Area and industrial development publications

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Title:
Area and industrial development publications
Physical Description:
10 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
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United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. -- Office of Industry and Commerce
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Office of Industry and Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
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Industrialization -- Bibliography -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
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federal government publication   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

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Dates or Sequential Designation:
No. 13 (Apr. 1951)-no. 22 (Apr. 1953).
General Note:
No. 13-22 issued as Business information service.
General Note:
Title from caption.

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 026322205
oclc - 10576983
Classification:
ddc - 016.33891 U47
System ID:
AA00013027:00004

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Preceded by:
Projects and publications of interest to planning and development agencies
Succeeded by:
Area and industrial development aids


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Full Text

7 RESEARCH


Business Information Service


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE
OFFICE OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE
CHARLES SAWYER, Secretary H. B. MCOY, Director



Washington, D. C. Price 15 cents January 1953


ARE A TRIAL DEVELOPMENT PUBLICATIONS

r ^(No. 21)
DEVELOPMENT DIVISION
C:r
ctor Roterus, Chief

WATER AND RY _
Water, its -an ality, is becoming more and more important as a factor in
industrial expansion ant location. The daily use of water in the new Fairless Works
of the U. S. Steel Corporation, for example, is greater than the use of the public water
supplies of metropolitan Washington. More information fortunately is becoming available
on the water resource and its industrial use.
Water Resources for Larger Industrial Centers.--The present utilization of water and
the water resources potentially available for a number of the Nation's larger industrial
centers are being studied by the U. S. Geological Survey. The areas covered include manu-
facturing concentrations of importance to defense activities, but the information present-
ed is also of value in the orderly planning for the growth of these areas. The data in-
clude volume of flow, flood and drought conditions, suspended sediment, chemical quality
and temperature characteristics of the major streams and tributaries, and the probable
yield, chemical quality and temperature characteristics of the ground-water reservoirs.
In addition, information is given on the quantities of water used and the sources of sup-
ply. The quantity and quality of public water supplies are covered also but in less de-
tail than in the circulars on industrial utility of public water supplies (see following
item on this subject).
Geological Survey Circulars: 104-Water Resources of Southeastern Bucks County, Pennsylvania, 1951, 21 pp.; 148-Yater
Resources of the Atlanta Metropolitan Area, 1951, 19 pp.; 173-Vater Resources of the Buffalo-Niagara Falls Region,
1952, 26 pp.; 174-Yater Resources of the Lake grie Shore Region in Pennsylvania, 1952, 36 pp.; 177--ater Resources
of the Mahoning River Basin, Ohio, With Special Reference to the Toungstown Area, 1952, 57 pp.; 183-Water Resources
of the Detroit Area, Michigan, 1952, 36 pp.; 216-Water Resources of the St. Louis Area, Missouri, 1952, 55 pp.;
5101-Water SuPPly of the Bouston Gulf Coast Region, 1951, 16 pp. These circulars are available free from the Geolog-
ical Survey, Washington 25, D. C.
Industrial Use of Public Water Supplies.--Industry leans heavily on public supplies
of water. Current data are now available in some detail on public water supplies in five
regions of the United States. Information relating to the chemical characteristics of
such supplies is included.: The U. S. Geological Survey will eventually issue similar re-
ports for the remaining four regions of the Nation and will combine the nine releases in a
revision of its Water-Supply Paper 658 published 20 years ago.
It is stated that in general the industrialist will choose a plant location where
soft water is available that is low in silica, non-corrosive, and free from iron and man-
ganese. Savings up to 85 percent are cited in the consumption of soap by commercial laun-
dries in some areas after treatment for hardness. Canners have found that vegetables are
toughened by cooking in hard water, whereas soft water tenderizes and gives better taste
and color to the product.- Boiler feed water requirements must be exacting to reduce re-
pair and damage to boiler tubes and keep down fuel costs.


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AREA AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT PUBLICATIONS JANUARY 1953


Geological Survey Circular 197-The Industrial Utility of Public Water Supplies in the East South Central States, 1952,
by E.W. Lohr, G. A. Billingsley, J. W. Geurin, W. L. Lamar, 69 pp.; Geological Survey Circular 203-The Industrial
Utility of Public Water Supplies in the Mountain States, 1952, by E. W. Lohr, C. S. Howard, R. T. Kiser, J. D. Hem,
H. A. Swenson, 79 pp.; Geological Survey Circular 206-The Industrial Utility of Public Water Su Olies in the West
forth-Central States, 1952, by E. W. Lohr, P. C. Benedict, H. A. Swenson, T. B. Dover, 109 pp.; Geological Survey Cir-
culars 221-The Industrial Utility of Public Water Supplies in the Vest South-Central Stales, 1952, by E. W. Lohr,
J. R. Avrett, B. Ireland, G. A. Billingaley, T. B. Dover, 123 pp.; Geological Survey Circular 232-The Industrial
Utility of Public Water Supplies in the Pacific States, 1952, by E. W. Lohr, R. T. Kiser, C. S. Howard, I. W. Walling,
89 pp. These circulars are available free from the Geological Survey, Washington 25, D. C.
First Census Coverage of Industrial Water Use Planned.-Water inquiries have been de-
veloped by the Bureau of the Census in cooperation with representatives of essentially all
applicable Federal agencies and also in cooperation with representatives of manufacturing
industries.- The results of these water inquiries--the first to be employed by Census-
will be included in the 1953 Census of Manufactures. Water use information will also be
collected in the 1953 Census of Mineral Industries. The questions asked are designed to
elicit data on total water intake (except mine water), total used in processing products,
total used for other industrial purposes, amount of water discharged (except mine water),
and the water saving involved through recirculation or reuse.
Water Pollution Control Information.-Industrial production in the United States has
increased 700 percent in the last 50 years and half of this increase has come in the last
10 years. This is one of the factors complicating the water pollution control problem,
according to a 12-page statement by Leonard B. Dworsky, Senior Sanitary Engineer, U. S.
Public Health Service, supplemented by many charts, showing the rise of the national pol-
lution problem over the half-century.. This presentation shows that after 50 years of work
on the problem we have more people today without sewage-treatment plants than there were
back in 1900. This statement is part of hearings, now available, on a bill to extend the
duration of the water pollution control act.
Gxtention of Water Pollution Control Act Yo. 82-14: Hearings Before the subcommittee on Rivers and Harbors of the Cow-
sittee on Public forks, House of Representatives, 82nd Congress, Second Session, on H. R. 6856, April 8 and May 20,
1952. Copies are available from the Committee on Public Works, House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. 85 pp. Free.

