M. Taylor Memoir on Schooling in Foley, Florida ( 1937 )

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Material Information

Title:
M. Taylor Memoir on Schooling in Foley, Florida ( 1937 )
Physical Description:
Memoir
Language:
English
Creator:
Taylor, M.
Nelson, Caitlin ( Transcriber )
Publisher:
M. Taylor
Place of Publication:
Foley, Florida
Publication Date:

Notes

Abstract:
Foley, Florida, was a company town located near Perry, Florida in Taylor County. The Brooks-Scanlon Lumber Company employed many of the town’s residents, both black and white. Most black employees performed manual and machine labor, whereas their white counterparts held managerial positions. Foley was geographically divided into a black quarter and a white quarter separated by the lumber mill and a reservoir. M. Taylor, the author of this memoir, traveled from Orlando to Foley in 1937 to teach at the local school. Little is known about the author, aside from her opinions of the town and its residents. She wrote mainly about the organization of the school, her experience teaching black students, and the people she met while in Foley. Her memoir alternates between observations of life and complaints about the culture of late-night gambling, drinking, and fighting. It includes photographs identifying various places and people.
General Note:
Transcription and scanning by Caitlin Nelson.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
System ID:
AA00013502:00001

Full Text

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Albert Stevenson 1743 Evergreen Ave. (a baker) [small newspaper clipping]



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The (mill) water resovoi r [sic] on the Lake from which we get our Light and water. The Environment The general surroundings are carefree, irresponsible, unattractive not conducive to home making. The adults are immoral highly sexed, profane gambles. Few exceptions. Children in school are roguish, inclined to fight not very sociable in an intellectual way. General atmosphere is charged with gossip, lies, and combat. The tendency to roam the streets until late at night, prevails.

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Mrs. Ina Wh ite (my Landlady) The Commissary

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A Lake : The white district My temporary home (wash day)

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A park scene in the rear of the schoolhouse



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One day the teacher was instructing the second grade spelling cl spelled and each member of the class was asked to bring in a sentence. The ages of each child were from 7 to 9 years. The following 1. I have something for God. 2. I know God. 3. I love God. 4. I love God and God loves me. 5. I see God and God sees me. 6. God has spared me. 7. God is up in heaven. General Vocabulary Foley, Fla Tha-ang (thing) nudn (another one) us (ours) herken (harken )(Prof.) uddn = other one

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Roster of County Superintendents 1937 Bay Panama City A.L. Hardy Calhoun Blounstown Geo. Atkins Citrus Inverness I.K. Nolan Dixie Cross City Franklin Apalachicola Gilchrist Trenton Cleaveland Moore Gulf Wewahitchka C.L. Costin Hardee Wachula J.E. Blackburn Hamilton Jasper Harry T. Reid Hendry La Belle S.A. Graves Highlands Sebring T.U.K. Baily Holmes Bonifay Ira C. Bush Hillsborough TampaE.L. Robinson Lafayette Mago Chas. Hinstead Lee Ft. Myers Harry T. Hendry Liberty Bristol Grady Shuler Marion Ocala Don T. Mann Nassau Fernandina N.J. Wooten Okaloosa Crestview J.L. Halding OkeechobeeOkeechobee St. H. Hancock Palm Beach Palm Beach John L. Leonard PinellaClearwater G.W. Fuguitt Santa Rosa Bullard J.C. Word Sumpter Bushnell Broward Miller Union Lake Butler T. S. Miller Wakulla Crawfordville S.W. Revells Walton Defuniak Springs Archie W. Anderson Washington Chipley Neil D. Blue

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A Foley belle

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[pamphlet Activity Type Lessons 1. Farm Life 2. Study of Trees 3. Study of Clothing (3-6) 4. A Store (2-3-4-5) 5. Banking (1-6) 6. Story of Rubber (3-4) 7. Study of Indians 8. Study of Animals (1-2-3) 9. The Home (preprimer) 10. A Garden (1-6 grades) 11. Our House (1-2 grades) 12. Building a City (blocks) 13. Indian ??? (1-2-3-4 grades) 14. Cleanliness (1-2-3 grades) 15. February Patriotic Making Liberty bell story of Washington Lincoln building a log cabin Booker T. Washington Draw his picture Learn story of Tuskeegee where when how poems Valentines story of day make some





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M. Taylor Memoir (Cover)

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The Trip to Foley I left Orlando, Florida, Sunday afternoon at 3 P.M. on January 25, on the bus. I rode on the last seat. It was so rough, that I was very sore all over my body when I reached my destination. The bus broke down on the way and all the passengers were conferred to make three changes before the arrival in Perry. forsaken place. I saw a Negro, who owned a car and asked him to take me to Foley. The Professor and wife was asleep, but awoke and directed me to Mrs. Bovers. I spent the remainder of the night sharing a bed with Miss Cleo Hadley, the other teacher. A very uncomfortable bed, but very acceptable after a ride on a bus on a back seat. A ll told, the trip reminded me of the stories I read of the stage coach days. I arose on time the next morning and secured a small hand basin that the family had used, sponged off drank a cup of coffee, and in company with Miss Hadl e y trudged over deep sa nd roads to the little green painted low ceiling school house. The School years old, very fair, pessimistic, and in the most dejected condition and I arrived at the school building. Two low roofed, rambling, frame buildings, painted dark green, with screened, low windows, and two small porches, greeted my eyes. Inside the building I was shown my home room and unattractive, unceiled room, opening into two other rooms. Large cumbersome, homemade, ten feet desks piled in rows, and three blackboards, on bare walls. The benches or desks, and floor were clean. There were no flowers inside nor outside. A nice heater graced the middle of the room and plenty of wood stacked in the corner of another room to burn. children trampled in noisily and took their places. The new teacher attracted attention, but in a little while the bell rung and --Ho! boys jumped over one another class to the other building! I stood, amazed at such order. Well, after the shock, I saw what was before me. Much work. I rolled up my sleeve and waded into work. The Organization The plan of the school, or method of daily class work is departmental: a high school taught thro the senior high school with four teachers including the principal. The elementary department is only one third equipped for its work because of this method. Children are in need of longer periods for recitations, supervised study and less regimentation.

