Zoo Miami entertainment area : revitalization through user experience

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Title:
Zoo Miami entertainment area : revitalization through user experience
Physical Description:
Book
Creator:
Fuster, Emilio R.
Publisher:
School of Landscape Architecture and Planning, College of Design, Construction and Planning, University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Notes

Abstract:
This project involves the creation of a Zoo Miami Entertainment Area that will serve as an addition to Zoo Miami and the Gold Coast Railroad Museum. The area should serve as arrival spaces and recreation for the two places, such as City Walk is to Universal Studios or Downtown Disney is to Disney World. The project is a mixture of resort and theme park design and should serve to revitalize Zoo Miami and the GCRM by bringing in a wide variety of users. The entire project is dictated by user experience in the site. By creating a wide variety of spaces with an array of uses, patrons to the site will not be limited only visiting one of these two institutions. This should help to bring in both tourists and locals to both the Zoo and GCRM.
General Note:
Landscape Architecture capstone project

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University of Florida Institutional Repository
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University of Florida
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All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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AA00013328:00001


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Zoo Miami Entertainment Area: Revitalization Through User Experience An Undergradute Thesis by Emilio R.Fuster

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ZOO MIAMI ENTERTAINMENT AREA: REVITALIZATION THROUGH USER EXPERIENCE An Undergraduate esis in Landscape Architecture College of Design, Construction & Planning e University of Florida by Emilio Fuster Department of Landscape Architecture Faculty Advisor Lester Linscott 2012 Prepared for: Zoo Miami Miami-Dade County Parks & Recreation Submitted in partial fulllment of the degree Bachelor in Landscape Architecture

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

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I would like to thank the entire Landscape Architecture faculty at the University of Florida for their help and guidance through the years. From my beginnings in Principles of LA, to the time I spent studying and exploring in the Paris Program and all the way up to this day you have all been an invaluable asset in my scholastic career. You have not only helped me to learn and grow as a design professional, but as a person as well, something I am eternally greatful for. I would also like to thank all of my family and friends for their support throughout the years. is sup port has driven me to where I am today. A special thanks to my parents for putting up with me through the years. To my dad for his guidance and expertise in the profession of Landscape Architecture and in life, and to my mom for her continuous support & worry through my extended college career. Lastly I would like to thank Chad Douglas for being my Zoo liason for this project. He has been ex tremely helpful with any and all questions I have had. I am very appreciative of all of the guidance he has provided. THANK YOU Emilio J Fuster Gina Fuster Kevin ompson Terry Schnadelbach Kay Williams Les Linscott Tina Gurucharri Mary Padua Glenn Acomb Chris Lathrop Bo Zhang

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

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SITE INTRODUCTION 8 Project Intent 10 Miami Tourisn 12 Miami Attractions 14 Project Overview 16 Location 18 Connections 20 History 22 Florida Pine 23 Naval Air Station Richmond 24 Gold Coast Railroad Museum 26 Zoo Miami 28 RESEARCH 30 Design Process 32 Users 34 Case Study: Downtown Disney 36 Goals 38 Objectives 40 Program 42 SITE PLANNING & ANALYSIS 46 Context 48 Site Inventory 52 Site Pictures 54 Site Analysis 60 Site Synthesis 62 DESIGN IMPLEMENTATION 64 Concepts 66 Land Use Plan 70 Master Plan 72 Master Plan Diagrams 74 Trac Circle & Family Entertainment Area Master Plan 80 Guidelines 82 Perspectives 84 Zoo Market Master Plan 86 Guidelines 88 Perspectives 90 Gold Coast Railroad Museum Market Master Plan 94 Guidelines 96 Perspectives 98 CONCLUSION 102 REFERENCES 104 APPENDIX 106

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SITE INTRODUCTION

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10 PROJECT INTENT Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind dont matter and those who matter dont mind. -Dr. Seuss I have always had an eye for the whimsical and have always loved places that transport people to fantasy worlds. Amusement parks such as Disney World and Universal Studios have always been a mecca of mine. In this nal project I am returning to my roots. I hope to transport people to another world outside of Miami when they enter the gates of a place that I have worked in and loved, Zoo Miami.

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12 MIAMI TOURISM Miami has always been known as a mecca for tourism and tourist attractions alike. Whether it be the beaches that it is known for, the trendy and exotic shops selling goods from all around, or the world renowned night life and entertainment, Miami has never lacked touristic apeal. e city has also never lacked variety in its available attractions and events and therefore always seems to keep the general public busy and entertained. With Miami International Airport (a major international airport) acting as a Gateway to the Americas and ying in people from all over the world, Miami is as varied in its visitors as it is in its oerings to them. is fact alone has led tourism in Miami to be one of its most important industries. In 2010 alone, Miami was ranked as the 5th most visited city in the United States by Forbes maga zine, with over 38, 100,000 visitors to the city. Known primarily for its beaches the city is blessed with an amazing tropical climate that allows for this va riety of activities and events. e tropical weather lasts year round, and aside from slight temperature drops, keeps the city pretty warm. e climate allows for a majority of the attractions in the city, such as museums and gardens, to take place outdoors rather than inside. e climate also allows for a great variety of tropical plant species. It is because of this climate, outdoor rec reation, and tropical atmosphere that Miami is what it is today, attracting many of its visitors from the cold of their home cities and towns to the Miami heat.

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Miami however does not just cater to those escap ing the cold. As mentioned it is an international hub and serves as one of the primary gateways to the United States from the Caribbean, Central America, and South America. As a result the city is home to a large Latin American community that comprises the majority of the populous and grows more diverse every day. Coinci dentally this community has also helped to make Miami a prime destination from the Caribbean and the Americas. Much of the tourism in the city can also be accredited to the Port of Miami. e Port serves not only to bring in cargo from all over the world, but also as the biggest cruise ship port in the world. is has earned Miami the nickname Cruise Ship Capital of the World, play ing host to over 4 million passengers per year. All of this together has earned Miami the title of Magic City.

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14 MIAMI ATTRACTIONS AQUARIUMS & ZOOS: 1. Zoo Miami One of the rst cageless zoos in the country, it is considered to be one of the nations best. 2. Parrot Jungle Island Near South Beach, it is home to birds and various other animals in their natural habitats. 3. Miami Seaquarium An outdoor aquarium, it benets from year round tropical weather. 4. Monkey Jungle A unique park where humans walk through cages as monkeys swing freely overhead. BEACHES: 5. South Beach e most recognized location in Miami, South Beach is not only as its namesake sug gests, a beach. It is a trendy area lled with shops, dining and entertainment. MUSEUMS & GARDENS: 6. Gold Coast Railroad Museum One of three Ocial Railroad Museums in Florida it is home to several historic trains in its eort to teach railroad history to the public. 7. Miami Science Museum FIlled with exhibits for children and adults alike, including an observatory. 8. Vizcaya: Museum and Gardens A historical 50-acre estate converted into a museum and open to the public. 9. Fairchild Tropical Botanic Gar dens A world reknowned botanical garden and re search center known for rare and exotic ora. 10. Coral Castle is resident created monument is a sculp tural landscape made from over 1,100 tons of carved coral rock. SPORTS FACILITIES: 11. American Airlines Arena Home to the Miami Heat, the AAA is also the location of several events and concerts. 12. Marlins Ballpark Home to the Miami Marlins, it is the new home to the franchise having moved from their stadium in North Miami. OTHER: 13. Miami International Airport A major international airport, it services tourists from throughout the globe and is the main gateway to Miami. 14. University of Miami (Main) Nationally recognized University with a beau tiful campus.

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16 PROJECT OVERVIEW e Zoo Miami Entertainment Area is an entertain ment and recreation oriented project in Miami, Florida. It is approximately 140 acres of land owned by the county. e site itself connects two very important educational and recreational institutions in Miami, Zoo Miami and the Gold Coast Railroad Museum. Zoo Miami is considered to be one of the best zoos in the country, while the Gold Coast Railroad Museum is considered the premiere rail road museum in Florida. Despite these facts, both institu tions experience less than desired attendance, partly in fact because of their locations so far south. e two locations share a common entry drive, Zoo Drive, but are otherwise very isolated entities. is was due to the fact that the GCRM was originally owned and opereated by the University of Miami, a private institution, while the Zoo was publically owned. Now both sites are owned and operated by Miami-Dade County parks and recreation. e site consists primarily of Zoo owned land. Much of the land in question is either large expanses of parking lot for the Zoo and Gold Coast Railroad Museum, or dilapidated asphalt remaining from an old Naval Air

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Station. ese ar eas are in such poor condition that grass es and weeds have taken them over. Just outside the site is an protected pine eco system. e county desires to utilize this site to create an entertain ment areas of sorts in the fashion of Down town Disney. It hopes to bring tour ists to a Zoo that has never fully recovered since Hurricane Andrew. e project is a huge undertak ing for the county that will take years. Current steps in progress begin and end with a Request For Proposal sent out by Parks and Recreation. Aside from this, there is no more available information. e RFP is very detailed and includes a desired program as well as other useful information. My approach to this project will be to rst evaluate said program and decide the best course of action. I looked forward to working on this wonderful and opportunistic project. It is an exciting project because it is basically a clean slate for design.

