The Argentine year book

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Argentine year book
Physical Description:
v. :ill. ;23 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
John Grant & Son
Place of Publication:
Buenos Aires
Publication Date:

Notes

General Note:
"With which are incorporated the "Anuario Pillado" and "John Grant's Argentine commercial guide"."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 29713361
oclc - 01772223
System ID:
AA00013043:00002


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
cASA PARDoo
0'S8AE0 ANTICUARI
DtlNSAI 1170
lI 8IUENOSA18SJ

Compa ia Introductora iD"Rn O D e

SOCEDAD ANNIMA de Buenos Aires

BARTOLOME MITRE, 531
----t--~-------
Sole importers of the following renowned brands:
G.eneva "Real Hollands"
Superior finest old Dutch gin. Distilled by Van Dulken
Weiland & Co., Rotterdam.
Whisky "Champion"
The finest of Scotch Whiskies.
CAN ID LE S of the world renowned manufactory of
GOUDA. Saloon and Coach candles (Crown and Two
Anchors) ( GOUDA > for family use.
Parafine Candcles LION brand, in various sizes,
for saloon, piano, etc.
Bitter Secrestat
Of universal renown.
Italian Cigars and Tobaccos
State Monopoly.
Guinness' Stout "Bulldog"
The oldest brand in the market.
Vermouth Torino "De Angeli"
Unrivalled in quality.
Schiedam Aromatic Schnapps
LIQUEURS AND COGNACS
OF MARIE BRIZARD & ROGER
The best of all.

General assortment of grocery ware. Wines of every description.











F'


III


Banco de Italia y Rio de la Plata
Founded in 1872


0hy ~BUENOS AIRES 448, B. MITRE
F\ I Rosario de Santa F6: Calles San Martin and Rioja. La Plata: Galles 7 and 48
Bahia Blanca: O'Higgins, 37 and 39

GOLD
AMERICAPaid up Capital. . ... $ 5.000.000
Reserve Fund .. . 461.450

ALLOWS
IN PAPER CURRENCY
On deposits in account current............................ I % per annum
> W at 30 days notice............................ ... 2
6o60 > ... .. ........ ...... .... 3 > > 0
> > Igo ) .............................. ... 4 "
For longer periods........... ....................................... conventional

IN GOLD
On deposits in account current.............................. I % per annum
> 0 at 3odaysnotice,up to$Io.ooogold I >>
) ) 60 o ... ....................... 2 ))
V D go. QO .. I .. ...... ........... .3 >> >> >>
D 180 ) )) .................... ....... 3 > > ,
For longer period, and for larger amount.............. conventional

CHARGES
For advances in current account............................... 9 per annum
,> discounting Bills and promissory notes, conventional
Letters of credit and drafts issued on all the principal cities of
Italy, Austria, Germany, England, Belgium, France, Switzerland,
Spain, also on Rio Janeiro, San Pablo, Santos, Montevideo, Asun-
ci6n, Bahia Blanca, Mercedes (Buenos Aires), C6rdoba, Villa Casil-
da, Esperanza, Rafaela (Santa F6), Santa F6, Tucumin; San Juan,
Mendoza, Corrientes, Concordia, Nogoyh, La Paz, Parana, Victoria,
Gualeguay, Gualeguaychi, Rosario Tala, Concepci6n del Uruguay,
Col6n, Diamante, etc., Telegraphic and Postal orders for payment.
The Bank issues telegraphic orders for payment in Europe, and
undertakes general banking business.
For further information, apply to the Management of the Bank.

HONORIO STOPPANI, MANAGER.
Buenos Aires, St December 1902.















THE "MANCHESTER"
385, Florida, 387 Sucursal: Bme. Mitre, 519
BUENOS AIRES
THE LEADING GENTLEMENS OUTFITTERS

HATTERS, HOSIERS & SHIRTMAKERS.
IMPORTERS
of the finest quality under clothing for
gentlemen only.
SOLE AGENTS FOR THE WELL KNOWN HAT MANUFACTURES

LINCOLN & BENNETT
LONDON
SPECIALITIES
Lounge Suits & Fancy Waistcoats
to measure
PRESENTATIONS
Gold, Silver Ware, Dressing Cases & Leather Goods.
CAMP ORDERS
Have careful attention and are executed by return.
CHISWELL BROTHERS.









Banco Espanol del Rio de la Plata
180 RECOIQUISTI, BUENOS 1IRES

Rosario de Santa Fe Branch : Buenos Aires Branch:
CALLE SAN MARTIN ONCE DE SEPTIEMBRE
CORNER OF SANTA FE. N.0 185, CENTRO AMERICA


Paid up Capital .... $ 6.000.000
Reserve Fund . 1.879.239.49

Issues letters of credit, bills of exchange, and telegraphic orders
on all the cities and towns of Spain, Italy, France, England, Portu-
gal, Belgium, Switzerland, Germany; Montevideo, Rosario, Asun-
cion, Chile, Mendoza, etc.
Discounts bills and promissory notes, advances money on quota-
ble scrip, undertakes collections, receives titles in deposit, remit-
ting interest to the owners residing abroad, buying and selling
gold, mortgage warrants, shares and other securities on account of
interested parties.
Carries out all kinds of banking operations.
ALLOWS
Paper
curancy Gold
On accounts current............... ......... I % no interest
Deposit at 30 days notice......... 2 I j %
>> > 60 V ......... 3 > 2
S >> >> go > ........ 4 > 3
> >> 18o0 > ......... 4 > -
>> >> longer time.............. conventional
Z > Savings Bank: from $ Io up to $ Io.ooo
after 60 days, 4 % allowed.

CHARGES
On account current in gold and paper currency 9 %.
Discount on promissory notes and bills: conventional.
OFFICE HOURS
From 10 to 3 p. m. every day except Saturdays and the last day
-of the month, when the hours are from 10 to 4.
Buenos Aires, 1st. July 1903.
AUGUSTO J. COELHO.
MANAGER.








VI

BUENOS AIRES ENGLISH HIGH SCHOOL

BOARDING AND DAY
SCHOOL FOR BOYS
AND GIRLS

3502
CALLE SANTA FE
3600
AND
2420 ARAOZ 2440 ==
(EXCLUSIVELY
FOR GIRL BOARDERS)

ATHLETIC CLUB FIELD IN PALERMO PARK


TWEIWTIETH I YEAR
TEACHING STAFF
1.- RECTOR 9.- VIOLIN AND MANDOLIN MASTER
A. Watson Hutton, M. A. etc., Master of E. Galvani, First Violin of the Italian
Arts (.Honours, in Philosophy) Operaand Conservatory of Music.
Edinburgh University, Fellow of 10.- PIANO MASTER
the Educational Institute of Scot-
land, First prize Essayist (Educa- N. ustnic. of the Conservatory of
tional Subjects) Edinburgh Uni- Msic.
versity, session 1879-1880; and for 11.-GYMNASTIC MASTER
more than eight years one of the G. Pinelli, Professor of Gymnastics
masters of George Watson's Col- at the Colegio Militar.
lege, Edinburgh. 12.- SUPERINTENDENT OF ELEMENTARY
2.- FIRST ASSISTANT MASTER DEPARTMENT
J. Laidlaw, L. A. Edinburgh Universi- Miss M. Forrest, Government certifi-
ty, and Government Certificated cated Teacher, late of Redheugh
Teacher. Infant School Newcastle
3.- SECOND ASSISTANT MASTER 13- KINDERGARTEN MISTRESS
A. A. Mack, B. A. Christ's College, Miss W. Treveven, Graduate of the
Cambridge. Rosario Normal School.
14.-- PIANO TEACHER
4.- THIRD ASSISTANT MASTER 1..- PIANO TEACHER
Miss I. Leonard, Royal College of Mu-
H. H. Fuchs, B. A. Queen's College, sic, London.
Cambridge. 15.- FIRST ASSISTANT LADY TEACHER
5.- Miss Buchanan, Dux Medallist of the
T. B. Browne, from Blundel Sands School.
High School, Liverpool. 16.-SECOND ASSISTANT LADY TEACHER
6.- SPANISH AND FRENCH MASTER Miss F. Boggs, Ex-Senior Pupil
Mons. L. A. Lanabit, Diplom6 (L'ensei- 17.- THIRD ASSISTANT LADY TEACHER
gnement secondaire) Bordeaux. Miss K. Holtum, Ex-Senior Pupil.
7.- GERMAN MASTER 18.-FOURTH ASSISTANT LADY TEACHER
lerr. F. Baeder, late of the *Gymnasia Miss Stewart.
Imperial. Vienna. 19.- HOUSE SUPERINTENDENT
8.- DRAWING AND PAINTING MASTER Mrs. Waters.
0. Bonifanti, Gold Medallist of the Ro- 20.-ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT
yal School of Arts, Turin. Mrs. Laidlaw.
ORDINARY SUBJECTS (Included in General Fees): English, Spa-
nish, French, German, Arithmetic, (general and metric system), Mathematics,
Elementary Science, Kindergarten, Writing, (plain and ornamental) Book.
keeping, Class singing, Sewing and Fancy work and preparation.
EXTRA SUBJECTS: Music, (piano, violin and mandolin) Drawing (flat
copy and model) and painting, solo singing, Latin, Greek, Dancing, Fencing,
Gymnastics, also lunch.
Illustrated Prospectus on Application.





VII

South American Bank

D Note Company
a M


Calles Chile, The most important
Balcarce printing house
and
Paseo Colon in South America
BUENOS AIRES -r r

R APID, perfect and economical execution of printing
of all kinds on STEEL, LETTER-PRESS LITHOGRAPHY
and PHOTOTYPES, TYPE-FOUNDING, BLOCK-MAKING, BOOK-
BINDING, and all branches of the trade carried on with the
most modern methods and improvements.


A Paper and Stationery
Department

has been opened at Calle Cangallo 457-59 where will
be found a new, carefully selected and complete assort-
ment of STATIONERY ARTICLES and PAPERS received direct
from the most important Manufactories in Europe and
North America.

Speciality: Commercial Books


Prices unapproachable.










Lumber & General Hardware
Merchants.

WAREHOUSES I OFFICES
3387/9 Calle Pedro Mendoza 649-673, CALLE DEFENSA
3401/17 D D
1981 Calle Patriclos ?-o~-oV~ o -0 V-,-o- 0 -0 -;-.-- V -

BUENOS AIRES
d'

Importers of White Pine, Pitch Pine, Spruce,
Oak, Ash, Walnut, etc., etc. Galv.
Corrugated Iron, Plain Galv. Iron, Fencing Wires
of every description, Tin, Tinplates, Zinc, Lead,
Spelter, Pig Iron and all metals.
Corn Mills, Corn Shellers, Ploughs, Harrows,
Seeders and all Agricultural Implements.
Ochres, White Lead, Red Lead, Enamels and
Paints of every description. tEG.s
Linseed Oil, Turpentine, Rosin, e "
Palm Oil, Soda Ash, Caustic Soda,
Crystal Soda, Sapolio, Superphos-
phates, Portland Cement, Ameri-
can Carriages and Sulkies, Chairs,
Clocks, Watches, Rifles, Guns, Saws, Lamps,
Chain, Canvas, Twine, Pumps, Shovels, Spades,
Forks, Cutlery, etc., etc.






IX

British Bank of jouth Ageaica, Limited
ESTABLISHED 1863
Head office: 2a, Moorgate Street, London
Branches: Buenos Aires, Bme. Mitre 400, corner of Reconquista 91; Rivadavia 2828
(Once Agency) and Buen Orden 1307 (Constitucion Agency); Rosario; Mon-
tevideo; Rio de Janeiro; Santos; San Paulo and Bahia.
Letters of Credit issued on Europe, United States, South America, South
Africa &c.
Commercial Bills discounted.
Bills on River Plate negotiated or collected by the Head Office (2a, Moor-
gate St., London) or by the Bank's correspondents.
Stocks and shares purchased or sold for account of clients, or received
for safe custody. Coupons and dividends collected.
Funds remitted to the River Plate through the Head Office (2a, Moorgate
Street, London), or the Bank's correspondents, viz:
PARIS.-Messrs. Heine & Co.
HAMBURG.-Messrs. Joh. Berenberg, Gossler & Co.
NEW YORK.-The Bank of New York, N. B. A.
All banking transactions through principal Banks in South Africa.
The following rates of interest will rule on deposits until further notice :
ALLOWED : Paper Gold
For deposits in Account Current ................................ 1 % nil
S Savings Bank to $ 10.000........................... 5 4 %
> > at 3 months fixed ................... .... 4 'I2 : 3 '2 .
Other periods...................................................... Conventional
CHARGED:
For overdrafts in Account Current................................ 10 % 9 %



Brauss, Mahn & Co.
BUENOS AIRES* MONTEVIDEO





Export

and Import





EUROPE
BRAUSS, MAHN & Co.
ANTWERP









Ph enix Hotel English Hotel
in Buenos Aires

CALLE SAN MARTIN 780, BUENOS AIRES


A i


Most open, healthful and central position in the town. Electric light. Fire pla-
ces, Hot and cold baths and Lift. Fine rooms, handsomely furnished. Every
modern convenience. Cuisine and wines of the best. Prices moderate.

Telegraphio Address: "OYLOYD" Proprietors Mrs. E. H. OYLER,
Uni6n Telef6nica 2171. W. G. LLOYD


BANCO POPULAR ARGENTINO
COOPERATIVE COMPANY OF CREDIT (LIMITED)
370, BARTOLOME MITRE, 370
Suscribed Capital on 30th. April 1903 $ 2.823.100 n/
Realized .......................................... 2.781.232
Debentures issued........................... 600.000
Reserve Fund................................ 1.050.348 >
Deposits received in account current, savings bank, at fixed date, at 1 % to
6 % interest.
Promissory notes discounted, loans secured by Mortgage, and drafts and let
ters of credit given on any town in Europe.
SIXTO J. QUESADA, Managing Director.





Engineers
& Contractors









C~"i


Calle 25 de Mayo, 81


Buenos Aires





XII

ZUBLIN, DE BARY & Co.
late Geiger, de Bary & Co.
Successors to the Oficina Tecnica de Ernesto Tornquist & Cia.

IMPORTERS OF MACHINERY.
SPECIALITY: INSTALLATION OF FREEZING ESTABLISHMENTS.
AGENCY AND DEPOT OF THE
VACUUM OIL COMPANY, ROCHESTER N. Y.

Sole Importers of the renowned Oval Wire
"ACERO INVENCIBLE SAN MARTIN".


Sheep Dip "INVENCIBLE" in powder and fluid,

Hard Wood Posts and Supports.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERS AND
MANUFACTURERS OF FARMING AND AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS.

OFFICES: RECONQUISTA 146.
WORKSHOPS AND WAREHOUSES:
Pasoo de Julio 1662; and: Establishment "LA ELISITA",
Barracas al Sud, on the Riachuelo.

BUENOS AIRES.
First Honorable Award and six first prizes at the
Exhibition of the SOCIEDAD RURAL, May, June 1903.






XIII


LA PREVISORA

The first of Argentine Life Insurance Companks
ESTABLISHED 1885

Financial Exhibit 31st. December 1902
ASSETS
Grand Hotel Buildings....................... ....................... $ 1.350.000
M etropole Buildings.............. ..... .............................. .. 800.000
Victoria Square Buildings.................. ........................... > 740.000
Head Office Buildings (in construction)........................ 400.000
Other real estate properties................... ........ ............ 312.000
1st. class M mortgages ................... .................. 702.000
Loans on Company's policies...................... ........ 275.ooo
Cash in Banks................................................................ ... 266.000
Government Bonds & other securities ......................... 135 000
Agents Balances & Fire Branch.......................................... 64.000
$ 5.044.000
LIABILITIES
Reserve on all Policies in force (Combined Experience
& 5 % int )................. ............. .. ...... ...... $ 3.085.000
Fire Branch ....................................... ... ............... .. 88.400
Deposits belonging to policy holders & others....... ...... 552.000
A ll other liabilities .... ............ .. .............................. > 138.200
$ 3.863.600
Surplus $ 1.180.400

Insurance in force....................................... ..... .......... .... $ 22.500.000
Premium Income............................. 1.173.910
Interest & Rent Incom e ............. ........ ....................... >, 281.500
PAID TO POLICY HOLDERS
D eath L osses......................................... 143.600
Matured endowments......... .. .. ............ ... ......... 55.674
Surrendered policies...................................... ........... 53.846
Dividends to the credit of accumulation Fund .......... v 122.634

President, Managing-Director,
OCTAVIO J. MOLINA. CARLOS CASARES.
HEAD OFFICES :
VICTORIA, 394 BUENOS AIRES









London & Brazilian Bank, Ltd.
BARTOLOME MITRE, 402, ESQ. RECONQUISTA.-BUENOS AIRES

Capital subscribed 1.500.000 Capital paid up 750.000 Reserve Fund 600.000,

Head Office: 7 Tokenhouse Yard, London
--------3-----
BRANCHES Para, Manaos, Pernambuco, Bahia, Rio de Janeiro, San Paulo, San-
tos, Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Montevideo, Rosario de Santa Fe, Lisbon,
Oporto, New York, (agency). AGENTS.- Paris: Messrs. Mallet Freres & Co., Ham
burg: Messrs. Joh. Berenberg, Gossler & Co. and Messrs. Schroder & Co. ( J. H
Schroder & Co., Nfgr.). Genoa; Messrs. Granet, Brown & Co.
Drafts issued on the foregoing cities, and on all the towns of Italy, etc.
Current accounts opened and deposits received at the following rates: -
ALLOAED. M. N. % O.S. %
In account current on balances up to $ 100,000 1 without interest
Deposits at 7 day's notice..................... 2 1
Do. 30 day's fixed ...................... 2 1
Do. 60 day's fixed... ................. 3 2
Do. 3 months fixed.................... 3 112 3
Do. 6 months fixed.................... 4 3112
Do. Above .......................... conventional
CHARGED Overdrafts in current account, gold and paper, 10 p. c.
Commercial bills discounted. Advances made against approved negotiable secu-
rities. Letters of credit opened for use of travellers and purchase of goods.
Stocks and shares purchased and sold for account of third parties. Payments.
made by cable. Every description of banking business transacted.
April 1903 A. F. ENNOR, Manager.



Bank of Tarapac Argeqtina, Limited

RECONQUISTA, 78.- BUENOS AIRES

Subscribed Capital ................................ 1.500.000 stg.
Paid-up Capital .................................... 750.000
Reserve Fund...................................... 175.000 0

London Office: 97-98 Bishopsgate St. Within, E. C.
Branches: Montevideo, Buenos Aires, Mendoza, Gallegos, Punta
Arenas, Concepci6n, ChillAn, Santiago, Valparaiso, Coquimbo, Sere-
na, Copiap6, Antofagasta, Calama, Iquique, Pisagua.
ALLOWED PAPER GOLD
Deposits in current account ...................... 1 % -
For 30 days fixed ..................... ... .... 2 1 %
For 60 days fixed ....... .......................... 3 2
For 90 days fixed ................................. 3 '/2 3
For 180 days fixed ............................... 4 3 '1
Other periods....................................... Conventional
CHARGED PAPER GOLD
On debit balances in current account .............. 10 % 9 %
HUGH MILLER, Manager.




XV
The Standard
LIFE ASSURANCE COMPANY
OF EDINBURGH.
The only British Purely Life Office
Represented in the Argentine Republic
FUNDS .$ 54.000.000 Gold
Moderate Premiums-Liberal Conditions-Absolute Security
For particulars apply to the General Agents:
MOORE & TUDOR
MAIPU 148 BUENOS AIRES


San Lorenzo 1049


Rosario de Santa Fe


NEW ZEALAND INSUIANE Chllpay
FIRE and MARINE
ESTABLISHED IN 1859


Nominal capital .
Subscribed .
Reserves. .. .
Guarantee Deposit held by the
Argentine Government


1.000.000
" 200.000
" 320.305

$ m 400.000


Representatives in the Argentine Republic

RUNCIMAN & C
B3UENO S AIRES











ESTP1 COMPANIA INGLESA

DE SEGUROS CONTRA INCENDIOS
ESTABLECIDA EN 1782


CAPITAL TODO SUBSCRIPTO .... ......- 2.688.800


RESERVAS .... .... .... .... .


" 1.411.258


Esta Compania ha pagado por siniestros mis de
25.000.000 en los 121 afios que tiene de existencia.


CANGALLO, 324
Union Telef. 151 (Central)
Coop. 299


SUCURSAL
BUENOS AIRES
E. CRISPIN, Gerente.


EL COMERCIO

MARINE AND FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY
AT FIXED PREMIUMS
Authorized by National Decree of 17th. May 1889


Subscribed Capital $ %I/
Losses paid up to 30th. June 1903 .. .. ..
Reserve Fund at 30th.June 1903
Reserve Fund at 30th. June 1903 ........


1,108.500:00
162.963:13
1,625.749:37
373.652:16


Directors.: Lorenzo Pellerano, Juan B. Mignaquy, Francisco B. Recondo,
Manfredi Hertelendi, Clodomiro Torres, Manuel Z. Rojas, Luis R. Scheiner.
Syidic.: Miguel Camuyrano; Syndic Suplentte Vicente Peluffo; Jlanager:
Martin S. Etchart.
OFFICES:
460, BARTOLOME MITRE, 460 (over the Banco del Comercio)
BUENOS AIRES


Cooperative Telephone 436


Union Telephone, 1046








COMPANiAS ARGENTINAS DE SEGUROS


LA ESTRELLA AM E R I C A
FUNDADA EN 1865 FUNDADA EN 1887
DIRECTION GENERAL :
559, CALLE RIVADAVIA, 559
BUENOS AIRES

SEGUROS CONTRA INCENDIO
Aseguran, comprendiendo los dafios por explosion de gas
y de vapor, y los electos del rayo, aun cuando no se pro-
duzea ineendio, edifieios. existencias de easas comereiales,
fAbrieas, mereaderias en dep6sitos de aduana, trilladoras,
motors, etc., etc.

SEGUROS MARITIMOS
Sobre buques, efeetos, animals en pie, fletes, gananeias
esperadas, etc.
Se abren pblizas flotantes en condieiones ventajosas.


SINIESTROS PAGADOS
LA ESTRELLA AMERICA
EN 12 ANOS (2.a 6poca) EN 16 ANOS
$ 1.488.457,89 .. Secci6n incendios .. $ 985.951,64
1.120.321,27 .. Secci6n maritima .. 498.612,24
$ 2.608.779,16 $ 1.484.563,88

SEGUROS ESPECIALES SOBRE EDIFICIOS
NOTA.- Estas Compafias son aseguradoras de edificios de pro-
piedad de la Naei6n y de la Municipalidad de la Capital, de los
edificios del Banco de la Naei6n y Baneo Hipotecario Nacional, de
la Bolsa de Comercio de Buenos Aires, de Bancos particulares, de
las principles easas de familiar, etc., etc.
Por 3 aRos se paga el premio de 2 aios
Por 5 afios se paga el premio de 3 aios
SE ACEPTA LA INSTALACION DE LOS DIVERSOS SISTEMAS
DE ALUMBRADO






XVIII

The liver plate Freh YMeat o. Ld.

