United States foreign trade; export trade by country

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Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade; export trade by country
Physical Description:
12 v. : 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Sept. 1955-1966.
Issuing Body:
Issued Sept. 1955- by the Bureau's Foreign Trade Division.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 023105471
oclc - 08601818
lccn - 58060058
System ID:
AA00013691:00011

Related Items

Preceded by:
United States foreign trade; trade by country

Full Text


UNIV F L Lii



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF C MERC BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Frederick H. Mueller, ecr ary Robert W. Burgess, Director
SPECIAL NOTICE
....-See page 5 of the February 1960 issue of this .... .U T report for "Notice of Possible Discontinuance of
UtAIS U.S.4SUSu Separate SUmarized Totals for United Jtates
L0D -Export and Import Trade rith the Dependencies
gIVE M of Western Europe.

UN OREIGN TRADE


SUMMARY REPORT AR0 FOR RELEASE
FT 950-E 0c Rf AMay 20, 1960


EX TTRA Y COUNTRY

The Bureau of the Census, Department o individual countries of this continent as follows: India, from
today that the increase in United States ep d s $44.3 to $67.4 million; Japan, from $107.5 to $115.7 million;
foreign merchandise from $1,576.1 million in Feb 51.2 Republic of Korea, from $12.9 to $18.5 illion; and the Republic million in March resulted from increases in exports to all areas of the Phillippines, from $23.0 to $28.1 million. However, deas follows: Western Europe, from $528.6 to $581.0 million; Can- lines were reported in exports to Pakistan and Israel from
ada, from $302.0 to $343.9 million; Latin American Republics, $16.9 to $11.4 million and from $12.1 to $8.2 million, respecfrom $276.8 to $298.6 million; dependencies of Western Europe, tively.
from $56.4 to $63.6 million; and "all other countries," from
$412.3 to $464.1 million. These figures include data on exports The bulk of the rise in exports to Europe from $470.1 to
of Special Category commodities which rose from $134.6 to $175.6 $493.3 million was accounted for by increases in exports to million. France, from $41.3 to $53.1 million; Belguim and Luxembourg,
from $30.5 to $41.9 million; West Germany, from $84.2 to $91.5
With Special Category commodities excluded, March exports million; and Sweden, from $17.2 to $22.2 million. These inof domestic and foreign merchandise were valued at $1,575.7 creases were partly offset, however, by declines in exports to
million and represented an increase of about $134.2 million over Turkey, from $18.5 to $10.6 million and the Union of Soviet the February total of $1 441.5 million. Exports to 0.E.E.C. Socialist Republics, from $4.6 to $0.4 million. An increase in
countries advanced from $446.8 to $474.4 million; Latin Ameri- exports to the United Arab Republic (Egypt Region), from $10.3
can Republics, from $268.7 to $290.4 million; and sterling area to $14.1 million, was the chief factor in the rise in exports countries, from $258.5 to $279.7 million. Increases were re- to Africa from $57.8 to $65.0 million. Exports to South America
ported in exports to all continents except Australia and Oceania. climbed from $158.6 to $165.3 million as increases in exports to Brazil, from $19.8 to $29.6 million and Uruguay, from $2.7 to
Exports to North America rose from $427.6 million in $5.5 million, were partly offset by a decline in exports to
February to $488.1 million in March as substantial increases Argentina, from $26.7 to $22.9 million.
were reported in exports to Canada, from $295.4 to $337.1 million; Mexico, from $60.6 to $71.2 million; and Cuba, from $21.5 Meanwhile, exports to Australia and Oceania fell from
to $26.1 million. Exports to Asia increased from $295.3 to $32.1 to $28.9 million owing chiefly to a decrease in exports
$335.1 million largely as a result of increases in exports to to Australia from $26.5 to $23.7 million.

EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS

COVERAGE: Export Statistics include government as well as port of exportation. It is based on the selling price (or cost
non-government shipments to foreign countries. The export sta- if not sold) and includes inland freight, insurance, and other
tiatics, therefore, include Mutual Security Program military charges to the port of exportation. Transportation and other
aid, Mutual Security Program economic aid, and Department of costs beyond the United States port of exportation are excludthe Army Civilian Supply shipments. Separate figures for Mutu- ed. However, in some instances the valuation may not be real Security Program military aid are shown in the footnotes of ported in accordance with hI definition, particularly where
this report. Shipments to United States armed forces and dip- the export value ic difficult to detor:Jne or must be estimatlomatic missions abroad for their own use are excluded from ex- ed. None of the values have been adjus ted for changes in price port statistics. United States trade with Puerto Rico and level.
United States Possessions is not included in this report, but
the export trade of Puerto Rico with foreign countries is EFFECT OF SAMPLING: The value of export shipents indiincluded as part of the United States export trade. Mer- vidually valued Lat 100-499 (about five percent of total echandise shipped in transit through the United States between port value) is estimated by sampling. Effective wth the .t
foreign countries is not included in export statistics, tistics for January 1 LU, the previous sample ratio of 1 percent has been increa s to a 50 percent sple for countries
COUNTRY DEFINITION: Although the country of destination other than Canada 1- h te 10 percent sample being retained for
is defined as the country of ultimate destination or the coun- Canada. The estimated values are distributed aong the area,
try where the goods are to be consumed, or further processed or continent and cou try otals. For the 1<( export figurs in manufactured, the statistics do not always reflect this defini- this report, he robable variability duIe to samplin i l the shipment. In such cases, the shipments are credited to the to probable variabili ty due to Saupling is less U a m ,
last country, as known to the exporter at the time of shipment or less than two ercent of the individual totals shown. Te
from the United States, to which the goods are to be shipped in largest variation from ounding of figures is 0, For their present form. It follows, therefore, that the statistics further infor a Lon regarding smplin p -rocedure, e e
will tend to be overcounted for shipments to transshipment or September 193, Febary 19, January ad June 1956, u the
merchanting countries and undercounted for other countries. As October-December 1959 i..ue: of Foreign rade JLtisti Note
explained in the footnotes to the table, exports of Special
Category comnities are not included in any of the published Further inrora.tio: reading cover e, count., definite,
country totals, for reasons of security, valuation, etc., cetalned in Uw "Ge a ra1 lxplmation" in
foreword of Report No, r' 410. For comph te ~ ttent, :ee
VALUATION: The valuation definition used in the export foreword in Foreign (outere and Nvigation of e Uniutm
statistics is the value at the seaport, border point, or air- States.

Prepared in the Bureau of the Consus, Foreign Trade Division
Fnr sale by the Bureau of the Crmnsus, *anhington 2S, D. V. Price lgt, annual ~ubarintion $1.00 for both FT 950-E and FT 950-1






2

UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE, BY COUNTRY OF DESTINATION: MARCH 1960 AND SELECTED PERIODS
(Value in millions of dollars. N.e.c. indicates not elsewhere classified. Figures for 1960 are as originally
issued and have not been revised to include published corrections. Figures for 1959 include revisions pub:lished with the December 1959 reports, or earlier, but do not include revisions published during 1960. See
"Explanation of Statistics" for information on sampling procedures and effect thereof on the data shown.)


March February March Monthly
Continent and cuty161901959 average
counry1 960 9601959

Total trade including Special Categories2...................1751.2 J1,576.1 '1,455.8 61,43.9
Western Europe ........................................581.0 528.6 405.5 453.6
Dependencies of Western Europe .........................63.6 56.4 61.2 53.6
Canada............................................... 343.9 302.0 329.5 318.7
Latin American Republics ...............................298.6 276.8 296.6 299.4
All other countries ...................................464.1 412.3 363.0 338.6
Total Special Categories2 ....................................175.6 134.6 144.4 149.0
Type 1................................................ 32.6 33.1 48.1 46.8
Type 2............................................... 143.0 101.5 96.2 102.0
Net total excluding Special Categories2 ......................1575.7 l1,441.5 1,1311.5 1,314.9
O.E.E.C. countries ....................................474.4 446.8 293.7 347.5
Latin American Republics .............................290.4 268.7 288.8 291.2
Sterling area countries. ............. o........-.....279.7 258.5 184.7 202.2