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18 LOCATION: e project is located within Miami-Dade County boundary but is actually considered to be a part of Unin corporated Miami-Dade County. It is situated in the very southern part of Miami. e Miami Zoo property (along with the Gold Coast Railroad Museum) lies in between four areas of Miami with ree Lakes to the north, South Miami Heights to the south, Palmetto Estates to the east, and Rich mond West to the west. Despite its prestige, the site is not located in an ideal location for tourism. e main attractions of Miami (for the most part) all lie to the north, concentrated around Miami Beach. e immediate area is almost exclusively residential. Almost immediately surrounding the residential areas are large expanses of agricultural land with Homestead to the south being a large agricultural hub. is is very detrimen tal to attandence so alternative attractions would add to the areas draw. LOCATION SITE ZOO GCRM

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SITE ZOO MIAMI / GCRM BOUNDARY

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20 CONNECTIONS: e Zoo Miami Property lies just to the east of the Florida Turnpike o of Coral Reef Drive (152nd Street). e main entrance o of Coral Reef Drive, is Zoo Drive (124 Avenue) and services both Zoo Miami and the Gold Coast Railroad museum. e fastest and most common route to the property is the Florida Turnpike. Having such a prime location with relation to connections, it can be easily reached from many dierent locations within Miami via dierent expressways and major roads. From many of the locations that lie in the northern part of Miami such as Miami International Airport and Mi ami Beach it connects via the Palmetto Expressway (826), the Dolphin Expressway (836), Interstate 95 (I95), Dixie High way (US1), and various other connectors. From the South, Dixie Highway and the Florida Turnpike are the main routes. Unfortunately the site is too far for the Metro Rail to reach, though future plans may change. Otherwise there are bus routes to and from the site, and stops within the property itself. CONNECTIONS

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22 PAST & PRESENT

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FLORIDA PINE e site is home to one of the most endangered ecosystems in South Florida. It is one of the last stands of Pine Rockland le in the state. e eco system is typically located in high ground areas of Miami. e ecosystem is situated upon a limestone foundation. It is characterized by its dominant species, South Florida Slash Pine or Pinus elliotti var. densa while the understory is composed of many rare and tropical hardwood and herbaceous species. e eco system is re dependent, relying on re to eliminate invasive species and regenerate new plant life. Its conservation status in South Florida is protected and is therefore untouchable. e site provides a unique opportunity to work with and around this ecologi cally sensitive forest.

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24 NAVAL AIR STATION RICHMOND In the year 1941 the United States of America was thrust abruptly into a war oversees. e U.S. was now a part of World War II. In its preparations the United States began to ship sup plies up and down the Atlantic and Pacic seaboards. In an attempt to halt these shipments and weaken the United States defense, German and Japanese submarines were launched against these cargo ships. e best way for the the U.S. to defend against these attacks was in the form of airships, or dirigibles. e air ships would scour the coast as giant patrollers. e airships were known as LTAs (Lighter an Air). ese giant airships needed bases, and so construction began on several bases, including Na val Air Station Richmond in 1942. Just south of Miami, the airstation choose a secluded location and began construction in one of the last large stands of native South Florida/Dade County Pine. Naval Air Station Rich mond took its name from the Richmond Lumber Company that had occupied the land around the turn of the century. e Rich mond Lumber Company had previously used the land to harvest the valuable Dade County Pine. e lumber of the pine was known for repelling detrimental insects with its high sap content. e pine was also very strong once aged, and would be used in metal working tools. Even though the creation of the base meant a removal of large amounts of this pine, much of it went unused in its construction, favoring dierent types of lumber. Naval Air Station Richmond itself covered an area of 2,107 acres, with a perimeter of over 8 miles in length. One of the larg

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est ever in Miami-Dade County history, the base was also consid ered the largest of all the coastline airship bases built for WWII. It consisted of over 7.3 miles of roads, 2.9 miles of sidewalk, and a landing mat over 2,000 feet across among other things. But the base is most known for its three massive airship hangars. e airship hangars are considered to be the worlds largest wooden structures, though the four pillars surrounding and sup porting the hangars were instead made of concrete. e supports alone were 148 feet high. To give a general idea of its size, the base could easily t 1,200 parked cars or 4 Boeing 747s. On September 15, 1945 a massive hurricane hit the Richmond Naval Air Station, which was exactly three years to the day that the base was commisisioned. ough the hurricane winds themselves did not irreparably harm the massive hangars, the storm cause res to erupt in all three of the hangars. e res grew enormous with the hangars lled with all sorts of equip ment, including high-octane fuel. As a result all three hangars burned down along with over $40,000,000 worth of equipment. It was, and still remains the largest structure re in Dade County history. Since the war had ended, none of it was rebuilt and the base was decommissioned in 1946. Remnants of the base can still be seen in the shape of the Zoo lot, as well as one remaining mas sive concrete pilar from the hangars.

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26 GOLD COAST RAILROAD MUSEUM Once the Richmond Naval Air Station was decommsis sioned the land was leased out to the University of Miami by the United States General Services Administration (GSA). e land was intended to be used for non-prot education and research. e site became an all male campus for returning GIs who took residence in the abandoned Naval barracks. e old Naval Station was also the site of a new botanical research facil ity, the Tropical Food Research Laboratory. Around that time a University of Miami Business Ad ministration student named William J. Godfrey became to show great interest in the land. e intrigue stemmed from miles of unused railroad tracks on the located on the site. His passion for everything rail lead him to Dr. Jay F.W. Pearson, the President of the University of Miami and fellow railroad enthusiast. Godfrey argued that the location was an ideal op portunity for operating a steam engine on the over three miles of track that existed on site. e idea behind it all was to serve as an engineering, educational, and historical attraction. Presi dent Pearson was convinced and preparations commenced. President Pearson became aware of steam engines that were to be retired by the United States Sugar Company. Presi dent Pearson, together with Executive Vice President Dr. James M. Godard, traveled to Clewiston, Florida to speak with Mr. R.M. Hare of the company.

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e USSC agreed to donate a locomotive and President Pearson hand picked Florida East Coast Locomotive #153. In April of 1957 the locomotive arrived on the campus. A large ceremony was held to commemorate the occasion and coin cidentally the Miami Railroad Historical Society was created. e MRHS would eventually grow to become the Gold Coast Railroad Museum. Around the mid 1960s the Cuban Missile Crisis was captivating the nation. Subsequently the base, now the site of the mu seum, was taken over by the Central Intel ligence Agency. e CIA was monitoring the situation in Cuba from the site under the name Zenith Technol ogy Services. Over 400 agents and equipment had over run the site making it the largest CIA facility outside of Langley, Virginia. As a result, the Museum had to moved to a location in Ft. Lauderdale in 1966. In 1983 the railroad museum was forced out of its new site in order to make room for a planned interstate highway. e CIA had subsequently moved out of the site of the old museum aer the missile crisis. So in that same year the Gold Coast Railroad Museum returned to the old base, where it operates today.