COMPANIA FRIGORIFICA DE CAMPANA
Rio Parand de las Palmas
ARGENTINE REPUBLIC
Capacidad de la Frigorifica per aio: 75.000 novillos y 1.250,000 capones.
Marca registrada REFORMER. Unicos exportadores de CHILLED BEEF marca REFORMER.
Compra novillos y capones mestizos y gordos.
Precio por cada uno 6 por Balanza.-Peso muerto en el Establecimiento.
PARA INFORMED DIRIGIRSE:
JOHN A. WOOD, General Manager JUAN ANGUS, Gerente
2, COLEMAN STREET 748, AVENIDA DE MAYO
LONDON, E. C. BUENOS AIRES
Agentes en Buenos Aires: DRABBLE Hnos. y Co.
AGENCIES .
LIVERPOOL, 24 Sir Thomas Street & Abattoir SOUTHAMPTON, 80 High Street
MANCHESTER, 129 Water Street PLYMOUTH, I St. Andrew's Terrace
NEWCASTLE on TYNE, 22 Blackett Street CARDIFF, 32, Tresillian Place
SHEFFIELD, 35 Pond Street DUBLIN, 35, Great Britain Street
LEEDS, 28 & 30 York Street BELFAST, St. Georges Market
BIRMINGHAM, City Meat Market GLASGOW, 65 Washington Street
LONDON, 356-7 Central Meat Market




ACAROINA
THE BEST REMEDY

TO CURE SCAB

TITE CPEATzEST & BEST

IT CONTAINS NO POISON AND DOES NOT STAIN THE WOOL

WE INVITE ESTANCIEROS AND BREEDERS TO
GIVE THIS SPECIFIC A TRIAL AND COMPARE ITS
PRICE AND EFFICACY WITH THOSE IMPORTED


COMPAilA PRIMITIVE DE iAS Y AlUMBRBDO ELECTRICO
DE BUENOS AIRES, Limitada
CALLE CUYO, 947- BUENOS AIRES









Luz Incandescente __


Superior a la Luz EIactrica
con menos de la mitad de cost


de AUER


ECONOMIA de40 % Ldmparas de Luz Incandescen-
en el consume del gas y
conun aumentode 200 te sistema A UER patentado
% en powder LUMINICO
sobre la luz comdn. Gran surtido de toda clase de Globes, Globitos, Bombas, Pan-
tallas, Platillos, Tubos, PICOS ECONOMICOS, para gas, etc. Luz inmejorable y
fija APROBADA por los medicos como la MEJOR, que da poco calor y no despite
humo.

La Compahia del : ,

"Gas del Rio de la Plata"
(Limitada)
IfNICA concesionaria en.
Repltblica Argentina del v
dero sistema de luz
incandescent del '.-.-
Doctor Auer


La Compaffia vende las --
I mparas a precious reduci-
dos y las mechas al pre- -' 1 / .,\.
cio de
40 centavos cada una.
Tiene tambidn en venta:
Coke, Alquitran y Carbonilla
a precious modicos; COCINAS -,
A GAS, ASADORES, CALEN-
TADORES, TOSTADORES DE
CAFE, PLANCHAS e infinidad
de otros aparatos !de cale-
faccion a gas.


Las coeinas, lo mismo que los demAs aparatos, ofreeen las ven-
tajas de eeonomia, aseo, prontitud, y se pueden obtener en la Admi-
nistraci6n de la Compafiia mediante un MODICO ALQUILER mensual.
El ealor en las cocinas A gas estA tan perfectamente regularizado
que no hay peligro alguno de que la comida que en ellas se prepare
se queme 6 se eehe A perder; dentro del horno el calor estA tan inge-
niosamente distribuido que la care espeeialmente se euece con today
igualdad y perfecci6n sin que ella pierda nada de su jugo.
Administration : 951, CORRIENTES, 959


I -a

^jTi









EL HOGAR ARGENTINO

BANK

Cooperative Loan and Building Society, Limited

FOUNDED SEPTEMBER 1899

*
D DIRECTORS 0
p *
President 2nd. icepresident
S DR. JULIAN BALRIN BSR. JOSE DEVOTE *
Vicepresident Treasurer *
S DR. ANTONIN M1. FERRARI SR. JOSE SN( IIEZ *
i Pro-Treasurer SR. JOSE J UREGUI *
DR. NICOL-S E. VIDELA SR. BENITO NOEL *
SSR. NARCISo LACLAU DR. LUIS ORTIZ BASUALDO *
: INS. EDUARDO E. CLERICI SR. GUILLERMO FRANCHINI *
SR. MIELITON PANEL DR. SANTIAGO G. O'FAREL *
DR. RAMON SANTAMARINA SR. ANGEL T. DE ALVEAR *
SYNDIC MANAGER :
S SR. JOSE ARTAL SR. AtUSTiN lIELIAN *
SECRETARY:
* DR. JosE S. ODERIGO *
* *

Subscribed Capital ... $ 15.000.000
Paid up Capital . 2.200.000
Last Annual Dividend Paid 11 0/0
Amount Lent . ... 2.000.000
Securities for Loans in Mortgages
on Properties . 3.500.000
The objects of this institution are to stimulate economy, to enable
its subscribers to acquire their own houses on easy terms, to enable
the working classes to gain certain and substantial profits on their
savings and to ensure a lucrative return to the investor.


OFFICES:
VICTORIA, corner of PIEDRAS

BUENOS AIRES












YOU wish to advertize in the
Argentine Republic, refer to

ANDERSON & WILLES
SAN MARTIN, 333 BUENOS AIRES

NEWSPAPERS
Advertisements placed with all local
and provincial papers under the most
advantageous conditions.
TRAMWAYS
Sole contractors for placing advertise-
ments on the cars of the following lines
CITY OF BUENOS AIRES.
BUENOS AIRES Y BELGRANO.
LA CAPITAL.
BUENOS AIRES ELECTRICS.

CONTRACTORS FOR
WALL ADVERTISING.
RAILWAY ,,
CIRCULAR ,,
Cable Address: SIFECURE. 1. B. C. & LIEBERS CODE.




XXII


de


Carvalzo


Chartered Accountant
and Sworn Translator


lMartn,


351


BUENOS AIRES


F.


B.


35',


San





XXIll
A A Drapers and Silk
A. AULD & O. Merchants
The most reliable House in Buenos Aires for
GENUINE BRITISH GOODS
IMMENSE SELECTION --- POPULAR PRICES
TIENDA INGLESA-Calle Peru, 162
DRESSMAKING MILLINERY

ALDAO & AGOTE
ARGENTINE BARRISTERS AT LAW
BUENOS AIRES : 605, Avenida de Mayo. ROSARIO : 890, Calle Laprida
LA PLATA : 872, Calle 49
BRANCH OFFICE IN LONDON:
602, Salisbury House.--Finsbury Circus
ANGLO-ARGENTINE INTERESTS
IN FINANCIAL, COMMERCIAL AND LEGAL MATTERS.
References in London: Legation of the Argentine Republic.-Rt. Hon. J. B. Shaw Lefe-
vre P. C. -Frank Parish, Esq. Chairman of -Buenos Aires Great Southern Railway Co.-


MANUEL JOSE COBO

LAS BARRANCAS Y LA BELEN

PRIZE STOCK OF DURHAM, LINCOLN,
SHROPSHIRE AND MERINO.
119 Awards.
Trap always at station.
FULL PARTICULARS FROM
MANUEL JOSE COBO
1265 CALLE ARTES-BUENOS AIRES.

DIEGO CHURCH
LEZAMA, F. C. S.







TE


XXIV

ALBION
(REGISTERED)


"AMO TE ALBION"


The best tea for the drinkers of best teas


Turner Tarn & Co.
Imzporters and Commission Merchants

Receive goods on consignment from Manufacturers
and Shippers,for prompt sale.
CORRESPONDENCE INVITED.


Cable address.
REKRTT, BuEnos Azi cs


Calle Bartolomn Mitre, 513
B UENOS AIRES





XXV'

ALUMBRADO A ALCOHOL
GHRAN EXIT
Lamparas a Alcohol Carburado
SISTEMA "DENAYROUZE"
40 % de economic sobre el alumbrado & kerosene
1er Premio en ]a Exposici6n de Agricultura que ha tenido lugar en Palermo en Mayo del aEo corriente

CALEFACCION A ALCOHOL
con Alcohol desnaturalizado sin olor preparado por la Sociedad Anonima "La Teutonia"

ESTUFAS Y CALENTADORES
ELEGANTES BARATOS ECON6MICOS
Manejo sencillfsimo Seguridad complete
SOCIEDAD ANONIMA
"LA TEUTON1IA"
Casa central: DEFENSA 429 Sucursal: CANCALLO 851


JAMES MARJORIBANKS
ENGINEER AND SHIPBUILDER, BUENOS AIRES
Works, (ex La Platense) Boca: Union Telephone 94, Barracas
Town Office, Bartolome Mitre 349 > 1485, Avenida
SLIPWAY FOR STEAMERS AND LIGHTERS
UP TO 800 TONS DISPLACEMENT
Construction and repairs of steamers, lighters,
all classes of machinery and piping

SPECIAL FANS FOR VENTILATING STEAMER'S HOLDS
WHEN CARRYING CATTLE, KEPT IN STOCK
Forgilgs of all kinds undertaken. Castings il Iron, Brass, and Patent Metal
SPECIAL ATTENTION TO OCEAN STEAMERS





XXTI

C6rdoba Central
and

C6rdoba & Rosario Railways

DIRECT ROUTE BETWEEN BUENOS AIRES
AND THE NORTHERN PROVINCES

C6rdoba mountains, Summer resorts.
For the convenience of tourists visiting the picturesque mount-
ains of C6rdoba the above companies offer special sleeping-cars at
a minimum cost of six tickets and corresponding bed charges, plus
0.20 cts. per kilometre run.
Applications for these sleeping cars should be made in anticipa-
tion. Also special return tickets at reduced rates are issued from
Buenos Aires (C. A.) & Rosario (F. C. C. &: R.) during the season,

Rosario de la Frontera winter resort.
Trains for Rosario de la Frontera termal baths are equipped with
splendid saloon, sleeping, restaurant and confiteria cars.
The catering for the latter being done direct by the railway
Company, only articles of food and refreshments of the very best
quality are supplied to passengers. Special return tickets at re-
duced rates are issued from Buenos Aires (C. A.) & Rosario (F. C.
C. & R ) during the season.

Booking of merchandise and general cargo.
In order to secure quick transport for goods destined to San
Francisco, Rafaela, Cordoba, Rioja, Catamarca, Santiago, Tucuman,
Salta and Jujuy merchants are requested to book all consignments
via "Empalme Embarcaderos".
For further particulars apply to the Administration in C6rdoba

Las Heras 578. Tucuman.
or San Martin 695. Rosario.
Avenida de Mayo 589. Buenos Aires.

Duncan 1V,. Munro
GENERAL MANAGER.






XXVII

RUNCIMAN & Co.
,ESTABLISHED 1865)
13UIEN(OS AIRES

General Merchants-Importers & Exporters
Insurance and Financial Agents


Purchase and Sale of Stocks for European Account

Investment in Real Estate and Mortgages
Camps bought, sold and rented

General Attorneys & Agents for Estancieros & Capitalists
Collection of Interest, Rents & Coupons. Commission Business in General


Importation of Fine Stock, etc., etc,,
-:. i --.---

Cream Separators, Accessories for Creameries, &c.

REPRESENTATIVES OF
The New Zealand Insurance Co., Fire and Marine
National Board of Marine Underwriters, New York,
Board of Marine Underwriters, Boston
Lloyd's London


RUNCIMAN & CO.
Postal Address: Casilla de Correo 125. A. I. & Liebers Codes Used.
Telegraphic Address: RUNCIMAN, Buenos Aires.-Union Telephone 1393 and 2025




7C)




THE


ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK.


(1903)


WITH WHICH ARE INCORPORATED THE "ANUARIO PILLADO"
AND "GRANT'S ARGENTINE COMMERCIAL GUIDE"

(ALL RIGHTS RESERVED).







PROPRIETORS AND PUBLISHERS:

THE SOUTH AMERICAN PUBLISHING Co., LD.

351 CALLE SAN MARTIN, BUENOS AIRES








LONDON AGENCY:

THE SOUTH AMERICAN JOURNAL,
DASHWOOD HOUSE,
9, NEW BROAD STREET.
LONDON. E. C.


AND
BATES, HENDY & CO.,
81, CANNON STREET, LONDON, E.C.















GENERAL INDEX.


ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE ....... SO
AGRICULTURE .................. 167, 172
AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS... 170
ALFALFA ................. 16), 170
ARABLE LANDS AND SOIL 167, 168
AREA.......................... 167
AREA UNDER CROP........ 169, 170
CONDITIONS................... 167
CONDITIONS AND CAPITAL RE-
QUIRED FOR CULTIVATION 171-72
COST OF PRODUCTION ......... 173
DROUGHTS AND LOCUSTS..... 167
INDIGENOUS AND ACCLIMA-
TIZED GRASSES........ 168, 169
SUGAR CANE AND SUGAR..... 172
WHEAT, LINSEED & MAIZE
CROPS.WITH COMPARISONS 170-71
AJo, PORT OF...................... 138
ALVEAR, PORT OF.................. 137
ANDES, TERRITORY OF THE........ 79
ANIMAL INDUSTRY.............. 172, 179
ARGENTINA'S CAPITAL IN LIVE
STOCK .................. .... 173
ARGENTINA'S CAPITAL INLIVE
STOCK, PER KILOMETRE..... 173
AVERAGE FEEDING CAPACI -
TY, PER HECTARE....... 172, 173
CURRENT PRICES OF LIVE
STOCK ....................... 174
ESTANCIA, DIVISION OF, AND '
OBJECTS.............. 174, 175
MEAT FREEZING PLANTS. 178, 170
ORIGIN OF ARGENTINE STOCK 173
PASTORAL FARMING, CAPITAL
REQUIRED ................... 175
SALADEROS OR BEEF SALTING
FACTORIES.................. 178
TABLES OF CAPITAL REQUI-
RED AND PROBABLE PRO
FITS..... ............... 176, 177
W OOL, AVERAGE CLIP PER
SHEEP................... ... 178
YIELD OF WOOL AND MEAT... 174
ANIMAL SANITARY LAWS & REGU-
LATIONS (LAWS 3959, OCTOBER 1900,
AND 4155, DECEMBER 1902) .... 180, 189
AREA UNDER CROP............. 169, 170
ARGENTINA FOREIGN CONSULAR
CORPS, IN...................... 24, 26
ARGENTINA FOREIGN DIPLOMATIC
CORPS, IN..................... 23, 24
PROSPECTS OF, ECONOMICAL-
LY CONSIDERED........ 213, 218
ARGENTINE AND GREENWICH TIME. 22
ARGENTINE BOUNDARIES.......... 7
ARGENTINE DIPLOMATIC CORPS. 21, 22
ARGENTINE HISTORY................ 1
ARGENTINE PHYSICAL ASPECTS.... 8
ARGENTINE PORT DUES ........ 155, 156
ARGENTINE REPUBLIC (SKETCH).... 7
ARGENTINE RIVERS................. 11
ARMY, THE..................... 119, 120

BAHIA BLANCA, PORT OF........... 139
BANKRUPTCY, LAWS RELATING To.84 89I
BARADERO, PORT OF.............. 138


BARRANQUERAS, PORT OF.......... 139
BEEF SALTING FACTORIES.......... 178
BELLA VISTA, PORT OF ........... 138
BERMEJO, PORT OF................. 138
BILLS OF EXCHANGE, LAW RELA-
TING To ........................... 83
BUENOS AIRES.
AREA................... .. 22'7, 228
CITY OF.................. 227, 229
MUNICIPAL AND VITAL STA-
TISTICS ................. 248, 249
POPULATION AND NATIONALI-
TIES ........................ 227
PORT DUES AND DOCK CHAR-
GES ..................... 156, 157
PORT OF................. 131, 132
SI MOVEMENT OF SHIP-
PING 1902). IN................ 133
PORT OF, MOVEMENT OF SHIP-
PING BY NATIONALITY.. 134, 136
PRINCIPAL SQUARES, STREETS
AND BUILDINGS......... 227, 229
PROVINCE OF ............. 34, 39
BUTTER COMPARISONS OF CONSUMP-
TION AND EXPORTS, WITH OTHER
COUNTRIES .... .. ............ 197, 198
BUTTER, EXPORTS OF............... 196

CABLEGRAMS ....................... 105
CABLEGRAMS. TARIFFS FOR........ 105
CAMPANA, PORT OF. ................ 137
CANALIZATION OF RIVERS...... 120, 122
CATAMARCA PROVINCE OF........ 62, 63
CHACO, TERRITORY OF............. 70
CHUBUT, PORT OF .................. 140
CHUBUT, TERRITORY OF......... 73, 74
CITY OF BUENOS AIRES........ 227, 22)
> A REA ......................... 227
POPULATION AND NATIONALI-
TIES................ ....... 227
> PRINCIPAL SQUARES, STREETS
AND BUILDINGS...,..... 228, 229
CITIZENSHIP, LAW OF............... 82
CIVIL AND COMMERCIAL LAWS.. 82, 9t)
CLIMATE AND METEOROLOGY. ...... 28
S TEMPERATURE... 28, 29
S RAINFALL ............... 30 31
COAST, LIGHTS ON ARGENTINE..... 15J
COCHICO, ESTANCIA ............ 245, 248
COLON, PORT OF ................... 140
COLONIZATION, HIRSCH............ 113
STROEDER .....11 11113
COMMERCE ...................... 158, 166
COMPARATIVE TABLES,
IMPORTS & EXPORTS ..... 159
IMPORTS & EXPORTS, 1902
AND 1ST. QUARTER 1903....... 158, 162
COMMERCE. NATURE OF EXPORTS,
WITH COMPARISONS........... 160, 161
COMMERCE. PRINCIPAL ARTICLES OF
EXPORTS, VITH TABLES ........ 16t,
COMMERCE. SUMMARY OF IMPORTS
AND EXPORTS 1893-1902 ........164, 165
COMMERCE. TARIFF LAW............ 163
S VALUES OF EXPORTS,
WITH TABLES ..................... 162








ERRATA.


For "Index T Companies And Comnmercial Section"' on-P 1B s
xxxiff XXXIV, Xxxx! Xxxvi of Index, read "Index- T6 Finanvial:u
Companies Section".
On page 293, in prices accepted for purchase by tender for amikr-
tisation, "July 1093", should read "July 1903".
On pago '396 in Now York Life iLisurance Co's report 46,925,6913
as "srls af ineorne over expenditure" should be $ 32,182,810.
On- page 313 in Southern Railway- Co's report, last line o page
shudappear under line 31,
'La Sud Ainarta" appearing- Linder "Nationtal" Insurance, Cot"u-,
panies, on pages 406-7, should be, elaasified as a Foreign Company.


Whitst marking the above cbrrections, indulgence ig sought-Tor the
comparatively, few typographical errors which hav occurred E- ,
result of the fact, that, the whole or the text ham 45"n Set-upb
compositors totallyv unancuaiited with the English language.












GENERAL INDEX xxx


COMMERCIAL MOVEMENT OF PRINCI-
PAL PORTS (1902 AND 1ST. QUAR-
TER 1903)................... 152, 153
COMMUNICATIONS, RIVER.......120, 122
COMODORO RIVADAVIA, PORT OF... 151
COMPANIES AND FINANCIAL SEC-
TION ...........................263, 468
CONCORDIA, PORT OF............... 139
CONSULAR CORPS IN ARGENTINA,
FOREIGN.............. ........ 24, 26
CONSTITUTION AND CIVIL RIGHTS.. 5
CONVERSION TABLES, WEIGHTS,
MEASURES AND VALUES....... 232, 236
C6RDOBA, PROVINCE OF......... 48, 49
CORONDA, PORT OF ................. 140
CORRIENTES, PORT OF.............. 139
PROVINCE OF ......42, 44
COTTON INDUSTRY.................. 211
CHEAMERIES ............... 194, 199, 201
CROPS ; WHEAT, LINE ED AND
MAIZE......................... 170, 171
CULTIVATION OF WHEAT IN THE
ARGENTINE REPUBLIC.........190, 193

DAIRY INDUSTRY.......................194, 201
DEBT, NATIONAL (EXTERNAL AND
INTERNAL) SEE INDEX TO FINAN-
CIAL AND COMPANIES SECTION...
DEEDS AND CONTRACTS, LAW RE
LATING TO........................ 83
DEFENCES NATIONAL.. ........ 114, 119
DIAMANTE, PORT OF ............... 140
DIPLOMATIC CORPS, ARGENTINE 21, 22
FOREIGN IN AR-
SGENTINA...................... 23, 24
DISTILLERIES................... 203, 205
DROUGHTS AND LOCUSTS........... 167
DUTIES, STAMP LAWS AND. ... 250, 253

EDUCATION, PUBLIC............. 97, 99
ELECTORAL LAW (1903).......... 91, 93
EMPEDRADO, PORT OF............. 141
ENTIRE RIOS, PROVINCE OF...... 40, 41
ESQUINA, PORT OF.................. 140
ESTANCIAS, MARTiN CHICO* AND
CoCRIC6 .................... 243, 248
EXPORTERS, LIST OF.......... 259, 260
EXPORTS AND CONSUMPTION O F
BUTTER, WITH COMPARISONS 197, 198
EXPORTS, IMPORTS AND, COMPARA-
TIVE TABLES................. .... 159
EXPORTS, IMPORTS AND, 1902 AND
1ST. QUARTER 1903.......... 158. 162
EXPORTS, IMPORTS AND, SUMMARY
OF (1898-1902) ............ .... 164, 165
EXPORTS, NATURE OF, WITH COM-
PARISONS...... .............. 160, 161
EXPORTS, OF BUTTER............... 196
PRINCIPAL ARTICLES OF,
WITH TABLES.................... 166
EXPORTS, VALUES OF, WITH TA-
BLES ............................... 162
EXTERNAL DEBT, NATIONAL, SEE INDEX
TO FINANCIAL SECTION.