WATER LAW IN THE WESTERN STATES
The extensive use of water for mining in the western States, beginning about 100
years ago, created a need for the development of a system of title to the water in surface
streams, adapted to the arid conditions in those States, according to a recent article.
The customs developed by the early western miners became the principles of the system of
appropriation rights now so thoroughly established in the arid areas of the United States.
The appropriation system, whereby title to the use of water is obtained under a procedure
which is separate from the acquirement of title to the land on which the water is to be
used, contrasts with the riparian system brought over from England by early settlers in
the humid eastern States. Under the latter, water rights are inherent in the land and no
separate procedure is required to secure rights to the use of water.
Water Law in the United States With Particular Reference to the Western States, by S. T. Harding. A 6-page article
appearing in the September, 1952 issue of Civil engineer, Easton, Pa. 50 cents per copy.

MINERAL RESOURCES ATLAS OF THE WORLD

A world atlas of mineral resources now available will be of interest to all those
concerned with the regional, national and international aspects of the subject. This col-
laborative work of the University of Maryland and the U. S. Bureau of Mines emphasizes
mineral deposits presently exploited and likely to play an important role in the near fu-
ture.' Twenty-nine commodities are covered.
Maps and graphs show salient features of the geographical distribution of mineral de-
posits and mineral production, and many special maps show major deposits in considerable
detail. The text reviews succinctly the most important technical factors that enter into
the exploitation of each mineral, the basic processing methods involved, the reserve situ-
ation, nationality of control, and principal uses of the mineral. Preparatory work on
this atlas showed available basic data on so-called "known" economic mineral deposits of
the world to be very incomplete.; Although admitting that a complete inventory of these
deposits is not yet available, the present work makes a notable contribution in that di-
rection.
The Mineral Resources of the World, by William Van Royen and Oliver Bowles, in collaboration with Elmer W. Person, is
published for the University of Maryland by Prentice-Hall, Inc., 70 Fifth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 1952. Page size
12 1/4" x 15 1/4". 181 pp. $10.75.
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AREA AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT PUBLICATIONS


CENSUS TO MEASURE INDUSTRIAL CONSUMPTION OF MATERIALS
Because of the increasing recognition of the value of materials-consumption statis-
tics in indicating the availability of materials at various stages of processing and in
throwing light on the market for manufactured products, the 1953 Census of Manufactures
will place greater emphasis on obtaining figures on important inputs into important indus-
tries. This specific coverage approach will be directed toward measuring the most impor-
tant material flows throughout the manufacturing economy. Emphasis will be placed on ma-
terials with large dollar volume, on collection costs and reportability, and on the stra-
tegic importance of the material and its relation to those materials currently under dis-
tribution control under the Defense Production Act.

ASBESTOS SURVEY
The greatest asbestos-products industry in the world has been developed in the United
States under conditions of overwhelming dependence upon foreign supplies of raw asbestos,
according to a study made by the Bureau of Mines under the sponsorship of the National Se-
curity Resources Board. One of the arresting statements is that there is no known substi-
tute for asbestos used as brake lining and clutch facings of automobiles, trucks, or other
mobile equipment used in peace or war; hence, a shortage of this commodity would immobi-
lize highway transport to a corresponding degree. The subjects covered include varieties
and composition of asbestos, deposits, mining and milling methods, grading and classifica-
tion, world production and reserves, international trade, marketing, substitutes, uses and
requirements of use.
1950 Materials Survey: Asbestos is for sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office,
Washington 25, D. C. 1952. 95 pp. $1.75.

BETTER POPULATION PROJECTIONS FOR AREAS AND COMMUNITIES
A comprehensive up-to-date manual is now available on making population projections
for regions, States, areas, and communities. It describes the uses, problems, and factors
involved. The relative advantages and weaknesses of various methods are pointed out; and
step-by-step procedures are set forth for making projections, including illustrative exam-
ples and sample work sheets.
Better Population Forecasting for Areas and Cosmmunities, by Van Beuren Stanbery, is published as Domestic Commerce
Series No. 32 of the U.S. Department of Coamerce and is for sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government
Printing Office, Washington 25, D.C. 1952. 80 pp. 25 cents.

POPULATION PROJECTIONS FOR NEW ENGLAND-NEW YORK AREA
The New England-New York area of seven States may look forward to a population growth
of about 4,600,000 by 1975 or a 19 percent increase over the 1950 population, according to
estimates of the U. S. Department of Commerce in a report prepared for use by the New
England-New York Inter-Agency Committee. The projections indicate that the population of
the New England portion of the area will increase during the quarter century by about
1,666,000 persons or 18 percent over the 1950 population. Projections for individual
States are:


Percent
State 1950 1975 increase

Connecticut.............. 2,007,280 2,575,000 28
Maine.................... 913,774 1,064,000 16
Massachusetts........... 4,690,514 5,412,000 15
New Hampshire............ 533,242 624,000 17
New York................. 14,830,192 17,798,000 20
Rhode Island............. 791,896 905,000 14
Vermon t................. 377,747 407,000 8


Business Information Service: Population Forecasts of the New Rngland-lew Tork Area, by David S. Campbell and David
Brown of the Area Development Division, is available from the Sales 'and Distribution Division, U. S. Department of Com-
merce, Washington 25, D. C. 1952. 13 pp. 25 cents.


