular
sandwich panels with corrugated cores
under edgewise compression, by
Paul M. Jenkinson and E. W. Kuenzi.
U.S. Forest Serv. Res. Paper FPL 25,
19 pp., May 1965.
Presents curves of coefficients and for-
mulas for use in calculating the buckling
of flat panels of sandwich construction with
corrugated cores under edgewise compres-
sive loads.

55. Minimum weight structural sandwich, by
E. W. Kuenzi. U.S. Forest Serv. Res.
Note FPL-086, 17 pp., Jan. 1965.
Presents theoretical analyses for deter-
mination of dimensions of structural sand-
wich of minimum weight that will have
certain stiffness and load-carrying capa-
bilities. Included is a brief discussion of
the resultant minimum weight
configurations.









Seasoning


31. The air-drying of southern hardwoods, by
R. C. Rietz. South. Lbrman 210(2617):
19-20, May 1, 1965.
Suggests that the unit package air drying
yard be laid out with the main alleys
parallel to the prevailing winds. Piles
should be roofed to reduce yard time as
well as degrade. Losses in value due to
warp can be materially reduced by
presurfacing.

Control and measurement of moisture in
wood, by R. L. Youngs and W. L, James.
International symposium on humidity and
moisture proc. Reinfold Pub. Co.,
New York, Vol. 2 pp. 307-319, chapter 35,
1965.
The oven-drying method is the basic
method of measuring wood's moisture
content. Present electrical methods are
not accurate at high levels of moisture
content or in wood treated with many types
of preservative or fire-retardant treat-
ments. Efforts to devise improved moisture
measurement methods for wood are under
way including nuclear radiation and nuclear
magnetic resonance methods.


Highly Technical

32. Shrinkage of coast-type Douglas-fir and
old-growth redwood boards, by
G. L. Comstock. U.S. Forest Serv. Res.
Paper FPL 30, 19 pp., May 1965.








Information is presented on the shrink-
age of coast-type Douglas-fir and old-
growth redwood boards dried to near
equilibrium at 6 percent and 12 percent
moisture content. Linear regressions for
shrinkage as a function of moisture content
were determined for the radial andtangen-
tial shrinkage of each species.



Wood in Construction



56. The Forest Products Laboratory exposure
structure, by R. A. Hann and 0. C. Heyer.
Forest Prod. Jour. 15(6): 252-254, June
1965.
Describes a unique exposure structure
built by the FPL in which new environ-
mental measuring techniques can be used
to evaluate a variety of materials under
realistic moisture and temperature
conditions.

57. Forest Products Laboratory list of publi-
cations of interest to architects, builders,
engineers, and retail lumbermen. FPL
Rpt. 64-044, 31 pp., Jan. 1965.
Contents indicated by title.


Wood Fiber Products



61. List of available publications on wood fiber
products research. FPL Rpt. 64-043,
33 pp., Jan. 1965.
Contents indicated by title.









62. The present and future use of hardwood for
pulp, paper, by Necmi Sanyer. Tech. Papers
of the Amer. Pulpwood Assoc., pp. 20-23,
Apr. 1965.
Characteristics and distribution of hard-
woods and their use in pulp and paper
manufacture are discussed. Future trends
and economic factors affecting the demand
for hardwood pulpwood and its relation to
the supply of softwoods are also reviewed.


Highly Technical

63. Magnesium-base sulfite semichemicalpulps
for corrugating boards, by Necmi Sanyer
and Eugene L. Keller. Tappi 48(2): 99-105,
Feb. 1965.
Corrugating boards made from hardwood
magnesium-base semichemical pulps inthe
70 to 80 percent yield range were of
acceptable quality but slightly weaker than
soda-base neutral sulfite semichemical
boards. Equal strength was obtained by
cooking to slightly lower yield or refining
to lower freeness.

64. Method for measuring the edgewise com-
pressive properties of paper, by
V. C. Setterholm and R. 0. Gertjejansen.
Tappi 48(5): 308-13, May 1965.
A method is described for obtaining
complete stress-strain curves for paper
specimens subjected to edgewise compres-
sive loads. Comparisons are included of
the strength and elastic properties of
several samples subjected to edgewise
tensile and compressive loads.