FEAST DAYS, AND PUBLIC HOLI-
DAYS............................... 237
FINANCES, NATIONAL, SEE INDEX FI-
NANCES AND COMPANIES SECTION.
FINANCIAL AND COMPANIES SEC-
TION .......................... 263, 468


FLEET........................... 115. 117
FLOUR INDUSTRY. .............. 205, 208
FOREIGN CONSULAR CORPS IN AR
GENTINA....................... 24, 26
FOREIGN DIPLOMATIC CORPS IN AR-
GENTINA. ..................... 23, 24
FORMOSA, PORT OF..... ........ 141
TERRITORY OF ........... 69
FRUIT INDUSTRY ................... 212

GARRUCHOS. PORT OF............... 142
GOVERNMENT, NATIONAL ........... 20
GOYA. PORT OF..................... 141
GRASSES, INDIGENOUS AND ACCLI-
MATIZED ..................... 168, 169
GUALEGUAY. PORT OF............. 141
GUALEGUAYCHL PORT OF........... 142

HARBOURS (SEE DOCKS AND HARBOUR
COMPANIES).
HELVECIA, PORT OF................. 142
HIRSCH COLONIZATION ............. 113
HOLIDAYS. PUBLIC AND FEAST
DAYS............................. 237

IMMIGRATION................... 109, 111
STATISTICS OF... 110, 111
IMPORTS AND EXPORTS (1902 AND
1ST. QUARTER 1903)........... 158, 162
IMPORTS AND EXPORTS. COMPARA-
TIVE TABLES................. 158, 162
IMPORTS AND EXPORTS SUMMARY
OF............................. 164, 165
IMPORTERS. LIST OF............ 254, 258
INDUSTRY. ANIMAL............. 172, 179
DAIRY................ 194, 201
INDUSTRIES, NEW............... '211. 212
INDUSTRIES. OTHER NATIONAL 202, 210
COTTON........................ 211
FLOUR .................... 205, 208
FRUIT......................... 212
IRON AND STEEL............... 210
OILS .............. ............ 211
RICE ......................... 212
SEED.......................... 211
SILK ........... .............. .. 1
SUGAR ......................... r.1
TEXTILE FABRICS............. 211
TOBACCO...................... 210
WINE .................... 202, 203
INSURANCE LICENSE LAW.......... 253
> STAMP .......... 253
INTERNAL DEBT, NATIONAL (SEE INDEX
TO FINANCIAL SECTION).
INTERNAL TAX LAW................ 252
ITUZAING6, PORT OF................ 142

JUJUY, PROVINCE OF............ 65, 66
JUSTICE, ADMINISTRATION OF...... 80

LA CURZ, PORT OF................... 143
LAND AND PROPERTY TAX LAW..... 253
LANDS, ARABLE AND SOIL ..... 167, 168
LA PAZ, PORT OF ................... 143
LA PLATA, .................... 14&
LA RIOJA, PROVINCE OF........ 60, 61
LAVALLE, PORT O............ 148, 144
LAW (RELATING TO) BANKRUPTCY.84, 89
BILLS OFEXCHANGE 83
CITIZENSHIP ...... 82


/


GENERAL INDEX


xxx










GENERAL INDEX


LAW (RELATING) DEEDS AND CON-
TRACTS .......... 83
INSURANCE LICEN-
SE ............... 253
INSURANCE STAMP 253
INTERNAL TAX..... 252
LAND 1903:..... 93, 96
LAND AND PROPER-
TY.... .......... 253
LIMITED LIABILITY
COMPANIES... 83, 84
MERCANTILE BOOKS 83
NATIONAL ELECTO-
RAL (1903 .... 93, 96
REAL ESTATE...... 83
SUCESSION......... 83
LAWS, CIVIL AND COMMERCIAL. 82, 96
STAMP AND LICENSE.... 250, 253
LEGAL STATUS OF FOREIGNERS..... 83
LICENSE LAW ....................... 252
> INSURANCE ........... 253
LIGHTS, ON ARGENTINE COAST
AND IN RIVER PLATE.............. 154
LIMITED, LIABILITY COMPANIES
(SEE INDEX TOFINANCIALSECTION.
LINSEED, MAIZE AND WHEAT
CROPS......................... 170, 171
LOCUSTS, DROUGHTS AND.......... 167

MADRYN, PORT OF.............. 144, 145
MAGDALENA 1 ................. 144
MAIZE, WHEAT AND LINSEED
CROPS......................... 170, 171
MAR DEL PLATA, PORT OF ......... 144
MAR CHICO, ESTANCIA .......... 243, 245
MEASURES, WEIGHTS,VALUES CON-
VERSION TABLES............... 282 236
MENDOZA, PROVINCE OF,........ 56, 57
MERCANTILE, BOOKS, LAW RELA-
TING TO ............................ 83
METALLURGY MINING AND,..... 219, 225
METEOROLOGY AND CLIMATE .... 28, 34
MINING AND METALLURGY..... 219. 225
MISIONES, TERRITORY OF ........ 67, 68
MONTE CASEROS, PORT OF,.......... 144
MOVEMENT. COMMERCIAL OF PRIN-
CIPAL PORTS (1902 & 1ST. QUAR-
TER 1903).................. ... 152. 153
MOVEMENT, OF SHIPPING....... 131, 151
MUNICIPAL AND VITAL STATISTICS,
BUENOS AIRES................ 248, 249

NATIONAL ELECTORAL LAW...... 91, 93
DEFENCES............ 114, 119
S GOVERNMENT ............. 20
TERRITORIES.......... 67. 79
NAVY, THE...................... 114, 118
NEW INDUSTRIES ............... 211, 212
NEUQUEN, TERRITORY OF. ...... 75, 76
NEWSPAPERS OF THE CAPITAL.. 238, 241

OCAMPO, PORT OF ................. 146
OILS, INDUSTRY ................... 211
OPERATIONS RAILWAYS, TABLE OF. 130
ORGANIZATION POSTAL............. 100
OROiO PORT OF..................... 145

PAMPA, TERRITORY OF.......... 71, 72
PARANA, PORT OF ................... 145
PASO DE LOS LIBRES. PORT OF..... 145
PATAGONES. PORT OF............... 146
PATENTS....... ................ 106. 107


PATENTS FEES IN RESPECT OF. 106. 107
PILCOMAYO, PORT OF............... 146
POPULATION, 1895 (CENSUS......... 26
FEDERAL CAPITAL... 27
IN FEMALES .......... 20
SMALES............. 26
SNATIONALITIES.... 26
PROVINCES............ 27
TERRITORIES ........ 27
31ST. DECEMBER 1902. 27
TOTAL ............... 26
FOR REPUBLIC 27
PORT DUES...................... 155. 156
SOF AJO. MOVEMENT OF SHIP-
PING (1902, IN ...................... 138
PORT OF ALVEAR, DO............... 137
BAHIA BLANCA, DO........ 139
BARADERO, DO............. 138
BARRANQUEAS, DO ....... 139
BELLA VISTA, DO......... 13S
BERMEJO, DO............. 138
BUENOS AIRES, DUES AND
DOCK CHARGES .............. 156, 157
PORT OF BUENOS AIRES........ 131. 132
> MOVEMENT
OF SHIPPING (1902) IN. ......... 133
PORT OF BUENOS AIRES, MOVEMENT
OF SHIPPING (1902) IN, BY NATIO-
NALITIES ..................... 134. 13n
PORT OF CAMPANA. MOV. OF SHIP
PING (1902) IN. 137
CHUBUT. 14o
COLON. 140
COM. RIVADAVIA, 151
CONCORDIA, 13"
CORONDA, 1411
CORRIENTES, 139
DIAMANTE, 140
EMPEDRADO, 141
ESQUINA, 140
FORMOSA. 141
GARRUCHOS. 142
GOYA. 141
GUALEGUAY. 141
GUALEGUAYCHI-, 14'
I ELVECIA. 142
ITUZAINGO. 142
LA CRUZ. 143
LA PAZ, 143
LA PLATA, 143
LAVALLE, 143. 144
MADRYN. 144, 145
MAGDALENA. 144
MAR DEL PLATA 14j
MONTE CASEROS 144
OCAMPO 146
ORORO, 145
PARANA. 145
PASO DE LOS LIBRES, 145
PATAGONES. 146
PILCOMAYO. 14-(
POSADAS, 146
QUEQUEN. 146
RAMALLO. 147
RECONQUISTA, 147 14,
RIo GALLEGOS, 147
ROSARIO. > 147
SAN BLAS. 151
SAN FERNANDO, 149
SAN JAVIER. 145
SAN NICOLAS. 14S
SAN PEDRO. 14


XXXI









GENERAL INDEX


PORT OF STA. CRUZ, MO1V. OF SHIP-
PING (1902) IN 149
SANTA FE. 148
SANTO TOM., > 148
TIGRE, 149
URUGUAY, 149, 150
USHUAIA, 1 50
VICTORIA. 150
V. CONSTITUCION. 150
ZARATE. 151
PORTS AND SHIPPING........... 131 157
PORTS. COMMERCIAL MOVEMENT OF
(190') AND IST. QUARTER 1903) 152 153
POSADAS. PORT OF ................ 14b
POSTAL ORGANIZATION ............. 100
S TARILFFS ............... 101. 102
PRODUCTS, AGRICULTURAL ......... 170
PROPERTY TAX LAW. LAND AND... 253
PROSPECTS OF ARGENTINA. ECO-
NOMICALLY CONSIDERED ..... 213 218
PROVINCE OF BUENOS AIRES.....34 3)
CATAMARCA ....... .62 63
CORDOBA .......... 48 49
CORRIENTES .......42 44
ENTRE RIos........ 40 41
JUJUY. .............65 66
LA RIOJA..........60 61
MENDOZA ..........56 57
SALTA............. 64
SAN JUAN ..........58 59
SAN LUIS...........50 51
RANTA F ..........45 47
SGo. DEL ESTERO.... 52
> TUCI'MAN ..........53 55
PROVINCES OF THE REPUHLIC... 31 66

QUEQUEN, PORT OF ................. 14o

RAILWAYS, IEING CONSTRUCTED... 128
CONCESSIONS ....... 123, 129
LINES PROJECTED ...... 12
PROGRESS IN ARGENTI-
NA..... ........ 123, 129
SUMMARY O F OPERA-
TIONS ................. 130
WORKINGS AND COMPA-
RISONS .. ....... 126, 128
RAMALLO, PORT OF.................. 147
REAL ESTATE. LAW RELATING TO.. 8S
RECONQUISTA. PORT OF........ 147, 148
REPUIIBLIC, PROVINCES O1....... 34, 66
RIO GALLEGOS. PORT OF............ 147
SNEGRO TERRITORY, OF..... 72, 73
RICE INDUSTRY ..................... 21'
RIVER COMMUNICATIONS ........ 121, 122
PLATE LIGHTHOUSES AND
IIGHTSHIPS .............. 134
ROSARIO, PORT OF................. 147

SALADEROS ................ ......... 178
SALTA, PROVINCE OF ................ 64
SAN BLAS. PORT OF................. 151
FERNANDO, PORT OF........... 14
J AVIER. PORT OF............... 145
JUAN. PROVINCE OF ........ 5, 5)
> LUIS. PROVINCE OF. ........ 50, 51
> NICOLAS, PORT OF .............. 148
PEDRO, PORT F01 ............... 11)
*SANTA CRUZ, PORT OF. .............. 14'


SANTA CRUZ. TERRITORY OF........ 77
FE, PORT OF ............. ... 148
S PROVINCE OF......... 45, 4,
SANTIAGO DELESTERO, PROVINCE OF 32
SANTO TOME, PORT OF.............. 148
SEED INDUSTRY .................... 211
SILK .................. 212
SHIPPING, PORTS AND .......... 131, 157
STAMP LAWS AND DUTIES ...... 250. 253
STATISTICS. MUNICIPAL AND VITAL
(BUENOS AIRES) .............. 248, 249
STEEL, AND IRON INDUSTRY ......... 210
STOCK, SALES OF BY AUCTION.. 230, 231
STROEDER COLONIZATION ......... 113
SUCCESSION, LAW RELATING TO.... 88
SUGAR CANE AND SUGAR ............ 172
S INDUSTRY .................. 209

TARIFFS, CABLE ............... ... ] 5
POSTAL ............... 101, 1D2
TELEGRAPIIS. ............. 104
TAX. INTERNAL LAW................. 22
1 LAND AND PROPERTY ......... 253
TELEGRAPHS AND CABLES...... 102, 105
TERRITORIES, NATIONAL ........ 67. 79
TERRITORY OF THE ANDES.......... 70
S CHACO.......... 70
CHUBUT .......... 73, 74
S FORMOSA............. 69
MISIONES .......... 67
S NEUQUEN ........ 75, 76
THE PAMPA ...... 71. 72
Rio NEGRO....... 72, 73
SANTA CRUZ......... 77
TIERRA D E L FUE-
GO .......... 77, 78
TEXTILE FABRICS. INDUSTRY OF.... 211
TIGRE, PORT OF ............... .. 140
TIMBER INDUSTRY ................. 212
TIME, GREENWICH MEAN AND COR-
D OBA ....................... .... 2'
TOBACCO INDUSTRY................ 210
TRADE IARKS. ................. 107. 108
TREATIES AND CONVENTIONSS ....... 12
TUCUMAN, PROVINCE OF.......... 53, 55
TYPICAL ESTANCIAS .......... 243, 24

URUGUAY, PORT OF............. 149, 150
USHUAIA, PORT OF ................. 15

VALUES. 'WEIGHTS. MEASURES AND
CONVERSION TABLES ........ 232. 236
VICTORIA. PORT OF................. 150
VILLA CONSTITUTION. PORT OF..... 150
VITAL STATISTICS, MUNICIPAL AND
(BUENOS AIRES) ........... '48, 249

WARSHIPS .................... 113, 117
'WEIGHTS. MEASURES AND VALUES
(CONVERSION TABLES)........ 232, 236
WVIFEAT, CULTIVATION OF IN THE
ARGENTINE REPUBLIC ........ 1('t, 193
WHIEAT LINSEED, AND ,1AIZ I-
(ROPS ......................... 170. 171
'VINE INDUSTRY .............. 202. 103
\~OOL .................... ..... 174, 178

ZARATE, PORT OF ... .............. 151


XXXII














INDEX TO COMPANIES

AND COMMERCIAL SECTION.


BANKS (AND FINANCIAL TRUSTS:
ACUMULATIVA (LA)........... 370
AHtORRO MUTUO (EL) (LA BO-
LA DE NIEVE)............... 369
ALEMAN TRANSATLANTICO... 863
BRITISH BANK OF SOUTH
AMERICA. ..............360, 361
CAJA DE CONVERSI6ON.... 356, 357
INTERNATIONAL MUTUA
DE PENSIONES ............. 369
COMMERCIAL DE DOLORES..... 370
COMERCI........... ........ .... 360
COMPANiA GENERAL DE AIIO-
RROS ........................ 368
COMPANIA NATIONAL DE AlIO-
IROS ........................ 369
ESPANOL DEL RIO DE LA
PLATA ...................362, 363
FRANCES DEL RIO DE LA
PLATA ....................... 364
HIPOTECARIO DE LA CAPITAL. 358
])E LA PROVIN-
CIA DE BUENOS AIRES.. 357, 358
HII'OTECARIO NATIONAL ...... 359
HOGAR ARGENTINO (EL).. 367, 368
ITALIA Y R. DE LA PLATA 363, 364
LONDON AND BRAZILIAN...... 361
SAND RIVER PLATE 35'9, 360
> MXICO AND SOUTII
AMERICA.. ................. 365
MlUNICIPAL DE PRESTAMOS... 367
NACI6N ARGENTINA .......355. 356
NUEVO ITALIANO, .........365, 366
POPULAR APGENTINO......... 366
ITALIANO........... 366
PROVINCIA DE BUENOS AIRES 35S
Rio DE LA PLATA............. 367
TARAPAC AND ARGENTINA.. 362
BREWERY COMPANIES:
BIECKERT'S BREWERY (1900 .. -147
CERVECERIA ARGENTINA DE
QUILMES .................... 447
CERVECERIA PALERMO ........ 448
Rio SEGUNDO... 448
FARRICA NATIONAL DE CER-
VEZA ........................ 448
BUDGETS, NATIONAL (1902, 1903) 263. 2o5

CAJA DE CONVERSION...........356, 357
COMPANIES, LIMITED LIABILITY 311, 468
BANKING.................. 353, 370
BREWERIES................447, 448
DOCKS AND HARBOURS .... 25, 428
INSURANCE, FOREIGN ......388, 403
NATIONAL ....404, 411
LIGHTING...................43, 439
MEAT FREEZING AND PRESER-
VING .....................429, 433
M INING ....................451, 453


COMPANIES:
MISCELLANEOUS ...........454, 465
MORTGAGE, LAND AND FI-
NANCE .................. 412, 424
RAILWAY ................. 311, 352
STATUTES APPROVED, AMEN-
DED AND DISSOLVED ('O02-
19(3 ..................... 466, 468
SUGAR ................... 449, 450
TELEGRAPH AND TELEPHO-
NE ........................443, 446
TRAMWAY ............... 371, 387
WAATER AND DRAINAGE ...440. 442
CONVERSION LAW AND BANKING 353, 854
CUSTOMS TARIFFS ....... ..... 469, 510

DEBiT, NATIONAL EXTERNAL... 270, 281
INTERNAL.... 282, 309
MUNICIPAL... 294, 300
PROVINCIAL.. 301, 309
DOCKS AND HARBOURS COMPANIES:
BUENOS AIRES HARIIOUR
WORKS TRUST........... 425, 426
BUENOS AIRES SOUTHERN
D OCK .................... 426, 427
CATALINAS WAREHOUSES AND
M OLE ................... .427, 428
PUERTO SAN NICOLS......... 428
DRAINAGE COMPANIES (SEE WATER AND
DRAINAGE COMPANIESj.

ESTANCIA COMPANIES (SEE MORTGAGE,
LAND AND FINANCES COMPANIES).
EXTERNAL DEBT, NATIONAL... .270. 281
FINANCE COMPANIES (SEE MORTGAGE,
LAND AND FINANCES COMPANIES).
FINANCES, NATIONAL...........263, 268
FINANCIAL TRUSTS (SEE UNDER BANKS
AND UNDER MORTGAGE, LAND AND
FINANCE COMPANIES.
FREEZING COMPANIES (SEE MEAT
FREEZING AND PRESERVING COM-
PANIES .


GOLD PREMIUMT (1896-1903).......... 269

INSURANCE COMPANIES, COMMIT-
TEES ................. ........... 388
INSURANCE COMPANIES, FOREIGN:
AACHEN AND MUNICH.I........ 389
ALLIANCE ................ 389, 390
ATLAS ........................ 390
COMMERCIAL UNION.......30, 391
CONFIANZA LA)............. 391
EQUITABLE LIFE U.S........ 392
FEDERAL MARINE ............. 392









INDEX TO COMPANIES AND COMMERCIAL SECTION xxxiv


INSURANCE COMPANIES:
GUARDIAN .................342 393
LIVERPOOL AND LONDON AND
G LOI E .................. .3'13, 3')4
LONDON AND LANCASHIRE 3)4, 3:95
ASSURANCE .......... 345
LUNION FIRE .......... ....... 3q0
NEW YORK LIFE .............. 3:6
NEW ZEALAND..............3'), 3-47
NORTH BRITISH AND MERCAN-
TILE ..... ................ 397
NORTHERN INSURANCE CO.... 398
NORWICH UNION............. 3'
PI ENI. ............... ......... 399)
ROY AL EXCHANGE ........ 3 ", 400
1 OYAL ........................ 400
SCOTTISH UNION AND NAT.400, 401
STANDARD LIFE .......... 401, 402
S N .......................... 402
UNION................. .... 4), 103
UNION SARINE.............. 4U3
INSURANCE (COMPANIES. NATIONAL:
AMERICA LA ................. 041
ASEGURADOHAV ESPANOLA ,LA, 404
A NDINA ........................ 405
COMERCIO ............ ....... 4 '0
ECONOMiA COMMERCIAL. ... 104, 405
EqUITATIVA DEL PLATA ...... 105
ESTRELLA ..................... 407
FRANCO-ARGENTINA .......... J4S
FRANCO PLATENSE ........... -lNS
HISPANO-ARGENTINA ......... 40S
IMPERIAL.................. ... )'
INMOBILIARIA ................ 40)
ITALIA......................... 40-
POSITIVA .............. .. 40(0
I:REVISO IA ..... ............. 4110
vEPI IE LICA .................. 411
HOSARIO ........ .. .......... 410
R URAL ........................ 410
SUD-AME.RICA .............406, 407
TRANSATLANTICA .......... 11
UNION INDUSTRIAL ARGEN-
TINA ................ ....... 411
UNIIN MERCANTIL ........... 411


LAND COMPANIES (S E E MORTGAGE
LAND AND FINANCE COS).
LIGHTING COMPANIES:
A L E M A N A TRANSATLANTICA
DE ELECTRICIDAD........ 433
BRIGHT'S LIGIT AND POWER.
LIMITED .....4... ...... 434, 4,35
IlUENOS AIRES NEW) GAS .... 435
(;AS DE PARANA ........... 435, 436
PRIMITIVE GAS AND ELECTRIC
LIGHTING CO. OF BUENOS
AIRES .................... 436, 437
RIVER PLATE ELECTRIC LIGHT
AND TRACTION .............. 437
RIVER PLATE GAS .........437, 438
ROSARIO ELECTRIC ........ 38, 439
SOUTH BARRACAS ( BS. As. )
GAS AND COKE .............. 43')


MEAT FREEZING AND PRESERVING COS:
ARGENTINE MEAT PRESER-
VING ........... ......... 42l
COMPAriA DE PRODUCTS
KEMMERICH ................ 43


MEAT FREEZING AND PRESERVING COS:
COMPANIA SANSINENA DE CAR
NES CONGELADAS ........ 430
JAMES NELSON AND SONS 430, 431
LA BLANCA .................... 431
LA PLATA COLD STORAGE..... 482
RIVER PLATE FRESH MEAT
432, 433
MINING COMPANIES:
ARGENTINE CONCESSIONS..... 451
ATLAS QUARRY ................ 451
INTERNATIONAL DE BORAX.... 452
PHOENIX ......... ........ 452
RIo NEGRO, PUTUCO (DRIFT
MINING .............. ....... 453
RIo NEGRO SALT.............. 453
SOUTHERN ARGENTINE EXPLO-
RATION.............. ....... 453
MISCELLANEOUS COMPANIES:
ARGENTINA ILA) PAPER FAC-
TORY ......................... 454
ARGENTINISCIHES W OCHEN-
AND TAGE ILATT ........... 454
BAGLEY, m1. 9. & Co....... 454, 455
BRISTOL HOTEL ............... 455
COMPANIA DE CAJAS DE SE-
GURIDAD..................... 455
COMPANIA GENERAL DE F(S-
FonES .................. 457, 458
COMPANiA INTRODUCTORY DE
BUENOS AIRES .............. 458
COMPANiA DE ()ORAS PtI'LI-
CAS................ .. ... 458
COMPANiA SMOLET DE CARBURO
D1E (ALCIO ................ 461
COMPANIA SUD- AMERICANADE
BILLETES DE BANCO........ 464
DESTILERIA FRANCO-ARGEN-
TINA ....... ........ ....... 46
EDIFI'ADORA LA,............ 456
EXPRESO VILLALONGA ........ 456
GAGGINO LAURET (TANNING
Co. ..................... 456, 457
GALERIA FLORIDA ............ 457
HURLINGHAM CLUB ........... 458
L'INDUSTRIEL BELGE ......... 458
MARTONA I LA) ................ 459
MERCADO CENTRAL DE FRU-
TO ...................... 460, 461
MERCADO DE AIIASTO PROVEE-
DOR ................ ........ 461
MOLINERA ANGLO ARGENTINA 462
PRIMITIVA (LA BAG FACTORY 463
PRINCE GEORGE'S HALL....... 462
SERVICIO MENSAJERO DE LA
CAPITAL ..................... 46"
SCHILL. SEEBHOM Y Co........ 463
SOUTH AMERICAN ASPHALT
PAVING........ ........ 464
TEUTONIA, LA ............... 464
TENERiA DE BS. AS., (LA)..... 465
UNION ARGENTINA, (LA)....... 465
WVALKER AND Co., C. H........ 465
MORTGAGE, LAND AND FINANCE
COMPANIES:
A RGE NTINE COLONIZATION
AND LAND ............... ... 415
ARGENTINE LAND AND IN-
VESTMENT. ............... 416. 417
ARGENTINE SOUTHERN LAND. 417
BELLA V ISTA ........... 417. 41S
BUENA ESPERANZA ........... 41








xxxv INDEX TO COMPANIES AND COMMERCIAL SECTION


MORTGAGE, LAND AND FINANCE
COMPANIES:
CREDIT TERRITORIAL DE
SANTA FE ............. 414, 415
ESPARTILLAR ESTANCIA....... 418
ESTANCIA AND PROPERTIES... 419
SY COLONIES CURU-
MALAN ...................... 419
ESTANCIA Y COLONIAL TORN
QUIST.................... 419, 420
ESTANCIAS UNIDAS DEL CHA-
co ........................... 420
INVESTMENT TRUST ,CASSELS, 415
LAND AND PRODUCE CO....... 420
LAS CABEZAS .............. 420, 421
MORTGAGE CO., OF THE RIVER
PLATE ................... 412 413
NEW ZEALAND AND RIVER
PLATE LAND AND MORTGAGE 414
OLIVERA ....................... 421
PAMPA ESTANCIA ............. 421
PASTORAL ARGENTINA, BEL
GA ....................... 421, 422
PLANTADORA ISLENA.......... 422
RIVER PLATE AND GENERAL
INVESTMENT TRUST..... 413, 414
RIVER PLATE TRUST LOAN
AND AGENCY ................ 413
SANTA FE AND CORDOnA
GREAT SOUTHERN LAND..... 422
SANTA FE LAND ............... 423
SOUTH AMERICAN LAND .. 423, 424


NATIONAL-EXTERNAL DEBT, (LOANS):
ARGENTINE 3 1/2 EXTERNAL
STERLING BONDS (LAW N.
2543) ......................... 277
ARC. GOVT. 4 "lo BONDS (CON-
VERSION OF PROVINCIAL
DEBTS) ................. .27, 280
ARG. GOVT.1 4112,, CONVER-
SION LOAN (1888) .. ........ 276
ARG, Gov. 6 ",, FUNDIIN G
LOAN (LAW N." 2770 ... .77, 278
ARG. Gov. 4 1/2 ,, INTERNAL
GOLD LOAN (LA l16S8 ..275, 276
ARG. Gov. 4 o(, LOAN (188I'. .. 2O0
5"[o (1884;... 271
5 '/o NATIONAL
BANK LOAN (1886)........274, 275
ARG. GOVT. 5 "lo PUBLIC
WORKS LOAN (1886-1887).... 2/72
ARG. GOVT. 6 "oo RAILWAY
LOAN (1881) .................. 270
ARGENTINE NORTIIERN CEN-
TRAL RAILWAY EXTENSIONS
5 % ( FIRST ISSUE) (LAWS
OCTOBER 1885 AND 1886 ..... 273
ARGENTINE NORTHERN CEN-
TRAL RAILWAY BONDS 5 %
(1890. SECOND ISSUE) ........ 274
ARGEnTINE RAILWAY GUA-
RANTEE 4 % RESCISSION
BONDS (186 AND 1899) .. 278, 279
ARGENTINE REPUBLIC PORT
OF BUENOS AIRES 5 % DE-
BENTURES (1892-1899).... 272. 273
ARGENTINE 5 % TREASURY
CONVERSION BONDS (LAws
N." 830 AND 1934) 1876, 1887.. 275


NATIONAL EXTERNAL DEBT. (LOANS):
BUENOS AIRES WATER SUPPLY
AND DRAINAGE WORKS (5 %
BONDS 1892) ................. 278
SUMMARY OF.................. 281
NATIONAL INTERNAL DEBT (LOANS):
LAW N." 1418 JUNE 1884... 282, 283
S2782 1891... 283, 284
2841 OCT. 1891... 284, 285
3059 JAN. 1894....... 286
S340 AND 3656 AUG.
AND NOV. 1897 ........... 286, 287
LAW N." 3683 JAN. 188 .... 87, 288
S3684 MAY 1898........ 288
(FOREIGN INSURANCE
CoS.) SEPT 1898 ......... 288, 290
LAW N." 1628 or 1885 AND NA-
TIONAL DECREE OCT. 1891
(REWARDS TO EXPEDITION~
NARY ARMY) ................. 290
LAW N.O 2216 Nov. 1887.... 20, 292
S2842 OCT. 1891.... 292, 293
2318, MUNICIPAL,
SEPT. 1888 ........... ..24 2,95
LAW N." 1267, MUNICIPAL,
OCT. 1882 ................. 95, 296
LAW N." 156', M u N IC I PAL,
OCT. 1884 ............ .'-6, 297
LAW N." 2874, l u N I I PA L,
Nov. 1]'1................ .2 7, 298
LAW N." 3465, MUNICI AL,
JAN. 18-,7 .............. .2"s8, 299
LAW (MUNICIPAL) STH. JAN.
19C3...................... .99: 800
NATIONAL INTERNAL DEBT, SUM-
MARY OF.......................... 300
NATIONAL INTERNAL DEBT, PROVIN-
CIAL........................... 301. 309
PREMIUM ON GOLD. CHANGES IN
(1896 1903)...................... 269
PRESERVING (MEAT) Cos., (SEE 'MEAT
FREEZING AND PRESERVING COS).