North America .................. o..........o................488.1 427.6 462.7 457.9
Greenland d........................................... ......... ....* o.) N*
Canada (including Newfoundland and Labrador) ......... o.......337.1 295.4 321.1 310.6
Miquelon and St. Pierre Islands ................. .. .............. (* N. *
Mexico..................................................... 71.2 60.6 59.9 60.9
Guatemala".......................... .........................5.6 5.6 4.9 5.3
British Hondurasb ......................................... 0o.4 0.3 0.4 0.4
El Salvador"....... o................... *.......................3.7 3.2 3.4 3.1
Honduras".... o.....................................3.0 2.7 2.7 2.7
Nicaragua".... o.....................................2.4 2.1 2.7 2.3
Costa Rica"................................................. 3.2 3.0 4.1 3.4
Republic of Panama............ o..............................7.5 7.3 6.4 7.5
Canal Zone.................................................. 1.1 1.3 1.5 1.4
Bermudab6,d.................................................. 2.9 2.4 2.6 2.4
Bahamab,d........................................................ .4.4 4.5 3.2 3.3
Cuba"...................................................... 26.1 21.5 31.1 36.4
Janiaicab,d.................................................. 4.3 3.5 2.2 3.0
Haitia...................................................... 2.5 2.4 1.4 2.0
Dominican Republica......................................... 3.5 4.0 6.4 5.0
Leeward and Windward Islandsb,d ..............................0.5 0.3 0. 5 0.4
Barbados b,d..................................................... .....4 0.4 0.3 0.3
Trinidad and Tobagob~d .......................................3.2 2.3 2.6 2.5
Netherlands Antilles d............................. ................ 4.7 4.6 4.9 4.7
French West Indiesd......................................... 0.2 0.2 0.2 0,2

South America........................................... 165.3 158.6 167.1 164.7
Colombia".................................................. 21.8 20.6 15.4 17.1
Venezuela"................................................. 50.4 52.9 60.9 61.4
British Guianab,d........................................... 1.1 0.8 0.5 0.6
Surinamd .......... o..........................................2.6 1.3 0.8 1.3
French Guiana d..).......................................... (*N 0.1 0.1 0.2
Ecuador".................................................... 4.6 4.2 3.2 4.0
Peru"...................................................... 11.1 11.0 11.5 10.1
B olivia" ........................ 1.9 2.1 2.1 1.9
Chile0 ................................................ 12.9 15.1 10.8 1.
Brazil".................................................... 29.6 19.8 46.2 33.8
Paraguay"................................................... 0.7 1.0 0.8 0.7
Uruguay".................................................... 5.5 2.7 1.4 2.8
Argentinaa................................................. 22.9 26.7 13.2 19.3
Falkland Islandsh-d .........................................(... .....

Europe ................................. .................493.3 470.1 337.2 382.0
Icelandb c, C................................................................. .1.6 0.7 0.8 1.1
Siledenc,e.................................................. 22.2 17.2 14..7 17,3
Norwayc .......................................... ......... 9.6 7.3 6.7 6.4

See footnotes at end of table.






3

UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE, BY COUNTRY OF DESTINATION: MARCH 1960 AND SELECTED PERIODS--Continued


March Febrary archMonthly
Continent and country March February March average
1960 1960 1959 1959