65. Treatment of kraft paperboards and a kraft
pulp with acrylonitrile, by R. A. Horn and
F. A. Simmonds. U.S. Forest Serv. Res.
Note FPL-083, 13 pp., Mar. 1965.
The desirable properties of unbleached
southern pine kraft linerboard and bleached
southern pine kraft card stock and sweet-
gum unbleached and bleached kraft pulps
were adversely affected by reaction with
acrylonitrile. Evidence of grafting could
not be established.


Wood Preservation



33. Comparison of wood preservatives in
Mississippi post study (1965 progress
report) by J. Oscar Blew, Jr. and
John W. Kulp, U.S. Forest Serv. Res.
Note. FPL-01, 23 pp., Feb. 1965.
Contains service data on two installations
of southern pine posts for evaluation of
70 wood preservatives used under condi-
tions highly favorable to decay and ter-
mite attack.


34. Comparison of wood preservatives in stake
tests (1965 progress report) by
J. Oscar Blew, Jr. U.S. Forest Serv. Res.
Note FPL-02, 68 pp., May 1965.
Reports results of tests on 2- by 4-inch
stakes installed at several test areas
showing the effectiveness of numerous
preservatives with different retentions in
protecting wood against decay and termite
attack.








35. Determination of residual creosote in disks
from fender piling after 30 years' service
in San Francisco-Oakland Bay bridge, by
R. H. Baechler and R. M. Alpen. AWPA
1965.
A previous study had shown a general
relation between retentions found in borings
and limnoria attack in the intertidal zone,
but the present study showed no relation
between retentions in mud-section disks
and attack in the water section. The
harmful effect of dapping a pile below the
waterline was clearly demonstrated.


36. Relation between distillation pattern of cre-
osote and its effectiveness as determined
by the soil-block method, by R. H. Baechler
and Lee R. Gjovik. AWPA 1965.
Distillation fractions of creosote were
blended to form reconstituted creosotes of
varied distillation patterns in the low- to
medium-residue range. Results indicate
the desirability of modifications in the
standard soil-block technique when the
material under evaluation is coal tar
creosote.


37. Retention and distribution of creosote in
redwood lumber treated at three levels of
moisture content, by J. 0. Blew and
H. G. Roth. AWPA 1965.
All heartwood, clear, end-matched red-
wood lumber specimens at three levels of
moisture content were impregnated with
creosote by the Lowry process. Preserv-
ative retentions and penetrations were
more favorable for pieces at an average








moisture content of 15 percent than for
those above the fiber saturation point--
at 32 or 46 percent.


Wood Structure and Growth Conditions


Estimating specific gravity of south
Arkansas pine, by Joe F. Christopher and
Harold E. Wahlgren. U.S. Forest Serv.
Res. Paper SO-14, 10 pp., 1964.
Specific gravity of the merchantable
portion of the bole of loblolly and shortleaf
pines can be estimated from increment
cores taken at breast height. At slight
additional cost, the precision of the esti-
mates can be substantially increased by
including such data as age, diameter, and
merchantable length.

81. Patterns of specific gravity variation in
North American conifers, by H. L. Mitchell.
Proc., Soc. of Amer. Foresters, 1964.
pp. 169-179, 1965.
In surveys of southern and western
forest resources, information was obtained
on the specific gravity of southern pines
and eight major western softwoods. The
report presents mean specific gravities
by species and areas, and discusses some
of the major factors that affect specific
gravity variation in the species studied.

82. Self-propelled tree pruner, by
F. B. Malcolm. Forest Prod. Jour. 15(2):
57, Feb. 1965. Also published as:A mechan-
ical self-propeller pruning machine.









Northern Logger 12(10): 22-23, Apr. 1965.
Describes machine that has the potential
for improving the economics of pruning
crop trees in young forests. It consists of
a tubular frame with driven wheels that
carries a motor and small chain saw and
weighs about 85 pounds. A preset lever
activates descent to 70 feet.

83. Southern wood density survey, 1965 status
report, by Forest Service. U.S. Forest
Serv. Res. Paper FPL 26, 40pp., May 1965.
In the survey of southern forest
resources, information was collected on
the specific gravity of the four major
southern pines. This report presents mean
specific gravities by State, survey unit,
and diameter class for each species.
i.-7 S: P -'
Highly Technical

Evidence of lignin in the tertiary wall of
certain wood cells, by I. B. Sachs. In
Cellular ultrastructure of wood plants,
Wilfred A. Cote, Jr., Editor. Univ. of
Syracuse Press. 1965.
Investigation of approximately 2,000-
year-old naturally cellulosic degraded
samples of Fagus sylvatica substantiates
the distribution of lignin in the compound
middle lamella, secondary wall, tertiary
wall, and warty layer reported by some
recent investigators.