RAILWAY COMPANIES :
ARGENT. GREAT WESTERN 331. 333
> NORTH EASTERN 342. 343
BAIIiA BLANCA AND NORTH
WESTERN ............. 344. 345
BELGA ARGENTINA DE FERRO-
CARRILES ............... 348. 350
BUENOS AIRES GREAT SOUTH-
ERN. .................... 311, 814
Bs. AIRES AND PACIFIC.. 325, 330
ROSARIO (IN-
CLUDING CENTRAL ARGEN-
TINE) .................... 3 1. 324
BUENOS AIRES VALPARAISO.
TRANSANDINE .......... 3416, 347
BUENOS AIRES WESTERN 315. 320
CORDOBA CENTRAL....... 338. 341
SAND NORTH WESTERN 341. 342
S ROSARIO......... 336, 337
EAST ARGENTINE......... 345. 346
ENTRE RIOS................ 334. 36
GOVERNMENT AND SECONDARY
LINES................... 351. 352
PROV. OF SANTA FE. FRENCH. 350
REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE (NA-
TIONAL BUDGETS 1902-1903..... 263, 265










INI)CX I) ('()MI'.'\NIl> ANI) C I)MMIHk'CI \1, I.C TI N \\\


K'VENUEI. 'ltoM IN I'ENALT 'I'AXA I IMN
1 U'2 .... ... ..... ....... ... 'l(
1 E VI NI NE I 'R<11M IN I E:RNA, i TAX \TVIN I
FiHs I- MI N'm1Ilis NI0m .. .. 2X


SA LAXIIl i S. Illll Oj I" I'I'1C ; 1it F
S"'ITA ......... ............ '-'L( '07
SUIAR ('OMPiANIE:
AZI CAlUtI.\ AlGlENINA ..... IJ-
TUCU MANA ....... .4'
JNGENI) SAN \Mlli' E.... 4JJ'. 150
R: rINE lli AG IENTINA ....... 150


T ARII' IS. I USTIl, lS .......... .. I 'l. 51N
TAXATION. RiVAEI'NUE FR'UOM INTEII
N A L ............ ............. 'hN-
TELEI;.1HAI 'I ANI Tl'''.I-l']IONI ClM-
'ANIES :
I'ENITRAI \NNI SOU'I'II A1MERI-
CAN TEILEGiRA Pl ..... -143
COMPANiA TEEI.EtHi FICO TE-
L.EFIIN[ CA [I. I 'LA'A ..... 1.
('OiMPANiA T' ,H .l;1XIFICO 'TE-
I.EIFl'NICA NACIONAL......... -445
( 'O ITE IBUR E ................ I -I


4 '< 1 E'.HAT I \ A T EI.EI''' NII'A 11 4-14
l; i ll n LAli i, ''I': El iA .l [ i 1 1
SNI i IEI ]l I:I I IAIL T. Ei.,
I l.: I .... ..... 15i. 4-1l
TEI EI' N h I '1 l'A Ni S ;,:EE TELE--
(II.HAi[H AND T''LI.E I'll' NE .
T'A' 11 WAY ('MI'ANI1S,
ANGIL) AlENTINE ...... 72. 373
BS. A1ll1, AND liEILGiiANO
ELievi'] tI .......... 373. 373
IIS. A Ell : El,':i.:c(' ...... 376, 377
AS. i(4IAN'I) N'IATIONA. 377. o38
N I1 ....... .. 38 0.. 382
I 'iT l s. i\ :s ........ 382. 383
LA ('AI'TAL, 1EX'I'ENSIONS. 385. 386
TRACTIiON AND
I;,IF[:( Ill .. ... .. .. 383. 384
LA CAI'TAlI TI'AMWAY./. 384. 385
LA I'LAT'IA Y ENSaENAIA.. 386. 387
TlA [IWAY ( 'OMP'ANIll. MAllEMENT
ill. I\ I '0 l .. .. ... .. .. 71


\\[A'HER AND D)ILAINAI'.l: ( COMPANIES:
( 'INSOLILDA i' Io LVA'TEItWOR1KS
ROSARIt ... ......... .... 14'
ROSARIO DRAINAGE.. .. 4 141





\1 I1I


Animi & (c3ecer







(ccon tiants, (t, clilors


c/mnancial 6ilqen/s


(onrique C 3eecher


Calle San2 cAirflifn, 44S
c9tienos (C1res





xxxxv II

NORTHERN
ASSURANCE COMPANY -
(FIRE INSURANCE)
oPA ESTABLISHED IN 1836

Accumulated Funds $ 27.500.000 gold

Losses paid by the Buenos Aires Agency
SIISTCE 1888

1.425.000 dollars

Agent: JULIq O WOSMANN I
441 BARTOLOME MITRE


Franklin & Herrera
W. E. Franklin J. J. de Herrera

FINANCIAL & COMMERCIAL AGENTS.
REGISTRATION OF PUBLIC COMPANIES.
FOREIGN REPRESENTATION. IMPORT & EXPORT.
ADMINISTRATION OF URBAN & RURAL PROPERTIES.
INVESTMENT IN REAL ESTATE & MORTGAGES.
CAMPS BOUGHT, SOLD & RENTED.
REPRESENTATION OF ESTANCIEROS & CAMP INTERESTS

REFERENCES:
BANCO DE LA NACION ARGENTINA.
LONDON AND RIVER PLATc BANK LIMITED.
BANCO DE ITALIA Y RIO DE LA PLATA.
Cable Address: RIOPLATA.
Telephones: UNION No. 2224 (Avenida). COOP. 425.
Offices: 417 BARTOLOME MITRE BUENOS AIRES.







John & Joseph Drysdale & Co.
440, CALLE PERO, 450 BUENOS AIRES


IMPORTERS

Of Jron, 5teel, .umber, Cement, Engines, portable
and Zraction, Threshers, English and American, Carriages,
Town WagonS, Reapers, flowers, .inders,
leader .inders, ploughs, arrows, Cultivators, feeders,
"Guanaco" Wire, Dlack and Galvanized


AMERICAN
Roll Top
DESKS
Office
CHAIRS


Book Cases
Letter Files
and
Other Office
Furniture


"Guanaco" Steel Power and pumping Wind Jlills
in six sizes, Galvanized Towers, 5teel, Wood, or Black iron
Zanks, Galvanized and Black 3ron Watering Troughs,
full line of pumps, Pipe and pipe fittings
t* 4 *i


Samples can be seen at our
440-CALLE
BTTEN()S


show rooms
PERU-450
AIlIES















INDEX TO MAPS AND PLANS.


MAPS

MAP OF THE ARGENTINE REPUBLIC
(FACING PAGE)........ ... ......
MAP OF THE PROVINCE OF BUENOS
A IRES....... ............. .........
MAP OF THE PROVINCE OF ENTIRE
Rios.. ............. .. ......
MAP OF THE PROVINCE OF CORRIEN-
TES ......... ..... .............
MAP OF THE PROVINCE OF SANTA FE
S> > CORDOBA.
SSAN LUIS.
SSANTIAGO
DEL ESTERO .......... .........
MAP OF THE PROVINCE OF TUCUMAN.
S> > MENDOZA .
S> *> SAN JUAN.
S> > LA RIOJA.
> > > CATAMAR-
CA ............ ... ..... .....
MAP OF THE PROVINCE OF SALTA....
SJUJUY .....
TERRITORY > MISIONES..
TERRITORIES OF FORMO-
SA AND THE CHACO........... ....
MAP OF THE TERRITORIES OF THE
PAMPA, Rio NEGRO AND CHUBUT...


MAP OF THE TERRITORY OF NEU-
QUEN............................ 75
MAP OF THE TERRITORIES SANTA
CRUZ AND TIERRA DEL FUEGO ..... 77
MAPS OF THE TERRITORY OF THE
ANDES............. .............. 79
MAP ELECTORAL, PROVINCE AND CA-
PITAL, BUENOS AIRES........... 90, 92
MAP OF THE RAILWAYS (OFFICIAL)
(FACING) ........................ 130

PLANS

PLAN OF THE "COLONIZACION STROE-
DER", COLONIES .................. 112
PLAN OF THE PORT OF BUENOS Al-
RES (FACING)..................... 136
PLAN OF THE SOUTHERN RAILWAY
COMPANY'S LINES............... 310
PLACN OF THE WESTERN RAILWAY
COMPANY'S LINES .......... .316
PLAN OF THE BUENOS AIRES AND RO-
SARIO AND CENTRAL ARGENTINE 322, 823
PLAN OF THE BUENOS AIRES AND PA-
CIFIC..................... ....... 326
PLAN OF THE BELGA-ARGENTINA DE
FERRO-CARRILES ................... 348


LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.


BUENOS AIRES IN 1830...............
MOLE OF SOUTHERN RAILWAY AT BA-
HIA BLANCA........... ........
THE BEACH AT MAR DEL PLATA.....
FERRY ACROSS RIVER QUEQUEN, NE-
COCHEA ................. .........
LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY, LA PLATA..
GOVERNMENT HOUSE, CORRIENTES....
PORT OF ROSARIO ....................
VIEW OF THE CITY OF CORDOBA.....
VIEW OF SANTIAGO DEL ESTERO......
PLAZA INDEPENDENCIA, TUCUMAN ....
PORT OF BELLA VISTA, (CORRIENTES).
A CAMP BREAKFAST .................
THE PRINCIPAL STREET IN JUJUY ....
GENERAL VIEW OF SALTA ..........
THE ROCKING STONE AT TANDIL......
PORT OF POSADAS (MISIONES) ........
THE TANDIL STREAM................
SUPREME COURTS OF JUSTICE (BUENOS
AIREs)......... .. ........
BUILDING, NATIONAL COUNCIL OF
EDUCATION................ .... ..


A NORMAL SCHOOL OF THE CAPITAL. 99
THE LAKE AT PALERMO (BUENOS AI-
RES).............................. 108
THE JOCKEY CLUB (BUENOS AIRES)... 119
CENTRAL PRODUCE MARKET
(BUENOS AIRES) .................... 157
PLAZA DE MAYO (ROSARIO)......... 179
AVENIDA DE MAYO (BUENOS AIRES).. 189
DAIRY MACHINERY......... 195, 199, 200
THE WATERWORKS, BUENOS AIRES.. 218
CLUB DEL PROGRESS, .. 226
BANK OF TIE NATION. 228
GATES OF PALERMO PARK, BUENOS
A IRES ........................... 229
A SALE AT BULLRICII'S, BUENOS
AIRES ............. ............. 231
"LA PRENSA", OFFICES AND WORKS,
BUENOS AIRES.................... 238
"LA NACION", OFFICES, BUENOS AI-
RES ................ ..... ..... .. 240
ESTANCIA "MARTIN CHICO" 242, 248, 244
S "COCHC ........... 246, 47
THE EXCHANGE, BUENOS AIRES...... 260









REFERENCES.


Although on pages 232-236 will be found full conversion tables of Weights'
Measures, and Values, a concise explanation of these and other foreign equiva-
lents and signs used in various sections of the book, may be usefully added as a
means of saving the reader a constant reference to the tables.

MEASURES.
(Approximate) 8 kilometres = 5 miles
(Exact) 8 = 4.971
Miles and kilometres .............. (p ximate) 1 = 4971
(Approximate) 100 = 161
(Exact) 100 = 160.932
Acres and hectares................. (Approximate) 1 hectare = 21i acres
(Exact) 1 = 2.471 '
Argentine varas and yards......... (Exact) 100 varas = 94.70 yards


WEIGHTS.
Argentine ton and pounds (English)... (Exact) 1 Argentine ton = 2025.60 lb.
S(Argentine)( )1 = 2000
kilogrammes ( )1 = 918.80 kilos


VALUES.
The pound sterling (libra esterlina) has the fixed equivalent value of $ 5.04,
Argentine gold dollars (pesos, "oro sellado", or, abbreviated, ols). The Argentine
currency dollar is denoted by the words "moneda national", "moneda legal" or
"curso legal", respectively abbreviated as min., mil. or cll. The gold dollar, (1st.
August 1903) is at a premium of 127.27 %, or, in other words, $ 100, gold, are equi-
valent to $ 227.27, currency.

REFERENCES TO MAPS.
Ferro-Carril, or F. C. = Railway. e. g. F. C. Sud = Southern Railway.
Alrededores = Suburbs.
Escala = Scale.
Monte = Plantation.
Bailados = Marshes or swamps.
Salinas = Salt Deposits.

LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANIES.
Sociedad Anonima = Limited Liability, or Joint Stock Company.
Fondo de Previsi6n = Prevision Fund. An additional reserve fund not obligatory,
or fixed, either by the law or the statutes.
Sindico = Syndic. The syndic of a company is an official appointed
by the shareholders, to protect their interests within
the Company. His duties are to exercise fiscal super-
vision and generally to see that the acts of the direc-
tors are not ultra vires the shareholders, and do not
exceed the powers conferred by the articles of associa-
tion. The balance sheets and reports of the company
must be signed by the syndic, who is responsible to the
Ministry of Justice, as well as to the shareholders, for
the proper fulfilment of these duties.












THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK.

(1903)


THE SOUTH AMERICAN PUBLISHING Co., LIMITED
351, CALLE SAN MARTIN, BUENOS AIRES.


LONDON AGENCY:

THE SOUTH AMERICAN JOURNAL,

DASHWOOD HOUSE,
9, NEW BROAD STREET,
LONDON. E. C.



Price in Argentina, $ 6.00 m/n. Post Free (Interior), $ 6.50 m/n
>> Enrope, 10 s/i. Post Free, 10s/6d.






PRINTED BY
LA COMPANIA SUD-AMERICANA DE IILLETES DE BANCO
263 CHILE. BUENOS AIRES








INTRODUCTION.


The tangible proofs afforded of the very wide appreciation of the
ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK (1902), have fully confirmed the belief,
expressed in that edition, in the necessity for a comprehensive and
periodical work of reference dealing with the vast and important
interests involved in the Ar entire Re public. It has been difficult,







ut even this service would
Rendered impossible, were it not for the ready co-operation and
kindly help of the various high officials of the government to whom is
entrusted the preparation of the statistics of their respective depart-
ments. T6 these gentlemen, and to their official chiefs, the Ministers,
the editor is greatly indebted for the supply of a mass of information,
which, in some instances, would not otherwise be presented to the
public; and, in others, is in anticipation of official publications.
In the present edition of the ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK several new
and important features have been introduced, especially in the
re-production of the numerous maps, of the Republic, the Provin-
ces, Territories, and Railways; the separate plans of the different
Railway Companies; the Port of Buenos Aires; centres of Coloni-
zation, and of the Electoral Divisions of the City and Province of
Buenos Aires. The coloured maps have been re-produced, with the
permission of the author, from originals in the "Pequeflo Atlas de
la Repablica Argentina" prepared and published by the distinguish-
ed chartographist, Seiior Aquilino Fernandez, and have been brought
down to date to show the latest boundary limits between Argentina
and Chili, and the most recent railway extensions.
The translations appended of the new Land Law (January 1903);
the new Animal Sanitary Law and Regulations; the Bankruptcy Law
(31st. December 1902); and the National Electoral Law (with
decrees to 24th. May 1903), will, it is hoped, prove of special inte-
rest; whilst the care which has been exercised in the revision,
checking, and comparing of the general data furnished, and the
authority of the leading contributors, justify the statement that the
ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK (1903) accurately and faithfully reflects the
actual situation of the Republic, and of the various institutions and
enterprises which are assisting in its development.


Buenos Aires, August 1903.








THE

ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK

1903.




ARGENTINE HISTORY.


The spirit of conquest which animated the Latin nations after the
discovery of America by Columbus led to the formation in Spain
of several exploring parties in various directions. Amongst others,
Don Juan Diaz de Solis organized an expedition consisting of three
ships and left the port of Lepe on the 8th. October 1515, sailing
as far South as latitude 35 where he followed the coast in a west-
erly direction. Observing that the waters in which they were float-
ing were no longer salt, he assumed that he had struck a large
river, which, in consequence of his being unable to see the other
coast, he described as Mar Dulce or Sweet Sea. Two of his vessels
anchored, whilst with the third he proceeded along what is now known
as the River Plate until he reached the island to which he gave the
name of Martin Garcia. Here he disembarked, but very soon after-
wards met his death at the hands of the Indians. After Solis a
Portuguese pilot, Don Hernando de Magallanes continued the voy-
age of discovery in the River Plate and in 1520 found the Mount
Cerro opposite what has since become the city of Montevideo. On
the 10th. April 1526, another Spanish expedition left Seville and
its commander, Don Sebastian Gabotto, having been successful in
ascending the rivers Parana and Uruguay, established the fort of
Espiritu Santo in the Delta of the former river. These early dis-
coveries in the River Plate led to a great deal of jealousy and desire
for territorial extension amongst the monarchs of Europe, and to-
wards the year 1535 the Emperor Charles V decided to send out
exploring parties, with Don Pedro de Mendoza in command, to
whom as an inducement, the offer was made of a governorship for
life, over any territories he might conquer or otherwise acquire.
The Mendoza expedition consisted of a fleet of 14 vessels and
about two thousand men, many of whom were Germans. This force
entered the River Plate in February 1536 and landed on the spot
which now constitutes the capital of the Argentine Republic. Here
a township was formed, Mendoza giving it the name of Santa Maria
de Buenos Aires. Subsequently the little township was destroyed
by the Querandi Indians who inhabited the region. Meanwhile
his principal lieutenant Don Juan de Ayolas continued the as-
cent of the River Parana and after numerous fights with the va-








THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


rious Indian tribes occupying the land, founded the town of Asun-
cion, now the capital of the Paraguayan Republic. Like several of
his predecessors and successors, Ayolas was murdered by the In-
dians and until 1576, when Don Juan de Garay was made Gover-
nor, little extension took place. The latter however, resolved to
attempt the reconquest of Buenos Aires and leaving Asuncion for
that purpose, arrived at the site of the township founded by Men-
doza in 1536. Plans were drawn for the demarcation of the limits
of the town which the Indians again essayed to destroy but were
unsuccessful in their attempt. The first inhabitants of Buenos Aires
were 50 Creoles and 19 Spaniards; and with this second founding
of the town the period of conquest in the regions now comprising
the Argentine Republic may be said to have finally closed, to be
followed by the Colonial regime, which lasted until 1810, when the
existing form of Government was proclaimed and established.
During the Viceroyalty of Rafael de Sobremonte, from 1804 to
1806, the British Government despatched a squadron of five vessels
and a force of 1500 soldiers, the former under the command of
Sir Home Popham, the latter under Sir William, Beresford, with a
view to securing some of the then much coveted territory in this
part of South America. On the 25th. June 1806, Sir William Beres-
ford and his troops landed at a point some twenty miles South of
Buenos Aires and immediately marched on to the town, which he
occupied on the following day. The inhabitants at once organized
to repel the invasion and appointed a number of officers to bring
reinforcements from Montevideo. On the 10th. August following,
the whole of the suburbs of the town were in the possession of the
Spanish who demanded the surrender of Beresford and his force.
This being refused, the town was attacked from all sides, and
two days later Sir William Beresford and his troops surrendered
unconditionally. The British Government still believing in the possi-
bility of a reconquest of Buenos-Aires, in the following year, sent
out a body of 14,000 men under General Whitelocke. These forces
captured the town of Montevideo and shortly afterwards made an
attempt to retake Buenos Aires. In this enterprise they were wholly
unsuccessful, being repulsed at every point by the Spanish
troops whose commander not only compelled them to surrender
in person, but also demanded and obtained written undertakings
that the British forces would immediately evacuate the city of
Montevideo and the whole of the River Plate.
In 1809 the last Viceroy was nominated by Spain and he remained
in office until the 25th. May 1810, the date on which an Adminis-
trative Assembly appointed by the people of Buenos Aires assumed
charge of the Government. The revolution of 1810, which ended
for ever, Spanish rule in the River Plate, was the result of a politi-
cal movement initiated in the Colonies at a much earlier period.
This movement was mainly dictated by the feelings inspired through
the inept and wretched form of Government established over the








THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


Colonies, whilst the repulse of the English invaders, the conquest of
Spain by Napoleon, and the declaration of Independence of the
United States of America naturally exercised their influence upon
the inhabitants of the River Plate territories and led them to the
belief that they could organize and conduct their own affairs inde-
pendently of the mother country with much greater advantage
and freedom than they enjoyed under Spanish rule. On the 13th.
of the previous month, news arrived in Montevideo of the invasion
of Andalusia by the French, of the fall of the Bourbons, and of the
anarchy reigning in Spain. The hour for the Americans had arrived,
and discarding the supreme authority, the Argentine patriots and
military chiefs agreed, and carried the people with them, that a
complete change of Government was necessary. A popular assemb-
ly was convened, the voting resulting in the deposition of the
Viceroy and the creation of an Administrative Congress. The mem-
bers of this body were duly nominated by the Cabildos or Mayoral
Councils under the presidency of the former Spanish Viceroy, but
by reason of a strong popular protest, this nomination was cancelled
on the same night. On May 25th. the populace assembled in the
Plaza de la Victoria, proclaiming its political liberty and naming the
first National Government. In order that the same political change
might be effected in the other provinces of the ex-viceroyalty,
Congress equipped two military expeditions, one to Peru, the other
to Paraguay. Both these expeditions ultimately succeeded in bring-
ing the two provinces under the new form of government. A very
short time elapsed, however, before the newly acquired independ-
ence was seriously menaced by the Royalists; but, fortune favoring
the Argentine forces, the Royalists were defeated in all directions
and on 9th. July 1816 the Congress held in TucumAn declared the
Independence of the United Provinces of the River Plate and
proclaimed a national flag of blue and white. The population of
the Argentine was divided into two classes, the urban and the rural;
the former more or less educated, the other largely ignorant. These
two classes, although united in the matter of independence, differ-
ed considerably in their views regarding the constitution of the
various branches of the Executive. The provincial representatives
were in favor of a Federal form of Government whilst the educated
classes desired the unitarian principle. Civil war arose out of this
dissension and so much anarchy prevailed that in the one year 1820,
there were twelve changes of Government in Buenos Aires. A more
settled condition was later created under the government of Gene-
ral Rodriguez, but this only lasted until 1825 when war was declared
against Brazil with the object of freeing the State of Uruguay.
Meanwhile Rivadavia was appointed President and under his rule
great progress was made in every direction.
In Buenos Aires during this period, a National Bank and a Uni-
versity were founded and other considerable improvements in the
city effected; but in 1827, after the defeat of the Brazilians by Gen-








4 THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK

eral Alvear, the deposition of General Rivadavia took place and
with it the end of the unitarian system of Government. Various
changes occurred in the Presidency between 1827 and 1831 when
Rozas secured the establishment of the Federal system.
The tyrannical methods of the administration of Rozas who be-
came Dictator, caused a set back in the immigration and general
progress of the country. In 1852 after a revolution in which the Dic-
tator was defeated and fled to England, a new era of political and
social reorganization set in, and in 1853 a Congress held in Santa
F6 sanctioned the National Constitution on the Federal system.
The Province of Buenos-Aires, not having taken part in this Con-
gress, a civil war resulted. Peace was again signed in 1865, but the
Province of Buenos Aires remained independent of the remain-
ing States of the Confederation. Four years later the Argentine
Confederation was again merged in war which lasted for two years,
after which the Constitution was revised and definitely established
in 1862 in the form in which it now governs the Republic. Gene-
ral BartolomB Mitre, who had done much to produce the necessary
reform of the Constitution was elected President of the Republic
and it was during his term of office that Don Francisco Solano Lo-
pez, the Dictator of Paraguay who was at war with Brazil, invaded
the Province of Corrientes without the sanction of the Argentine
Government. As a result of this action, Argentina became an ally
of Brazil and Uruguay, and after a war, which continued for five
years, defeated the Paraguayans and killed Lopez.
General Mitre's successor in the Presidency was General Sar-
miento who ruled from 1868 to 1874 and to him is largely due the
great advance which has been made in the direction of Public
Education. He was succeeded by Don Nicolas Avellaneda, who
retained the Presidency until 1880. During the intervening pe-
riod, with the military assistance of General Julio A. Roca, what is
known as the conquest of the desert took place, the whole of the
plains of the Province of Buenos Aires having been cleared of In-
dians who had hitherto impeded the development of the agricul-
tural industries in that part of the country.
In 1880 General Roca was elected President and on September
21st. of the same year the City of Buenos Aires was declared the
Federal Capital of the Republic. General Roca having completed
his six years' tenure of the chief magistracy, was followed by Don
Miguel Juarez Celman who resigned on the 7th. August 1890 after
a political revolution of some importance. The then vice-Presi-
dent, Dr. Carlos Pellegrini, became President and held the position
until it became vacant by effluxion of time. On the 12th. October
1892 Dr. Luis Saenz Peiia was elected President, resigning his office
in January 1895 and was succeeded in turn until 1898 by the vice-
President Dr. Jos6 E. Uriburu. In October of that year General
Julio A. Roca again became President and continues to hold office
to the general satisfaction of the inhabitants of the country.







THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


THE CONSTITUTION AND CIVIL RIGHTS


The National Constitution of the Argentine Republic is based
upon the broadest principles of liberty and justice and affords the
most ample guarantees for the enjoyment of full civil rights by and
for the protection of the material interests of all the inhabitants.
In one of its first articles its principal objects are declared to be
"to create national unity, to consolidate justice and internal peace.
to provide for the common defence, promote the general welfare;
and to assure the benefits of liberty to us, to our descendants
and to all the people of the world who may reside in Argen-
tine territory." In this instrument, provision is made for a separ-
ate but correlative existence of the powers forming the Federal
and the Provincial Governments, the constitutions of the various
Provinces being based upon the same republican representative
federal system in accordance with the principles, declarations, and
guarantees of the National Constitution. Thus, all the public
acts and judicial proceedings of one Province have the full force
of law and authority in the others. Art. 20 of the National Cons-
titution declares "that foreigners may freely exercise their callings
or any profession for which they are qualified, navigate the rivers
and coasts, make testamentary dispositions, marry in accordance
with the laws of the Republic, own and deal in real estate, and,
exempt from differential taxation, travel, associate for lawful pur-
poses, petition and do all such things as may be legally done by
born citizens of the State. They may obtain naturalization papers
on completing a term of two years residence in the country, or
such lesser term as may be fixed by the Executive Govern-
ment in cases of proof of service to the State, such naturalized
citizens being immune for a period of ten years from date of natu-
ralization from compulsory military service." Other articles of the
constitution provide for the free exercise of all religions; and es-
tablish the principle of official encouragement to European immi-
grants especially laying down that the Government shall at no time
limit, or reduce, or charge with taxes, the entry into Argentine terri-
tory of foreigners whose object is to devote themselves to agricul-
ture, industry, science or the arts.







THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


Foreigners after four or six years of naturalization, respectively,
become eligible for election as national deputies or senators, but
without being naturalized, may hold administrative and official po-
sitions in the Executive Government. The Government of the
Nation is divided into three branches, established by the Cons-
titution. (1) The legislative power which makes the laws; (2) the
executive power which carries them into effect; and (3) the judicial
body which construes and applies them in cases of conflict. The
Executive Power of the Nation is exercised by the President who
must be born in the Republic and profess the Roman Catholie
religion. The President is the supreme head of the Nation and
has charge of the general administration of the country, assisted
by a Vice-President and eight Secretaries of State, the latter being
directly appointed by himself. The legislative authority is vested
in a National Congress consisting of a Senate and a Chamber of
Deputies, the former numbering 30, two for each province and two
for the capital, elected by a special body of electors in the capi-
tal and by the legislatures in the provinces. A senator must be
thirty years of age, have been a citizen for six years, possess an in-
come of $ 2,000, and be a native of the province for which he is
elected, or have resided two years therein. A senator- is elected
for nine years and may be re-elected. A third of the Senate is
renewed every three years. The deputies are elected by the peo-
ple in the proportion of one for every 33,000 inhabitants or frac-
tion not below 16,000. At the present time there are 120 deputies.
The age qualification is 25 years, four years citizenship being
obligatory. They are elected for four years and may be re-elec-
ted, half the number retiring every two years. Both chambers
sit in ordinary session during each year from 1st. May until the
30th. September. The Vice-President of the Republic is chair-
man ofthe Senate, but otherwise holds no political power. Should
the positions of President and Vice-President become vacant, the
Senate has the power to fill the -vacancies. The President is Com-
mander-in-chief of the Army and Navy and appoints to all civil,
military and judicial offices, subject to the approval of the Senate,
and has the right of presentation to bishoprics.





RE P(UBLICA ARGENTINA


--


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REFERENCIAS


.Ferro Carriles
-+ 4++++.++++ .....--. Lines de la Republica
- -..- .- ----- ,, pirovulcitales


7,?i.2


Montle


I3aiados
.Salnas


Va '1t


Escala
(o0 o Lt 0 o 90 30o


KilcZtros


4-0 a0N


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I


I ,.


-----


0~


-* l-


... .. 1. %







THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


THE ARGENTINE REPUBLIC.

A BRIEF SURVEY OF ITS PRINCIPAL FEATURES.


The Argentine Republic occupies the southern portion of South
America, and is cofitained between the degrees of 21 40' and
55 South latitude, and 530 38' and 730 West longitude. Its area,
according to the census taken in 1895, was 2,885,620 square
kilometres; but, adding to this, the Territory of Los Andes, and
the extension acquired under the recent arbitration with Chili, it
may now be computed at over 3,000,000 square kilometres,
embracing a population of rather more than 5,000,000 inhabitants.
The Republic is bounded on the north, by Bolivia, Paraguay
and Brazil; on the east, by Paraguay, Brazil, the Republic of Uru-
guay, the River Plate and the Atlantic Ocean; on the south, by
Chili and the Atlantic Ocean; and on the west, by Chili from which
it is separated by the Cordillera of the Andes. In regard to the
latter, reference is made elsewhere to the convention signed in
Santiago on May 28th. of last year, whereby, (through the friendly
offices of His Majesty King Edward VII) the long pending bound-
ary dispute between Argentina and Chili was brought to a pacific
solution. The demarcation of the limits has since been effected by
Sir Thomas Holdich's commission, and these are shown on the
map of the Argentine Republic presented herewith.
With Bolivia, a treaty was signed by the Governments of the two
countries by virtue of which, the province of Tarija, whose posses-
sion had been disputed, was declared to belong to Bolivia. By a
decision of the United States Minister in Buenos Aires, given in
arbitration in the year 1899, a large portion of Atacama, now form-
ing the Territory of Los Andes, was adjudged to the Argentine
Republic. With Paraguay, a settlement of boundaries has also
been arrived at, through the arbitration of the President of the
United States, who, in 1878 awarded to Paraguay that portion of
the Chaco Territory (on the right bank of the River Paraguay), to
the north of the River Pilcomayo, this river, with the river Paraguay
and the Parana as far as the Iguazi, forming the present boundary
with that Republic. By the same award the islands of Apip6 and
of Cerrito were declared to be Argentine, the first mentioned in
the Paranh, and the second on the confluence of that river with
the Paraguay. The differences with Brazil were brought to a
conclusion by an award of the arbitrator, the President of the
United States, dated the 6th, of February 1895. By that award,
the territory in dispute, the eastern part of Misiones, was declared
to belong to Brazil, and the rivers Pepiri-Guazil and San Antonio
were given as the boundaries. Thus, all the questions of territorial







THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


limits which had existed between Argentina and her neighbours
for a period extending over 25 years, have been amicably adjusted,
and peaceful relations established.
In its physical aspects the Argentine Republic may be divided
into three sections: The western or Andine, the Pampean, and
the Mesopotamian. The western is mountainous and comprises
the elongated district sheltered by the Cordillera of the Andes
and its ramifications. It contains numerous valleys of varied
character, and abounds in mineral wealth. The northern and
Andine provinces and the western part of the southern terri-
tories form part of this division. The Pampean. section embraces
the southern and central part of the Republic from the eastern
portions of the province of Salta with the territories of Formosa
and the Chaco down to the territories in the south; they comprise
the flat portions of the Andine district and the rich provinces of
Santa F6 and Buenos Aires. This section as its name indicates, is
an extended plain sloping towards the south east. It is crossed by
innumerable rivers and streams which descend from the Andes and
either lose themselves in the Pampa, or, become affluents of the
great river system of the Parana, or flow on till they join the Atlantic
Ocean. In this section there are some few isolated ranges of hills,
but the general character is that of a plain. There are numerous
lakes and lagoons with swamps and salt marshes, while a rich and
varied vegetation gives sustenance to millions of cattle. The southern
portion of the district is more sparsely stocked and the vegetation
less abundant. The Mesopotamian section lies between the rivers
Parana and Uruguay and comprises the Provinces of Entre Rios and
Corrientes, and the Territory of Misiones. At its southern extremity
is the beautiful delta of the Parana studded with islands of rich soil
and fertile vegetation. Advancing northwards, the land becomes
undulating with tree-clothed hill slopes intersected by a net-work
of rivulets and streams which water rich meadows and woodland,
and stretch to the north over a great part of the Province of Cor-
rientes. Then the land dips in a remarkable manner, forming
great lagoons and marshes, and once more changes character in
the Territory of Misiones, where hills abound, covered with ver-
dure and surrounded for the most part by forests.
The mountains form part of four separate systems: the Andine,
the Central, the Southern, and that of Misiones. The principal
chain, the great Cordillera of the Andes, more correctly called
the Western Cordillera, extends from north to south as far as
Tierra del Fuego and constitutes a giant boundary wall between
Argentina and Chili. Highest in the northern portion, the altitudes
gradually diminish, until they are well nigh lost in the plains
of Patagonia. The slopes of this great range are always less
abrupt on the Argentine than on the Chilian side. Its point of
commencement may be given as the high table land to the west
of Catamarca, The mountain systems of Jujuy, Salta, Tucuman,








THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


and Catamarca, are branches of the so called Eastern Cordillera,
the true Andean chain known to the ancient Peruvians by the
name of "Antis".
In regard to the hydrography of the country, some authorities
have adopted a division into two systems, the north, and the
south, but for purposes of clearness it is better to divide into five
systems, viz: (1) The River Plate System, to which belong the rivers
Parana, Uruguay, Paraguay, Pilcomayo, Bermejo, Iguazil, Sala-
do (North), Carcara5i, Salado and all their respective affluents.
(2) The Central System, of which the rivers of C6rdoba form part:
the Rio Primero, Segundo, Tercero or Carcarail (which we also
include in the system of the River Plate), the Cuarto and the
Quinto. (3) The system of the Cordillera, includes all those
rivers, which, rising in the Cordilleras and their Andine branches,
lose themselves in the swamps and lagoons of the plains, comprising
the Bermejo, Jachal, San Juan, Mendoza, Tunuyin, Diamante, Atuel,
and others which traverse the western provinces and Tucuman.
(4) The Pampa System, or that of the plain, formed by all the
rivers which cross the southern plains of Buenos Aires and fall into
the Atlantic Ocean, and. (5) The Patagonian System, consisting
of the rivers which cross the southern territories from the Andes to
the Atlantic. The principal of these are the Colorado, the Negro,
the Chubut, the Deseado, the Santa Cruz and the Gallegos.
The River Plate is formed by the confluence of the rivers Parana
and Uruguay which pour into it the volume of water they receive
from their numerous affluents in the south of Bolivia and Brazil,
from Paraguay and Uruguay, and from the east and north of
Argentine territory. In formation, it constitutes an immense
gulf, extending from the confluence of the Parana and Uruguay to
the Atlantic, with its termination in a line drawn between Cape
Santa Maria (in the Uruguayan Republic), and San Antonio, in the
Province of Buenos Aires. The width at its mouth is about 180
kilometres, and some 40 kilometres at its commencement, the total
area being calculated to be 35,000 kilometres. The depth of the
Plate varies from 10 to 30 metres, its bed being obstructed in parts
by banks of sand and mud. Of these banks the most important
are "El Ingl6s", (or English Bank), Arquimedes, Ortiz, Banco
Chico, and the Placer de Las Palmas, this last being a continuation
of the Delta of the Parana. The other banks are less dangerous
to navigation. The Ortiz bank, situated between the cities of
Buenos Aires and Montevideo obstructs navigation over an
extensive portion of the estuary, but two channels are left free,
one on the north, and the other to the south, the latter being
used by deep draught vessels and the former by the coasting
steamers which run up the rivers Uruguay and Parana. The banks
on the Uruguayan side are irregular, in some parts rocky, in others
sandy, while the Argentine shore is muddy, rising here and there
in high banks of clay and "tosca", or indurated mud. In the nor-







THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


them portion, near the shore, are several small islands, such as
Lobos Gorriti, Flores and Martin Garcia; this last, the largest of
them all is a stronghold of the Argentine Republic, and commands
the mouth of the rivers ParanA and Uruguay. On the Argentine
coast there is the bay of Samboromb6n and the creek of Barragan.
On this line are the principal Argentine and Uruguayan ports.
Buenos Aires, La Plata, Montevideo,Maldonado and Colonia. In
the upper part, the water is sweet, but from a line drawn from
Montevideo to Punta del Indio at the mouth, the water, mixed to a
great extent with sea-water from the Atlantic, is more or less salt.
The influence of the tide in the rise and fall of the river is unim-
portant, though there is generally a daily rise up to noon, followed
by a corresponding fall till midnight, but the tides have not so
much to do with the level of the River Plate as the freshets of its
affluents the Parana and the Uruguay. The winds from the south
and the east, sometimes very strong, drive the waters of the ocean
against the river and cause great floods; on the other hand, the
north and north-west winds, and especially the stormy south-west
wind, called the "Pampero", drive the water high against the Uru-
guayan coast, frequently causing damage to shipping.
The Republic has a seaboard on the Atlantic Ocean extending
approximately over 2,500 kilometres from Cape San Antonio to
Tierra del Fuego. In general, the coast is low and sandy in the
northern portion, and higher towards the south, often rising in
bluffs and cliffs. The principal bays counting from north to south
are La Blanca, Uni6n, San Blas, Camarones, Skeyring Water,
San Sebastian and the Ensenada del Engalo in Chubut. The gulfs
are San Matias, San Jos6, Nuevo and San Jorge.
Situated almost entirely in the southern temperate zone, the
climate is moderate and may be classified as warm in the north,
fresh in the central portions, and almost cold in the south. It is
subject to modification by many influences such as the elevation
of the soil, mountains, winds, and rivers. The interior provinces
are much drier than those of the littoral. The temperature never
exceeds 400 in summer, nor falls below zero in winter. In the
littoral districts the rainfalls are abundant, especially in summer,
somewhat lighter in the centre of the country and very scanty
in the Andine provinces. In the western part of the southern
territories rains are also of frequent occurrence. With the excep-
tion of an intermittent fever prevalent in Tucuman and Salta,
called "Chucho" no epidemic diseases exist in the Republic,
although sporadic cases introduced from abroad are occasionally
reported. Dr. Latzina asserts it to be "a climate equally conducive
to the health of man and to the productiveness of the soil, adding,
that here, men of all the European races without previous acclima-
tisation can lead the life to which they are accustomed without
the slightest risk to health".
The growing development of pastoral industry has secured for







THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK 11

the Republic, in this department, a leading place among the nations
of the world. In the quality of the cattle a continual improvement
is taking place due to the crossing of the native breeds with the best
imported stock. In the order of their relative importance sheep
come first, then cattle, horses, mules, goats, pigs and asses. Owing
to its geographical situation and the special conditions of its
soil, the Argentine Republic provides a rich vegetation such as
few countries possess. Numerous forests exist, for the most part
unexploited, containing excellent timber, both for building purposes
and cabinet work. Rich grasses furnish pasture for countless flocks
and herds. Medicinal, textile and tinctorial plants abound, while
the sugar cane, vine, maize, wheat, barley, rice, oats, linseed and
other cereals with cotton, tobacco, coffee, yerba mat6 and olives,
all flourish.
The most important industries are pastoral, and agricultural.
Pastoral industry may be said to constitute the mainstay of the
Republic. In the many estancias scattered over the country are
to be found about 120 millions of sheep, 30 millions of cattle,
5 millions horses, 3 millions goats, and 1 million pigs. For cattle
and sheep the principal provinces are Buenos Aires, C6rdoba,
Entre Rios, Corrientes, and Santa F6. The mining industry is at
present of comparatively small importance, but with improvements
in the means of communication and transport there is no doubt
that in time the country will derive immense benefit from the
exploitation of its great mineral wealth. The saladero or slaughter-
house business, the sugar industry, wine production, and the mill-
ing, have all, of late, made notable advances. The most important
articles of export are, live animals, frozen or salted meat, wool,
hides, tallow, horns, horsehair, bones, ash, animal oil, and lumber.
The countries with which Argentina maintains the largest commer-
cial relations are, England, France, Germany, Italy, Belgium, Spain,
Portugal, the United States, Chili, Brazil, Uruguay, Paraguay,
Bolivia and the West Indies.
In order to encourage the colonization and settlement of
the large uninhabited tracks to be found in the Republic the
Government offers advantages to foreigners, which enable them
easily to become proprietors. To such as come out under a con-
tract of this nature their ocean passages are paid, and their ex-
penses defrayed to the colony where they are about to settle. They
are provided in addition with dwelling, food, animals for draught
and breeding, seeds and implements for the term of one year or
less, the value of these to be refunded to the State on easy terms.
The principal railways of the Republic are the Southern, Western,
Central Argentine, Buenos Aires and Rosario, Pacific, Bahia Blanca
and North Western, Oeste Santafecino, Gran Sud de Santa F6 and
C6rdoba, Central de C6rdoba, Central del Norte, Gran Oeste Ar-
gentino, Transandino, Entre Rios, Argentino del Este, and Nord-
Este, and others, having a total length of lines open, of 17,377 kilom.








THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


TREATIES AND CONVENTIONS

ENTERED INTO

BETWEEN ARGENTINA AND OTHER COUNTRIES


(The sub-headings indicate the subject of the treaty or convention).


AUSTRIA-HUNGARY.
POSTAL CONVENTION.
Signed 4th. July 1891.

BELGIUM.
GENERAL TREATY FOR LIBERATION OF DUES ON THE SCHELDT.
Signed 16th. July 1863. Additional protocol signed 12th. Octo-
ber 1868.
TARIFFS. (ANTWERP PORT).
Agreement of 28th. March 1883.
EXTRADITION.
Treaty signed 12th. August 1886, approved 23rd. November
1887, exchanged 30th. November 1887.
CUSTOM HOUSE TARIFFS.
Convention signed 5th. July 1890.

BOLIVIA.
FRIENDSHIP, PEACE, COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION.
Treaty signed 9th. July 1868, approved 7th. October of the
same year, exchanged 24th. Sept. 1869.
EXCHANGE OF PUBLICATIONS.
Convention signed 25th. May 1886, approved 28th. June of
same year.
TERRITORIAL LIMITS.
Treaty signed 10th. May 1889, approved 12th. Nov. 1891, ex-
changed 10th. March 1893.
ARBITRATION (Protocol).
Signed 26th. June 1894, approved 26th. June of same year.
RAILWAYS.
Convention signed 30th. June 1894, approved 24th. January
1895, exchanged 14th. Dec. 1895.








THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


REBATE OF TRANSIT DUES.
Decree of 12th. May 1896.
ARBITRATION.
Treaty signed 3rd. Feb. 1902.

BRAZIL.
PRELIMINARY PEACE CONVENTION.
1828. (With the United Provinces of the River Plate.)
FRIENDSHIP, PEACE, COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION.
Treaty signed 7th. March 1856, approved 23rd. June of the
same year, exchanged 25th June 1856.
FLUVIAL CONVENTION.
Signed 20th. Nov. 1857, approved 20th. July 1858, exchanged
20th. July 1858.
TREATY OF PEACE.
Supplementary convention signed 2nd. January 1859. (Supple-
mentary to the Preliminary Convention of 1828.)
PROTOCOL (Fortifications of Martin Garcia).
25th. February 1864.
OFFENSIVE AND DEFENSIVE ALLIANCE.
Treaty signed 1st. May 1865. (Brazil and Uruguay.)
EXTRADITION OF MILITARY DESERTERS.
Additional clause to the convention of 7th. March 1856, signed
22nd October 1878, approved 18th. June 1881.
CARTAS ROGATIVAS (Petitions).
Agreement signed 14th. February 1880, approved 21st. Octo-
ber 1880.
FRONTIER GARRISONS.
Protocol signed 29th. April 1884, approved 13th. May 1884.
TERRITORIAL AND FLUVIAL ARBITRATION.
Treaty signed 28th. Sept. 1885, approved 9th. Nov. of the same
year, exchanged 4th. March 1886.
WAR MEDALS (Paraguay war).
Protocol signed 13th. May and approved 20th. August 1889.
ARBITRATION (TERRITORIAL QUESTIONS).
Treaty signed 7th. Sept. 1889, approved 23rd. October 1889,
exchanged 4th. Nov. of same year.
ARBITRATION (PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES).
Protocol signed 9th. August 1895, approved 7th. Sept. oft he
same year.








THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


ADDITIONAL CLAUSE TO CONVENTION OF 9th. AUGUST 1895.
Signed 1st. October 1898, approved 11th. October of the same
year.
SUPPLEMENTARY TREATY (Demarcation).
Signed 6th. October 1898, approved 25th. Sept. 1899, exchanged
26th. May 1900.
SUPPLEMENTARY CONVENTION (Demarcation).
Signed 2nd. August 1900, approved 16th. August 1900.