Europe-Continued
Denmarkc ,e ................................................ 6.9 7.9 6.4 8.9
United Kingdom b ........................ 9j.5 94.7 50.9 73.7
Ireland (Eire)bce. .............................. .... .... 1.8 2.2 2.0 2.5
Netherlands C, e...................................................... 53.2 52.9 32.6 45.6
Belgium and Luxembourgc,e ................................ 41.9 30.5 27.5 29.1
Friancec,e ,e................................. ........ 53.1 41.3 24.6 28.2
West Germanyc'e .........................................91.5 84.2 56.6 62.3
East Germany........................................... 0.3 (*) (*) 0.1
Austriac,e ................... ............................ 7 7.8 4.2 5.6
Cizechoslovakia ........................................... 0.1 0.6 0.2 0.2
Hungry ......................... ..................... 0.1 0.1 0.3 0.1
Switzerland c, e................................................. .. 17.8 17.7 14.4 15.6
Finlandc ... .................. .................. .4.1 5.6 3.4 3.6
Estonia ......................... ................................ ........ ... ... ..
Latvia...................................... ...
Lithuania..........................................
Poland and Danzig ........................................ 4.5 6. 4. 6.2
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics ....................... 0.4 4.6 0.1 0.6
Azoresd...... .......................................01 (*) 0.2 0.1
Spainc e. ........................... ............... 56 7.0 21.2 12.7
Portugalce... ..... o .................. 3 ...........3.8 1.9 3.6 2.2
Gibraltarb,d ........................................ 0.9 o.8 0.1 0.1
Malta, Gozo, and Cyprusbd................................. ...0.1 O.3 O.5 0.3
Italyce... ................ ....................... .47.8 50.3 34.2 33.9
Free Territory of Triestec,e ................. ........ ...... 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3
Yugoslavia"....................................... ..... -..0 4.9 13.5 10.1
Albania.. .............................................. .(*) .
Greecec,e.. ............... ..........................5.6 4.3 3.9 4.3
Rumania.... ...........................................0.1 0.1 (*) 0.2
Bulgaria........ ............... ..............(*) (*) 0.1 0.1
Tklrkeyc e.................................... ....... .... 10.6 18.5 10.4 lo3
Unidentified Countries in Western Europe?,e e............. 0.1 ... ... (*)

Asia ............. o...... o..........o...o.....o.............335.1 295.3 244.8 227.4
-United Arab Republic (Syria Region)...................... 3.5 3.9 1.0 1.0
Lebanon ....... .................. ................4.2 3.7 2.9 3.3
Iraq (Mesopotamia) ...................................... 3.8 2.8 2.5 2.3
Iran (Persia) ................. ....................... 12.3 8.4 9.4 9.4
Israel ............................ ................... 8.2 12.1 8.9 9.8
Palestine.................................................(*) (*) (*) (*)
Jordanb ............................... ................ .17 0.7 2.0 1.3
Kuwaitb d ................................................ 51 3.2 4." 5.0
Saudi Arabia ............... ............................. 7 4.3 5.3 4.1
Arabia Peninsula States, n.e.c ........................... 0.7 0.4 0.7 0.7
Aden ....................................................... .0.3 0.1 0.3 0.2
State of Bahrein ...............7 0.5
Afghanistan....................................... ...0.5 0.7 1.5 0.6
India b ................................................. .... 67.4 44.3 45.3 28.0
iiiiiii!!!Pakistanb.................................6
Pak i" s1 tan blll w 6ll o on 1. 4 16 .9 6 .3 8. 6
Nepal... ..............................................() 0.2
Ceylonb ................................................. .1.2 1.4 1.2 1.9
aia.................................................. .0.8 0.7 0.6 0.7
Thailand (Siam)......................................... 6.0 5.3 6.5 5.2
Viet-Nam................................................. 4.1 4.4 4.6 4.7
Laos ................................................... 0.1 0.1 0.4 0.2
Cambodia ............. o............... o.......................0.4 0.4 o.4 0.5
Federation of Malayab ...... .............................. 2.0 1.2 0.7 0.7
Colony of Singapore; British Borneob ,... ............. 3.1 2.8 2.4 2.6
Republic of Indonesia ................................. 9.6 8.8 5.0 5,5
Republic of the Philippines ............................. 28.1 23.0 23.7 23,0
Mac ao (Macau) d ........................................ ..... 0.2 () (") (.)
Portuguese Asia, n.e.c...................... ( 0
.......P 0.20.i0I
Southern and Southeastern Asia, n.e.c ..................... (*) ( )
China (including Manchuria) ....................... .

See footnotes at end of table.
V iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
i: iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiil~ ~iiiiii . .




