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Graduate Conducting Recital

University of Florida Institutional Repository UFAFA
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Material Information

Title:
Graduate Conducting Recital
Physical Description:
Project in lieu of thesis
Language:
English
Creator:
Kingry, Lauren Elizabeth
Publisher:
College of Fine Arts, University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla

Subjects

Genre:
Spatial Coverage:

Notes

Abstract:
This Master of Music Conducting Recital was performed on November 29, 2011 at 7:30pm in the University Memorial Auditorium. The program included works from the standard orchestral repertoire as well as select works chosen by the 2011-2012 Concerto Competition Winners. The recital was performed by the University of Florida Symphony Orchestra and included two pieces for instrumental soloists and orchestra, as well as two works for large symphonic orchestra. The opening piece was Carl Maria von Weber’s Overture to his opera Der Freischütz. The opera, usually translated as ‘The Marksman,’ recounts the German folklore of a young hunter who makes a deal with the devil. The young man is allowed seven magic bullets that are guaranteed to hit whichever target he chooses. Der Freischütz is classified as the first German romantic opera, one that would begin to reject its Italian counterparts and serve as a precursor to German nationalist music. The Overture was chosen for this performance because it truly showcases Weber’s strong romantic qualities and grandiose orchestration. It foreshadows the drama that plays out in the opera and reflects the continuous shifting moods of the forest where the Marksman hunts. Next on the program was the Concerto for Saxophone and String Orchestra by Swedish composer Lars-Erik Larsson which featured Joshua Bond, the winner of the undergraduate division of the annual Concerto Competition. As a student of Alban Berg, Larsson’s compositional style exemplifies a complete understanding of twelve-tone technique while including late romanticism and neo-classical features as well. His Concerto for Saxophone was written for Sigurd Rascher and stands alone as a significant contribution to the art of saxophone performance in Sweden. The graduate winner of the concerto competition was Anna Feucht, a vocalist who artfully prepared the Regnava nel Silencio aria from Gaetano Donizetti’s opera: Lucia di Lammermoor. In this scene, Lucia laments that she has just seen the ghost of a girl who was killed in a jealous rage. Donizetti masterfully illustrates her torment with dramatic ornamentations and embellishments as the soprano reaches a high D. The final work on the program was the monumental First Symphony of Ludwig van Beethoven. While giving obvious homage to his two great influences, Haydn and Mozart, Beethoven still finds his own voice in style and form. The Symphony surprises the listener with a musical joke, as the first chord tonicises the subdominant of the home key, no other symphony had ever begun this way! The work continues to captivate listeners throughout with its seamless transitions, change in textures and timbres, and overall attention to detail. Beethoven gave the premiere, himself, when he was twenty-nine. Offering his first large orchestral work to the public was no easy task and while reviews of the Symphony have varied since its inception, the sounds spoke for themselves and have secured a place in history as the beginning signs of a revolutionist.
General Note:
Instrumental Conducting terminal project
General Note:
Conducting terminal project
General Note:
Additional files being processed; audio files

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the submitter.
Resource Identifier:
System ID:
AA00013500:00002

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Graduate Conducting Recital
Physical Description:
Project in lieu of thesis
Language:
English
Creator:
Kingry, Lauren Elizabeth
Publisher:
College of Fine Arts, University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla

Subjects

Genre:
Spatial Coverage:

