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Collaborating with Strangers ( CoLAB ) Grant Proposal ( 2011 )
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00013651/00001
 Material Information
Title: Collaborating with Strangers ( CoLAB ) Grant Proposal ( 2011 )
Physical Description: Evaluation
Language: English
Creator: Clapp, Missy
de Farber, Bess
Hood, Barbara
Johnson, Margeaux
Lindell, Ann
Publisher: George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, FL
Publication Date: 2011
 Notes
Abstract: Collaborating with Strangers is a team effort by the UF Libraries (three librarians, PR officer, and grants manager/project facilitator) and partner representatives from arts, science, engineering, and various undergraduate programs to promote, facilitate and evaluate 6 “speed meeting” sessions (2 hours each from 4 to 6 p.m.) based on a facilitative process known as CoLAB Planning®. An average of 30 participants for each session will include faculty, graduate and undergraduate students; pre-registration is not required. External evaluation will determine effectiveness for future replication and expansion. The project goal is to use successful facilitation processes and online follow-up for eliminating barriers to networking and learning about extant campus resources. By doing so, the team and its partners will create the fertile ground necessary to generate creative ideas for sharing resources/information while combining forces across disciplines.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
System ID: AA00013651:00002

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LibrariesCatalystFundApplication-3-18-11-FINAL ( PDF )


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Catalyst Fund Application Due to the Creative Campus Committee by March 18, 2011. Please submit via email to the Committee Chair, Dr. Kevin Knudson, at kknudson@honors.ufl.edu Please attach the following documents: Brief biography (1 page max) of each team member Name (last, first, UFID): Additional Team Members (last, first, UFID, position): Email address: College: Department: Campus address: Total funding amount requested: Project abstract (150 words max): Project goals:

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Project description (Describe the motivations, content, and breadth of the project on one page only, in a way that can be understood by colleagues outside your field):

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Project timeline (Provide logistical details about how the project will unfold in a half page): Project budget (Explain how requested funds will be used in a half page):

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Creative impacts (How will this project encourage creative thinking in a field/community/population? What innovativ e outcomes are expected, and why?): In Robert Fritz's The Path of Least Resistance Learning to Become the Creative Force in Your Own Life he discusses the two requirements for developing creativ ity: 1) conceiving the result one wants to create or achieve; and 2) knowing what already exis ts. CoLAB Planning sessions fulfill both of these requirements. Typically during the speed-meeting pr ocess participants focus on learning about others' passions, interests, resources and skills while being c ognizant of their own answers to these questions. This intensive learning process encourages partic ipants to quickly identify those who can potentially contribute to a participants' desired results, while pr oviding potential access to currently available resources and information that may be unknown to the participant. Collaborating with Strangers will effectively promote and recruit undergraduates from a variety of campus programs and departments: Florida Opportunities Scholars, and Honors Progra ms, as well as arts and sciences (biology as represented by Dr. Doug Levey's participation). In terms of graduate students and faculty beyond biology and arts (theatre, dance, design, visual arts, hist ory, and music), the project partners in I-cubed and College of Engineering agree to promote and recruit faculty and graduate students. All participants will walk away with a renewed se nse of community and access to this community. Sessions will create an energy of enthusiasm for learning from and about strangers, and will feel confident inquiring about access to new resources with any of the expected 240 participants. Simply identifying oneself as a “CoLABer” will grant permissi on to go beyond typical daily conversation, to a new level of confidence and inquiry required to seek resources and information. Project team members plan to develop poster sessio ns for state and national library conferences, and an article for publishing in a wide range of publications from those focusing on librarianship and innovation, to the Libraries' campus and donor communities, and beyond through the Alligator and the general media. Also, posting a YouTube video will pr ovide another means for creating impact beyond UF borders. Community impacts (Will the project have impacts on the campus community, overlapping with a broad range of departments? Will it reach beyond the campus for local, statewide, national, or international impacts?): Collaborating with Strangers will effectively promote and recruit undergraduates from a variety of campus programs and departments: Florida Oppo rtunities Scholars, McNair Scholars, and Honors Programs, as well as arts and sciences (biology as represented by Dr. Doug Levey’s participation). In terms of graduate students and faculty beyond biology and arts (theatre, dance, design, visual arts, history, and music), the project partners in I-c ubed and College of Engineering agree to promote and recruit faculty and graduate students. All participants will walk away with a renewed se nse of community and access to this community. Sessions will create an energy of enthusiasm for learning from and about strangers, and will feel confident inquiring about access to new resources with any of the expected 240 participants. Simply identifying oneself as a “CoLABer” will grant permissi on to go beyond typical daily conversation, to a new level of confidence and inquiry required to seek resources and information. Project team members plan to develop poster sessio ns for state and national library conferences, and an article for publishing in a wide range of publications from those focusing on librarianship and innovation, to the Libraries’ campus and donor communities, and beyond through the Alligator and the general media. Also, posting a YouTube video will pr ovide another means for creating impact beyond UF borders. Through the evaluation process we will deter mine the need for a train-the-trainer program. Presentations, articles and posters will reach bey ond campus to the local, statewide and national audiences and can become a national model for other universities to follow.