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AREA AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT PUBLICATIONS


ESTIMATING CURRENT POPULATIONS OF CENSUS TRACTS
As the population of individual census tracts often increases with great rapidity and
with little regard to trends in other tracts or the city as a whole, current population
estimates at the census tract level are a necessary and basic tool of administrators, so-
cial scientists, public health workers, and city planners. Two useful methods of making
such estimates-based on building permits and land use maps-are described in a recent
magazine article. While both methods appear to give reasonably accurate population esti-
mates at the census tract level, the land-use estimates err on the low side and those
based on permit data on the high side. Other sources-such as school enrollments, city
directories, utility data, post office estimates, voting lists, and birth and death rec-
ords-are indicated to be less reliable, whereas purely mathematical techniques are still
less promising.
"Estimating Current Populations of Census tracts," by Robert C. Schmitt, is an article reprinted from the September-
October 1952 issue of Sociology and Social Research, published by the University of Southern California, 3518 Univer-
sity Ave., Los Angeles 7, Calif. 4 pp. Related is the release "Population Analysis of Baall Areas" issued by the
Area Development Division of the U.S. Department of Conmerce, May 1950, and available from the Sales and Distribution
Division of that Department, Washington 25, D.C., without charge.

DISTRIBUTION OF OLDER PEOPLE
One in 12 (8.4 percent) of all civilians in the United States are 65 years old or
over and one in 10 of them live in New.York State, according to a release of the Bureau of
the Census based on its July 1, 1951, estimates. New Hampshire leads all the States in
the percentage of persons in this age group (11.1 percent) and New Mexico is at the other
end of the scale with only 5.1 percent. The proportion in California and Florida is only
8.8 percent each. The consistently high percentage in the New England States is indicated
in the table below.
States having the highest absolute number of persons 65 years of age and over and the
highest percentage of such persons in their total populations are as follows:
Number Percent
New York............... 1,319,000 New Hampshire........... 11.1
California............ 940,000 Vermont ............... 10.8
Pennsylvan ia............ 920,000 Iowa................... 10.7
Illinois.............. 787,000 Maine ................. 10.6
Ohio.................. 735,000 Missouri.... .......... 10.
Texas.................. 540,000 Massachusetts .......... 10.3
Michi gan.,............. 487,000 Nebraska............... 10.1
Massachusetts.......... 482,000
Data on all States are available without charge in a 2-page press release from the Population and Housing Division,
Attention Mrs. Bauman, Information Office, Bureau of the Census, Washington 25, D.C.

STUDY OF AMERICAN URBAN COMMUNITIES
A comprehensive approach to urban phenomena is provided in a recent work. The field
covered is so broad as to preclude detailed attention to many of the aspects of the sub-
ject, but the volume serves as an introductory textbook in the field.
American Urban Communities, by Wilbur C. Hallenbeck, is published by Harper & Brothers, 49 East 33rd St., New York 16,
N.Y. 1951. 615 pp. $6.00.

GROWTH AND DECLINE OF AMERICAN URBAN CENTERS
Urban places having populations over 10,000 increased 15.6 percent in population from
1940 to 1950 (little more than the 14.4 percent increase for the Nation).- The number of
such places increased from 1,077 to 1,262, and in 1950 their cumulative population repre-
sented 49.3 percent of the Nation's total.
Nearly half of the country's urban places of over 10,000 which showed substantial
gains were located in the South (South Atlantic, East South Central, and West South Cen-
tral States). The States of Arkansas and Oklahoma both declined in total population dur-
ing the decade, although in each a high proportion of the towns of 10,000 or more in-
creased by more than 25 percent. Annexation was an important factor in the growth of some
centers, especially in Texas where Dalla., Forth Worth, Houston, and San Antonio each in-
creased in area by 90 percent or more.
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AREA AND INDUSTRIAL DEVElOPMENT PUBLICATIONS


The experience of the Northeast is shown in sharp contrast to that of the South and
West, for one-fourth of the urban places of the New England and Middle Atlantic States de-
creased in population during the decade.
"The Rises and Declines of American Urban Ceniers During the 1940's" is an article by Albert G. Ballert, reprinted from
the August 1952 issue of Land economics; QuarterlyJournal of PZ:nring, Housing and Public Utilities, published by the
University of Wisconsin, Madison 6, Wisconsin. 9 pp.

CITY PLANNING GUIDE
A new booklet provides information to assist citizens and officials in organizing a
planning program and proposes a general pattern designed to obtain the best and most last-
ing results. Separate chapters are devoted to each of the following subjects: What city
planning is, who does it, tools for planning, and special aspects.
The discussion of tools for planning points out that failure to recognize the funda-
mental difference.between the Comprehensive or "Master Plan" and the Official Map (the
latter normally including precise locations of all legally established streets and high-
ways, parks, playgrounds, etc.) leads to much misunderstanding and confusion. The other
tools discussed are the zoning ordinance, subdivision regulation, urban redevelopment,
neighborhood conservation and rehabilitation, programming of public improvements, and pub-
lic relations. This is a cooperative job, prepared by a committee of the National Chamber
of Commerce appointed by the American Institute of Planners.
City Planning and Urban Development, published by the Construction and Civic Development Department, Chamber of Com-
merce of the United States, Washington 6, D.C. 1952. 47 pp. 30 cents.

NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING POPULARIZED
The principles of neighborhood planning in a city are made understandable and inter-
esting to young and old through dialogue and simple graphics in a current publication.-
leghbor Plap 1fot: the City Planning Frog, by Bill Ewald and Merle Hendrickson, published by Henry Schuman, Inc., 20
East 70th St., New York 21, N. Y. 1952. 56 pp. $2.50.

STUDIES OF LOCAL EFFECT OF SAVANNAH RIVER AEC PROJECT
A series of articles describing the impact on the surrounding community of the con-
struction of the Atomic Energy Commission's largest installation-near Aiken, S.C.-will
be helpful to other small communities faced by similar emergencies. The four articles
cover: (1) manpower, wages, and recruitment, (2) unionization and industrial relations,
(3) living conditions, and (4) community facilities and social changes.
The series of articles, by M. Mead Smith, appeared in the following issues of the Monthly Labor Review published by the
U.S. Department of Labor and sold by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25,
D.C. for 55 cents a copy: Part I, June 1952 issue; Part II, July 1952 issue; Part III, August 1952 issue; Part IV,
September 1952 issue. The series is combined in Bulletin No. 1100 of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, sold also by the
Superintendent of Documents. 41 pp. 25 cents.