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28 ZOO MIAMI In the year 1948 Miami-Dade County purchased three monkeys, one goat, and two black bears from a small travel ling show. As a result of this $270 purchase, Crandon park Zoo was born. e zoo, taking the name of the park itself, sat on approximatley 54 acres of land inside of Crandon Park in Key Biscayne. From there the zoo managed to grow into one of the major zoos in the United States in 1965. e zoo boasted over 1,000 residents representing over 380 dierent species. Unfor tunately due to a major hurricane, Hurricane Betsy, the zoo was covered in over 3 feet of water. e ood was responsible for killing 250 animals. As a result, plans for a new location began. e Crandon Park Zoo recovered and became one of the top 25 zoos in the country, but all the while the Zoological Society of Florida was working to change its location. In 1970, Dade County applies for 600 acres of land on the location of the old Richmond Naval Air Station. From here the ZSF com missioned T.A. Strawser to develop a master plan for a new zoo. Further progress came with the assitance of Dade County Manager Ray Goode, when the project is granted $10 million as part of the Decade of Progress Bill. In the year 1975 con struction on the new project begins. Miami Metro Zoo opened its doors in December of 1980. e initial opening consisted of only 12 exhibits and was known as e Preview Center. From here the rst major lobe Asia, opened in 1981. Because of the Zoos new trademark

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cageless design, pieces of the original cage bars were given out as symbols. From here the zoo grew rapidly into what is is today. Features of the new zoo included an African lobe (1982), an Australian lobe (1988), and a 1.6 acre free-ight avi ary known as Wings of Asia Aviary (1988). A monorail system was also constructed in 1984 to connect these dierent areas. In August of 1992 the zoo is devastated by Hurricane Andrew. e hurricane did extensive ammounts of damage killing over 5,000 trees and completely de stroying the aviary and over 100 of its inhabit ants. By December of 1992 the zoo reopens, and by Jully of the fol lowing year many of the animals that were temporarily relocated to other zoos, return along with over 7,000 new trees. e zoo recovered over the next decade, and in 2003 the biggest aviary in the western hemisphere was opened to replace the one lost to Hurricane Andrew. is new aviary was called the American Bankers Family Aviary Wings of Asia. Expan sion continued with the Amazon & Beyond exhibit in 2008 until 2010 whenthe zoo unveiled its new name and logo on its 30th anniversary, Zoo Miami.

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RESEARCH

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32 DESIGN PROCESS With research, the design approach for the site became evident. To properly work with the site and encapsulate its essence in design, two major components need to be taken into account. e rst of these components is the sites rich history and ecology. e history not only shaped the site, but the whole region. e ecology of the site is also very unique and needs to be preserved. All of the dierent uses throughout the years contributed to it and therefore should not be overlooked. e second major component is user experience. e site, acting as a public entity serving educational and recreational purposes should concentrate on what the users want, and how they want it. e success of the site is dependent on meeting user needs.

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Research Goals & Objectives Program Building Site Analysis Synthesis Concept Design Land Use Planning Master Planning

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34 USERS

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CURRENT USERS: -Families with children -School Groups -Tourists PROJECTED USERS: -Adults -Young Adults -Seniors USER EXPERIENCE In order to enhance user experience and bring visitors to the site the uses of the site need to be expanded. e site should provide a vast array of recreational, educational, and commercial amenities. e more things to do, the greater the variety of users to do them. Currently, the site is only used for activities during the day. e area around the site does not provide many, if any nighttime activities. To be successful, the site needs to attract us ers in both the day & night time. e primariy objective with regards to users is to keep people on site and entertained in hopes that they will return in the future.

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36 CASE STUDY: ENTERTAINMENT AREA DOWNTOWN DISNEY: -Destination for locals and tourists -Complimentary to Disney Parks -Visually captivating and engrossing -Wide variety of uses and amenities -Daytime and nighttime amenities -AMC eaters -House of Blues -Caters to all ages -Pleasure Island -emed retail -World of Disney -LEGO Imagination Center -Orlando Harley Davidson -emed dining -Rainforest Cafe -Bongos Cuban Cafe -Lakeside -Shows

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38 GOALS

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40 OBJECTIVES An emphasis for this project must be placed on user analysis for both the current and potential users of the site. Analyze the existing suggested program elements in order to determine if those elements can indeed work in conjunction with the two existing institutions as wells as serve the needs of different groups of users. Design a program that brings locals in for shopping, festivals, markets, and other recreational activities. Creating spaces that serve different user groups is integral to bringing a variety of users to the site.

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Work with the existing entrance features of the Zoo and Gold Coast Railroad Museum to enhance them. Create features that build up to the attractions giving them the feel of a grand entrance. Utilize existing ecological context to both restore said context and create connections to the site itself. Hide parking from view to allow for a more complete user experience as you entire the property. Work with existing contours to create aesthetically beautiful stormwater

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42 PROGRAM Richmond Trac Circle nections between all of the areas of the Entertainment Area. tion areas. Gold Coast Railroad Museum Main Street: Food and Retail Mall although it need not be animals or historic transportation. Food service and specialty themed retail, along with architectural amenities consistent with the attraction are required. tion areas. Must provide for on-site parking within the Gold Coast Railroad Museum parcel, and may consider shared public parking on adjacent parking areas. e number and location of required spaces shall be determined by both provisions of the Code and departmental requirements. During peak use periods, parking may be allowed to overow to additional parking areas.

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Zoo Miami Main Street: Food and Retail Mall service, retail and the architectural amenities in support of these improvements must appeal to visitors of all ages. tion areas. Parking relies on parking developed for Zoo Miami. Active Use Retention Lake appeal to visitors of all ages. Should utilize shared public parking on adjacent parking areas.

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44 PROGRAM Family Entertainment Center although it need not focus on animals. Attractions and elements must appeal to visitors of all ages and may include indoor arcades (elec tronic games, simulations, etc.), indoor challenge area (ice/roller skating, covered kart racing, laser tag, etc.), outdoor childrens area (fee/ free rides, games of skill and chance), performance space and dynamic audience participation areas. attraction areas. e Developer may provide for on-site parking, or may consider shared public parking on adjacent parking areas. e number and location of required spaces shall be determined by both provisions of the Code and departmental requirements. During peak use periods, parking may be allowed to overow to additional parking areas. Rockland Pine Restoration Area Vacation Hotel time for on-site visitors. It is more likely to include no restaurant and few resort amenities.

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traction areas. e Developer must provide for on-site parking within the hotel, but may consider shared public parking. e number and location of required spaces shall be determined by both provisions of the Code and departmental requirements. Banquet Hall although it need not focus on animals. e Banquet Hall is intended to be a two story facility adjacent to the entrance of the Zoo. ere is some expectation that the venue includes animal exhibits. Zoo Miami for all restaurant and banquet functions. Parking over 3000 parking spaces. e Developer may utilize this parcel for on-site and overow parking. e number and location of required spaces shall be determined by both provisions of the Code and departmental requirements. During peak use periods, parking may be al lowed to overow to all parking areas within the Entertainment Area.

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SITE PLANNING & ANALYSIS

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48 CONTEXT: AT LARGE e areas directly surrounding and encompassing the Zoo Mi ami and Gold Coast Railroad Museum property are ree Lakes to the north, South Miami Heights to the south, Palmetto Estates to the east, and Richmond West to the west. ese four areas, along with the site are all a part of unincorporated Miami Dade County. ese four areas serve primarily in a residential capacity. Included in and surrounding these four areas is a signicant amount of agricultural land, with lim ited commercial properties as well. Overall the Zoo is not in an ideal location for tourism. Its loca tion in proximity to other prominent areas of Miami and other attrac tions is quite remote. e area is also not a typical urban/pedestrian friendly one. Connections to the site are almost primarily vehicular. is severly limits connectability. Adding to this, the land uses of the areas do not add to its draw. Primarily residential, there is nothing but the Zoo and GCRM attracting visitors to the region. Visitors need more reasons to come to the site. Go ve rnment Owned Recr eational Va cant Non-Residentia l Industria l Co mmercia l Institutional Ag ricultural Residental

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50 CONTEXT: AREA Ra ilroad F edera l Co unty School Ag ricultural Unkn ow n e land directly surrounding the site using a much smaller scale, is almost exclusively government owned and operated with few exceptions. As can be seen the land represents dierent levels of gov ernment from the county to federal scale. e federal portion of the land hosts several dierent government organizations including the CIA, U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Army, and the U.S. Prison Bureau. e county portion inluceds Zoo Miami, the Gold Coast Railroad Muse um, and the Larry and Penny ompson Memorial Park. Interspersed in the land are parcels of school property, two of which comprise the University of Miami South Campus. e third school parcel is the site of Robert Morgan Vocational Technical In stitute. In the north west corner of the site, railroad owned property can be found set adjacent to the GCRM. Directly to the west of that is a singular parcel of agricultural land. Due to incomplete parcel data there is one unknown parcel of land believed to be owned by the CIA.

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52 SITE INVENTORY CONTOURS Shown here are 2 contour lines. As you can see the land is very at and as a re sult it retains alot of water. Also running around the Zoo Mi ami parcel is a 10 wide moat shown here.

