Crop reporters

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Material Information

Title:
Crop reporters how crop and livestock reports help you
Portion of title:
How crop and livestock reports help you
Physical Description:
1 folded sheet (4 p.) : ill. ; 23 x 20 cm. folded to 23 x 10 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
Publisher:
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Marketing Service
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Farms -- Statistics -- United States   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Statistics -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 028185120
oclc - 83862326
System ID:
AA00013748:00001


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HOW CRi P .CK
REPORT' -PYOU l
| APR 22 #,.4 3
Crop and Livesto porting is a ice
rendered farmers by e S. Dep m of
Agriculture, usually wi 4 *io f the
State department of agri e State
agricultural college.
This service was started because farmers
found out how hard it was to grow the right
amounts of farm products to get a fair price
without having nationwide information on the
kind and amount of each product needed. It is
one of the oldest of all Government services.
It started in the Patent Office in 1839, before
there was a Department of Agriculture.





HERE IT IS IN A NUTSHELL..

Most of the basic information on production,
supplies, and prices of farm products is col-
lected and analyzed by the Crop and Livestock
Reporting Service.
Whether you get information about produc-
tion of crops and livestock direct from your
State statistician, your county agent, or from a
newspaper or radio, just remember that these
facts come from your Crop and Livestock Re-
porting Service. The information comes first,
though, from some 600,000 experienced farmers
and ranchers in the United States who are crop
reporters.
Information is also furnished by some 83,000
local merchants; 8,500 ginners; 14,000 mills,
elevators, and warehouses; 10,000 hatcheries;
28,000 dairy plants; and 14,000 meat packers.











REPORTS HELP ALL FARMERS

DIRECTLY, the crop forecasts help farmers
and ranchers from month to month in planning
the marketing of their crops.
INDIRECTLY, crop estimates made during
the growing season help you by making it pos-
sible for the railroads, trucking industries, mills,
elevators, gins, and so on, to take care of your
crops properly.
The cotton reports help cotton growers to
keep up with crop prospects. There are special
reports for dairymen and for producers of
tobacco, poultry, vegetables, fruits, and most
other products.



GET ALL THE FACTS

The Government reports give estimates of
the number of cattle on feed. If the feeder
thinks the supply looks too high, he may want
to reduce his feeding operation-or else get set
for lower prices. Likewise, if the supply of fat
cattle is down and demand looks strong, he may
want to put some more cattle on feed, or feed
to heavier weights and higher grades.
You benefit directly when you use livestock
reports in planning your breeding and market-
ing programs. You benefit indirectly when the
buyer uses Government reports.
If the buyer did not know about the prospec-
tive supply and demand, he would have to pay
less than he could otherwise because of his
uncertainty.
Speculation thrives on uncertainty and adds
to the cost of marketing. When all of the facts
are known, there is less speculation.









STUDY THE FACTS -

The annual report on livestock numbers on
farms, issued in mid-February, tells you the
number of cattle and calves in the United States,
and where they are. There are also reports on
cattle feeding issued in January, April, July,
and November. Thus, both cattle producers and
feeders can get a very good picture of the supply
situation during the year.
Likewise, the June and December pig surveys
give the facts about numbers of hogs and pigs
on hand and what farmers plan about future
farrowings.



REPORTERS CAN TAKE PRIDE


Every reporter can take special pride in the
crop and livestock reports because he helps
make them. It gives a person a lot of satisfac-
tion to know he has helped with a public service
that is so essential, and helps millions of people.
You Crop Reporters can get free reports cov-
ering such items as ACREAGE, YIELD, PRO-
DUCTION, and PRICES of field and orchard
crops; numbers and value of LIVESTOCK;
quantity and value of livestock products; and
prices PAID by farmers for their supplies and
for labor.




-? HOW IT'S DONE


Your State is served by trained agricultural
statisticians who understand farming. The
figures in completed questionnaires from farm-





ers and ranchers are listed and added in the
State statistician's office. Averages and other
statistical measures are computed and crop and
livestock estimates are made for the State.
The method is like that used to find the grade
and test weight of a load of grain that a farmer
sells. The sample of grain taken from the load
represents the entire load. Likewise, the replies
?from farmers-who serve as voluntary report-
ers without pay-make up the sample used to
represent the State.
The estimates for all States are sent to
Washington, D. C., and combined by the U. S.
Crop Reporting Board.
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
II IDl illilllillll llull li ili llllill ill I
3 1262 08860 5893

EVERY ANSWER HELPS


Every answer helps complete the picture. So,
you can see why your State statistician needs
to get a good representative coverage from
farmers and ranchers EVERY time an inquiry
is mailed to them. Even though you may be
able to answer only one or two questions, you
will still be helping a great deal by reporting
these.
If you do not mail your report PROMPTLY
after receiving your questionnaire, it may get
in too late to help with the report from your
State. You wouldn't want that to happen-and
neither do we.
Again, thanks a million for your help!

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE AMS
2-54
U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 288928-p




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