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Many children in different grades have completed the work of the previous grades in a three weeks summer school and cannot grasp the work of the grades they are in now. The primary school needs one teacher. To get adjusted to new methods of different teachers, time elapsing between the passing of classes, and moving from room to room makes for disorder and maladjustments. High sch ool courses are too difficult for the pupils because of the poor, inefficient preparation in the grades. English and Literature are two subjects very much unlearned. The Community Foley, Florida This is a large sawmill firm or settlement, situated _____ of Pe rry in Taylor County. There are about 1500 people living in two sections. Several lakes abound from which much fish is caught. The negroes on the most part are thriftless, happy, and carefree. Much quarreling and separation prevails among the married peop le, which is reflected in the smallest child. Several old men, some crippled, are piddling, having been with the company for more than 20 years. Many intelligent, nice looking young men and women are here that adds to the attraction of Foley. Very little gardening is engaged in and no farming. A typical mill town; gambling, fighting, drinking, gossiping, hold sway. The Professor Personality: blustering, pretentious, scheming, loud. Superficial to a great extent. Pretends to be a college dean, lawyer, a condescending intellectual, high falutin genius to o fine Prof. W.M. Oney is a large, stout character, slightly bald, brown skin, uses his tongue in talking like a snake. He looks scheming, tricky, and grafty like a snake. Makes loose expressions to his teachers in an impolite manner. A very poor example in courtesy and culture. He teaches precept only My Home Two young people from rural Georgia 19 and 22 years old respectively; ignorant, slovenly, but good intentioned. They made me welcome to what they had, but they had nothing. I had a bed and springs and mattress and a dressing table, only. The room was ceiled in the top, only. I set to work to wash the door facings, the windows and si lls, make slats for the bed, build shelves and tables in the room and kitchen, after which I secured cardboard boxes from the trash man and ceiled the room; (after I slept in a wet room) and nearly took sick with pneumonia. There were only two plates 2 sp pots and a small pan to cook my food in.

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shopkeeper for syrup buckets; in which I kept my raw and cooked food. I built a shelf up high on the one porch to put butter, milk and cooked food. Ina is an attractive country girl, just getting an insight in to life. Very virile. Very immoral, but appar ently has no sense of right, discretion, obediency, wrong duties. The School An attempt to teach eleven grades with four teachers. Departmental work in all grades. Result A poor comprehension Stultifying mental growth Restles sness and disorder Poor teaching skill The Quarter Boss George Rodenberry is a tall, mean looking man, is over the white and Negro sections with full control to arrest whip and give so much time to leave the place; according to his discretion. He co llects rent that is see what houses are empty, what occupied. brutally treated many women and men. A typical Mrs. Ezell A country store and home combined, a bolita and whiskey joint, the most of the sporty crowd gather nightly to carouse until a late hour, Sunday included. The fun increased to such an extent until a high barbed wire fence was built around the Negro quarter s and an edict said that no one was to cross night or day and nothing sold over it. The Church Orderly services, a choir, ushers and a well organized Sunday school using denominational literature. The services are led and well attended by men. In all t he organizations, men lead. The women follow sparsely. Mrs. Gonzales is an efficient organist and her music is well selected and played with life. Songs Response after Prayer

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Activities th give you a few points from Matthews. He cussed out the church and talked about religion but he has yet got to explain what passion means. The Mascot 3 grade Ella May Taylor and Eddie Williams Two children in the grade, very small but knowing working and grasping working. The principal insists that they remain. Sad situation from the child viewpoint. The 2 Grade Johnny Baskin Johnny May Barner James Joner Dorothy Thompson Annie Mayell Barnes Project (class) The Commissary The price of everything is high. Dry goods, meats, fish, and fruit and vegetables are carried in stock. The rental from houses range from $1.35 to $ 3.50 and $4 per we ek. There are about 400 houses.

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The Depot The Office : Brooks Scanlon Lumber Company The Picnic 1 2 3 Grade and Guests Hadley Taylor, sponsors Vocabulary Us for ours and we bring climb thing another one that boy John Mary Dishyuh this

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General Psychology of the Children 1. A combative spirit in big and little. No harmony; lack of cooperation and sociality; sensitive, no forbearance 2. Careless and indolent in attendance, slouchy in dress, loud in speech, whining, complaining, anguish and irresponsible. Some exceptions. 3. In all the grades the children are rebellious on provocation, and resentful