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PROTECTED ROCKLAND PINE One of the last of its habitat, the county makes continuous eorts to main tain it. DISTURBED AND DILAPIDATED Much of the asphalt from the origi nal Naval Air Station remains, broken and weed infested. EXISTING PARKING e excess asphalt from the base has developed in a huge sea of unecessary parking.

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54 SITE PICTURES

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56 SITE PICTURES

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58 SITE PICTURES

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60 SITE ANALYSIS VIEWS & BUFFERS e site has several point of interest. e three main ones are the entrance to the property, the entrance to the Zoo, and the entrance to the Gold Coast Railroad Mu seum. ere are several disrup tive views out of the site that are not ideal, including but not limited to fencing that circles the length of the prop erty and disturbed lands.

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CIRCULATION Vehicular circulation to and from the Zoo is straightforward, but is poorly conceived to the Gold Coast Railroad Museum. Bus circulation to the Zoo is also well designed, but again is lacking with regards to the GCRM. Pedestrian circulation on site is almost completely ignored, and connec tions do not even exist to the GCRM. VEHICULAR BUS PEDESTRIAN

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62 SITE SYNTHESIS Opportunities 1. Opportunity to widen and enhance for grander entrance. 2. Opportunity to envelope users in the site, transporting them into another world. 3. Opportunity for grand unifying element to the site. 4. Opportunity to enhance existing Gold Coast Railroad Museum Entrance. 5. Opportunity to enhance Zoo Miami entrance. 6. Opportunity to connect to existing protected Rockland Pine habitat. 7. Opportunity to reestablish protected Rockland Pine habitat. 8. & 9. Opportunity to rethink vast expanses of underutilized asphalt. 10. Opportunity to utilize and enhance existing pedestrian circulation. 11. Opportunity to work with existing bus connections. Constraints 1. Existing CIA entrance needs concealing. 2. Existing entrance only has one connection over perimeter moat. 3. Primary service entrance to zoo needs concealing. 4. Secondary service entrance to zoo needs concealing. 5. Tertiary service entrance to zoo needs concealing.

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DESIGN IMPLEMENTATION

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66 CONCEPTS: PRELIMINARY TRACE SKETCHUP AUTOCAD RENDER

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Program Based Based exclusively on program elements and the areas best suited for their needs. Circulation Based Based on ease of circula tion both vehicular and pedestrian. User Experience Based Based around a central focal point directing the other elements.

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68 CONCEPTS: FINAL Based on a combination of the concepts, this one is dictating the major areas rather than ow. It is concen trated around a central focal point like the User Experience based concept, but has elements of the other two. e sites peculiar shape dictates exactly how it should be designed. Hence why many of the concepts are so similar. e central focal point juts out into 3 areas of primary interest. e location of these is determined by the entrances to the Zoo and GCRM. ere is a secondary area of interest between the two leading to the GCRM and Zoo respectively. e lighter areas should be treated as having the least interest, sites ideal for parking. Lastly the green is showing the possibility for ecological restoration and activity. 1 1 3 3 5 5 2 2 2 2 4 4 4 4 CENTRAL FOCUS CONSERVATION SPACE SECONDARY SPACE / CONNECTION PRIMARY ACTIVE SPACE PASSIVE SPACE

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PEDESTRIAN NODE ROCKLAND PINE EXISTING & RESTORED VEHICLE CIRCULATION PEDESTRIAN CIRCULATION ACTIVE FEATURE

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70 LAND USE: PLAN RETAIL & DINING ROCKLAND PINE EXISTING & RESTORED MULTI-PURPOSE LAKE RECREATIONAL SPACE HOTEL e Land use plan, in accordance with the program, provides for a variety of uses on site. Shown here (but not in the remaining plans) is the land alotted for the hotel. e hotel should be located amidst areas of the re-established Rockland Pine, keeping it secluded from the rest of the site. Trails should lead directly from the hotel to the rest of the site. e hotel should serve to keep tourists on site for multiday excursions, but only if a variety of uses allows this. At this scale, one can see that a majority of the site is dedicated to existing and proposed Rockland Pine habitat. It is indeed one of the last remaining stands of the endangered ecosystem and Miami Dade County already spends a great deal of time and energy to maintain it. Even with mainte nance existing areas of Rockland Pine are non-accessible on site, and are therefore unutilized. With the knowledge of this care and maintenance for the ecosystem, and due to its relatively shallow grow medium, the Rockland Pine habitat should be easily re-estabishable. Creating trails would bring an amenity that provides an educational and recreational service that makes use of land already maintained.

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0 600 1200 1800 2400 ZOO ZOO DRIVE GOLD COAST RAILROAD MUSEUM

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72 MASTER PLAN 1 3 5 11 7 13 2 4 10 6 12 8 9 TRAFFIC CIRCLE ACTIVE USE LAKE GOLD COAST MUSEUM PARKING ZOO MARKET ZOO BANQUET HALL GOLD COAST MUSEUM ENTRANCE FAMILY ENTERTAINMENT AREA ROCKLAND PINE CONSERVATION AREA ZOO MIAMI ENTRANCE GOLD COAST MARKET ZOO MIAMI PARKING BANQUET HALL TRAIL LAKE TRAIL AND PICNIC GROUNDS e main vein of the site is Zoo Drive which allows the only access to all parts of the site. In order to releave trac to the dierent areas of the site, Zoo drive will dump o into a large trac circle. e trac circle will serve as a central feature, dictating all forms of circulation. e traf c circle accesses all of the major areas of the site. It does so without interruption allowing for a better overall user expe rience. Radiating from the trac circle are the three major areas of the site. ese three areas are the Family Entertainment Area, the Zoo Market, and the Gold Coast Market. ese three ar eas are in themselves entry ports to dierent areas surround ing the site. e Family Entertainment Area accesses the Rockland Pine Restoration Area, the Zoo Market accesses the Zoo, and the Gold Coast Market accesses the Gold Coast Railroad Museum. A secondary feature coming o of the trac circle is the active use lake. e lake acts to compli ment the rest of the site, will maintaing its identity and uses. Altogether the variety of amenities will create a multitude of uses bringing and keeping visitors on-site.

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0 400 800 1200 1600 1 3 5 11 7 13 2 4 10 6 12 8 9

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74 MASTER PLAN: DIAGRAMS VEHICULAR CIRCULATION: Vehicular circulation throughout the site is dictat ed by the central trac circle while Zoo Drive remains unchanged. e circulation should remain uninterrupted through a series of bridges and underpasses. Service entrances are easily accesible in dierent areas of the site through both paved and un paved roads.

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0 400 800 1200 1600 PEDESTRIAN CIRCULATION: Pedestrian circulation throughout the site pro vides the users with dier ent options and experiences throughout the site. e cir culation should remain un interrupted through a series of bridges, boardwalks, and trails. Circulation ranges from paved to unpaved.

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76 PARKING AREAS: Parking has changed considerably, though the areas of parking remain relatively the same. e Zoo Miami parking shied around, while the Gold Coast Railroad Museum parking increased. e areas of overow parking are to be grassed open spaces that utilized during events or in future development. MASTER PLAN: DIAGRAMS PERMANENT GRASS OVERFLOW / FUTURE DEVELOPMENT

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SERVICE AREAS: Service areas can be found throughout the site. ese areas serve the dif fererent dining, retail, and entertainment facilities allowing for site specic maintenance. ese can all be accessed via the regular circulation of the site. Ser vice entrances to Zoo Miami and the Gold Coast Railroad Museum can each be found through eachs respective parking lot as well as sur rounding the restored Rock land Pine habitat. 0 400 800 1200 1600

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78 MASTER PLAN: DIAGRAMS Sample Bioswale in Lot

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STORMWATER MANAGEMENT: One of the major prob lems associated with the site due to its lack of contours is stormwater. ough the sites soils are easily drained, the issue of on-site retention of water needs to be addressed. As seen, the individual park ing lot islands act as swales. ese mini-swales send wa ter to the main swale / vein of the lot. is water then moves towards the trac cir cle where the excess eventu ally makes its way to the lake. is tiered system helps treat water on site. 0 400 800 1200 1600

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80 MASTER PLAN: TRAFFIC CIRCLE & F.E.A. 1 3 5 11 7 13 2 4 10 6 12 8 14 9 WALK-THROUGH WATERFALL / GROTTO LARGE PAVED PLAZA ROCKLAND PINE TRAIL GOLD COAST PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE (14 CLEARANCE) KAYAK RENTALS INTERACTIVE FOUNTAIN JETS ZOO MARKET PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE (14 CLEARANCE) PLAYGROUND BOARDWALK & PICNIC GROUNDS ZOO MARKET CLOCK TOWER ROCKLAND PINE NATURE CENTER AMPHITHEATER EVENT / OVERFLOW PARKING IMAX THEATERS e trac circle at the center of the site will serve as its heart. Everything eminates from the trac circle making it a feature in itself. At the center of the trac circle will be a large waterfall that acts a support for the pedestrian bridge that connects the two markets. is allows for the neither pedestrian, nor vehicular trac to be impeded. e pedes trian bridge will go through and under the waterfall allowing for visitors to see through the back of the feature.e circle also serves as the beginning of the active use lake feature. e Family Entertainment Area comes o of the circle. One of the main features of the site, it features a large vibrant pedestrian plaza. e plaza will feature a series of colorful tiled circular spaces in the style of Burle Marx. Coming o of this plaza is a series of amenities to enhance user experi ence. e idea behind these amenities and facilities is to create a space that users can visit both before and aer Zoo Miami and the Gold Coast Railroad Museum, respectively. e Family Entertainment Area butts up against the active use lake, allowing users to use them both interchangebly or in conjunction.