EVALUATING CONTRIBUTION OF PORT TO ITS COMMUNITY'
The contribution of local maritime activities to the income and prosperity of Norfolk
has been measured by an analysis of the expenditures made locally by all maritime firms
during a certain period for payrolls, services, and supplies. On this basis it was found
that Norfolk's maritime industry contributes to the City's economy the equivalent of what
665 average size manufacturing plants would contribute, the average being determinedarith-
metically from Census data.
"Value of Virginia's Ports, by E.O. Jewell, General Manager, Norfolk Port Authority, appeared in the October 15, 1953
issue of lewe Letter, published by the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

EMPLOYMENT MULTIPLIER TECHNIQUE APPLIED TO WICHITA
When changes occur within a local area in the number employed in serving external
markets, changes also are expected in the number employed in industries which primarily
serve the local market, such as retail trade, personal services, and residential construc-
tion. The effect on an area's total employment resulting from a change in basic employ-
ment serving regional, national, and world markets is termed the employment multiplier.- A
recent article describes the method and result of measuring the multiplier effect on local
employment in the Wichita area arising from variations in aircraft and other export em-
ployment during different periods since 1940.
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JANUARY 1953






AREA AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT PUBLICATIONS


This analysis yields no single, simple relationship between export and local employ-
ment in the Wichita area. It is indicated that the multiplier concept is of greatest
value over fairly long periods of years and should be used with reservation for shorter
periods. With qualifications, it is concluded that the addition of a given number of
workers supplying outside markets may be expected to lead to an increase of approximately
one and one-third times as many workers engaged in serving local area markets over the
course of years.
"the sfployment Multiplier in Wichita" in an article appearing in the Monthly Review of the Federal Reserve Bank of
Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri, September 30, 1952 issue. 7 pp.

SYMPOSIUM ON AMERICAN REGIONALISM
American regionalism is discussed in a 5-part volume. Part I shows the development
and use of the concept of regionalism from its historic beginnings in the eighteenth cen-
tury to the present, both as a tool of research and as a practical force in political and
economic administration of national affairs. Part II is an account of the Old South, the
Spanish Southwest, and the Pacific Northwest, including their relations with other regions
and the Nation. Part III deals with regionalism in American culture; Part IV with region-
alism as a practical concept in development and administration of government programs (the
TVA, the Great Lakes cutover area, and the projected Missouri Valley plan), and Part V
with the limitations and promise of regionalism. The papers presented were delivered at a
symposium held at the University of Wisconsin in 1949, sponsored by a committee appointed
to administer a grant of funds from the Rockefeller Foundation. A bibliography follows
each chapter of this work.
Regionalism in America, Edited by Merrill Jensen, is published by the University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, Wisconsin
1951. 425 pp. $4.75.

RURAL TRENDS SHOWN GRAPHICALLY
A graphic presentation of rural trends in the United States shows great changes since
1940. The proportion of farms with electricity has more than doubled, combines and corn
pickers more than trebled, milking machines quadrupled, fertilizer inputs nearly trebled,
and crop yields per acre and livestock products per animal unit have greatly increased.
Urban population first outstripped the rural population in the 1910-20 decade and has
grown until in 1950 urban population represented 59 percent of the total. The large drop
in number of farms (100,000 a year since 1945) is attributed in part to changes in census
definitions and in part to an acceleration of the factors that caused the more gradual de-
cline for the 25 years ending in 1945.
A Graphic Presentation of Rural friends, by Arthur F. Raper, is published by the Extension Service and the Bureau of
Agricultural Economics, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Washington 25, D. C. 1952. 33 pp. A few copies are available
free from the Department. It is also for sale by the Superintendant of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office,
Washington 25, D. C. 20 cents.

MIGRATORY LABOR IN AGRICULTURE
The migratory farm work problem, which has long been a pressing one both in the social
and economic sense, is'dealt with in a forthright manner by the report of the President's
Commission on Migratory Labor. ,This report presents a comprehensive analysis of the many
aspects of the problem, plus a great many very specific recommendations designed to raise
the migratory worker's standard of living, improve his health, utilize his labor to advan-
tage and his profit, and better his standing in our socio-economic structure. It is
stressed that the issue is one of job standards, not the employment of foreign workers.
Nevertheless, it is recommended that first reliance be placed on using the domestic labor
force more effectively and that no special measures be adopted to increase the number of
alien contract laborers beyond the number admitted in 1950.
Migratory Labor in American Agriculture: Report of the President's Consission on Migratory Labor is for sale by the
Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C. 1951. 188 pp. 75 cents.

LABOR DEVELOPMENTS IN FISCAL YEAR 1951
The Secretary of Labor has issued a yearbook dealing with the more significant man-
power and other problems which employers, workers, their unions and the Government were
called upon to solve during the fiscal year 1951 in order to meet mobilization require-
ments. The 13 chapters cover manpower trends and outlook, Defense Manpower Administration
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JANUARY 1953







AREA AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT PUBLICATIONS


and policy, allocation, training, and utilization of labor force, price and wage develop-
ments, industrial relations, labor legislation and court decisions, the role of labor in
the defense program, organized labor's own war against communism, and the international
labor program of the U. S. Government.
Mobilizing Labor for Dfeanr.', Labor Yearbook Vol. 1, 39th Annual Report of the Secretary of Labor for Fiscal Year Ended
June 30, 1951, is sold by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C. 223
pp. 75 cents.

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING PATTERNS ANALYZED FOR A COUNTY

Collective bargaining patterns in Spokane County, Washington, as siiown in 100 con-
tracts, have been carefully analyzed and classified. It is shown that all of the contracts
covered union security; hours of work and overtime; wages; duration, amendment, and termi-
nation. The bulk of the contracts for each industry division also covered discharge,
grievance procedure and arbitration, economic action, management, union rights,and related
matters. Contracts in some industries covered also seniority, fringe benefits, and leaves
of absence. Part of the variation in the contracts is attributed to differences between
the industries in question.
Collective Bargaining Patterns in Spokane County, Washington, by Ralph I. Thayer and Elizabeth F. Thayer, is published
by the Bureau of Economic and Business Research, the State College of Washington, Pullman, Washington. 1952. 255 pp.
$2.50 paperbound, $3.50 clothbound.