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Evaluation plan (How will you improve the quality of the project as work is being conducted? How will you evaluate the outcomes of this project?): Dissemination and archival plan (How do you plan to share the results of your project? How will you preserve the deliverable outputs of your project? Describe in a half page):

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Project resources for success (Please indicate existing resources/tools e.g., instruments, collections, groups, past projects, expertise, etc. that will allow for the successful completion of the project in a half page) : Please indicate how your Catalyst project may be leveraged to apply for continuing sources of funding (internal or external) and to continue the life of the project in perpetuity, if appropriate (in a half page):

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PROJECT TEAM BIOS Melissa J. Clapp is an Assistant University Libr arian at Library West where she coordinates instruction and outreach events fo r the libraries. She works closely with the Dean of Students Office, the University Writing Program and other groups on campus. Melissa earned her MS in Information Studies at Florida State University in 2007 and her MA in English at Norther n Illinois University in 2002. She has worked in the UF libraries since 2003 and joined the faculty in 2007. Melissa co-authored a recent article, Building a Participatory Culture: Collaborat ing with Student Organizations for 21st Century Library Instruction, published in Collaborative Librarianship (3)1 2011. She is currently co-editing a book due out in the summer 2011 from Scarecrow Press called Tips for Librarians Running Libraries Alone. Melissa planned the largest student outreach event in library history with 500 attendees, Capture the Info Flag, in collaboration with Student Govern ment in 2009. She grew up in the Blue Mountains of Pennsylvania and graduated from Shippensbur g University with a BA in English in 1999. Project role: Recruiting and promoting the project to students, faculty and other librarians, participating in the sessions, co-w riting an article and/or poster upon projects completion. Bess de Farber, a Florida native, is the library grants manager, a new position in the Libraries as of October 6, 2008. Her primary responsib ility is training and providing project management for library faculty who co-prepare grant proposals and manage grant funded projects. e Farber manages all grants related ac tivities from conception to project completion. Prior to accepting this position, she served for three years as grants and revenue manager for the University of Arizona Libraries and Center for Creative Photography, in Tucson. She holds a BM in Clarinet Performance from USC, an MNM (Master of Nonprofit Management) from FAU, and is a certified professional facilitator through the International Association of Facilitators. Bess has held positions in the world of philanthropy and the nonprofit sect or for the past 25 years, assisting over 600 organizations. In 2001, she created the CoLAB Planning workshop series, a speed dating method for mob ilizing and connecting community assets, mostly in Florida. It has been a successful facilitation tool for people working in 700+ different organizations including foundations, libraries museums, universities, nonprofits, and governmental agencies. Project role: Facilitator of t he sessions, complete IRB forms, co-supervise graduate student OPS employee. Barbara Hood is the sr. information specialist fo r the libraries where she generates and coordinates public relations efforts on behalf of the libraries as a whole and individual programs, events and initiative s. She works closely with the library administration, faculty and staff, UF News Bureau and UF F oundation, Inc. to disse minate information and promote the libraries to the academic, li brary and general public communities at the local, state and national levels She describes library projects, especially those receiving external support, in news articles released to the information to the media. Barbara also organizes programs and gras ps opportunities for developing library education and social events in conjunction with specific dev elopment efforts, educational campaigns or academic events. She earned her bac helors degree in visual arts from the University of