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0 160 320 480 640 1 3 5 11 7 13 2 4 10 6 12 8 14 9

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82 GUIDELINES: TRAFFIC CIRCLE & F.E.A. USES: Trac Circle -Walk under waterfall -Pedestrian Bridge between markets Plaza -Festivals & Events -Interactive Fountain -Childrens Playground Amphitheater -Concerts -Plays -Public Speakers -Outdoor movies IMAX eater -Nature based movies -Family friendly movies -Educational movies Nature Center -Nature based education -Pine Rockland Trail Lake -Kayak rentals -Boardwalks -Islands -Picnic Grounds -Running / walking trails e family entertainment area will be an open and vibrant multi-use space for people to gather in the day and night.

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TRAFFIC CIRCLE: -Heavily planted interactive waterfall -Feature clock tower -Wooden pedestrian bridge AMPHITHEATER AND THEATER: -2 large IMAX theaters (typical theater architecture) -Tiered grass outdoor amphitheater -Heavily planted entrances and exteriors NATURE CENTER & LAKE: -Wooden outdoor nature center -Wooden boardwalk -Native Rockland Pine ora FAMILY ENTERTAINMENT PLAZA: -Large plaza of circular spaces paved with colorful pavers -Interactive fountain jets that can be controlled -Large shade trees in planters such as Live Oaks

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84 PERSPECTIVE: TRAFFIC CIRCLE TRAFFIC CIRCLE WITH BRIDGE: In this perspective you can see the character of the waterfall as it would appear from the trac circle. From here the Zoo Market Clock Tower is also visible along with the pedestrian bridge. As you can see the pedestrian bridge has a clearance of 14 allowing for a bus stop under it. e bridge then goes through the waterfall (under it) and to the other side allowing for seemless pedestrian ac cess.

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86 MASTER PLAN: ZOO MARKET 1 3 5 7 2 4 10 6 8 9 AMAZON MARKET NODE INFORMATION KIOSK ASIA MARKET NODE ZOO MARKET BOARDWALK AUSTRALIA MARKET NODE RIVER FEATURE (4 SEGMENTS) AFRICA MARKET NODE ZOO MIAMI ENTRY PLAZA SANDY BEACH & PICNIC GROUNDS INTERCHANGEABLE SERVICE ROAD / PATH e Zoo Miami Market will take on the appearance of a world market. Just as the Zoo itself has four major lobes from around the world (the Amazon, Australia, Asia, and Af rica) so to will the market have four nodes. Each individual node will transport you to these four dierent areas of the world respectively. e nodes will achieve this with a combi nation of the typical architecture of the region as well as the native ora. Joining the four nodes will be a river of sorts that transforms throughout each node, beginning with the Amazon River and ending with the Nile River. Each node will have specialty themed retail and dining from each region. e retail and dining need not be limited to small food stands and shops, but may include larger more well known restaurants and stores. One such example would be an Outback Steakhouse in the Australia node. e idea is to create retail and dining that will bring Zoo visitors earlier and have them leaving later. ese nodes, along with the ac companying boardwalk, will also bring non-Zoo patrons to the site to shop and dine. us the Zoo Market adds to the Zoo while maintaining its individuality.

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88 GUIDELINES: ZOO MARKET USES: Amazon Market Node -emed Shopping -emed Dining -Festivals & Events Australia Market Node -emed Shopping -emed Dining -Festivals & Events Asia Market Node -emed Shopping -emed Dining -Festivals & Events -Zen Garden (Meditation) Africa Market Node -emed Shopping -emed Dining -Festivals & Events -Outdoor market Boardwalk -Outdoor Dining -Lakeside Shows (Fireworks) -Running / walking trails Beach -NO swimming -Picnics Grounds -Running / walking trails e Zoo Market node will send the users travelling to dierent exotic locations throughout the world.

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AMAZON MARKET NODE: -Combination of Spanish colonial architecture with barrel shingle roofs & South America indigenous huts. -Large leaf tropical ora found in the Amazon rainforest such as Philodendrons, Palms, Bromeliads, and Orchids ASIA MARKET NODE: -Pagoda style architecture with multi-tiered roofs -Asian native ora such as Bamboo and Crepe Myrtles AFRICA MARKET NODE: -Combination of equatorial Africa thatched roof huts & north African moorish architecture -African native ora such as Kapok trees, Savannah grasses, and Date Palms AUSTRALIA MARKET NODE: -Ranch style Australian architecture with porches -Australian native ora such as Foxtail Palms, Acacias, and Eucalyptus

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90 PERSPECTIVE: ZOO MARKET AFRICA MARKET NODE: In this perspective you can see the character of the Africa Market Node. Aside from site furniture and rail ings, you can see how pedestrians move throughout the space. e central element of the space is the large Kapok tree alongside the Nile River. Dierent types of African architecture and ora are evident throughout the site to represent dierent regions of the continent. Shops and dining should t these themes.

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92 PERSPECTIVE: ZOO MARKET ASIA MARKET NODE: In this perspective you can see the character of the Asia Market Node. Aside from site furniture and railings, you can see how pedestrians move throughout the space. e central element of the space is a Zen gravel garden with a pagoda type gazebo, all surrounded by water. Dif ferent types of Asian architecture and ora are evident throughout the site to represent dierent regions of the continent. Shops and dining should t these themes.

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94 MASTER PLAN: G.C.R.M. MARKET 1 3 5 7 2 4 6 8 9 HENRY FLAGLER VILLAGE NODE DECOMISSIONED AIRSHIP (INTERATIVE) JULIA TUTTLE TOWN NODE KIOSK / PLANTED RAILWAY WWII MUSEUM NODE CENTRAL BANDSTAND WWII MUSEUM (EXISTING STRUCTURE) FARMERS MARKET GOLD COAST MUSEUM ENTRY PLAZA e Gold Coast Market will take on the appearance of historical Florida. History says Julia Tuttle sent Henry Fla gler an Orange Blossom from Miami so inspiring a railroad extension down to the city, making Miami the city it is to day. To honor this, along with some site specic history, the market will be broken up into three nodes all connected by an inset railroad track. e rst node will be Flagler Village displaying an old Florida cracker town feel. e second node will be an old WWII town complete with bandstand to com pliment the existing WWII Museum. In this node a deco missioned interactive WWII Airship will be present to assist the museum in sharing the history of the site. e last node will be Tuttle Town which will have the feel of old Miami. Each node will have specialty themed retail and din ing. e retail and dining need not be limited to small food stands and shops, but may include larger more well known restaurants and stores, such as Cracker Barrel. e idea is to create retail and dining that will bring museum visitors ear lier and have them leaving later. us the Gold Coast Market adds to the GCRM while maintaining its individuality.

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96 GUIDELINES: G.C.R.M. MARKET USES: Henry Flagler Village Node -emed shopping -emed dining -Festivals & Events -Picnics -Farmers Market WWII Town Node -World War II Museum -Airship Interactive ride -emed shopping -emed Dining -Festivals & Events -Picnics -Bandstand Small Shows Pubic Speakers Julia Tuttle Town Node -Miami History Museum -emed shopping -emed dining -Festivals & Events -Picnics e Gold Coast Market will transport you through dierent eras of what Florida used to be, especially in its railroad towns.