NEW PLANT EXPANSIONS TO CONTINUE AT HIGH LEVELS

Capital outlays by American business in 1953 will approximate the high rates of 1952
and 1951, according to a preliminary survey of 1953 capital budgets conducted during Octo-
ber by the U. S. Department of Commerce and the Securities and Exchange Commission. Ex-
penditures on new plant and equipment planned by U. S. business for 1953 total
$11,907,000,000, representing a four percent decrease from the 1952 total.
Full details concerning the above may be obtained without charge from Mr. Lawrence Bridge, Office of Business Econom-
ics, U. S. Department of Coamerce, Washington 25, D. C.

INDUSTRIAL DISPERSION PROGRAM PROGRESS

As of December 15, 20 urban areas in the United States had their dispersion survey
reports officially certified by appropriate Federal agencies. Of 82 local dispersion
groups, another 25 were reported to have nearly completed their reports.
A principal use of the local industrial dispersion surveys both at the local and Fed-
eral levels is to insure proper dispersion of new defense plant locations. One of the
conditions to favorable action on applications for rapid tax amortization (certificates of
necessity) requires a showing by the applicant that the location of a proposed facility
meets the dispersion standards of the national program. The local dispersion groups
assist the applicant in achieving conformance to these standards.
Industrial Dispersion Program: Progress in Urban Areas of the United States, compiled from reports of Field Offices,
U. S. Department of Cammerce, is available from the Area Development Division, U. S. Department of Commerce, Washing-
ton 25, D. C. December 15, 1952. 7 pp. Standards of the program are outlined in that Division's Industrial Disper-
sion Guidebook for Communities, Domestic Commerce Series No. 31, for sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S.
Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C. 22 pp. 20 cents.

PROTECTION GUIDES FOR INDUSTRIAL PLANTS

Uniform guides of plant protection measures are available for use by management of
vital war industries and by the Armed Services. A booklet on principles of plant protec-
tion covers hazards to industry, internal security, minimizing effects of enemy attack,
and planning for plant protection. Supplementing this is a booklet relating to standards
for plant protection and dealing with prevention of unauthorized entry, control of author-
ized entry, espionage and sabotage, protection of sensitive points, minimization of damage,
passive defense measures, fire defense measures, prevention of accidents, and restoration
of production. The protection of classified security information in the hands of industry,
another phase of industrial security, is covered in a third publication.
The following were prepared by the Munitions Board, Department of Defense, and are for sale by the Superintendent of
Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.: Principles of Plant Protection, 1950, 24 pp., 15
cents; Standards for Plant Protection, 1952, 53 pp., 20 cents; and Industrial Security Manual for ?1ferg arding Classi-
fied Security Information, Dec. 13, 1951. 17 pp., 15 cents.
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DESIGN OF BUILDINGS EXPOSED TO ATOMIC BLAST
A guide for the design of buildings which may be exposed to atomic blast, intended
primarily for architects and engineers, describes briefly the effects of atomic explosions
on buildings; suggests methods of increasing the strength of new buildings; and points out
hazards which should be considered in designing shelter areas in buildings.
Interim Guide for the Design of Buildings Bxposed to Atomic Blast, a technical manual prepared by the Federal Civil De-
fense Administration, is for sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25,
D. C. 1952. 34 pp. 15 cents.

WESTINGHOUSE PLANT LOCATION POLICIES
The policies which guide Westinghouse in selecting new plant locations are discussed
by the president and other executives of that corporation in a recently published inter-
view. First consideration is given to special over-riding requirements inhering in the
nature of the plant, such as television broadcasting areas for a new television plant,
water of specific analysis for electronic tube plants, and ready accessibility to sheet
steel supplies for new appliance plants. Next come the usual economic and social factors,
to which has been added recently the need of spreAding out defense plants for security
reasons.
Westinghouse operates each manufacturing division as a self-contained company,and the
final decision on locating a new plant is up to the division manager who has access to
outside consulting services, headquarter specialists and others who can advise him. In
addition there is a planning committee composed of headquarter executives which acts as an
advisory board.
The local tax situation is not a primary consideration and receives serious consider-
ation only after several possible sites have been chosen, but nevertheless an unfavorable
tax picture can sway the decision on sites otherwise equally balanced. The most attrac-
tive industrial sites are often found to be cluttered up with a few substantial homes or
commercial establishments which make the relative cost of the sites prohibitive-a situa-
tion traceable to lack of organized planning for local industrial development. It is
stressed that local promotion groups should carefully survey all potential industrial
sites and prepare topographical survey maps and aerial photographs which clearly indicate
the amount and character of available land. The survey maps should indicate the location
and size of the nearest water, gas and electric lines, sewers, etc. In order to take care
of future expansions, Westinghouse has adopted a policy of buying initially at least 5 to
10 times as much land as the original plant will occupy.
"Westinghouse Seeks Places To Spend Construction Noney" is an article which appeared in Engineering News-Record of
October 2, 1952, published by McGraw-Hill Publishing Company, Inc., 99-129 North Broadway, Albany I, N. Y. 3 pp.
Single copy 35 cents.

INDUSTRIAL LOCATION THROUGH EYES OF INDUSTRY
Two helpful speeches on what industry looks for in a new location were reprinted in a
recent release. One reflects the experience of a specialist employed by a factory-locating
service; the other is by the president of an important industrial firm which has lo-
cated many new plants,
"What Industry Looks for in a New Location," by Maurice Fulton, Fantus Factory Locating Service, is a 4-page speech;
"The Town in Which We Want To Build a Plant" is a 3-page speech by Don G. Mitchell, President of Sylvania Electric
Products, Inc. Both are reprinted from issues of the Oklah pa Business Bulletin and appear in the May 1952 issue of
Arizona Business and Sconomic Review, published by the Bureau of Business Research, University of Arizona, Tucson,
Arizona.

