Nelson's oil-colour picture book for the nursery

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Material Information

Title:
Nelson's oil-colour picture book for the nursery
Uniform Title:
comprising, Three little kittens, Four-footed favourites, Nursery rhymes, Children in the wood ; with twenty-four pages of illustrations printed in oil colours.
Physical Description:
1 v. (various pagings), 24 leaves of plates :col. ill. ;28 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
T. Nelson and Sons,
Place of Publication:
London ;Edinburgh ;New York :
Publication Date:

Notes

General Note:
Baldwin Library copy lacks 2 plates. Children's poetry. Nursery rhymes Local subject: Bldn1866.
General Note:
Index-Genre/Form: Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding)1866.rbbin A.E. Corp. Name: Thomas Nelson & Sons A.E. Uniform Titles:Three little kittens. Children in the wood (Ballad). A.E. Hier Places: England ,London. Scotland, Edinburgh. United States, New York,New York.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
UF Special Collections
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 26642848
oclc - 34770093
System ID:
AA00013047:00001


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THREE LITTLE KITTEI;3.
FOUR-F.OTED FAVOURITE, ,


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OME, listen, little children,
And all my words attend,
SFor I some joyous pictures
Would to your gaze commend;
SAnd ne'er was such a peep-,show
Thrown open to your view,
As this, whose brilliant changes
I now reveal to you!

First, see the little kittens who have lost their little mittens--
What trouble and confusion all such carelessness must cause!
And next, our gallant rover, who swims the brooklet over,
Brave Neptune, with his master's stick between his sturdy paws!


Lo! here again sits Tabby, demure as monk in abbey-
How you must love to look upon your old Four-footed Friends!
And the lambkins, gentle creatures, with innocent mild features;
And Cadwallader, the goat, you know,-how well her kids she tends!

Here, too, is blithsome Bunny, with his ways so quaint and funny,
And he nibbles, nibbles, nibbles at the cabbage fresh and green;
While the squirrel, ever whimful, of mirth and frolic brimful,
Hides among the hazel-boughs, or the old oak's leafy screen.


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A WORD TO THE LITTLE ONES.

Next see the children crying-poor dears I to bed they're hininiig--
I wonder how so many elves in one small shoe could sleep;
And here is Baby swinging, while Nurse is softly singing;
And the queer old dame who thought that she the silver moon could
sweep!

Snail, snail, I hear a humming; away, for thieves are coming;
And you, along with Mistress Doll, to bed had better go.
But what comes next? Oh, fie now! The scene will make you cry now,
For here the little children lie whose uncle worked such woe!

Two cruel ruffians bore them-I cannot but deplore them-
Far, far into the woodland dim, and left them there to die;
Their days too soon were numbered, and in death they softly slumbered,
While o'er them gentle Robin piled the autumn leaves so dry I

Then listen, little children,
And all my words attend,
For I some beauteous fancies
Would to your gaze commend;
And, surely, ne'er did little ones
On such a peep-show look
As this, in brilliant colours,-
THE NURSERY ,PICTURE-B OOK!














"THE THREE LITTLE KITTENS."


I.

IREE little kittens they lost their mittens,
And they began to cry,
Oh! mammy dear,
We sadly fear,
Our mittens we have lost!"
"What! lost your mittens
You naughty kittens,
Then you shall have no pie."
Miew, miew, miew, miew,
Miew, miew, miew, miew,




























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IE three little kittens had need of mittens;
The winter now was nigh.
".Oh! mammy dear,
We fear, we fear,
Our mittens we shall need."
"Go, seek your mittens,
You silly kittens;
There's tempest in the sky."
Miew, miew, miew, miew,
Miew, miew, miew, miew.



















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III.


JE three little kittens, in seeking their mittens,
Upset the table high.
Oh! mammy dear,
We doubt and fear
The house is tumbling down."
" You foolish kittens,
Go, find your mittens,
And do not make things fly."
Miew, miew, miew, miew,
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IE three little kittens they found their mittens,
And they began to cry,
"Oh! mammy dear,
See here, see here,
Our mittens we have found."
"What.! found your mittens,
You little kittens,
Then you shall have some pie."
Purr, purr, purr,'purr,
Purr, purr, purr, purr.

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HE three little kittens put on their mittens,
And soon ate up the pie;
Oh! mammy dear,
We greatly fear,
Our mittens we have soiled."
"What! soiled your mittens
You naughty kittens! "
Then they began to sigh,
Miew, miew, miew, miew,
Miew, miew, miew, miew,

The three little kittens they washed their mittens,
And hung them up to dry;
Oh! mammy dear,
Look here, look here,
Our mittens we have washed."
"What! washed your mittens,
You darling kittens!
But I smell a rat close by!
Hush! hush! Miew, miew,
Miew, miew, miew, miew.










































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OUR CAT ANI KITTENS.