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HENRY FLAGLER VILLAGE NODE: -Old Florida cracker style architecture with wood structures, porches and metal roofs -Plants native to northern Florida such as Live Oaks and Sabal Palms WWII TOWN NODE: -Existing historic barracks building & typical Americana architecture with bandstand -Florida native plants such as Florida Royals, Slash Pines and Saw Palmettos JULIA TUTTLE TOWN NODE: -Beach bungalow style architecture -Beach type ora native to Miami such as Citrus trees, Sea Grapes and Coconut Palms

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98 PERSPECTIVE: G.C.R.M. MARKET FLAGLER VILLAGE NODE: In this perspective you can see the character of the Flagler Village Node. You can see how the railroad tracks move through the space. e central element of the space is a simple gazebo to relax under. Old Florida cracker style architecture and ora are evident throughout the site to represent what Henry Flaglers Florida may have resembled. Shops and dining should t these themes, including an open air farmers market.

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100 PERSPECTIVE: G.C.R.M. MARKET WWII TOWN NODE: In this perspective you can see the character of the WWII Town Node. You can see how the railroad tracks move through the space. e central element of the space is an old style band stand. e sites existing historic building (museum) will dictate the architecture and ora throughout the space. In the background the blimp is visible behind the museum. Shops and dining should t these themes, including an open air farmers market.

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CONCLUSION

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In conclusion, to enhance user experience, one must cre ate a variety of experiences for a variety of people to enjoy. With this in mind, Miami-Dade County Parks and Recre ation has a real opportunity to create a destination that will open up this southern part of Miami. e project could help Zoo Miami and the Gold Coast Railroad Museum to not only be revitalized, but to become premiere destinations rather than secondary ones. THANK YOU

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REFERENCES Works Cited: Asher, Kevin. Miami-Dade County Zoo Entertainment Area: Request for Information. Rep. Miami, 2011. Print. Camp Everglades. South Florida Council, Home. Web. 26 Apr. 2012. . Dade County Pine. List of North American Trees. Web. 26 Apr. 2012. . Downtown Disney Area. Downtown Disney Area. Web. 26 Apr. 2012. . Fairchilds Pineland. Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden. Web. 26 Apr. 2012. . FGDL Search/ Download Data. Florida Geographic Data Library. Web. 26 Apr. 2012. . FNAI | Cooperative Land Cover Map. Florida Natural Areas Inventory. Web. 26 Apr. 2012. . Freeman, Paul. Richmond Naval Air Station, Richmond Heights, FL. Abandoned & Little-Known Airelds. 2002. Web. 26 Apr. 2012. . Gold Coast Railroad Museum Bringing History to Life. Gold Coast Railroad Museum. Web. 26 Apr. 2012. . Gold Coast Railroad Museum. Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 24 Apr. 2012. Web. 26 Apr. 2012. . History in the Making. Gold Coast Railroad Museum. Web. 26 Apr. 2012. . List: Americas Most Visited Cities. Forbes. Forbes Magazine. Web. 26 Apr. 2012. . Marcus, Clare Cooper. People Places: Design Guidelines. Berkeley, CA: Dept. of Landscape Architecture, University of California, 1976. Print.

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Miami Dade County Department of Planning and Zoning. Miami Metro Zoo DRI Application to Amend the Miami-Dade County Comprehensive Development Master Plan. Rep. Miami: Miami-Dade County Department of Planning and Zoning, 2007. Print. Miami. Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 26 Apr. 2012. Web. 26 Apr. 2012. . Naval Air Station Richmond. Gold Coast Railroad Museum. Web. 26 Apr. 2012. . Ocial Port of Miami Cruise Guide. Greater Miami and the Beaches. Web. 26 Apr. 2012. . ORCA Consulting LLC, and Forbes Architects. Miami Metro Zoo Entertainment Area: On-Site Trac Study. Rep. Miami: ORCA Consulting LLC, 2009. Print. Pine Rocklands. Web. 26 Apr. 2012. . Quick Facts. ZOO MIAMI. Web. 26 Apr. 2012. . Richmond Naval Air Station. Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 26 Apr. 2012. Web. 26 Apr. 2012. . SOFIA DOI Science Plan in Support of Ecosystem Restoration, Preservation, and Protection in South Florida Habitat and Species Recovery Proj ects Projects to Recover Vegetative Communities and Multiple Animal Species. South Florida Information Access (SOFIA). Web. 26 Apr. 2012. . South Florida Rocklands. Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 26 Apr. 2012. Web. 26 Apr. 2012. . Top 11 ings To Do in Miami, Florida. About.com Miami. Web. 26 Apr. 2012. . U-boat Archive U-134 Photographs of Airship Operations at NAS Richmond. U-boat Archive. Web. 26 Apr. 2012. . Zoo History. ZOO MIAMI. Web. 26 Apr. 2012. . Zoo Miami. Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 23 Apr. 2012. Web. 26 Apr. 2012. .

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Images: the Entrance to the Crandon Park Zoo on Key Biscayne Photo Don Boyd Photos at Pbase.com. PBase. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Almms African Savanna. Almms African Savanna: Environment. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Australian Ranch House. e Telegraph. Telegraph Media Group. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Bamboo Clump. Bamboo Biology. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Banko Safra Park. Transvaal. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Beach Bungalow. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Boardwalk Trail. NO Adventure. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Child Hiking. Adventure Families. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Child Laughing. Isucceedbook.com. Web. 26 Apr. 2012. . Cibolo Nature Center Lake|Flato Architects. Lake|Flato Architects. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Coconut Palm. Lionheart Palm Nursery Ft. Myers, Florida by Juliet Vidussi. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Cracker Farmhouses, 1840-1920. Home Remodeling, Repair and Improvement. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . De Funiak Springs, FL : e New Boardwalk, on Lake De Funiak. Photo, Picture, Image (Florida) at City-data.com. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Dixieland Band Stand at Yesterland. Yesterland. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Downtown Disney Map. Whats Up With e Mouse? Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Downtown Disney Market. An Aernoon at Downtown Disney|. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Downtown Disney. Reviews in Downtown Disney! Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Eucalyptus Deglupta. Grey Grid Paper. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Family Smiling. Balboa Photography. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Flamenco Dancers. Great Middle Way. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Florida Royal Palm. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. .

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Four Cornered Pagoda. Four Cornered Pagoda. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Frank A. Leak Amphitheater For e Arts. Village of Colonie, New York. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Grand Canyon Imax eater. Grand Canyon Imax eater. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Grandparents. Steves Digicams. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . House of Blues. Walt Disney World Resort. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Interactive Fountain. West Palm Beach News. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Laughing African American Family. Coalition for Healthy African American Relationships and Marriages (CHAARM) St. Louis. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Live Oak. Scraeblog. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Miami Aerial. AERIAL VIEW OF MIAMI BEACH WALLPAPER. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Miami Skyline. Home. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Moroccan Architecture. Golf, Where to Play, What to See, Where to Stay Ou Jouer, Que Voir, Ou Sejourner. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Parking Lot Bio-Swale. Document Moved. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Pedestrian Bridge. ArchDaily. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Petersen & Clark Expedition: Town Clock. Topics: Santa Barbara. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Philodendrons. Alibaba. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Rainforest Cafe Downtown Disney. Rainforest Cafe. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Spanish Architecture. Landscape Design Services with Free Ideas from Online Architects and Contractors. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . StevenM_61. People Boarding Train, Gold Coast Railroad, C. 1960. Flickr. Yahoo!, 03 Oct. 2007. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Tropical Shopping Center. Architectural Elements. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. . Zookeeper in Hurricane Damage at Miami Zoo. OUT965034. Web. 27 Apr. 2012. .