ECONOMIC SURVEYS FOR SELECTED INDUSTRIES
Recent studies of several industries-electronics, furniture, frozen foods, gas fur-
naces and heaters, and paint, varnish and lacquer-provide certain new information on de-
velopment and location aspects for these industries generally, although the studies are
centered on California.
For example, the paint, varnish and lacquer industry report points out that the capi-
talization needs of a small producer could be met for an estimated three to five thousand
dollars. Selected leading grocery chains plan to expand their frozen foods space by 36
percent over the next three years, according to their questionnaire response.
Average manufacturing costs of a few manufacturers of gas furnaces and heaters are
revealed to be as follows: labor 16.7 percent, parts and steel 46.0 percent, overhead
31.6 percent, administration and selling 5.7 percent.
-13357


JANUARY 1953






AREA AND INDUSTRIAL F' ELOPMENT PUBLICATIONS


The rep ias on selected industries are:
n vamination of California's Frozen food Industry, 1952, 56 pp.
An gxasination of California's electronics Industry, 1952, 57 pp.
An Examination of California's Furniture Industry, 1952, 33 pp.
An examination of California's Gas Furnace and Gas Beater Industry, 1952, 27 pp.
An Examination of Californta's Paint, Varnish and Lacquer Industry, 1952, 38 pp.
All are available without charge from the Research Department, California State Chamber of Commerce, 350 Bush St., San
Francisco, California.

WHY WOOLEN INDUSTRY IS GROWING IN SOUTH
A current study points out that as yet no large-scale migration o. woolen mills to-
ward the South has occurred, although since 1929 this industry has grown at a faster rate
there than in New England. After stating that the South has "a more favorable cost envi-
roinm!ent" for woolen and worsted production than New England, the report observes that
Southern competition will make necessary certain adjustments in the New England segment of
the Industry-notably modernization, tax revisions, joint management-union actions. Even
with these improvements, however, the report indicates a decline in New England wool ac-
tivity.
Voolen and Vorsted Manufactring in the Southern Piedmont, by James A. Morris, is published by the University of South
Carolina Press, Columbia, S. C. 1952. 197 pp. Price not indicated.

DEFENSE PLANT EXPANSIONS IN MISSOURI BASIN

Private industry plans to invest one and a third billion dollars in defense industri-
al expansion in the 10 Missouri River Basin States, according to a current report. This
amount is the total indicated in 736 defense facility applications for accelerated tax
amortization which have been approved by Federal defense agencies within the last two
years (through August 20, 1952). This does not include those transportation, storage and
public utilities expansions which cannot be allocated to specific locations within any one
State. For the portions of the 10 States that drain into the Missouri Basin 195 defense
facilities expansions amounting to approximately 200 million dollars were approved over
the same period.
The expansion of defense manufacturing facilities in the 10 Missouri Basin States is
largely in metal production (including aluminum), petroleum products, chemicals and rubber
products, whereas before the Korean war these States produced mainly food products, ma-
chinery, apparel and leather. No new defense manufacturing facilities are planned in the
agricultural Upper Basin States of North and South Dakota, and their plans for nonmanufac-
turing expansions are relatively slight.
Jew Defense Production Facilities in the Missouri River Basin, a Business Information Service, by Sterling R. March,
Area Development Division, is for sale by the Sales and Distribution Division, U. S. Department of Commerce, Washing-
ton 25, D. C. Dec. 1952. 28 pp. 30 cents.

STATE INCOME PAYMENTS IN 1951

Total income payments to individuals in 1951 were greater in 1950 in every State of
the Nation, according to a study recently published. On a regional basis the Southwest
led with a 15 percent gain, followed by the Far West (14 percent), the Southeast (13 per-
cent), the Central region (12 percent, matching that of the country as a whole), the
Northwest (11 percent), New England (10 percent), and the Middle East (9 percent).
Agriculture is shown as having an important influence, as in the past, in altering
the geographic distribution of total income from 1950 to 1951. In 10 of the 13 States
with the greatest gains in total income, farm income was largely responsible; whereas in
three of the six States where aggregate incomes rose the least, farm income was the prin-
cipal dampening factor.
The States showing the largest percent gains in per capital income payments, with the
percentage in each instance, were: South Carolina, 20; South Dakota, 19; Kentucky, 16;
Georgia, Arizona, and New Mexico, 15 each; Ohio, 14; Connecticut, Alabama, Arkansas, Vir-
ginia, Indiana, Wisconsin, and Wyoming, 13 each; New Hampshire, West Virginia, Colorado,
and Utah, 12 each.
-1=367


JANUARY 1'53






10 AREA AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT PUBLICATIONS JANUARY 1953

States having the largest per capital income payments in 1951 were:
District of Columbia.... $2,095 Montana................. $1,742
Delaware................ 2,076 Massachusetts........... 1,738
Nevada................. 2,029 Michigan................ 1,734
Connecticut............ 1,999 Wyoming ................ 1,722
New York............... 1,996 Maryland................ 1,714
California .............. 1,933 Rhode Island............ 1,691
,I ll inois............... 1,928, Pennsylvania............ 1,663
New Jersey............... 1,885 Oregon................. 1,652
Ohio................... 1,799 Indiana................. 1,649
Washington.............. 1,755 Wisconsin............... 1,614
"State Income Payments in 1951," by Robert E. Graham, Jr., a 9-page article appearing in the August 1952 issue of
Survey of Current Business published by the U. S. Department of Commerce and for sale by the Superintendent of Docu-
ments, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C. or field offices of the Department of Commerce, price 30
cents.

GUIDE FOR MICHIGAN MANUFACTURERS SEEKING DEFENSE BUSINESS
A current booklet aids Michigan manufacturers to participate in the defense produc-
tion program by providing information in quick'reference form on such subjects as the
principal procurement offices of the Government serving the area, sources of information
on prime contractors' names, subcontracting possibilities, and Federal regulations.
Defense Production Handbook: A Guide for Michigan Nanufacturers Seeking Defense Business, prepared and published by the
Michigan Economic Development Dept., 422 W. Michigan Ave., Lansing 15, Mich. 1952. 9 pp.