Notes

Abstract:
This Master of Music Conducting Recital was performed on November 29, 2011 at 7:30pm in the University Memorial Auditorium. The program included works from the standard orchestral repertoire as well as select works chosen by the 2011-2012 Concerto Competition Winners. The recital was performed by the University of Florida Symphony Orchestra and included two pieces for instrumental soloists and orchestra, as well as two works for large symphonic orchestra. The opening piece was Carl Maria von Weber’s Overture to his opera Der Freischütz. The opera, usually translated as ‘The Marksman,’ recounts the German folklore of a young hunter who makes a deal with the devil. The young man is allowed seven magic bullets that are guaranteed to hit whichever target he chooses. Der Freischütz is classified as the first German romantic opera, one that would begin to reject its Italian counterparts and serve as a precursor to German nationalist music. The Overture was chosen for this performance because it truly showcases Weber’s strong romantic qualities and grandiose orchestration. It foreshadows the drama that plays out in the opera and reflects the continuous shifting moods of the forest where the Marksman hunts. Next on the program was the Concerto for Saxophone and String Orchestra by Swedish composer Lars-Erik Larsson which featured Joshua Bond, the winner of the undergraduate division of the annual Concerto Competition. As a student of Alban Berg, Larsson’s compositional style exemplifies a complete understanding of twelve-tone technique while including late romanticism and neo-classical features as well. His Concerto for Saxophone was written for Sigurd Rascher and stands alone as a significant contribution to the art of saxophone performance in Sweden. The graduate winner of the concerto competition was Anna Feucht, a vocalist who artfully prepared the Regnava nel Silencio aria from Gaetano Donizetti’s opera: Lucia di Lammermoor. In this scene, Lucia laments that she has just seen the ghost of a girl who was killed in a jealous rage. Donizetti masterfully illustrates her torment with dramatic ornamentations and embellishments as the soprano reaches a high D. The final work on the program was the monumental First Symphony of Ludwig van Beethoven. While giving obvious homage to his two great influences, Haydn and Mozart, Beethoven still finds his own voice in style and form. The Symphony surprises the listener with a musical joke, as the first chord tonicises the subdominant of the home key, no other symphony had ever begun this way! The work continues to captivate listeners throughout with its seamless transitions, change in textures and timbres, and overall attention to detail. Beethoven gave the premiere, himself, when he was twenty-nine. Offering his first large orchestral work to the public was no easy task and while reviews of the Symphony have varied since its inception, the sounds spoke for themselves and have secured a place in history as the beginning signs of a revolutionist.
General Note:
Instrumental Conducting terminal project
General Note:
Conducting terminal project
General Note:
Additional files being processed; audio files

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the submitter.
Resource Identifier:
System ID:
AA00013500:00002

Full Text













THE 45th ANNUAL CONCERTO
COMPETITION WINNERS

JOSHUA BOND, ALTO SAXOPHONE
ANNA FEUCHT, SOPRANO

UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
LAUREN E. KINGRY, CONDUCTOR

NOVEMBER 29, 2011
UNIVERSITY AUDITORIUM
7:30 P.M.


UFSYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
Since 1911






PROGRAM


CARL MARIA VON WEBER
(1786-1826)

LARS-ERIK LARSSON
(1908-1986)


OVERTURE TO DER FREISCHUTZ, J. 277


CONCERTO FOR ALTO SAXOPHONE AND
STRING ORCHESTRA, Op. 14


I. Allegro molto moderato
II. Adagio
III. Allegro scherzando

JOSHUA BOND, ALTO SAXOPHONE
Winner of the Undergraduate Division
From the studio of Dr. Geoffrey Deibel and Dr. Jonathan Helton (on sabbatical leave)


GAETANO DONIZETTI
(1797-1848)


SCENA E CAVATINA: REGNAVA NEL SILENCIO
FROM LUCIA DI LAMMERMOOR


ANNA FEUCHT, SOPRANO
Winner of the Graduate Division
From the studio of Dr. Elizabeth Graham


INTERMISSION


LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN
(1770-1827)


SYMPHONY NO. 1 IN C MAJOR, OP. 21


I. Adagio molto Allegro con brio
II. Andante cantabile con moto
III. Menuetto: Allegro molto e vivace
IV. Adagio Allegro molto e vivace


This concert is presented in partial fulfillment of the Master's in Instrumental Conducting Degree
Lauren E. Kingry is from the studio of Dr Raymond Chobaz