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FUSTER 2 Summary of Work : The intent is the c reation of a Zoo Miami Entertainment Area that will serve as an addition to the existing Miami Zoo fabric. The project is a mixture of resort and theme park design and should serve to revitalize Zoo Miami by bring ing in an influx of tourism. In order to do this properly a revisio n of existing phases and parcels for development is in order. The project is in fact a real addition to the Zoo that has been plan ned for the future, and while not designed, already has a desired program. The project is currently on hold with a variety o f other Miami Zoo additions currently in progress. Zoo Miami has sent out a Request for Information to a variety of firms and investors in order to gauge interest in the project. The desired program includes a Water Park and a Vacation Hotel, but I will concentrate on all the surrounding and connecting areas with a general land use plan for the remainder (all of which is detailed further in the proposal) This involves areas directly surrou nding and connecting the Water P ark and Hotel, the complete desig n of the Family Entertainment Center, Gulf Coast Railroad Museum Main Street, and Zoo Entrance Main Street (with building footprints and architectural style in place of actual building architecture). My goal is to create a finalized master/land use plan fo r the entire Zoo Miami Entertainment Area with more emphasis on the connections, entrances, and pedestrian areas and less emphasis on both the hotel and water park design. The idea is to create a Downtown Disney feel to the area in order to bring in both tourists and locals alike. The area should also serve to become a build up and grand entrance to the zoo. While the main attraction of the site is indeed the Zoo and the Gold Coast Railroad Museum, the project should stand alone as its own entity with it s own uses. The idea in connecting all of these sites is also to create a connection between the Gold Coast Railroad Museum and APPENDIX

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FUSTER 3 the Zoo to bring more tourism to both. Site Context with proposed site highlighted in green and Zoo boundary in red FUSTER 4 BACKGROUND Previous Studies Zoo Miami has gone through a variety of studies, b ut with regards to the site there are two that are of particular interest and relevance. There is the Comprehensive Development Masterplan which was designed for the entirety of the Zoo in order to set a plan and land uses for a future cohesive development (shown below). The study is a very zoomed out plan for the different phases of development the Zoo wishes to go throug h. I was told this plan is outdated and that they are very open to new ide as and suggestions with regards to the Entertainment Area The other is an On-Site Traffic Study with Planning Assumptions, Layout, Parking, and On-Site Transportation done for the entrance of the Zoo, which suggests the best locations for each of the elements of the program (shown below). Though the study is relatively new, I was also told that this is flexible. The information is as follows and copies of the studies can be provided upon request.

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FUSTER 5 On-Site Traffic Study: Planning Assumptions, Layout, Parking, and On-Site Transportation ORCA Consulting LLC and Forbes Architects 2009 Miami Metrozoo Entertainment Area Traffic Study Final Report June 2009 FUSTER 6 Comprehensive Master Plan for different additions to Miami Zoo that will be built in phases. This is a concept, nothing here is finalized or designed Project Value The project has various levels of value for me and for my professional future. The project involves a more commercial style of design that gear s towards

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FUSTER 7 that of resorts and amusement parks. This area of the profession is not only what I hope to concentrate on in my professional life, but these are also aspects of Landscape Architecture that are relatively unknown to me. I hope to use this project to gain a basal knowledge of these aspects so as to have them for my future. The project is als o an important project to me not only because I was born and raised in Miami, but also because I had volunteered at the Zoo for quite some time in my past. I have a lot of emotional stock in the zoo, and thus this project. I hope to create a product that could actually become reality and could help to revitalize Zoo Miami. The revitalization effort is not just to bring tourists into the site, but also to bring the residents back to Zoo Miami. Major Issues The Zoo Miami Entertainment Area site has a few potential issues. One such issue is that of stormwater management and grading. The site, like much of Miami and especially South Miami, is very flat. As a result of the site being flat and low-lying, it retains a lot of water during rain events. Findin g ways to mediate this water and preventing flooding will prove to be a difficult task. Another issue with the site is the lack of proposed architecture for the proposed program. One such element is the hotel, but also includes any buildings that are going to be located on the site. Without this information I will be forced to create very basic building footprints for the site. Lastly there is the issue of on -site parking. With the addition of new program elements on existing parking areas, much of the parking will have to be relocated. Also, parking will have to be added to the site to accommodate for its new uses. Due to this, creating connections FUSTER 8 between the proposed non -parking program elements will be difficult to create without having these connections interrupted by parking. All these elements, though prevalent, are seemingly resolvable. SITE CONTEXT Physical Features The site is currently a mix of undeveloped land and expanses of parking lot. There are various areas of parking, most of which need better connections between one another. Scattered throughout the parking lots are vegetated parking lot islands whose value s need to be determined. As previously stated, the site is a low-lying flat area. The site also lacks contours and as a result it collects a significant amo unt of water during rain events. The removal and treatment of this stormwater will be a major factor in the design for the site. Further along in the analysis of the site, a soil survey is necessary in order t o determine the permeability of the soils to see how well they drain stormwater. As far as current structures go, the only significant one on -site is the Gold Coast Railroad Museum. Just off -site are all of the Zoological Society of Florida buildings tha t need to be taken into account. Surrounding Uses and Context One of the major issues that Zoo Miami currently has is its proximity to different areas of Miami, especially the prominent tourist areas of Miami. While expectations that the project would ta ke away tourism from Miami Beach are unreasonable, the area could become a day time destination for families. The

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FUSTER 9 immediate surrounding areas surrounding the Zoo have a variety of uses. Prior to entering into the Zoo is a major roadway that is surrounded by mostly residential properties with some commercial ones as well (in particular a shopping plaza to the Northeast of the entrance). Surrounding the Zoo on three sides (East, West, and South) are military bases and military housing, though the immediate area around is forested providing a buffer from these. PROJECT DATA Existing Program A revision of the desired program will most likely be in order, as well as a reorganization of the parcels of land that Miami -Dade County wishes to develop The program has been described as flexible allowing for new suggestions for parcel uses (such as a different land use in place of a water park). Suggestions are open as long as they make sense and take into account existing utilities and infrastructure. As it is the program includes a water park, a family entertainment center, a vacation hotel, two areas of food service/specialty retail (main street themed), a banquet hall, and parking What I intend to focus on is the overall connections between the elemen ts with simple land use plans for many of the program elements (I will not be doing detailed designs for the individual areas) As for the two Main Streets and parking, I do intend to go into detail. A copy of the actual Request For Informations progr am can be seen in the appendix All of the proposed elements are to be for people of all ages and should also relate to the existing Zoo fabric. The proposed attraction (water park) area is located on a 22-acre plot of land and has a maximum allowable hei ght of 70 feet. FUSTER 10 The proposed amusement (family entertainment center) area is located on a 19acre plot of land. The proposed lodging (vacation hotel) area is located on a 24 acre plot of land. The proposed food service and specialty themed restaurant (main streets) areas are located on three acre (Gold Coast Railroad Museum main street) and four acre (Zoo Miami main street) plots of land. The parking area is located on 37 separate acres of land and can accommodate 3000 parking spaces. Lastly, the resta urant/banquet hall is located on a quarter acre of land. Below is a map of the existing program and each elements designated parcels. Proposed Land Use for Developable Parcels as per the traffic study done

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FUSTER 12 tourism, not only from out -of-towners but also from locals. A success would be a site that can attract some of the visitors that would otherwise be going to Miami Beach, while still creating an environment that locals can frequent. PROPOSED RESULTS Products Products will be adjusted with more information and analysis. Goals and Objectives Case studies of projects with one or more similarities. *I could not find any precedents to my project. Analysis *Vegetation, soils topography, program, user, history, hydrology, etc. Synthesis Evaluation of Past Studies *Based on both traffic study and comprehensive master plan. Concept Plan Land Use Plan Master Plan Phasing plan Grading/Stormwater Management Detail Plans *Only for certain areas Sections SketchUp Model FUSTER 11 Architecture and Structures Currently the only structure the site has is the Gold Coast Railroad Museum, though the proposed designs must work with the existing buildings, architecture and infrastructure of the entrance of Zoo Miami. Seeing as though the project is currently only in the Request For Information phase, the architecture of many of the program elements has not yet b een design ed. Thus I will be making simple building footprints and faade/building character suggestions in place of actual architecture. Base Information Currently have very limited base information, with most of it being presented in the pages of this proposal. The acreage for the site is in the existing traffic study shown in this packet. My contacts with the project have been incredibly helpful and have offered to provide me with any base information I need in the future. With future analysis, a better understanding of the site and more information will be provided. Inventory Information I currently do not have any inventory information. The goal for the remainder of the semester is to collect this information to have it available to start the spring semester. Users The site is primarily used by families with young children The intent of the design is to bring more variety to the users of the site, while still maintaining the family oriented nature. The design of the site will also seek to increase