EE our Tabby! There she sits
With nearly half-a-dozen kits!
Pretty little kittens! they
Do but little else than play.
One, you see, is lapping milk;
One unwinds a reel of silk ;
One a riband drags along,
To show that she is getting strong.
The other white one wants to steal
Her jet black brother's pretty reel.
And kitten number five-well, she
With Mother Tabby's tail makes free.
So now, good folks, our rhyming ends
About our six FOUR-FOOTED FRIENDS.





















































































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OUR LAMBS.


EERE are three of our friends; they look sheepish we know,
And lambs look more sheepish the older they grow;
Yet lambs are such gentle and innocent creatures,
We care more for their ways than we do for their features.
They are pleasant to look at; we wish they were bolder,
And would live long and yet not get bigger or older;
We would keep them young always if we had the power,
But lambs, like ourselves, all grow older each hour.
As lambkins get older, less playful are they,
And children should strive to get wiser each day.
The boy who cares more for his play than his book,
The older he grows the more sheepish will look,
And for sheepishness innocence can't make amends,
As it does in the case of our FOUR-FOOTED FRIENDS.



























































































































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OUR GOAT AND KIDS.


JR pretty goat was born in Wales,
She and her kids have little tails-
Their ears are large enough, no doubt-
Quite large enough to whisk about.
Their hair is long and soft as wool;
Their eyes are brilliant, soft, and full.
We know that many goats can leap
From crag to crag, however steep;
We wonder that they do not fall,
Yet think our Nan would beat them all;
For once or twice we saw her jump
Three times the height of yonder pump;
And see how well her kids she tends!-
We like our Welsh FOUR-FOOTED FRIENDS.





















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OUR RABBITS.


^ RISKY and frolicksome, furry and funny,
- Every one is a favourite bullinn,
tEven the little ones come when we call them, i
The tricks that we play them do not appal them ;
But if strangers attempt with our rabbits to play,,
They are timid and shy, and scamper away,
Over each other they scramble and tumble,
Of food and litter they make a sad jumble.
Rabbits, as all the world knows, will be rabbits;
Ours are the best of their kind in their habits,
We know they don't sing, and they're desperate feeders,
But our does are so plump, and such capital breeders
That carrots, and turnips, and green odds and ends,
We never can grudge to our FOUR-FOOTED FRIENDS.



































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OUR SQ UI REL.


ITH his fine bushy tail, and his merry bright eyes,
To show he is happy our pet squirrel tries;
Such a good-tempered fellow, so brimful of glee,
He plays in his cage just as though he were free.
If he were a wild one, we know that his tail
-. He would in his bark-boat use as a sail;
He would, too, in autumn, for winter provide,
Acorns and.nuts he would carefully hide.
Up the oak in our garden he merrily goes,
And there plainly his fondness for acorns he shews,
On his hind legs he sits, or as some say, he stands,
And his fore-paws he cleverly uses like hands!
He munches his acorns although the bough bends;
He deserves to be classed with our FOUR-FOOTED FRIENDS.













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HASH-A-BYE, BABY.
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USH-A-BYE, baby, on the tree top! !
There you are put, and there you must.stop! !*l
This way and that way the cradle will swing, .
High on the tree where the birds sit and sin.
When the wind blows, the cradle will rock'!
AV. -
Then, baby, take care of your pretty new frock -
For if the strong wind should blow it away,
And take you inside it, why, what would .y.oti say ?
And should the bough break, the cradle would fall-
Then down would come baby, the new frock and all!
But hush-a-bye baby, don't cry, pretty dear,
The bough is quite strong, there is no need to fear!










































































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THE OLD WOMAN IN A BASKET.


IERE was an old woman who had a large broom,
She sat in a basket to sweep a small room;
Though her seat was so low, her thoughts were so high,
They carried her-basket and all-to the sky.
Said she, I shall come back, I know, very soon,
I'll sweep down those cobwebs I see on the moon;
Oh, dear! it is nice in a basket to fly,
I think I can bring home a star if I try."
She turned out her toes and-she gave a loud scream,
And cried out, "0 dear! what a very strange dream!
Now who would have thought that when I meant to sweep
I should sit in a basket, and fall asleep!"

















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SNAIL, SNAIL.


NAIL, snail, gallop away!
Robbers are coming to pull down your wall
Snail, snail; do not delay!
Robbers are coming, so loudly we call.
Snail, snail, gallop away!
Robbers are coming to steal all your corn,
Snail, snail, early to-day!
Robbers are comimg-so put out your horn.
Snail, snail, gallop away!
Robbers are coming at six in the morn,
Snail, snail, hear what we say!
Robbers care not for your wall or your horn.








































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GOING TO BED.



C" OMAE, come away, and leave your play,
t Put up Mistress Doll for another day.
The sun in the west has gone to rest,
And the little Robin is in his nest.
The pretty flowers, well washed with showers,
Are closing to sleep through the quiet hours.
Then haste to bed," gentle sister said,
As her little pets to their crib she led.
But Master Joe came quiet and slow,
He did not like to his bed to go.
And Missy Ann to whimper began,
But blithe little Peterkin forward ran.
No fuss he made, at once he obeyed,
His nice round head on the pillow laid











































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CHIL RBEN IN THE W4OOD.