WASHINGTON STATE'S DIRECTORY OF MANUFACTURERS
A directory of manufacturers throughout the State of Washington is available for the
first time, listing firms engaged in manufacturing as defined in the Census Bureau's clas-
sification for 1947.
Directory of Manufacturers State of Washington, The State College of Washington, Pullman, Washington. May 1952. 91pp.
$3.00.

HAWAIIAN TOURIST INDUSTRY ANALYZED
A survey of passengers to Hawaii during March and the first quarter of 1952 treats
separately tourists destined for Hawaii and those destined beyond that area. Visitor
characteristics were computed from baggage declaration forms filled out by westbound pas-
sengers. Of those destined for Hawaii, an overwhelming proportion were in parties of one
or two persons, the largest proportion were in the 50-to 59 year age group, female out-
numbered male visitors, the largest proportion came from the Pacific States, 74 percent
came for pleasure and 16 percent for business and pleasure, and the largest number came
for 8 to 14 days.
Survey of Passengers to Bauwii, March and first Quarter, 1952, prepared by John Child and Company for the Research
Committee, Hawaii Visitors Bureau, Honolulu, Hawaii. May 16, 1952. 17 tables. Charge not indicated.

SALES OUTLETS AS NEW INDUSTRY PROSPECTS
Opportunities for new branch plants, discussed in a recent economic survey of a Cali-
fornia county, includes the following observation which may be helpful elsewhere:
"Probably the best prospects for new branch plants are to be found among national and
western manufacturers already established in southern California, especially those having
sales representation in this area. The record of branch plant locations indicates that in
nine cases out of ten they have been preceded by local sales and distribution activities
in the territory. A useful prospect list could be developed by checking the names of man-
ufacturers having sales offices or major distributors in Riverside County, and exploring
the possibility of their setting up additional branch plants."
Riverside County-Its Present and Puture Sconowic Deve lopmeit was prepared for the Riverside County Board of Trade by
Industrial Survey Associates, West Coast Life Bldg., 605 Market St., San Francisco 5, California. 1952. 87 pp. exclu-
sive of appendix which lists industries suited to the County.
-1Z357






AREA AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT PUBLICATIONS


INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT PAPERS
The proceedings of the March 30-April 1, 1952 annual conference of the American In-
dustrial Development Council, now available, include among other interesting features dis-
cussion of municipal industrial development, the services offered by the Clearing Indus- -
trial District of Chicago, and the future of certain new developments in the chemical in-
dustry.
P oc.eiings of the 27th Annual Conference of the American Industrial Development Council, March 30-April 1, 1952, is
available fror the Secretary-Treasurer, American Industrial Development Council, c/o Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce,
Minneapolis, Minn. 148 pp. $3.50.

COMMUNITY FINANCING OF NEW INDUSTRY
Proceedings of the 1952 annual conference of the Association of State Planning and
Development Agencies contain a section devoted to several papers on industrial financing.
The opinion is expressed that such financing through "municipal securities" owes its re-
surgence to the following facts: (1) Federal taxation has become so heavy, and the advan-
tage of holding tax-free municipal securities so great, that the situation stimulates a
market for such issues; (2) such financing appeals to industry because most of the financ-
ing provides for the payment of a lease rental which will amortize the cost of the plant
(also of the equipment if provided) and these rentals are deductible for tax purposes as
expenses; and (3) in view of the difficulty, under the tax laws, of accumulating suffi-
cient funds to construct a new plant, the industrialist welcomes the lease arrangements,
which make such accumulation unnecessary. The importance of available modern facilities
as a factor in new plant location was cited in the case of Rhode Island where a survey
showed that in the past year over 40 concerns seriously interested in coming to that State
decided otherwise because modern plant facilities were not available there.
Although employment of municipal credit to finance private undertakings is not new,
it was given a new twist in Mississippi through the State law (the BAWI or Balance Agri-
culture with Industry program) which permitted its municipalities, upon passage of a ref-
erendum, to issue general obligation bonds whose proceeds would be used to construct fac-
tory buildings for lease to operating companies. In the last several years Alabama, Ken-
tucky, Tennessee and Louisiana have passed State laws establishing rules for industrial
financing by municipalities. The Tennessee law is described as authorizing only revenue
bonds, which have played an insignificant role in Tennessee's recent industrial progress.
[Since the above conference, a constitutional amendment was adopted at the general
election in Louisiana on November 4, 1952, providing for issue of local bonds for industri-
al development. It permits any parish, (county) ward or municipality of the State to in-
cur debt and issue negotiable bonds to acquire industrial plant sites and other necessary
property, and to acquire or construct industrial buildings. These bonds shall not be sold
for less than par or bear more than six percent interest and shall not exceed in the ag-
gregate 20 percent of the assessed valuation of the taxable property of such parish, ward
or municipality. Certain other conditions are imposed, including approval of the Board of
Commerce and Industry.]
Proceedings Seventh Annual Conference June 15-18, 1952, Minneapolis, published by the Association of State Planning
and Development Agencies, 1313 East 60th St., Chicago 37, Ill. No price indicated.

INDUSTRIAL FOUNDATIONS AND COMMUNITY PROGRESS
In appraising the role of the industrial development corporation in community economic
development a Harvard Business Review article states "the first need of a community in
economic trouble is not money from the outside but leadership from the inside. When the
leadership is forthcoming, then quite probably the needed money will also be found from
the inside. What communities need from the outside is neither leadership nor funds, but
'know how'. While the United States Government is currently furnishing significant tech-
nical and scientific aid overseas under its Point Four Program, let us not overlook our
own 'underdeveloped' communities. They also deserve something akin to Point Four-when
their business leaders have organized in a manner to profit from such aid."
Another statement on industrial foundations points out, "A study...of new manufac-
turing concerns established in New England since the end of the war showed that the commu-
nity selected as a location by the firm was chosen in almost one-third of the cases be-
cause of the availability of plant space....So the industrial foundation has been used
in many cases to overcome the shortage of adequate space."
-13357


JANUAIhI' 1953







AREA AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT PUBLICATIONS JANUARY 1953


The Harvard Business Review article, entitled "Industrial Foundations and Comumity Progress," by Philip H. Ragan, ap-
peared in the November-December 1952 issue of the Review, published by the Graduate School of Business Adminscrarnon,
Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. 14 pp. $1.50 per copy. The last-named source is remarks on "Industrial Fouda-
tions," by Donald B. Gilmore, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, Boston, Mass., on occasion of New England Council's
Foundations Day, Feb. 5, 1952. 7 pp.