UF UNIVERSITY of
UFFLORIDA
The Foundation for The Gator Nation


Program Number Forty-Seven of the
School of Music Concert Series 2011-2012






PROGRAM NOTES


Carl Maria von Weber began work on Der Freischiutz in 1817, although it was not finished until
1821. Usually translated as 'The Marksman', it is considered the first German Romantic opera, one
that would lead away from its Italian counterpart and serve as a precursor to German nationalist
music. Friedrich Kind, the librettist, based his text upon the German folklore of a Freischiitz, in
which a marksman signs a contract with the devil. The devil allows him seven bullets which are to
hit, without fail, whatever he wishes. The Overture foreshadows the drama of the opera and reflects
the shifting moods of the forest. The opening chords illustrate the serene, sunlight peeking through
the trees. Before becoming too complacent, a shuddering tremolo of the strings is heard as the basses
and timpani emulate a mysterious tone meant to depict Samiel, the young marksman and his seven
charmed bullets. The New York Times review exclaimed of the Overture: "good and evil clash in a
symphonic development."
Swedish composer Lars-Erik Larsson studied at the Stockholm Conservatory as a student of
Alban Berg. He later moved to Vienna and Leipzig to study with Fritz Reuter. In 1947, Larsson
became Director of Music of the Stockholm Conservatory and in 1961 he took the same position at
Uppsala University. His composition style is eclectic, ranging from late Romantic to neo-classicism
to techniques similar to Arnold Schoenberg's twelve-tone technique. His Concerto for Saxophone and
Strings was written for saxophonist Sigurd Rascher. The work is not only the first Swedish saxophone
concerto, but stands as a significant contribution to the art of saxophone performance in Sweden.
The story of Lucia di Lammermoor is based on Sir Walter Scott's novel The Bride ofLammermoor.
In Regnava nel silenzio (Act I, Scene 2), Lucia stands at the fountain in the park of Ravenswood Castle
describing an encounter with the ghost of a girl who was slain in a jealous rage by one of her ancestors.
She also mentions that the water had turned to blood. This aria is a fine example of Donizetti's gift of
using vocal ornament to dramatic ends, the embellishments vividly conveying the heroine's unstable
state. The first performance of Lucia di Lammermoor took place in Naples in 1835.
At the age of twenty-nine, a young Beethoven conducted the premiere of his first large orchestral
work at the Hofburg Theater in Vienna on April 2, 1800. The First Symphony seems to bid farewell to
the eighteenth century and welcomes the dawning of a new age. It serves as homage to Beethoven's
two great influences, Haydn and Mozart, and is dedicated to Baron Gottfried van Swieten. While the
nods to his teacher Haydn are obvious, Beethoven finds his own language in style and form. At the
first sounds, he rejects all listener expectations and begins on the wrong chord: the dominant to the
subdominant. This is commonly referred to as a "musical joke" or "a comedy of manners," which
illustrates early on the composer's daring musical experimentation. Reviews of the symphony have
varied since its premiere. One critic stated, these are "the confused explosions of the outrageous
effrontery of a young man." Another exclaimed, "the astonishing success of this Symphony is a
danger to musical art ... a prodigal use of the most barbarous dissonances and a noisy use of all the
instruments." Other critics praised the work, using the words "masterpiece" and "originality" again
and again. The sounds of the symphony can speak for themselves, and its place in history will hold
firm as the beginning signs of a revolutionist.
Lauren E. Kingry







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
RAYMOND CHOBAZ, MUSIC DIRECTOR & CONDUCTOR
LAUREN KINGRY, ASSOCIATE CONDUCTOR
ASHLEY DUDASH, PRESIDENT LEANDRA COMBASS, VICE-PRESIDENT
KELVIN MEDINA, SECRETARY


VIOLIN
Amir Hadjimiry
Concertmaster
Jueun Kim Warf
Assistant Concertmaster
Marina Tucker
Principal
Emily Graves
Assistant Principal
Melissa Cirillo
Neyza Copa
Melanie Cox
Luis Giraldo
Curie Ham
Elim Kuo
Gloria Lee
Yunqi Liao
Natalie Meeks
Lucy Miller
Kathleen Moulton
Ryan Rudderham
Jennifer Russell
Paul Smith
Kirk Walker
Alexandria Warwick
VIOLA
Jeremiah Gadway
Principal
Nathalia Basso
Assistant Principal
Justin Dourado
Kelvin Medina
VIOLONCELLO
Will Teegarden
Principal
Laura Mac-Knight Maule
Assistant Principal


Andrew Baten
Christina Chen
Elizabeth Feeley
Alexandra Gates
Evan Kassof
Rachel McGahey
Lauren Nickoloff
Alexander Noe
Cody Smith
Carlos Soto
Kriti Vedhanayagam
BASS
Casey Odell
Principal
Jarrod Doll
Ashley Dudash
Darius Rucker
FLUTE
Jodie Sluys
Principal
Hsiao-Wei Chen
Kimberly Olson
Erica Scarano
OBOE
Ariel Palau
Principal
Jos6 Gabriel Sanchez
CLARINET
Keith Northover
Principal
Michael Tran
BASSOON
Andrew Schultz
Principal
Ethan Miller


HORN
Hannah Gill
Laura Weiss
Co-Principals
Katie Lundahl
Cameron Vaadi

TRUMPET
Leandra Combass
Robert Polidan
Co-Principals
Clifford Gilmore
Caleb Melin

TROMBONE
Martha Sturm
Principal
Alan J. Herring
Craig O'Brien

TIMPANI
Paul Keck
Principal

PERSONNEL MANAGER
Lauren Kingry

LIBRARIAN
Marina Tucker
Emily Graves

STAGE MANAGER
Evan Kassof

EQUIPMENT MANAGER
Amanda Odom


Orchestra Website: www.arts.ufl.edu/orchestra
NEXT UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA PERFORMANCE:
FEBRUARY 17 & 18, 2012 CARMINA BURANA WITH DANCE ALIVE NATIONAL BALLET
PHILLIPS CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS 7:30 PM