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W ponder well, you parents dear,
These words which I shall write;
A doleful story you shall hear,
In time brought forth to light.
1 A gentleman of good account
In Norfolk dwelt of late,
Who did in honour far surmount
Most men of his estate.








THE CHILDREN IN THE .WOOD.


II.
Sore sick he was, and like to die,
No help his life could save;
His wife by him as sick did lie,
And both possessed one grave.
No love between these two was lost,
Each was to other kind;
In love they lived, in love they died,
And left two babes behind.


III.
The one, a fine and pretty boy,
Not passing three years old;
The other, a girl more young than he,
And framed in beauty's mould,.
The father left his little son,
As plainly doth appear,
When he to perfect age should come,
Three hundred pounds a year.






















































































































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THE CHILDREN IN THE WOOD.


IV.
And to his little daughter Jane,
Five hundred pounds in gold,
To be paid down on her marriage-dla-
Which might no t
But, e children chanced to die,
Ere they to age should come,
Their uncle should possess their wealth;
For so the will did run.

v.
" Now, brother," said the dying man,
Look to my children dear;
Be good unto my boy and girl,
No friends else have they here:
To God and you I recommend
My children dear this day;
But little while be sure we have
Within this world to stay.


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THE CHILDREN IN THE WOOD.


VI.
You must be father and mother both,
J,' And uncle all in one;
/'?< .knows what will become of them,

SWhen I am deatrl,1.
With that bespake their mother d6f,
S" O, brother kind," quoth she,
', You are the man must bring our babes
To wealth or misery.


VII.
And if you keep them carefully,
Then God will you reward;
But if you otherwise should deal,
God will your deeds regard."
With lips as cold as any stone,

They kissed their children small:
"God bless you both, my children dear;"
With that their tears did fall.


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THE CHILDREN IN THE WOOD. 5


VIII.
These speeches then their brother spake
To this sick couple there:
"The keeping of your little ones,
Sweet sister, do not fear.
God never prosper me nor mine,
Nor aught else that I have,
If I do wrong your children dear
When you are laid in grave."

IX.

The parents being dead and gone,
The children home he takes,
And brings them straight unto his house,
Where much of them he makes.
He had not kept these pretty babes
A twelvemonth and a day,
But, for their wealth, he did devise
To make them both away.









THE CHILDREN IN THE WOOD.


X.

He bargained with two ruffians strong
Which were of furious mood,
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That they should take these children young

And slay them in a wood.
He told his wife an artful tale:

He would the children send
To be brought up in fair London,

With one that was his friend.


XI.
Away then went those pretty babes,
Rejoicing at that tide,

Rejoicing with a merry mind,
They should on cock-horse ride.
They prate and prattle pleasantly,

As they rode on the way,
To those that should their butchers be,
And work their lives' decay.


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THE CHILDREN IN THE WOOD.


XII.
So-that the pretty speech they had,
Made murder's heart relent:
And they that undertook the deed,
Full sore did now repent.
Yet one of them, more hard of heart,
Did vow to do his charge,
Because the wretch that hired him,
Had paid him very large.

XIII.
The other won't agree thereto,
So here they fall to strife ;
With one another they did fight
About the children's life:
And he that was of mildest mood,
Did slay the other there,
Within an unfrequented wood:
The babes did quake for fear!









THE CHILDREN IN THE WOOD.


XIV.
He took the children by the hand,
Tears standing in their eye,
And bade them straightway follow him,
And look they did not cry;
And two long miles he led them on,
While they for food complain:
"Stay here," quoth he, I'll bring you bread,
When I come back again."

XV.
These pretty babes, with hand in hand,
Went wandering up and down;
But never more could see the man
Approaching from the town:
Their pretty lips with blackberries
Were all besmeared and dyed,
And when they saw the darksome night,
They sat them down and cried.






































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THE CHILDREN IN THE WOOD.


XVI.

Thus wandered these poor innocents
Till death did end their grief,
In one another's arms they died,
As wanting due relief:
No burial this pretty pair
Of any man receives,
Till Robin Redbreast piously
Did cover them with leaves.


XVII.

And now the heavy wrath of God
Upon their uncle fell;

Yea, fearful fiends did haunt his house,
His conscience felt an hell:

His barns were fired, his goods consumed,
His lands were barren made,
His cattle died within the field,
And nothing with him stayed.


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THE CHILDREN IN THE WOOD.


XVIII.
And in the voyage to Portugal
Two of his sons did die;
And to conclude, himself was brought
To want and misery.
He pawned and mortgaged all his land
Ere seven years came about,
And now at length this wicked act
Did by this means come out:


XIX.
The fellow that did take in hand
These children for to kill,
Was for a robbery judged to die,
Such was God's blessed will.
Who did confess the very truth,
As here hath been displayed:
Their uncle having died in jail,
Where he for debt was laid.


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