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South Florida. Project role: promote the project to the appropriate media outlets, both internal and external to the University of Florida, co-supervise graduate student OPS employee, greet people at session, and photograph them. Margeaux Johnson recently graduated with an M.L.S. from the iSchool at University of Maryland College Park and is pursuing a gra duate degree in Educational Technology at the University of Florida. Currently, s he is a Science & Tec hnology Librarian at University of Florida’s Marston Science Li brary where she coordinates instruction for science and engineering students. In her primary role as the Instruction Coordinator for the Sciences at University of Florida’s Marston Science Library, Johnson strives to design instruction and outreach programs that will challenge students to make sense of information and collections in a meaningful wa y. Project role: Re cruiting and promoting the project to students, facult y and other librarians, partici pating in the sessions, cowriting an article and/or poste r upon project’s completion. Ann Lindell is an Associate University Librari an with 20 years of experience as an academic librarian. In her pos ition at the University of Fl orida she serves as Chair of Departmental Libraries and Head of the Architecture & Fine Arts Library. She serves as the primary liaison to the UF College of Design, Construction and Planning, building collections and providing specialized refe rence and instructional services for the disciplines of architecture, bu ilding construction, interior design, landscape architecture, and urban & regional planning. Lindell holds the BA and MFA in Studio Art, and a Master of Library and Information Science. S he has held leadership positions in several professional organizations incl uding the American Library Asso ciation, the Art Libraries Society of North America, and the Associati on of Architecture School Librarians. Her current research centers on t he analysis of trends in scholar ship by graduate students in the design disciplines. Project role: Recruiting and promoting t he project to students, faculty and other librarians, participating in the sessions, co-writing an article and/or poster upon project’s completion.

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Comments about past CoLABs on the UF campus Faculty members : I was impressed with Bess' introduction. Specifci ally the levels of risk one is will to take to interact with others. I think she hit the nail on the head. To successfully collaborate, the partners must be willing to change behavior for th e potential of a successful venture. I also liked the di scussion of assets. This pre-discussion is/was particularly important for our young scientists. The actual interactions between students and faculty were fun and it was striking the similarities that were written on our pl acards, despite signif icant age/experience differences. I really enjoyed meeting t he students and pleased that we have such motivated young women. We certainly met new people (one of the objecti ves), but it is not clear that the students identified new mentors. Our in terests were quite varied. On the other hand, the faculty regardless of discipline should have a lot of experience that t hey could pass on. Perhaps time will tell. I would like to see such an event at the facu lty level. This would be a great way of identifying assets around the ca mpus. We have web sites that list peoples interest...but it is not the same as a one on one interaction. I met two interesting graduate students and I met a faculty member in Engineering doing social network analysis, which is a met hod I'm using in collaboration with another UF faculty member in the social sciences small world! How much of our research can be integrat ed. I met new facu lty and briefly learned exactly what other faculty were doing th rough their graduate students, it was very interesting Grad Student: I learned how to get important information from people you meet for the first time when we are talking. I also learned some inte resting research area from faculties. I recommend future CoLab can offer us more opportunities to talk with grad students, so that we can not only find something interest ing in our academic work, but also can we broaden our social network:) I found work of three faculty members interest ing and in tune to my research interests.

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Undergrads: I learned how easy it is to begin a conversation with someone else by finding common ground or an interesting fact about them. It amazed me how much I had in common with so many of the people I met and how much could be learned fr om a person, simply by filling out a simple card. I was surprised to have an hour of meet-and greet complete with hand-made profiles we pinned to ourselves. It was fun,though. The Colab session was an interesting way to develop a familiarity with the other people in the class. Furthermore, the use of the signs allowed us to quickly summarize some main points about a person, and provided di scussion topics for the conversations. I learned the importance of finding comm on ground when communicating with others, especially when meeting for the first time. Reading the si gns, which initially seemed awkward; forced us to learn something about the other person, and then encouraged us to find something to talk about for the required amount of time. I learned that people can always find something that they have in common to talk about. These commonalities may not necessarily be personal, but arise from the situation at the time of the conversation. For example, there were a few people that I talked to during the session who completely bypassed the information written on my card and preferred instead to talk about the class itself.