CHILI.
FRIENDSHIP, PEACE, COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION.
Treaty signed 30th. August 1855, approved 1st. October 1855
and exchanged 29th. April 1856.
TERRITORIAL LIMITS.
Treaty signed 23rd. July 1881, approved 11th. October 1881,
exchanged 22nd. of the same month.
CONVENTION (RAILWAY TRAFFIC).
Signed 17th. October 1887, approved 18th. Nov. of the same
year and exchanged 2nd. January 1888.
SUPPLEMENTARY CONVENTION (TO TREATY OF 23rd. JULY 1881).
Signed 20th. August 1888, approved 17th. August 1889, ex-
changed 11th January 1890.
ADDITIONAL CLAUSE (TO TREATY OF LIMITS 23rd. JULY 1881).
Signed 1st. May 1893, approved 14th. December of same year,
exchanged 21st. Dec. 1893.
CONVENTION (CONSTRUCTION OF CART-ROADS).
Signed 8th. February 1894, approved 31st. August of the same
year, exchanged 20th. Nov. 1894.
EXCHANGE OF PUBLICATIONS.
Convention signed 8th February 1894 and approved 5th June
1894.
EXTRADITION ACTS.
Signed 15th March 1894, approved 5th. June of the same year.
AGREEMENT (DEMARCATION OF LIMITS).
Signed 6th Sept. 1895 and approved 21st. October 1895. An
additional clause to the above agreement was signed 17th.
April 1896 and approved 27th. April 1896.
CONVENTION (RELATING TO DIPLOMATIC CORRESPONDENCE).
Signed and. approved 12th. January 1898.
ARBITRATION ACTS.
Signed 15th, 17th. and 22nd. Sept. 1898, approved 11th. October
of the same year.








THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


ACTS AND NOTES (DEMARCATION).
Signed 2nd. and 25th. Nov. 1898, approved 11th. Jan. 1899.
AGREEMENT (ANDINE DIVISION LINE).
Signed 30th. April 1900, approved 9th. May of the same year.
Final acts signed and approved 29th. Dec. 1900.
TREATY OF ARBITRATION AND FOR SETTLEMENT OF BOUNDARY
LIMITS.
Signed in Santiago on 28th. May 1902. The pacts embodying
the judgment delivered by the Arbitration Court which was
appointed by H. M. King Edward VII, provide:
1) for the demarcation of the boundary limits (since effected
by Sir Thomas Holdich's Commission);
2) a political convention containing a declaration of the inter-
national policy of the two republics;
3) an agreement for the reduction of naval forces by both par-
ties; and
4) an agreement to submit to arbitration all disputes that may
hereafter arise between the two Nations.
DENMARK.
RECOGNITION OF INDEPENDENCE.
Protocol signed 20th. January 1841, ratified 5th. May 1841,
additional Protocol 11th. December of the same year.
TRADE MARKS.
Declaration signed 9th. January 1883, approved 12th. August
1884.
FRANCE.
NAVIGATION OF THE RIVERS PARANA AND URUGUAY.
Treaty signed 10th. July 1853, approved 14th. September 1853.
exchanged 21st. September 1853.
MARITIME RIGHTS.
Declaration signed 1st. October 1856.
MEASURES AND WEIGHTS.
Convention signed 20th. May 1875, approved 28th. August 1876,
exchanged 16th. March 1877.
SUBMARINE CABLES.
Convention signed 14th. March 1884, approved 25th. June 1885
and exchanged 18th. November 1885.
INTESTATE ESTATE.
Convention signed 26th. February 1889.
COMMERCE.
Convention (additional to treaty of 10th. July 1858), signed
10th. August 1892, approved 26th. October 1892, exchanged
31st. May 1893.








THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


COPYRIGHT.
Presidential Decree of 3nd. May 1896.
GERMANY.
RECOGNITION OF INDEPENDENCE.
Protocols, with the City of Bremen, 11th. April and 7th.
December 1843; with the City of Hamburg, 1st. March 1844
and 22nd. August 1845; with Prussia, 2nd. October 1844,
FRIENDSHIP, COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION.
Treaty signed 19th. September 1857, approved 29th. of the
same month, exchanged 3rd. June 1859.
GREAT BRITAIN.
RECOGNITION OF INDEPENDENCE.
Note dated 15th. December 1823.
FRIENDSHIP, COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION.
Treaty signed 2nd. February 1825, approved 23rd. September
of same year, exchanged 12th. May 1825.
NAVIGATION OF RIVERS PARANA AND URUGUAY.
Treaty signed 10th. July 1853, approved 2nd. December 1854,
exchanged 11th. March 1854.
EXTRADITION.
Treaty signed 22nd. March 1889, exchanged 15th. December
1893.
POSTAL CONVENTION.
Signed 28th. June 1889, approved 3rd. July of the same year.
Additional clause signed 12th. November 1895, approved
13th. November 1895.
ITALY.
RECOGNITION OF INDEPENDENCE.
Signed in 1837.
EXCHANGE OF OFFICIAL DOCUMENTS RELATING TO STATISTICAL,
ADMINISTRATIVE AND SCIENTIFIC MATTER.
Declaration signed 2nd. December 1876.
EXCHANGE OF PUBLICATIONS.
Signed 20th. June 1885, approved 28th. July of the same year.
CONSULAR CONVENTION.
Signed 28th. December 1885, approved 16th. August 1895, ex-
changed 17th. April 1896.
EXTRADITION.
Treaty signed 16th. Jane, approved 18th. November 1893, ex-
changed 14th. November 1900.








THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


TREATMENT OF MOST FAVOURED NATION.
Convention signed 1st. June 1894, approved 5th. October 1891,
exchanged 28th. February 1896.
COPYRIGHT.
Decree of 18th. April 1900.
JAPAN.
COMMERCE, FRIENDSHIP AND NAVIGATION.
Signed in Washington 30th. November 1888, ratified and ex-
changed 6th. June 1889.
NETHERLANDS.
EXTRADITION.
Treaty signed 7th. September 1893, approved 3rd. September
1897, exchanged 16th. December 1897.
PARAGUAY.
DEFINITIVE TREATY OF PEACE.
Signed 3rd. February 1876, approved 7th. July and exchanged
13th. September 1876.
TREATY (RELATING TO LIMITS).
Signed, approved and exchanged 3rd. February, 7th. July and
13th. September 1876 respectively.
CONSULAR CONVENTION.
Signed 14th. March and approved 19th. December 1877. Ex-
changed 19th. February 1878.
ARBITRATION. (PRESIDENT OF U. S.)
Acts signed 12th. November 1878.
CIVIL RIGHTS.
Treaties sanctioned 25th. August 1888 and 18th. February 1889.
POSTAL.
Conventions relating to the Exchange of Declared Values, Par-
cels and Postal Orders. Signed 15th. September 1892, ap-
proved 8th. July 1896 and exchanged 24th. September of the
same year.
ARBITRATION.
Treaty signed 6th. November 1899.
PERU.
FRIENDSHIP, COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION.
Treaty signed 9th March 1874, approved 28th September 1874
and exchanged 20th December 1875.
CONSULAR CONVENTION.
Signed 5th. May 1874, approved 19th. June 1876, exchanged
30th December 1878.








THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


CIVIL RIGHTS.
Treaties sanctioned by the South American Congress at Mon-
tevideo (25th. August 1888 to 18th. February 1889).
CONVENTION (RELATING TO DIPLOMATIC CORRESPONDENCE).
Signed and approved 11th. August 1900.
PORTUGAL.
RECOGNITION OF INDEPENDENCE.
Signed in 1821.
CONSULAR CONVENTION.
Signed 24th. December 1878, approved 10th. July 1882, exchan-
ged 24th. January 1883.
RUSSIA.
TELEGRAPHS.
Convention signed 22nd. July 1875.
SPAIN.
RECOGNITION OF INDEPENDENCE, PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP.
Treaty signed 21st. September 1863, approved 6th. November
1863 and exchanged 21st. June 1864.
INTESTATE ESTATES. (Declaration respecting Consular Inter-
vention.)
17th. July 1869.
RATIFICATION (TREATY OF 21st. SEPTEMBER 1863.)
Signed 23rd. January 1871 and ratified 12ch. June 1871
EXTRADITION.
Treaty signed 7th. March 1881, approved 17th. July of the same
year, exchanged 21st. October 1882.
EXCHANGE OF PUBLICATIONS.
Agreement signed and approved 20th. June 1884.
COPYRIGHT.
Signed 11th. January 1889, approved 30th. January 1900.
SWEDEN AND NORWAY.
RECOGNITION OF INDEPENDENCE.
Signed in 1846.
GANGING OF SHIPS.
Convention signed 8th. October 1878, approved 25th. June
1881. Additional clause signed and exchanged 19th. October
1881.
FRIENDSHIP, COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION.
Treaty signed 17th. July 1885, approved 21st. October 1885, ex-
changed 14th. January 1896.









THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


SWITZERLAND.
GENEVA CONVENTION.
Signed 22nd. August 1864.
UNITED STATES.
Recognition of Independence, 7th and 8th. March 1822.
NAVIGATION TREATY. (Rivers Parana and Uruguay.)
Signed 10th. July 1853, approved 2nd. December 1854, ex-
changed 20th. December of the same year.
FRIENDSHIP, COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION.
Treaty signed 27th. July 1853, approved 3rd. December 1854,
and exchanged 20th. December of same year. Additional
clausessigned 23rd. June 1885 and approved 16th. July 1885.
EXTRADITION TREATY.
Signed 26th. September 1896, approved 29th. December 1898,
exchanged 2nd. June 1900.
URUGUAY.
ALLIANCE (OFFENSIVE AND DEFENSIVE).
Treaty signed 1st. May 1865. (Uruguay and Brazil).
TELEGRAPHS.
Convention signed 3rd. January 1883, approved 28th. August
and exchanged 24th. November of the same year.
PILOTAGE CONVENTION.
Signed 14th. August 1888, approved 15 October 1891, exchan-
ged 13th. November of the same year.
CIVIL RIGHTS.
Treaties sanctioned by South American Congress 1st. Fe-
bruary 1889.
IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF LIVE CATTLE.
Convention signed and approved 23rd. October 1899.
ARBITRATION.
Treaty signed 8th. June 1899.


Other treaties have been made, or, are in course of negotiation, hut not yet
having been ratified, do not appear in the Foreigu Office register. (Ed.(









THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


NATIONAL GOVERNMENT



PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC:
Lt.-General Julio A. Roea.
Secretary: Dr. Jaime Llavallol.
Pro-Secretary: Dr. Julio Roca (Jr.).
VICE PRESIDENT:
Dr. Norberto Quirno Costa (President of the Senate).
MINISTER OF THE INTERIOR:
Dr. Joaquin V. GonzAlez.
Sub-Secretary: Dr. Armando Claros.
MINISTER OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS AND PUBLIC WORSHIP:
Dr. Jos6 A. Terry.
Sub-Secretary: Dr. Clodoveo Miranda Nadn.
MINISTER OF FINANCE:
Sr. Marco Avellaneda.
Sub-Secretary: Dr. Antonio Dellepiane.
MINISTER OF WAR:
Colonel Pablo Riccheri.
Adjutant to the Minister: Major Antonio Tassi.
MINISTER OF MARINE:
Captain Onofre Betbeder.
Sub-Secretary: Captain Alfredo A. C6rdova.
MINISTER OF JUSTICE AND PUBLIC INSTRUCTION:
Dr. Juan Ram6n FernAndez.
Sub-Secretary: Sr. Florentino Barros.
MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE AND COMMERCE:
Dr. Wenceslao Escalante.
Sub-Secretary: Dr. Carlos Ibarguren.
MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS:
Dr. Emilio Civit.
Sub-Secretary: Sr. Horacio Bustos Mor6n, C. E.








THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


ARGENTINE DIPLOMATIC CORPS.



BELGIUM AND HOLLAND. (BRUSELS).
Minister: Dr. Eduardo Wilde.
First Secretary: Sr. Paulino Llambi Campbell jr.
BOLIVIA. (LA PAZ).
Minister: Sr. Lauro Cabral.
First Secretary: Sr. Jacinto S. Gareia.
Hon. Attaches: Sr. Pedro Guesalaga and Sr. Rodolfo Raymond.
BRAZIL. (Rio DE JANEIRO).
Minister: Sr. Manuel Gorostiaga.
First Secretary: Sr. Baldomero Garcia Sagastume.
CHILI. (SANTIAGO).
Minister: Dr. Jose A. Terry.
First Secretary: Dr. Alberto Blaneas.
FRANCE AND THE HOLY SHE. (PARIS).
Minister: Sr. Carlos Calvo.
First Secretary: Sr. Daniel Garcia Mansilla.
Second Secretary: Sr. Luis de Oliveira Cezar.
Military Attach6: Major NicolAs de Vedia (France).
Naval Attache: Lieutenant Mariano Beascochea (France).
GERMANY, AUSTRIA-HUNGARY AND RUSSIA. (BERLIN).
Minister: Dr. Vicente G. Quesada.
First Secretary: Baldomero M. Fonseca.
Second Secretary: Sr. Mario Seeber.
Military Attache: Lt. Col. Ram6n J. Jones.
Naval Attache: (Germany) Lieutenant JuliAn Irizar.
(Austria Hungary & Russia) Lieut. Luis Almada.
Hon. Attache: Sr. Diego de Alvear.
GREAT BRITAIN. (LONDON).
Minister: Sr. Florencio L. Dominguez.
First Secretary: Sr. Vicente J. Dominguez.
Second Secretary: Sr. Luis H. Dominguez.
Naval Attache: Lieutenant JuliAn Irizar.
ITALY AND SWITZERLAND. (ROME).
Minister: Sr. Enrique B. Moreno.
First Secretary: Sr. Carlos Zavalia.
Second Secretary: Dr. Mario Ruiz de los Llanos.
Naval Attache: Lieutenant Mariano Beacochea (Italy).
Hon. Attache: Sr. Eduardo de Rossi.







THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


PARAGUAY. (ASUNCI6N).
Minister: Sr. Alejandro Guesalaga.
First Secretary: Sr. Carlos Burgos.
PERd AND ECUADOR. (LIMA).
Minister: Sr. Agustin Arroyo.
First Secretary: Sr. Gabriel Martinez Campos.
SPAIN AND PORTUGAL. (MADRID).
Minister: Sr. Epifanio Portela.
First Secretary: Sr. Carlos M. Ocantos.
Hon. Attaches: Sr. JuliAn Portela and Sr. Eliseo M. Segurn.
UNITED STATES & MEXICO. (WASHINGTON).
Minister: Sr. Martin Garcia Merou.
First Secretary: Sr. Antonio del Viso.
Naval Attache: Lieutenant Ezequiel Guttero.
URUGUAY. (MONTEVIDEO).
Minister: Dr. Mariano Demaria.
First Secretary: Sr. Solano Torres y Cabrera.




ARGENTINE TIME


The standard time adopted throughout the Argentine Republic
is referred to the Meridian of ColdobE 4h. 17m. to the West of
Greenwich. The greatest deviation of local mean from the official
time would not exceed 25 minutes in any part of the country;
Buenos Aires is 23m. 20s. East of Cordoba, and Mendoza, the most
western town of importance, is 18m. 32s. West of Cordoba. At the
port of Buenos Aires-Dock N. 4-the time ball is dropped daily
at Ih. 6m. 9s. Cordoba mean time.






h A J^








THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


FOREIGN DIPLOMATIC CORPS IN ARGENTINA



AUSTRIA-HUNGARY.
Minister: Baron Otto Kuhn.
BELGIUM.
Minister: M. H. Ledeganek.
Attache: M. Jules von Hauten.
BOLIVIA.
Minister: Dr. Juan C. Carrillo.
Secretary: Dr. Cornelio Rios.
BRAZIL.
Minister: Dr. Cyro de Azevedo.
First Secretary: Senhor Sylvino Gurgel do Amaral.
CHILI.
Minister: (Post Vacant.)
Charge d'affaires: Sr. Eleodoro Infante Vald6s.
Second Secretary: Sr. Felipe Aninat y Serrano.
ECUADOR.
Minister: Dr. Carlos R. Tobar (absent).
FRANCE.
Minister: Count Sala (absent).
First Secretary: M. Paul Vieugue.
GERMANY.
Minister: Bar6n von Wangenheim.
Secretary: Count von Hacke.
GREAT BRITAIN.
Minister: W. H. D. Haggard Esq. C. B.
First Secretary: Fred. D. Harford Esq.
HOLY SEE.
Papal Nuncio: Msgr. Antonio Sabatucci.
ITALY.
Minister: Count Francisco Bottaro Costa.
First Secretary: Bar6n Carlos Aliotti.
JAPAN.
Minister: M. Narinori Okoshi (absent).
MEXIco.
Minister: Sr. Francisco L. de la Barra.
Secretary: Dr. Carbajal y Rosas.








THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


NETHERLANDS.
Charge d'affaires: Sr. L. van Riet, Buenos Aires.
PARAGUAY.
Minister: Dr. Manuel M. Viera.
Secretary: Sr. Andr6s Gill.
PERd.
Minister: (Vacant).
Charge d'affaires: Sr. Ernesto de Tezanos Pinto.
Attache: Sr. Manuel Eduardo de la Torre.
PORTUGAL.
Charge d'affaires: Senhor Constaneio Roque da Costa.
RUSSIA.
Minister: Chevalier Alexis de Speyer.
Charge d'affaires ad interim and Secretary: M. Alexander Greger.
Attache: M. Anthony Wolff.
SPAIN.
Minister: Sr. Julio de Arellano, Marques de Casa Calvo.
Charge d'affaires and First Secretary: Sr. Juan GonzAlez de
Salazar.
SWVITZERLAND.
Minister: M. Jose Choffat.
Secretary: M. Henri Schreiber.
UNITED STATES.
Minister: (Absent).
Secretary in charge: Edward Winslow Ames Esq.
Military Attach6: Lieutenant Henry A. Whitney.
URUGUAY.
Minister: Sr. Daniel Mufioz.
First Secretary: Dr. Pablo Perez Gomar.
The following countries have Consular Representation only:
Denmark, Sweden and Norway, Guatemala, Haiti, Nicaragua, Ve-
nezuela, Persia, Liberia (Africa).



FOREIGN CONSULAR CORPS IN ARGENTINA
(BUENOS AIRES).


AUSTRIA HUNGRY.
C6nsul General: Sr. Nicolas Mihanovich.
BELGIUM.
Hon. C6nsul General: Sr. Alberto Oostendorp.









THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


BOLIVIA.
Acting C6nsul General: Dr. Cornelio Rios.
BRAZIL.
C6nsul General: Sr. Arturo Teixeira de Macedo.
C HII.
Cdnsul General: Sr. Gustavo Munizaga Varela.
DENMARK.
Acting C6nsul General: Sr. Lars Larsen.
FRANCE.
C6nsul: Sr. Enrique Francastel.
GERMANY.
C6nsul General: Sr. Erich Steifensand (absent).
Acting C6nsul General: Dr. Oldshausen.
GREAT BRITAIN.
C6nsul: A. Carnegie Ross Esq. C. B.
GUArEMALA.
C6nsul: Sr. Pedro Hahn.
HAITI.
C6nsul General: Sr. Gabriel Storni.
ITALY.
C6nsul General: Sr. Ludovico Gioia.
LIBERIA.
C6nsul: Walter Ferris Biggs Esq.
MixICo.
C6nsul General: Sr. Juan Gnelfreire.
NETHERLANDS.
C6nsul General: Sr. L. van Riet.
NICARAGUA.
C6nsul General: Sr. Eduardo Caamailo.
PARAGUAY.
C6nsul General: Sr. Federico Alonso.
PERSIA.
lHon. C6nsul General: Sr. Enrique Enthoven.
PERi.
Consulate: In charge of the Legation.
PORTUGAL.
C6nsul General: Sr. Constancio Roque da Costa.








26 v THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK

RUSSIA.
Consulate General: In charge of the Legation.
SPAIN.
C6nsul: Sr. Emilio Perera y Blesa.
SWEDEN AND NORWAY.
C6nsul General: Sr. S. A. Christophersen.
UNITED STATES.
C6nsul: Sr. Daniel Mayer.
URUGUAY.
C6nsul General: Sr. Florencio FernAndez.
VENEZUELA.
C6nsul: Dr. Fernando Perez.




POPULATION


According to the census taken on May 10th. 1895, the total
population of the Republic amounted to 3,954,911 inhabitants of
which number 2,950,384 were Argentines and 1,004,527 foreigners.
The nationality of the inhabitants according to the 1895 cen-
sus was:

NATIONALITIES Males Females Total


Argentines ....... ......... 1,452,952 1,497,432 2,950,384
Brazilians ............... 14,512 10,213 24,725
Bolivians.................. 4,832 2,529 7,361
Chilians....................... 12,795 7,799 20,594
North Americans........... 979 402 1,381
Uruguayans............... 27,353 21,297 48,650
Paraguayans .. ........... 8,258 6,304 14,562
Other Americans............ 462 367 859
Germans ................... 10,978 6,165 17.143
Austrians............ ...... 8,685 4,118 12,803,
Spaniards................... 130,105 68,580 198,685
French .................... 56,207 37,891 94,098
English ..................... 14,155 7,633 21,788
Italians .................... 316,272 176,364 492,636
Swiss....................... 9,323 5,466 14,789
Other Europeans........... 19,075 11,750 30,825
Other Races................. 1,946 1,682 3,628








TIE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


The following table gives the official return of the entire popu-
lation of the Republic at 31st. December 1902:


FEDI ERA. CAPITAL
Prove inches and Territories


Total
Division Population population of
division


City of Buenos Aires.........
Province of Buenos Aires... Eastern
Santa Fe....... or
Entre Rios..... Litoral
Corrientes......
Province of C6rdoba ........
San Luis....... Central
S Santiago........
Province of Mendoza....... Western
> San Juan......
S Rioja....... .. Andine
SCatamarca......
Province of Tucuman......
a Salta........... Northern
> Jujuy ..........
Territory of Misiones........
D Formosa....... Northern
Chaco..........
Territory of La Pampa...... Central
Territory of Neuquen........ Western
Territory of Rio Negro......
Chubut......... Southern
SSanta Cruz ..... S
Tierra del Fuego
Territory of Los Andes...... North Eastern


865,490
1,208,937
576,385 3,293,834
354,596
288,426
436,859
93,976 715,029
184,194
152,720
97,803 430,578
79,4421
100.613 I
251,8571
132,613 438,757
54.287
36,286 5
5,844 55,088
12,958
48,391 48,391
16,874 16,874
14,947
4,911| ,3
1,63P1 22,531
1,042
1,166i 1,166


Total population of the Republic... 5,022,248


BUENOS AIRES IN 1830


I







THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


CLIMATE AND METEOROLOGY


The data here supplied, in regard to Climate and Meteorology, have been
compiled, with the permission of the author, from the admirable and exhaustive
work "The Climate of the Argentine Republic", by Mr. Walter G. Davis,
Director of the National Meteorological Department.