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FUSTER 13 *Possible SCHEDULE *Schedule is tentative. Fall Semester Further contact with clients Develop a plan for action Collect base information Goals and Objectives Case studies of projects with one or more similarities. Analysis Spring Semester Week 1 Synthesis / Book Layout Week 2 Study Evaluation / Book Layout Week 3 Concept Plan / Land Use Plan Week 4 Land Use Plan / Master Plan Week 5 MID TERM REVIEWS / Master Plan Week 6 Post Review Corrections Week 7 Post Review Corrections Week 8 Phasing Plan Week 9 Grading/Stormwater Management Week 10 Detail Plans Week 11 Detail Plans Week 12 Sections FUSTER 14 Week 13 SketchUp Model Week 14 SketchUp Model / Finalize Book Week 15 Finalize Book Week 16 FINAL PRESENTATIONS A PPENDIX The following is the program for the site as written in the Request For Information by Kevin Asher: Attraction Approximately 22 -acre parcel of land that is intended to be developed into a water park. The parcel lies to the northwest of the front gate of the zoo and is currently a parking lot. It has already been determined to be freely developable and free of environmental hazards. If the WF is located here, the proposed venue should contain attractions and elements commonly found in contemporary and successful water parks. The WP may have rides and features that include, but are not limited to a lazy river, wave/surf pool, bowls, inner tube/mat racer slides, slide towers, flow riders, family raft rides, water coaster and interactive play areas. Attractions and elements should appeal to visitors of all ages. The selected Proposer shall be responsible f or all construction within and outside the WP area, inclusive of design and permitting, for all rides and attractions, support buildings, equipment areas, parking, access roads, traffic signalization and entrances necessary to provide seamless access for p atron vehicles, on -site trolley vehicles and pedestrians between all attraction areas. There is a height limit of 70 feet on this site. The Developer may provide for on site parking within the WP parcel, or may consider shared public parking on adjacent parking areas under the exclusive control of Zoo Miami and possibly subject to a parking charge. The number and location of required spaces shall be determined by both provisions of the Code and departmental requirements. All parking revenues accrue sol ely to Miami -Dade County. During peak use periods, parking may be allowed to overflow to additional parking areas as determined by Miami Dade County. (Asher) AmusementApproximately 19 -acre parcel of land that is intended to be developed into a Family Entertainment Center. The parcel lies to the northwest of the front gate of the zoo and is currently a parking lot. It has already been determined to be freely developable and free of environmental hazards. The proposed Family Entertainment Center should be both complimentary and compatible with the Zoo Miami and the adjacent Water Park, although it need not focus on animals. Attractions and elements must appeal to visitors of all ages

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FUSTER 15 and may include indoor arcades (electronic games, simulations, etc.), indoor challenge area (ice/roller skating, covered kart racing, laser tag, etc.), outdoor childrens area (fee/free rides, games of skill and chance), performance space and dynamic audience participation areas. Over 75,000 sf of specialty themed retail and food service area already approved for this area. No miniature golf attraction will be considered for inclusion in the project. The selected Proposer shall be responsible for all construction within and outside the FEC area, inclusive of design and per mitting, for all elements, support buildings, equipment areas, parking, access roads, traffic signalization and entrances necessary to provide seamless access for patron vehicles, service vehicles, on -site trolley vehicles and pedestrians between all attra ction areas. The Developer may provide for on -site parking within the FEC parcel, or may consider shared public parking on adjacent parking areas under the exclusive control of Zoo Miami and possibly subject to a parking charge. The number and location o f required spaces shall be determined by both provisions of the Code and departmental requirements. All parking revenues accrue solely to Miami Dade County. During peak use periods, parking may be allowed to overflow to additional parking areas as determ ined by Miami Dade County. (Asher) LodgingThe Vacation Hotel (VH) attraction parcel is an approximately twenty four-acre site (24.53 acres) and lies furthest northwest of the front gate of Zoo Miami (Map 3). The site, currently unimproved, is exempt ed from development restrictions, can be leased for private development and has already been determined to be freely developable and clear of environmental hazards. If located here, the Vacation Hotel may have 200 rooms and not exceed 70 feet tall. This low to mid -range hotel is designed to extend stay time for on site visitors. It is more likely to include no restaurant and few resort amenities. The selected Proposer shall be responsible for all construction within and outside the VH area, inclusive of design and permitting, for all elements, support buildings, equipment areas, parking, access roads, traffic signalization and entrances necessary to provide seamless access for patron vehicles, service vehicles, on -site trolley vehicles and pedestrians between all attraction areas. The Developer must provide for on-site parking within the VH parcel, but may consider shared public parking on adjacent parking areas under the exclusive control of Miami Metrozoo and subject to a parking charge. The number and location of required spaces shall be determined by both provisions of the Code and departmental requirements. All parking revenues accrue solely to Miami -Dade County. (Asher) Food Service and Specialty Themed Retail The Gold Coast Main Street (GC MS) parcel is an approximately three acre site and lies within the Gold Coast Railroad Museum Park property. The site, currently a parking lot, is exempted from development restrictions, can be licensed for private development and has already been determi ned to be freely developable and clear of environmental hazards. The proposed GCMS venue should be both complimentary and compatible with the Zoo Miami and adjacent Water Park, although it need not be FUSTER 16 animals or historic transportation. Food service and s pecialty themed retail, along with architectural amenities consistent with the attraction are required. Over 30,000 sf of food service area and 20,000 sf of specialty themed retail have already been approved for this area. The selected Proposer shall be r esponsible for all construction within and outside the Gold Coast Main Street area, inclusive of design and permitting, for all elements, support buildings, equipment areas, parking, access roads, traffic signalization and entrances necessary to provide se amless access for patron vehicles, service vehicles, on -site trolley vehicles and pedestrians between all attraction areas. The Developer must provide for on -site parking within the Gold Coast Railroad Museum parcel, and may consider shared public parking on adjacent parking areas under the exclusive control of Miami Dade County and subject to a parking charge. The number and location of required spaces shall be determined by both provisions of the Code and departmental requirements. All parking revenues accrue solely to Miami -Dade County. During peak use periods, parking may be allowed to overflow to additional parking areas as determined by Miami Dade County. (Asher) Food Service and Specialty Themed Retail The Zoo Miami Main Street (ZMMS) parcel is an approximately four acre site (4.32 acres) and lies within the Zoo Miami property (Map 3). The site, currently a landscaped walkway, is exempted from development restrictions, can be licensed for private development and has already been determined to be freely developable and clear of environmental hazards. If located here, the proposed venue should be both complimentary and compatible with the Zoo Miami and any adjacent Water Park. Food service, retail and the architectural amenities in support of these improvements must appeal to visitors of all ages. Only semi -permanent sales areas along the Main Street are permissible. The selected Proposer shall be responsible for all construction within and outside the ZMMS area, inclusive of design and permitting, for all elements, support buildings, parking, access roads, traffic signalization and entrances necessary to provide seaml ess access for patron vehicles, service vehicles, on -site trolley vehicles and pedestrians between all attraction areas. Parking relies on parking developed for Zoo Miami. (Asher) ParkingThe Common Parking (CP) parcel is an approximately thirty -seven acre site, comprised of three separate areas (23 acres, 9 acres, and 5 acres) and located within Zoo Miami and Gold Coast Railroad Museum Park properties. The parcel, currently unimproved, is exempted from development restrictions, can be leased for private development and has already been determined to be freely developable and clear of environmental hazards. The CP parcel is designed to provide common and shared parking for the entire Entertainment Area. Depending on design, the property can support ove r 3000 parking spaces. The Developer may utilize this parcel for on -site and overflow parking under the exclusive control of Zoo Miami and subject to a parking charge. The Developer would be responsible for upgrading and

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FUSTER 17 constructing lighted parking to t he requirements of current Code. The number and location of required spaces shall be determined by both provisions of the Code and departmental requirements. All parking revenues accrue solely to Miami -Dade County. During peak use periods, parking may b e allowed to overflow to all parking areas within the Entertainment Area as determined by Miami Dade County. (Asher) Food Service The Restaurant/Banquet Hall (RBH) parcel is an approximately onequarter-acre site (0.26 acres) and located within the Z oo Miami. The site, currently supporting parking, can be licensed for private development and has already been determined to be freely developable and clear of environmental hazards. The proposed RBH venue designed to both complimentary and compatible wi th the Zoo Miami and the adjacent Water Park, although it need not focus on animals. The RBH is approved for 19,000 sf, where the bottom 9,000 sf support a conventional restaurant at the front gate of Zoo Miami; and the second floor of the facility supports a 10,000 sf banquet hall for catered events. There is some expectation that the venue includes animal exhibits, and the County will commit to certain maintenance of these areas at its expense. The selected Proposer shall be responsible for all c onstruction within and outside the RBH area, inclusive of design and permitting, for all elements, equipment and exhibit areas necessary to provide seamless access for pedestrians between all attraction areas. The Developer may rely on existing parking wit hin Zoo Miami for all res taurant and banquet functions. (Asher)