Ultrastructure of the secondary phloem of
Tilia americana, by Ray F. Evert and
Lidija Murmanis. Amer. Jour. of Botany
52(1): 95-106, 1965.








Secondary phloem of Tilia americana
was studied with the electron microscope.
Mature parenchyma cells were found to
contain all the characteristic cellular com-
ponents. During differentiation, mature
sieve elements lose the constituents that
do not participate in food conduction but
possess slime which undoubtedly plays
an important role in the food conducting
system.


Miscellaneous



101. FPL 1964, Annual report of research at the
Forest Products Laboratory.
Summarizes research program and
accomplishments.

Research to reality, by Edward G. Locke.
In "Seminar probes pine plywood
problems." Wood and Wood Prod. 70(3): 52,
Mar. 1965.
Address to Southern Pine Plywood sem-
inar at Meridian, Miss., Jan. 12-13, 1965,
summarizing history of research and FPL
role in launching of southern pine plywood
industry and developing a commercial
standard for the product.

102. Where research in wood problems has paid
off, by Edward G. Locke, Ind. Woodworking,
p. 18, Apr. 1965.
Cites various significant research devel-
opments, such as dry kilns, grading rules,
veneer cutting, gluing technology, and









dimensional stabilization treatments, that
have resulted in major contributions to
development of the forest products
industries.

Wood research in a hymn to Hippocrates,
by Fred A. Strenge. Amer. Forests 71(5):
42-45, 78, May 1965.
Describes in detail the turning and treat-
ment of a limb from a tree on the Isle of
Cos, where Hippocrates was born and
taught medicine 24 centuries ago. The limb
was used to make a shaft for a ceremo-
nial mace for the American College of
Physicians.














PROGRAMS FOR DEVE
AND MANAGEMENT OF
ERS v s MILLION ACRES IN TI
NATIONAL FOREST S


FORESTRY PROGRAMS OF
STATES AND PRIVATE AGENCIES
INCLUDING WOOD USING
INDUSTRIES


FOREST AND RANGE
EXPERIMENT STATIONS
S10 REGIONAL STATIONS AND A
TROPICAL FORESTRY INSTI-
TuTE IN PUERTO RICO

LOPMENT
STHE 8I6

SYSTEM


FOREST PRODUCTS
S LABORATORY
I NATIONAL LABORATORY

-I


BETWEEN FOREST PRODUCTS, "
LABORATORY ANO FOREST
EXPERIMENT STATIONS
s


FOREST RESOURCE ECONOMICS
AND MARKETING
FOREST SURVEY
FOREST ECONOMICS
FOREST PRODUCTS MARKET TING


FOREST AND RANGE MANAGEMENT
TIMBER
SOIL AND WATER
RANGE FORAGE
WILDLIFE HABITAT
FOREST RECREATION


FOREST PROTECTION
FOREST FiRE
FOREST INSECTS
FOREST DISEASES

FOREST PRODUCTS AND ENGINEERING
UTILIZATION-FIELD RESEARCH' TO SUPPLEMENT
FOREST PRODUCTS LABORATORY
FOREST ENGINEERING

WOOD QUALITY- LO AND TREE GRADES
SOLID WOOD AND COMPOSITE PRODUCTS
WOOD CHEMISTRY AND PRODUCTS
PULP, PAPER, AND FIBER PRODUCTS
WOOD STRuCTURES AND ENGINEERING


Forestry research in the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture


FOREST SERVICE

























The FOREST SERVICE of the
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
is dedicated to the principle of mul-
tiple use management of the Nation's
forest resources for sustained yields
of wood, water, forage, wildlife, and
recreation. Through forestry research,
cooperation with the States and private
forest owners, and management of
the National Forests and National
Grasslands, it strives as directed
by Congress to provide increasingly
greater service to a growing Nation.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
1I IIII3 1262 08739 7237ll1111 III
3 1262 08739 7237




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