Treating of the climate of a territory which has an extension
of 330 of latitude, and whose surface rises from the level of the
Atlantic in the east to the-snow-capped mountains of the central
chains of the Andes to the west, it is easy to understand the great
differences in the atmospheric conditions which exist between
the different sections composing the Argentine Republic. Taking
the two principal climatic factors, temperature and rain, the
action of which, separate or combined, exercise such powerful
influence on the products of the soil, we have as great differences
between the extreme normals of these elements, following the same
parallel of latitude across the Republic, as, in its greater extension,
is found from North to South. We have, for example, the narrow
zone of one and a half degrees of latitude of the Republic, which
is to the north of the Tropic of Capricorn. Starting from the
oriental boundary with an annual average temperature of 23
degrees, we cross the isothermic lines almost at a right angle,
and, arrive at the western boundary with a temperature below 14
degrees; and the rain-fall has diminished from 1,600 millimetres
in the region whence we started, to less than 50 millimetres at the
point of arrival. The zone traversed is about 800 kilometres,
and the aspect of the soil changes from the lowlands of the Cha-
co, covered with a veritable tropical vegetation, to the arid
table lands of Salta and Jujuy which, in their turn, are confounded
with the sides of the Andes which terminate in snow-capped moun-
tains. At 8 or 9 degrees of latitude further south, the climatic con-
ditions are distinctly modified; as between parallel 300 and 310 the
isotherm of 190 passes through the north section of the Province of
Entre Rios, the centre of Santa Fe and the north of Cordoba, crossing
Rioja and entering into San Juan, where it doubles at a right angle
to the north. In this part the Republic has a width of 1,200 kilome-
tres, of which 900 are in the same degree of temperature, which
falls rapidly, following the same route to the West, ascending the
slopes of the Cordilleras.
In this route the average annual rain-fall has decreased from
1,000 or 1,200 mm. in the east section of the Province of Entre
Rios, to less than 100 mm. in the Province of San Juan. Ten
degrees further south, in the Rio Negro territory, where the width
of the Republic is scarcely 600 kilometres, we find but slight varia-








THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


tions in the climatic factors from east to west. The isotherm 13'
and 14" extend from the Atlantic to the Andes, taking a S. E. to
N. W. direction, and the average annual rain-fall of 200 to 400 mm.
is about the same over all the territory, with the exception of a
narrow zone on the eastern slopes of the Cordilleras, extending
from 390 to 410 of latitude, when the annual rainfall is something
over 2,000 m. m. In the extreme south of the Republic, at 550
latitude the climate is very severe. In Tierra del Fuego and
adjoining islands the temperature varies from 8 to 90 in summer,
to 20 to 30 in winter. Snow falls every month and the rains are
exceptionally frequent.
With respect to climate, the territory may be divided into three
general regions as follows: Littoral, comprising Formosa, the Cha-
co, Misiones and the provinces of Corrientes, Entre Rios, Santa Fe,
and Buenos-Aires: Mediterranean, comprising the central portion
of the Republic from the Bolivian frontier onthe north, to the
southern extremity of the continent including the Atlantic Coast to
the south of the Province of Buenos-Aires; Andine, which embraces
the east side of the Cordillera and the pre-Cordilleras, having the
same north and south limits as the Mediterranean. Each of these
regions can be sub-divided into Northern, Central, and Southern
sections.




TEMPERATURE



The highest mean temperature, represented by the isotherm of
240, passes through the northern part of Formosa in latitude 220
and the lowest, 50, in the islands lying to the south of Tierra del
Fuego in latitude 560. Thus with an increase of 340 of latitude the
mean temperature has decreased 190. In the Northern section of
the Littoral the temperature is rarely above 410 or below 50, and in
the southern part the ordinary limits can be placed at 390 and 10.
In the Mediterranean region the extremes are greater; the highest
temperatures registered in the Republic have occurred in the
Province of Catamarca, where the maximum of 480 was observed
during the hot wave of February 1900. The opposite extreme is
found in the territory of Santa Cruz, where it is probable that the
minimum of about-200 may occur. The lowest register was-18
making the extreme range of temperature actually observed within
Argentine limits, 66.
The characteristic feature of the temperatures of the Littoral is
the smaller amplitude both in the daily and yearly variation as
compared with those of the Mediterranean and Andine regions








THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


where the clearer skies produce a greater evaporation and noctur-
nal radiation. The following table shows the average temperature in
distinctive parts of the country for the four seasons and the year

Summer comprising December, January and February,
Autumn March, April and May.
Winter June, July and August.
Spring September, October and November.

Jan April July Oct Year

Asunci6n (Paraguay) 27.21 22.29 18.66 22.89 22.67
Esperanza (Jujuy).... 25.75 19.96 15.48 22.72 21.08
Goya............... 25.02 19.09 14.16 19.42 19.39
Tucuman............ 24.55 18.94 12.39 20.09 18.90
San Juan............. 25.88 17.43 9.29 18.92 17.97
C6rdoba ......... ... 2 2.61 16.45 10.44 16.55 16.91
San Luis............. 24.71 15.01 10.09 18.13 16.54
Rosario.............. 23.93 16.72 10 76 16.16 16.87
Chos Malal.......... 21 45 13.05 7.41 12.51 13.69
Buenos Aires......... 24.25 17.15 10.70 15.67 16.95
Staten Island........ 8.94 6.12 2.59 4.84 5.61
Rawson (Chubut)..... 20.66 10.90 5.66 13.81 I 12.61


The daily average difference of temperature in the above points
is: -

Jan April July Oct Year

Asunci6n ......... 93 10.0 9.3 10.2 9,6
Goya................ 7.6 7.4 7.3 7.9 7.7
Rosario .............. 12.7 10.6 8.1 12.0 11.2
Buenos Aires........ 7.4 6.3 4.4 6.8 6.2
Tucuman........... : 10.3 9.6 12.6 12.8 11.5
C6rdoba............. 12.2 11.7 12.2 11.6 11.9
San Luis...... ....... 9.4 8.6 10.0 8.9 9.0
Rawson.............. 11.5 12.3 10.3 11.3 11.0
Esperanza ........... 8.1 6.2 10.1 10.3 8.9
San Juan ........... 9.8 10.0 11.5 10.8 10.9
ChosMalal........... 11.1 12.2 7.6 10.2 10.3
Staten Island........ 3.9 1.8 0.8 2.8 2.2


The effect of the different winds on the temperature is as follows:
the north winds are hot and the increase in the heat is, as a
rule, proportional to the duration of the wind from this direction,
whilst the South winds are cool, refreshing the air, and relieving
the suffocation produced during the successive days of north







THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


wind. In the Andine region the dry, hot winds are called Zondas,
which generally blow from N. or N. W. and at times with such
intensity that respiration is difficult. These winds rise about midday
and last till sunset, but at times they last two or three days without
interruption, being strongest in the months of September and
October. The changes of temperature after a severe Zonda, succee-
ded by a south wind which usually follows it, frequently reach
25". In the Littoral and Mediterranean the heat produced by the
north wind generally termin ates with a thunderstorm or pampero.
The pamperos in the Littoral are more frequent in winter and
spring. The fall of temperature which accompanies the change
of wind from the north to the south quadrants, is frequently from
150 to 200.




RAINFALL


The yearly distribution of the rainfall to the north of Lat. 358
both as regards quantity as well as frequency, can be divided into
two seasons; the rainy season during the six months from October
to March; and the dry season from April to September. In the Lit-
toral the difference in the quantity of rain which normally falls in
these two seasons is less marked in the south section, than in the
north, that is, in Buenos Aires, the relation of rains in the wet, to
the dry seasons, is 56 % and in Corrientes 65 %. In the Mediter-
ranean region, the rains of C6rdoba, as example, are in the propor-
tion of 86 to 14, and in Salta 96 to 4. To the south of 380 the
distribution is very regular during the whole year, as much rain
falling in the winter as in the summer. The cause of the great
inequality between the rainfall of summer and winter is due to
the high and low atmospheric pressure and to the direction of the
winds, which after travelling over a large extension of the ocean,
arrive on the land charged with vapour which is precipitated in the
form of rain, and is most abundant when the winds blow towards
regions with low temperatures. The hills of San Luis, C6rdoba
and the range of Aconquija intercept the vapours, causing the con-
densation of them on their east sides, so that when the winds reach
the Andine region the greater portion of the vapour has been
withdrawn and but a small quantity is left for that zone during the
summer months.
The yearly rainfall in various parts of the country is as follows,
in millimetres:-







32 THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK

Aver- Maxi- Mini-
Period age per m u mum
per per
year year year

Estaci6n Misionera (Chaco).. 1896-1900 1045.2 1275.0 827.0
Asunci6n (Paraguay) ..... 1892-1900 1323.9 1795.111049.9
Villa Formosa............... 1879-1892 1450.3 1868.011014.0
Corrientes ................ 1876-1900 1250.7 1832.5j 731.9
San Lorenzo (Corrientes).... 1892-1900 892.3 1226.1 570.9
Garruchos (Corrientes)...... 1888-1896 1558.7 1727.6 1084.0
Gova ...................... 1876-1900 972.3 1543.0 513.9
Monte Caseros............. 1893-1900 1031.6 1497.4 764.7
Coneordia .................. 1876-78 & 1887-98 1067.3 1509.9 843.1
Paran ..................... 1875-82 & 1896.98 899.8 1181.8 652.5
Uruguay .................. 1895-1899 1154.5 1326.2 978.0
Carearaa .................. 1889-1900 891.8 1277.1 674.1
Rosario .................... 1875-80 & 1886-1900 950.7 1188.5 576.9
El Paraiso (Buenos Aires)... 1888-1900 915.31390.4 650.7
Buenos Aires ............... 1861-1900 933.1 2024.7 547 0
Estancia San Juan (Quilmes). 1867-1900 1080.5 1720.41 534.2
Lobos ................ ..... 1892-1900 842.01328.4 502.0
Dolores..................... 1869 1900 820.2 1015.0 582 8
Saladillo ....... ........... 1893 1900 722.91047.6 267.9
Maip .............. ........ 1888-1900 679.51174.2 307.2
Azul ........... .. 1888-1900 819.5 1086.0 407.2
Tandil .................... 1888 1900 824.0 1628.0 371.6
Mar del Plata .............. 1888-1900 658.2 1073.0 432.4
General Lamadrid.......... 1888-1900 653.0 896.0 407.3
Pileiao (Prov. Catamarca)... 1866-1879 131.0 193.1 69.3
Catamara ................. 1881-1900 321.5 392.3 246.0
Andalg-al (Prov. Catamarea)! 1895-1900 225.31 393.5' 201.3
La Rioja ................... 1875-1892 273.6 370.2 149.0
San Juan .................. 1875-1900 74.4 147.0 2.0
Mendoza ................ 1866-80 & 1885-1900 179.6 284.7 58.4
16 de Octubre (Chubut) .. 1896-1900 453.7 622.4 338.1
Staten Island ............... 1886-93 & 1899-1900 1372.1 1491.7:1186.2
The following tables show the quantity of rain that fell in Bue-
nos Aires and C6rdoba, respectively, for the years 1892 to 1900 in
the different seasons of the year, in milimetres.


Year.

1892
1893
1894
1895
1896
1897
1898
1899
J900


Summer.

220
165
78
183
322
235
375.7
275
269.1


BUENOS AIRES

Autumn. Winter.


238
102
180
324
118
298
253.3
417.5
751


91
150
148
272
157
80
169.3
190.7
447.2


Spring.

150
179
392
566
237
204
204
240.8
536.7


Total.

699
596
798
1.345
834
817
1002.3
1124
2004







THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


CORDOBA

Year. Summer. Autumn. Winter. Spring. Total.

1892 348.6 165.8 51.9 318.2 884.5
1893 277.8 214.9 6.5 197.8 697.0
1894 376.8 205.3 50.2 133.7 766.0
1895 261.7 99.7 17.2 79.5 458.1
1896 288.8 175.0 14.9 198.4 677.1
1897 487.6 100.7 24.9 215.1 828.3
1898 349.1 156.4 14.3 114.0 633.8
1899 483.4 118.7 30.4 108.1 740.6
1900 213.1 154.6 80.5 165.3 613.5


In regard to the intensity of the rainfall in the different sections
of the country, marked differences are found, especially in the
character of the rains which fall near the Atlantic coast and the
region bordering on the great river system, as compared with
those of the interior. In the regions where the annual precipita-
tions are greatest the rain as a rule falls more slowly and is of long-
er duration.
In the Mediterranean and some parts of the Andine region
during spring and summer, short and heavy rainfalls are frequent,
accompanied by thunder and lightning and occasionally by hail.
For example: in the City of Salta, on the 23rd. of December 1889,
42 mm. of rain tell in 39 minutes; in C6rdoba, in the afternoon of
November 2nd. 1890, 23mm. were registered in 14 minutes; and on
the 18th. of December of the same year 27.3 mm. fell between
5.46 p. m. and 5.58 p. m. or at the rate of 99 and 136 mm. per hour
respectively. The heaviest rain recorded in the Republic occurred
in Rosario on the morning of 26th. March 1880, when 254 mm. were
registered between 5 and 9 a. m. 80 mm. of which fell in 30 min-
utes. All of these storms were accompanied by severe thunder and
lightning, and in Salta and Rosario by hail.
The following shows the number of days in the year, in which
the rain has fallen in various parts of the country:-
Asunei6n 88; Corrientes 48; Concordia 56; ParanA 50; Rosario 77;
Buenos Aires 59; Salado 65; Tandil 82; Bahia Blanca 53; Salta 46;
'TucumAn 65; Santiago del Estero 41; Catamarca 33; La Rioja 38;
-Crdoba 70; San Juan 15; Mendoza 42; San Luis 59; Chubut 67;
Staten Island 251.
The changes in the extreme temperature figures, are due to recent
observations made at new stations established in the Territory of
Santa Cruz, as also is the note of the excessive rainfall in Neu-
quen. These changes represent the latest observations, so far,
.not officially published.







THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


PROVINCES OF THE REPUBLIC


The Argentine Republic contains fourteen Provinces comprising
those of Buenos Aires, Santa F6, Entre Rios, Corrientes, C6rdoba,
San Luis, Santiago del Estero, Mendoza, San Juan, Rioja, Cata-
marca, Tucuman, Salta and Jujuy. Detailed references to the agri-
culture, climate, industries and other special features of these
Provinces, are dealt with under the respective headings of the sub-
ject matter. The views of the Provinces and Territories are re-
produced from photographs by Mr. E. C. Moody, Buenos Aires.



PROVINCE OF BUENOS AIRES


SITUATION. Buenos Aires is one of the littoral provinces situated
on the River Plate and the Atlantic Ocean between 330 15' and 410
South latitude, and 560 41' and 630 22' West longitude.
LIMITs. To the north, the provinces of C6rdoba, Santa F6 and
part of Entre Rios; to the east, the Parana-Guazi (which separ-
ates it from Entre Rios), the River Plate and the Atlantic Ocean; to
the south, the same ocean and a part of the Rio Negro; and to the
west, a part of this last territory and that of the Pampa.
AREA. 305,121 square kilometres.
POPULATION. About 1,200,000 inhabitants.
GENERAL FEATURES. The Province of Buenos Aires belongs to,
the region of the Pampa and is an immense plain with a gentle
incline towards the sea. The monotony of this plain is broken by
medanos or movable sand hills by slight undulations to the north
of the Rio Salado and by two chains of sierras in the south. One
of these chains extends north east from Cape Corrientes as far as
the centre of the province, and the second, smaller in size, lies to
the south west of the first mentioned range. They are covered by
hardy and abundant grasses. Trees are chiefly to be found in the
vicinity of the Delta, of the River Plate, of the Salado, and of the
Atlantic Ocean; thus frequently no standing vegetation is visible
for leagues, but the solitary "ombfi" or the plantations that
surround the dwelling houses; yet there are streams and lagoons
and meadows in infinite abundance with pasture lands such as
have made this fair province the richest of the Republic. The length
of the coast, counting from the Arroyo del Medio is more than
2,000 kilometres, which, though regular in general outline, includes-
numerous points, capes, harbours, bays and creeks.











lip, -_ -A
1 ^_- "" '





_T 4'T_
______ I


pitiL INC I

n 1yrar~







THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


OROGRAPHY. The sierras of this province form what is some-
what loosely called the South Argentine system. It is composed of
two distinct ranges whose highest summits have an altitude of 300
to 400 metres. The sierras of the first range run from Cape Cor-
rientes, near Mar del Plata in a direction south east to north
east as far as the partido or department of Olavarria. Locally
they are known under many designations such as the sierra de los
Padres, del Junco, de La Vigilancia, del Volcan, del Tandil, Tan-
dileofit, de los Huesos, del Azul, Chica and Quillalauquen, but
generally they are all called the sierras of Tandil. The second
range is situated some 40 leagues South West of the first, and is
composed of the sierras of La Ventana, Pillahuinc6 and Curruma-
lan, with elevations ranging from a little more than 400 to 1,000
metres, the highest point being the Sierra de la Ventana. In all
these sierras vegetation exists on the high table-lands. The slopes
on the second group are less precipitous than those of the first.
HYDROGRAPHY. The hydrography of the province is of the
greatest importance, not only on account of the large number of
rivers and streams by which it is intersected, but also from the
numerous lagoons and watered meadows in which many of the
former rise and disappear, For the most part, the water courses
are of small volume, and run in shallow channels, but being fed
principally from rainfall they are apt to overflow in winter and to
dry up in summer. Not one of them is navigable but they -render
incalculable service to the pastoral and agricultural industries. The
three systems or basins of importance are those of the Rio Salado,
the Northern, or Parana and River Plate, and that of the Atlantic.
Into the Northern Basin flow the Arroyo del Medio forming the
boundary with the Province of Santa F6, the Ramallo, the Arreci-
fes, (formed by the Pergamino and the Rojas) the Areco, the Lujan,
(into which flows the Rio de las Conchas), the Riachuelo or Matan-
zas (partly navigable), the Samboromb6n and the Salado del Sud,
(the largest river in the province). The Salado has its source in the
north west of the province in the lagoons of Corzo, Mar Chiquita,
Chaliar and Gomez and crosses it from north east to south east
in a serpentine course through a bed of little depth, for a distance
of about 700 kilometres until it falls into the inlet of San Borom-
bon. Its mouth is obstructed by a formidable bar with the result,
that often, the river, 25 kilometres higher up, is subject to frequent
inundations, being unable during heavy rains to contain the great
volume of water from the many streams and rivulets which empty
into it, especially from the right bank.
Innumerable lagoons, as may be seen by the map, are to be
found throughout the province. The points and bluffs on the
coast are numerous and there are two important capes-San Anto-
nio and Corrientes. Of the bays, the principal are Bahia Blanca
and San Bias, and of the inlets, Barragan and Samborombon.
PROVINCIAL PORTS. There are several on the Parana and the





THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


I i-





MOLE OF SOUTHERN RAILWAY AT BAHIA BLANCA








THE BEACH AT MAR DEL PLATA








FERRY ACROSS RIVER QUEQUEN, NECOCIIEA








THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK 37

River Plate, such as San Nicolas, San Pedro, Baradero, Zarate,
Campana, Ensenada, and Magdalena. Tuyu, Mar del Plata, Ne-
cochea and Bahia Blanca are on the Atlantic Ocean, and there is
one, Carmen de Patagones, on the Rio Negro. On some points of
the coast lighthouses have been erected visible like that of Mogo-
tes for a distance of 20 miles. In one or two places light-ships
are also in use.
CLIMATE. The Province of Buenos Aires owing to its geogra-
phical position, the configuration of its ground, allowing free circu-
lation of the winds, and to its proximity to the sea, possesses a
fresher and more agreeable climate than that of the other Argentine
provinces. The zone that lies to the south of the Salado is natu-
rally cooler than that to the north, but, in both, the climate is
salubrious. The rains, frequent in winter are irregular in summer,
when storms not uncommonly occur, in some of the cases unattend-
ed by rain. These storms are generally accompanied by the violent
wind from the south west called the Pampero which sometimes
carries along with it dense clouds of fine dust. From the north also
the wind often blows with strength, while, on the other hand, the
sea breezes, as a rule, are mild and gentle.
PRODUCTS. In point of wealth the Province of Buenos Aires
occupies the first place in the Republic, as it also does in every
branch of pastoral industry, owning about three fifths of the total
number of cattle and sheep in the country. In agriculture it ranks
next to Santa F6. The returns from this province indicate the
existence of some 55 millions of sheep and 7 millions head of
cattle, besides large numbers of horses, goats, mules, and asses,
making a grand total of something over 70 millions and a half. In
regard to cattle and sheep, the native breeds are constantly refined
by importation of the best foreign stock. The greater part of the
estancias are situated in the central and southern parts of the
province where the richest pasture is found. There are also
hundreds of thousands of ostriches and numberless kinds of
gallinaceous and other birds. Wild animals were formerly abundant,
but their number is becoming sensibly diminished with the
settlements and occupation of the Pampa. The province is rich
in grasses, the great basis of its pastoral activity; but of late years,
especially in the north and west, wonderful advances have been
made in agriculture the soil being admirably suited for the cultivation
of maize, wheat, barley, and linseed. Lucerne (alfalfa), fruit, and
vegetables are grown on a large scale. The cultivation of the vine
has been lately tried with favorable results, particularly in the
northern portions of the province. On the coast and in the
neighbourhood of the Parana large plantations of willows, acacias,
poplars and talas are to be met with.
Agriculture in this province, as also in Santa Fe, has a terrible
enemy to contend against in the droughts and locusts, which from
time to time, are the cause of serious injury to the colonist.








THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


The mineral products of the province are poor. Lime, slate,
granite, and salt are met with in unimportant quantities, but the
marbles of Azul are well known whilst the quarries of Olavarria
have long been worked with good results. There are also some salt
deposits in the vicinity of Bahia Blanca.
INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE. The leading industries are those
connected with sheep and cattle and with agriculture; but there
are numerous manufacturing establishments of all descriptions to
be found in the province, one of the most important being a large
paper mill in Zhrate. The commercial movement consists in the
exportation of live cattle and sheep, wool, hides, skins, salt and
frozen meat, and in short of all pastoral and agricultural products;
and in the importation from abroad of machinery, soft goods,
provisions, fancy articles etc. The province of Buenos Aires
constitutes with those of Santa Fe and Entre Rios the granary of
the Republic. It possesses a wide, and in many places, picturesque
coastline, a soil fertile in almost every part, a railway system of the
greatest importance, connecting hundreds of rapidly increasing
towns and villages, some of them like Chivilcoy, Mercedes, San
Nicolas, Dolores, Nueve de Julio, Azul, Mar del Plata, Necochea
and Bahia Blanca, destined to grow into large cities. Its one million
inhabitants, practically the fifth part of the population of the
Republic, will easily be doubled as soon as its fertile lands are taken
possession of by the agriculturist.
PRINCIPAL TOWNS. La Plata, since 1882 the capital of the
province, was founded by its first governor, Dr. Dardo Rocha, and
is situated on a high ground behind the Ensenada de Barragan,
where an important port has been constructed available for foreign
shipping. It is a handsome modern city, with spacious streets
and boulevards and diagonal avenues 30 metres wide, converging
to a central point. It is well paved and lighted and provided with
water-works, tramways, telegraphs, telephones and other convenien-
ces. A park or "Bosque" thickly planted with Eucalyptus trees
adjoins the city. Some of the plazas or squares are well laid out
and the many public buildings are such as would attract attention
in any European city. The museum contains an especially fine
collection of antidiluvian specimens. There are frequent daily
trains to the Federal Capital, a distance of about 50 kilometres.
The population is estimated at 65,000. Other towns of importance
include San Nicolas de los Arroyos, on the Parant with upwards
of 18,000 inhabitants. This is a river port and the judicial cen-
tre for the Northern department. The streets are paved and
furnished with tramways, and there are water works and electric
light. Mercedes, a town of pleasing appearance the seat of
authority for the central departments. It has paved streets, a
Normal School, Banks, Prison, etc. Population 12,000. Chivilcoy,
with 16,000 inhabitants, an important agricultural and commercial
centre with weather works, gas, electric light, and several noti-








THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


ceable plazas and squares. Dolores, population 8,000; the judicial
centre of the Southern Departments has a mixed Normal School,
a Prison, Banks, Tramways, etc., and is a commercial point of
some importance. Azul in the South, with 9,000 inhabitants
carries a considerable trade. Bahia Blanca, is situated at the head
of the bay of the same name, near Puerto Belgrano, the national
military port. Bahia Blanca is the principal port in the South
and has a great commercial future. Present population 10,000.
Barracas Al Sud with 12,000 inhabitants has many industrial
establishments. Other towns are Lujan, where is the Sanctuary
of the Virgin of that name, much frequented by pilgrims; Mar del
Plata, a sea bathing resort, always crowded in the summer season.
Chascomus, a fair sized town, skirted by a large lagoon noted for
its fish. Tandil, prettily situated near the famous rocking stone.
Necochea, a sea-side place with a better beach than Mar del Plata
but less frequented, owing to its distance, about three miles fronJ
the sea; whilst, as summer resorts, may be mentioned the Tigr
Campana, San Isidro, San Fernando, San Martin, Adrogue, Lomas
de Zamora, Quilmes and Mor6n.
COMMUNICATIONS. The Province of Buenos Aires is crossed
in all directions by a net work of railways which converge in the
Federal Capital. They connect with the other provinces of the
Republic and with General Acha and Toay in the Territory of La
Pampa. A line has also been constructed from Bahia Blanca to
Neuquen passing by Choele-Choele.