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 06586 0724


UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE, By COUNTRY OF DESTINATION: MARCH 1960 AND SELECTED PERIODS--Continued


March February March Motl
Continent and country 1960'! 19015
1960196019591959

Asia-Continued
Outer Mongolia ........................................ ..*....,.
North Korea............................................
Republic of Korea ............................................851. 12,21,
Hong Kongbd........................................................... 10.7 12.6 8.4 8,o
Taiwan (Formosa) .............................................8.4 9.3 12.0 8.9
Japan...................................................... 115.7 107.5 73.4 77.5
Nansei and Nanpo, Islands, n.e.c....................... 1.6 2.5 1.5 1.4
Australia and Oceania ................................ 28.9 32.1 18.6 26.8
Austra1iab ............ ......................................23.7 26.5 15.3 22,1
New Guinea '................................................ (* 0.1
New Zealand'................................ .... 4.2 4.2 3.2 4.0
British Western Pacific Islandsb,d ............................0.1 0.1 (i)0.1
French Pacific Islands d............................#.. 0.5 1.0 0,2 0.4
Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands ........................0.3 0.3 0.1 0.2
Africa................................................. 65.0 57.8 80,9 56.1
Morocco..................................................... 3.6 2.5 4,53.
Algeria8.................................................... 2.0 1.9 3.6 2.2
T1.unisia..................................................... 1.3 1.9 1.8 0.8
Libyab...................................................... 3.1 2.0 1.8 2,6
United Arab Republic (.Egypt Region) ..........................14.1 10.3 3.78.
Sudan....................................................... 0.3 0.4 0.2 0.2
Canary Islands8............................................. 0o.8 0.9 0.1 0.5
Spanish Africa, n.e.c.,l.......................................0.1 ()*)0.1
Cameroun ....................................................0.2 0.9 0.3 0.3
French Equatorial Africa8....................................0.6 0.5 0,4 0.6
French West Africa and Republic of Togod ......................1.0 0.8 2.8 1.3
Ghana'...................................................... 1.5 0.8 0.8 1.1
Nigeria'.................................................... 2.6 1.6 0.8 1.5
British West Africa, n.e.c.bod ................................0.2 0.1 0,.1 0.1
Madeira Islands" ........................................ (* 0.1 0.3
Angolad..................................................... 1.0 0.8 1.0 0.9
Western Portuguese Africa, n.e.c.d.......................... (* 0.1
Liberia.................................................. 2.6 2.0 32.8 7.3
Belgian Congo8.............................................. 3.1 2.2 2.9 2.6
Somalil~and................................................ 0.1 N* 0.1 0.1
Ethiopia (Abyssinia) ................................ 0.8 1.0 0.9 0.8
French Somalilandd......................................... 0.1 0.1 0.1 0,1
British Somalilandb,d..................................... (* M* i)(t
Seychelles and Dependenciesb~d .................... ..............,., *
Mauritius and Dependencies1'.d................................0.1 0.2 0.1 0.1
British East Africa1'."..................................... 0.9 1.0 0.5 0,7
M02.anbiqued............................................ ..0,o8 1.1 0.6 0. 6
Madagascar (Malgache Republic)4 ....... 0............... 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.2
Union of South Africab .................................... 22.6 23.3 19.6 16.4
Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasalandb ............... 1.21 1.11 0.8 0.9

Latin American Republics. bSterling area countries. C Western Europe. dDependencies of Western
Europe. eO.E.E.C. (Organization for European Economic Cooperation) countries. *Indicates less than
$50,000. 'For definitions of countries as used in this report, refer to current edition of Schedule 2CP
Classification of Country Designations Used in Compiling the United States Foreign Trade Statistics, Coun-. try detail is not reported in the export statistics for Special Category commodities beginning July 1950 for security reasons. For certain areas, export totals include Special Categories, as shown at the beginning of the table. Export figures for other areas and countries represent total exports: less exports of Special Category commodities. See the April 1958 Issue of Foreign Trade Statistics Notes for further explanation and list of Special Category commodities. 3Includes $117,2 million of Military Mutual Security Program shipments
($62. 4 million to Western Europe). 4Includes *78.9 million of Military Mutual Security Program shipments ($39.3 million to Western Europe). 51ncludes $81,2 million of Military Mutual Security Program
shipments ($ 39.6 million- to Western Europe). 6Includes $102.3 million of Military Mutual Security Program shipments ($ 54.9 million to Western Europe). 7As explained in the April 1958 issue of Foreign
Trade Statistics Notes, this is an arbitrary category established with April 1958 statistics to cover certain shipments to unidentified countries in Western Europe.