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LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY, LA PLATA







THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


PROVINCE OF ENTIRE RIOS


SITUATION. This province belongs to the littoral group and
occupies the southern portion of the so-called Argentine Mesopo-
tamia. It is situated between the degrees 300 7' and 340 20' of
South latitude and 570 50' and 60 40' West longitude. The
limits in the north, are the streams (arroyos) Guayquirar6 and
Mocoreth which separate it from Corrientes; to the east, the River
Uruguay, which separates it from the Republic of that name; to,
the south, the River Parana, which separates it from Buenos Aires;
and to the west, the same river which forms the boundary with
Santa Fe. As will be seen it is completely surrounded by rivers
and from this circumstance it derives the name of Entre Rios.
The population is about 354,000.
AREA. The area of the province is 74,751 square kilometres.
GENERAL FEATURES. This province, which is called the gar-
den of the littoral, lies between the largest water courses of the
Republic, with a slightly undulating surface crossed and fertilised
in all directions by innumerable rivers and streams. The vegeta-
tion of Entre Rios is one of the richest description and millions
of head of cattle find sustenance thereon. In all parts, water is
found in abundance, with rich pastures and good agricultural
land. The banks on both rivers are exceedingly picturesque. In
the north-west portion extending over nearly the fifth part of the
province, is a large forest, the selva de Montiel, rich in building
timber of various descriptions.
OROGRAPHY. Entre Rios has no elevations of importance but
there are two small chains of hills known as cuchillas, which star-
ting together from a point about midway in the line of boundary
with Corrientes, become separated and run from north to south
in a direction nearly parallel with each other; the eastern chain is
known as the "Cuchilla Grande", that on the west as the "Cuchi-
Ila de Montiel". .The highest altitude is about 80 metres. From
these chains and their ramifications spring almost all the rivers
and streams which traverse the province and they form the water-
sheds of three systems, that of the Uruguay to the east, of the Gua-
leguay in the centre, and of the Paranh to the south and west.
HYDROGRAPHY. The rivers belonging to the system of the River
Plate and emptying themselves directly into the Parana, Uruguay,
or Gualeguay, are of no great length. Only those mentioned are
navigable, having a depth of 4 metres and upwards. The Parana
has an average width, in the province, of 7 kilometres and the
Uruguay of 15 kilometres. They are navigable by vessels draw-
ing 10 and even 12 feet. The principal affluents of the Parana
in the province, taking them from north to south, are the Guay-

















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THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


quirar6, (with its affluents the Basualdo), the Feliciano, the Her-
nandarias, the Conchas, (with its affluents the Jala, Quebracho and
Espinillo), the Dol, the Nogoya, the C16 and the Gualeguay This
last which divides the province into two parts, running from north
to south, receives on its left bank many affluents, such as the Ro-
bledo, Chaiiar, CurupA, Villaguay Grande and others, and on the
right bank the Ortiz, Sauce Luna, Mojones, Tigre, Raices and
Obispo. The principal affluents of the Uruguay are, the Mandisovi
Chico, the Mocoreth (with the Juncas), the Mandisovi Grande, the
Grande, Gualeguaycito, the Palma, Urquiza, and the Gualeguay-
chil, which is the principal river of the province after the Guale-
guay. The climate is temperate and healthy and the rains are
frequent.
PRODUCTS. A pastoral province, it ranks second, containing
about ten millions head of cattle, its agricultural products including
maize, wheat, barley, linseed vines, lucerne, olives, and all kinds
of fruit trees and vegetables. Many useful or medicinal plants are
also indigenous to the province, and there are also to be found a
large variety of woods.
INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE. Cattle breeding is the chief indus-
try, but much attention is paid to agriculture, and there are numer-
ous colonies, amongst which, may be mentioned, Villa Urquiza,
Alvear, Villa Libertad, San Jos6, and some of the Hirsch Colo-
nies. Entre Rios exports wool, hides, salted meat, and other pro-
ducts from its saladeros and tanneries, and lime and gypsum from
its quarries. The usual manufactured articles are imported.
PRINCIPAL TOWNS. The capital is Parani, with upwards of
25,000 inhabitants and close to it is the ocean port of the province
at Bajada Grande on the Entre Rios Railway. Parana is built on
high ground on the left bank of the Parana, and is the residence of
the provincial authorities, and the seat of a bishopric. There is
constant communication with Santa Fe on the other side of the
river. It was founded in 1730 by the Spaniards and from 1853 to
1861 was the capital of the Argentine Confederation. It is a town
that has made much progress, and has its own waterworks, gas-
works, and electric light stations with many public buildings and
institutions. Other important centres are Concepci6n del Uru-
guay with 9,000 inhabitants, until 1882 the capital of Entre Rios;
(in the National College here many famous Argentines received
their education). Concordia with 15,000 inhabitants, Gualeguay-
chii, Col6n, with important saladeros, La Paz, Diamante, Victoria,
Gualeguay, Rosario de Tala, Villaguay and NogoyA.
COMMUNICATIONS. The Entre Rios Railways contain the follow-
ing main line and branches:--Bajada Grande (Parana) to Con-
cepci6n del Uruguay, Nogoy- to Victoria, Tala to Puerto Ruiz,
Basalvibaso to Gualeguaychil, Soli to MaciA, and Villaguay to
Concordia, joining up the provinces of Entre Rios and Corrientes.








THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


PROVINCE OF CORRIENTES


SITUATION. A littoral province forming part of the Argentine
Mesopotamia. It is comprised within the degrees of 550 45' and
590 40' South latitude and 270 20' and 300 40' West latitude.
LInITS. On the north it is bounded by the River Parana which
separates it from the Republic of Paraguay; on the north east by
the territory of Misiones, from which it is separated by the streams
Itacumbe and Chimiray; to the east by Brazil, separated by the
River Uruguay; to the south from Entre Rios separated by the
River Guayquirar6, and the arroyos Basualdo, Tunas and MocoretA;
and to the west by Santa Fe and the Chaco from which it is sepa-
rated by the Parana.
AREA. 84,402 square kilometres.
POPULATION. 288,000.
GENERAL FEATURES. These vary in different localities. The
south of the province is simply a continuation of the Province of
Entre Rios with the same undulations, the same high, well-watered
pasture lands, and in the south-west, the dense forest of Payubre
a continuation of the forest of Montiel in Entre Rios. Advancing
northward the land dips, inducing the formation of countless
broad and permanent lagoons and marshes. Here the climate is
warmer and vegetation profuse. To the north east the undulating
character of the land reappears andfontinues as far as Misiones,
from whose mountain system several picturesque "Cuchillas" or
ranges penetrate into Correntine territory. The province also
presents the aspect of a plain gently inclined towards the east,
with watery depressions to the north, terminated in the north-east
by a group of hills passing into Misiones. It is a well-watered dis-
trict specially adapted for cattle raising. In the eastern portion of
the province in the strip of land between the swamps 6f IberA and
the Rio Uruguay, are the "Malezales" thickly covered with conical
ant-hills a metre and upwards in height, which render transit
extremely difficult.
OROGRAPHY. With the exception of the Tres Cerros in the
department of La Cruz and of the small ranges in the north east,
Corrientes possesses no mountains worthy of mention.
HYDROGRAPHY. It is not the magnitude or navigability of the
watercourses of Corrientes that claim attention, but their influence
on the condition of the soil. An infinite number of rivers and
streams with great lagoons and swamps cover a considerable part
of the province, and do the work of fertilization. The rivers flow
east and west into the Uruguay and Parana respectively. Of these
the most important are, into the Uruguay, from south to north:
the Mocoreta, the Mirifiay, the Aguapey, and the Chimiray. Into








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THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


the Parana, counting from north to south, the Riachuelo, the Em-
pedrado, the San Lorenzo, the San Ambrosio, Santa Lucia, the Cor-
rientes and the Guayquirar6. Of the lagoons the most remarkable
are Ibera (bright water) to the north east, and Maloya to the
north west. The first, some 22,000 square kilometres in extent,
including the surrounding swamps, is a vast basin discharging its
surplus waters into the rivers Corrientes and Miriiay and into the
Parana and Uruguay respectively. It is remarkable that the level
of its waters rises and falls with that of the Parana, a coincidence
which gives rise to the supposition that, notwithstanding the
rocky, and, in places, argillacious barrier above ground, some sub-
terranean communication exists between the two. The navigation
on the Ibera is rendered difficult and access to its multitude of
islands almost impossible by the infinity of aquatic plants, trees and
creepers interlaced in such a manner, that no one, it is said has
succeeded in penetrating this tangled wilderness of islands and
plants. Crocodiles, tigers, boas, myriads of birds and insects, even
wild cattle live there quite unmolested, and yet, so the chronicles of
the Conquest record, these islands were once the home of a tribe
of Indians, called the Caracaras, who were dislodged by the
Spaniards. The belief obtains among the ignorant classes that this
strange region is peopled by mysterious beings, whose sighs and
laments are audible by night; but these are doubtless nothing more
than the natural sounds produced by the birds, serpents, and rep-
tiles, so abundant there. The lights said to be visible and magnified
by reports, are also the effect of small phosphorescent insects so
numerous in swampy places. The other lagoon called Maloya, 15
leagues from the city of Corrientes, is of large extent and formed
of muddy swamps. It is the source of several streams which flow
into the Paranh.
CLIMATE. Notwithstanding its proximity to the tropics, the
physical peculiarities of the province, the free circulation of the
winds and the evaporation from its numerous waters, tend to
modify the summer heat. The winters are generally dry andmild.
Rain falls regularly in spring and autumn; but droughts are rare,
owing to the large number of lagoons and flooded lands.
PRODUCTS. .In animal production, Corrientes takes a high
position, especially as regards cattle and horses, the climate not
being suitable for sheep. In vegetable substances there is an abun-
dance of hard woods, besides the usual products of temperate and
tropical climates such as sugar-cane, tobacco, cotton, maize, yerba,
oranges, etc., while the almost unexplored forest of Payubre is full
of vegetable wealth.
INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE. In the export of timber, hides and
.salted meat, the distillation of spirit, and in the manufacture of
cotton fabrics there is abundant scope for increased activity.
PRINCIPAL TOWNS. Corrientes, the capital of the province,
stands on the left bank of the Parana, 40 kilometres south of its








THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


junction with the Paraguay. It is an important centre of river
navigation, being accessible during the greater part of the year to
vessels drawing up to 4 metres of water. It was founded by Don
Alonso de Vera y Aragon on the 3rd. of April 1588, and has a po-
pulation of about 17,000. As a commercial centre it is growing in
importance, but its buildings for the most part are poor and anti-
quated, although some modern houses have been recently erected.
It possesses the usual public edifices and two or three historical
monuments. Next in importance, is Goya, with 7,000 inhabitants,
situated on the Uruguay, founded in 1807, and by its position the
commercial and industrial centre of the south of the province. The
cheeses of Goya are consumed throughout the Republic. Monte
Caseros with about 4,000 inhabitants is the terminus of the East
Argentine Railway, and the starting point of the North East Argen-
tine Railway which extends as far as the capital. It is the point se-
lected by estancieros to pass their cattle over to Brazil. Esquina,
population, 3,000, on the Parani, at the mouth of the river Corrien-
tes, transacts a considerable trade in firewood and timber from the
adjoining forest of Payubre. Among the smaller towns are: Empe-
drado, Mercedes, Lavalle (near which is the village of Santa Lucia,
an old Jesuit mission), Paso de los Libres, with a trade in wood,
yerba, etc. and Curuzfi Cuatii, founded by Belgrano, with other
departmental capitals.
With the exception of the fluvial communications afforded by the
Parana and Uruguay, and, to some extent, by one or two of the pro-
vincial rivers, the means of transit in Corrientes are very deficient,
but of late years the East Argentine Railway from Concordia to
Monte Caseros with a short branch to Ceibo in Entre Rios and
another somewhat larger to Paso de los Libres, and the North East
Argentine Railway, from Monte Caseros to the Capital, have done
incalculable service in promoting the development of the province.


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THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


PROVINCE OF SANTA FE


SITUATION. One of the group of littoral provinces contained
between the degrees 590 and 620 50'. West longitude, and 280 and
300 25, South latitude.
LIMITS. To the north, the Territory of the Chaco; to the east,
the River Parana, which separates it from Entre Rios and Corrien-
tes; to the south, the Province of Buenos-Aires, from which it is
separated in part by the Arroyo del Medio; to the west, C6rdoba
and Santiago del Estero, the boundary being, in part, the Arroyo
,de las Tortugas, the Caiiada de San Antonio and the Collados de
los Altos.
AREA. 131,906 square kilometres.
POPULATION. 576,000.
GENERAL FEATURES. Santa Fe is a vast and almost uniform plain,
undulating slightly in the neighbourhood of Rosario, and with
some irregular elevations known as "Los Altos" on the frontier of
Santiago. The province may be divided into two distinct regions,
the north and the south. The first is thickly wooded, the trees
becoming more dense and increasing in size in the direction of the
north. This region is crossed in all directions by streams and
gullies, which either join, or flow on to the Parana.
The southern region is a rich plain, with scarcely a tree upon it,
-save here and there, the solitary "Omba" of the Pampa, but the
grasses are rich and abundant, and the soil excellent, both for
agricultural and pastoral pursuits. A journey through the nume-
rous agricultural colonies of the province reveals the pleasing
change which the hand of industry can effect in the appearance of
a country. According to the season the eye will rest for leagues
on a sea of waving verdure, formed by the young wheat, or, on a
vast expanse of golden ears bowing to the breeze, and giving pro-
mise of abundant harvest.
HYDROGRAPHY. The three principal rivers of Santa F6 are the
Parana, the Salado or Juramento, and the Carcarafii, all belonging
to the system of the River Plate. The Parana traverses the province
on its eastern frontier for a distance of 700 kilometres. Owing
to the lowness of the ground and its flat character, it is split up
into numerous branches which form islands of all dimensions and
shapes covered with exuberant vegetation. Of these branches the
principal are the Parani-Mini, the San Javier, the Colastin6, the
Santa Fe, and its continuation the Coronda. The ParanA is naviga-
:ble in all seasons, and of its branches the San Javier, but only by
small craft, and as far as the Colony of the same name. The Salado
which comes down from Salta crosses the province with a bend







THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


from north-west to south-east and diverges into the channel of
Santa F6. Many lagoons and swamps are formed along its banks.
The Carcarafh rises in C6rdoba and running from west to
east and then to the north, flows into the Parana jointly with
the Coronda. Both rivers might be rendered navigable by canali-
zation.
The principal ports on the Paranr from North to South are
Ocampo, Reconquista, San Javier, Helvecia, Santa Rosa, San
Jose, Colastin6, Santa Fe, Coronda, Puerto G6mez, San Lorenzo,
Rosario, and Villa Constitucion. The climate of Santa Fe, like
that of Entre Rios, is exceedingly mild and healthy. Frosts are
rare and of short duration; the rains are abundant, but occasional,
and the winds, at all seasons, moderate.
PRODUCTS. Santa Fe is one of the richest provincesof the Re-
public due chiefly to the fertility of its soil and the abundance
and variety of its vegetable products. It is the agricultural region
par excellence of the country, and possesses some 350 colonies,
which find employment for an ever-increasing body of immigrants.
Wheat, maize linseed, barley, alfalfa, groundnuts, (mani), rice,
tobacco, sugar cane, fruit trees, vegetables, etc., are all cultivated.
The forests in the north are rich in hard woods of all kinds, and
both coarse and refined grasses cover large portions of the south
tern districts. As a pastoral province it occupies the third place,
special attention being given to sheep.
INDUSTRIES AND COMMERCE. The principal industries are pas-
toral and agricultural. Flour-mills, saw-mills, tanneries, saladeros
and produce stores exist in large numbers, besides industrial estab-
lishments and factories of all kinds, such as breweries, oil-mills,
distilleries, foundries, and a large sugar refinery. Cereals, flour,
hides, meat and wool are exported.
PRINCIPAL TOWNS. Santa F6, the capital, is situated on the Ca-
nal of the same name near the mouth of the Salado, and has a
population of 26,000. It was founded by Juan de Garay on the
15th. of November 1573. As a city it offers little of interest, but
has the usual public buildings and a town hall, famous in Argentine
history as the meeting place of the Constituent Congress of 1852
and of the Convention of 1860. There are tramways, telegraphs,
telephones and a custom house.
Rosario, with 110,000 inhabitants, is the principal port of the
province (the second of the Republic) and is advancing rapidly by
reason of its commercial spirit, and great activity. It was founded
by Francisco Godoy in 1730. It is a port of call for all vessels
navigating the Parana, and ships of large tonnage can anchor in
front of the city. Rosario contains many notable buildings of
modern construction, fine plazas,and well paved streets, water-
works, gas, electric light, tramways, theatres, schools, hospitals,
banks, clubs, etc., also a well planted Boulevard, "El Santafecino",
with a double road-way and a long central garden. There are








THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


numerous factories producing soap, candles, hats, matches, etc.,
and an important refinery which turns out sugar to the value of
more than 70 millions dollars annually. Esperanza, chief town
of the department de Las Colonias was founded in 1856 and has a
population of 10,000. It has a normal school, flour mills, distil-
leries and a branch of the National Bank. San Lorenzo, with a
population of 7,000, stands on the Parana, five leagues north from
Rosario. It is the chief town of the Department of the same name
and contains the historical convent of San Carlos, remarkable for
the victory gained there by General San Martin on the 3.rd February
1813. Other towns of some importance are San Javier, Helvecia,
Ocampo and San Jos6.
COMMUNICATIONS. The River Paranh with its branches San Javier,
Colastin6, Santa Fe and Coronda, and a vast net work of railways
connecting the Colonies with the principal centres of the province
and of the Republic. There are also various lines of city and rural
tramways, telegraphs and telephones.






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PORT OF ROSARIO







THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


PROVINCE OF CORDOBA


SITUATION. Belongs to the central group, between degrees 290
30' and 350 South latitude and 61 52' and 650 56' West longitude.
LIMITS. To the north, Santiago del Estero; to the south, the
Pampa and Buenos Aires; to the east, Santa Fe; to the west,
Catamarca, La Rioja, and San Luis.
AREA. 174,767 square kilometres.
POPULATION. 430,000.
GENERAL FEATURES. The surface is flat with a slight inclination
to the east. In the north and west of the province rise three
chains of sierras the (highest of 2,000 metres) within which are
many fertile valleys watered by numerous-rivulets and very suitable
for agriculture. In the north-west district are to be found large
salt deposits. To the north-east, the ground is low and swampy,
and the large lagoons of Mar Chiquita and Los Porongos are met
with. To the south and east the soil, although good, suffers from
the absence of water, and from the dryness of the climate.
OROGRAPHY: The sierras of this province constitute the central
system. There are three distinct ranges, the first, lying furthest to
the east, Is called the Sierra del Campo and is divided into four
sections by the rivers Primero, Segundo and Tercero; these divisions
have an elevation, at some points, of 1,000 metres. The highest
summit in the province is that of Champaqui at the junction of the
sierra Achala with that of Comechingones. It measures 2,880 metres.
HYDROGRAPHY. The rivers of C6rdoba belong to the northern
system and are fed by rains. With the exception of the Rio Ter-
cero they have no affluents. They only serve for irrigation. They
are known as the Rivers Primero, Segundo, Tercero, Cuarto and
Quinto. The rivers Primero and Segundo rise in the sierra of
Achala; and, running from west to east, almost parallel to each
other, for a distance of 50 kilometres, cut the sierra de Campo at
the points San Roque and Anisacate respectively and lose them-
selves in the swamps near Mar Chiquita. A project for the
construction of a navigable canal through the province to the
Parana was recently sanctioned by Congress.
CLIMATE. The climate is healthy, temperate, and dry. There
are frequent rains, especially in spring and summer, when the
rivers rise, often overflowing their banks.
PRODUCTS. C6rdoba ranks fourth among the pastoral provin-
ces and possesses some four million head of cattle of different
kinds. In forestry and agriculture there are woods of various des-
criptions, fruit trees, alfalfa, and cereals. The minerals, worked
on a small scale, include gold, silver, copper, lead, iron, coal, lime,
and gypsum. Marbles and salt are found in abundance.,



































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THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


INDUSTRIES AND COMMERCE. Pastoral pursuits are the most
general but the province numbers some 80 agricultural colonies.
Mining is neglected owing to the scarcity of labour. Trade
deals chiefly with the export of live stock, hides, skins, wool, lime,
cereals and preserved fruits.
PRINCIPAL TOWNS. The city of C6rdoba, the capital of the pro-
vince situated on the Rio Primero, was founded in 1573 by Don
Ger6nimo de Cabrera. It has a population of about 60,000 and is
the seat of a Bishopric, of a University, and of an Astronomical
Observatory. It possesses the usual public buildings and institu-
tions and ranks as the seventh city of the Republic. It has been
a centre of intellectual culture since the colonial epoch. The city
is supplied with water by means of a reservoir and dam constructed
on the Rio Primero, some four leagues above the city, the largest
work of the kind in South America. Power is also supplied from
it for the electric lighting of the city and the running of several
industrial establishments. Other towns are Rio Cuarto with a po-
pulation of 12,000, Villa Maria, Belle Ville, Cruz del Eje, Santa
Rosa, Cosquin and Jesus Maria.
COMMUNICATIONS. C6rdoba is traversed by various lines of
railways connecting its capital with the chief cities of the Republic.
With Rosario and the Federal capital it is connected by the Cen-
tral Argentine; with Santiago, Catamarca, Tucuman, Salta and
Jujuy by the Central del Norte; with Santa F6 by the Central de
C6rdoba; and with Cruz del Eje and Malaguefio by local lines. The
province is also crossed by the national line, the Andine, by the
Buenos Aires and Pacific, and by the Argentino del Norte. Tele-
graphs, telephones, tramways and diligences are also numerous.


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VIEW OF THE CITY OF COR OBA







THE ARGENTINE YEAR BOOK


PROVINCE OF SAN LUIS


SITUATION. It belongs to the group of central provinces and
lies between the degrees 310 54' and 36 South latitude and 64 55'
and 67" 54, West longitude.
LIMITS. To the north, La Rioja and C6rdoba; to the east,
C6rdova and the Pampa; to the south, the Pampa; to the west,
Mendoza and San Juan; the division at the former provinces being
the River Desaguadero or Salado.
AREA. 73,923 square kilometres.
POPULATION. 94,000.
GENERAL FEATURES. The northern region, generally fertile,
contains a mass of sierras of 1,500, 2000 and up to 2,220 metres,
enclosing numerous short and narrow valleys. The southern
region is a complete contrast to the former, being flat, arid, and
sterile. In the western zone is the great lake of the Bebedero,
and several swamps and saline deposits.
OROGRAPHY. This belongs chiefly to the central or C6rdoba
system. The principal group lies to the north, and bears the name
of San Luis. To the south east rise the Morro and the sierras of
Portezuela and Yulto. To the south of the sierra de la Punta in
the above group, a series of isolated hills stretch as far as the lake
of Bebedero, and another group of small sierras interrupt the plain
to the west.
HYDROGRAPHY. San Luis suffers from the paucity of its water-
courses, being traversed only by two rivers of any importance, the
Rio Quinto and the Desaguadero. The Rio Quinto rises in the
mountains of San Luis, and taking a rapid course southward, it
passes the towns of San Ignacio and Mercedes and discharges
into the lagoon Amarga to the south west of C6rdoba. The Des-
aguadero, with its source in the lagoons of Huanacache, flows from
north to south to the extreme west of the province receiving the
Tunuyan and Diamante from Mendoza. Other streams are the
Conlara, the Quines, the Chorrillos and the Nogoli. The lake of
the Bebedero is a vast saline basin to the south west of the city of
San Luis.
CLIMATE. The climate is temperate, salubrious and relatively
dry, although rain falls frequently, especially in the sierras. The
temperature in summer is often relieved by cold winds from the
west.
PRODUCTS. Cattle raising is carried on, but is handicapped by
the scarcity of water. Agriculture meets with the same difficulty
especially in the South where artificial irrigation is indispensable;
in the North there is abundant vegetation and many trees of differ-
ent kinds. It is in minerals that the wealth of San Luis exists,




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