COUNTY BUSINESS PATTERNS, FIRST QUARTER 1950
The subject publication has been published in summary form for the United States and
in separate bulletins for each of four groups of regions. This is the fifth first-quarter
release of county statistics on establishments, employment and payrolls derived from wage
reports filed by employers under the Federal Old-Age and Survivors Insurance Program. It
is the second release which presents manufacturing data that have been coordinated with
the Census Bureau's Annual Survey of Manufacturers and published under joint BOASI-Census
sponsorship. Present plans are to resume the publication of both manufacturing and non-
manufacturing data beginning with the first quarter of 1951 wage reports.
County Business Patterns, First Quarter 1950 is published as follows: Part I. United States Summary, 25 cents; Part II
(Geographic Divisions),No. 1, New England and Middle Atlantic, 45 cents; No. 2, East North Central and West North Cen-
tral, 50 cents; No. 3, South Atlantic, East South Central, and West South Central, 55 cents; and No. 4, Mountain, Pa-
cific, Alaska, and Hawaii, 35 cents. For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office,
Washington 25, D. C.

STATISTICAL SERVICES OF THE U. S. GOVERNMENT
A revised and enlarged description of statistical services of the Federal Government
provides a general description of the economic and social statistical programs of the Gov-
ernment-where they are located, how the data are collected, and what data are available
in these areas from Federal agencies. Part I deals with the organization of statistical
agencies, coordination of statistical services, and general statistical principles and
practices. Part II describes the principal types of economic and social statistics. An
appendix includes a description of the statistical responsibilities of the various Federal
Agencies and presents a bibliography of principal periodical statistical publications.
Statistical Services of the United States Government, Revised Edition June 1952, published by the Office of Statistical
Standards, Bureau of the Budget, and for sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office,
Washington 25, D. C. 78 pp. 45 cents.

STATISTICAL ABSTRACT OF THE UNITED STATES: 1952
The 1952 edition of the Statistical Abstract of the United States, presenting govern-
ment and private data available in the early part of the 1952 calendar year, has been pub-
lished. This work serves as a convenient volume of statistical reference and also as a
guide to other statistical publications and sources.
The Statistical Abstract of the United States: 1952 was prepared by the Bureau of the Census and is for sale by the
Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C. 1081 pp. $3.25.

CENSUS VOLUME ON INDEXES OF PRODUCTION
Manufacturing production indexes have been published by the Bureau of the Census and
supplement previously published Census data. These indexes make possible comparisons of
physical output changes among industries of groups of industries, between all manufactur-
ing industries and agriculture, mining, and any other principal segments of the economy
for which output data are available, and between manufacturing output in the more recent
period and in the past.
These measures use the results of the 1947 Census of Manufactures and furnish a basis
for comparison and adjustment of the indexes currently constructed by the Federal Reserve
System and other agencies. Indexes are given for all manufacturing industries and indexes
at the 2-digit and 4-digit Standard Industrial Classification levels. Data for 263 indus-
tries are included in 217 separate industry indexes. An appendix shows detailed 1939 and
1947 quantity and value of products statistics for 1,512 items used in constructing the
production indexes. Included are a number of. revisions made subsequent to the publication
of the 1947 basic Census volumes, and some comparable 1939 and 1947 statistics not shown
in earlier publications.
Census of Manufactures: 1947, Indexes of Production, for sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government
,Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C. 1952. 99 pp. $1.75.
-13357






AREA 4ND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT PUBLICATIONS


STATE STATISTICAL ABSTRACT
A convenient basic statistical reference handbook is now available for Washington
State. The statistics cover areas and their populations, what these populations do, where
they work, facts about the industries in which they are employed, the monies received from
these industries, the costs of the items for which their income is spent, and the income
that is saved. An usually detailed index facilitates reference to the contents.
Yashington State Statistical Abstract, by Marilyn Druck Robinson, published by the Bureau of Business Research, Uni-
versity of Washington, is for sale by the University of Wasl.ington Press, Seattle, Washington. 1952. 159 pp. $4.50.

STATISTICAL PRESENTATION AND SEASONALITY ANALYSIS
Tw- handbooks are now available which should be helpful to those concerned with the
prepare ion and publication of statistics. One is a guide for the preparation of statis-
tical tables; the other describes a method recommended for measuring and eliminating sea-
tonal variation from economic data.
The Preparation of Statistical fables: A Bandbook, slightly revised August 1952, 39 pp., and Agriculture Handbook No.
48, Seasonal Variation: methods of Measurement and Tests of Significance, September 1952, 16 pp., are both available
free from the Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Washington 25, D. C.

HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SURVEYS
A two-part volume has been issued by the Highway Research Board giving (1) a review
of literature on highway traffic, including highway planning surveys, highway needs
studies, origin-destination surveys, conclusions, and a check list of city origin-
destination reports; and (2) a well-annotated bibliography and indexes of authors and
sources.
The importance of this field of study is emphasized by the statement that since the
beginnings of a national road program in 1916, Federal funds expended on highway construc-
tion, exclusive of relief funds, have amounted to nearly six billion dollars and that over
a period of 30 years some 50 billion dollars have been spent by all levels of government
for road construction and maintenance. Nevertheless, 41 billion dollars are still needed
to correct all existing highway deficiencies throughout the Nation.
Origin-Destination Surveys and Traffic Folume Studies-Bibliography No. 11, by Robert Emmanuel Barkley, is published by
the Hibhway Research Board, 2101 Constitution Avenue, Washington 25, D. C. 1951. 271 pp. $3.00.

CATALOG OF DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE PUBLICATIONS
A comprehensive catalog and index of selected publications issued by the U. S. Depart-
ment of Commerce and its predecessor agencies over the past several decades is available.
Additional helpful features include the location in the United States of depository li-
braries designated as the recipient of Government publications and libraries and institu-
tions in foreign countries where many of the publications, particularly those no longer
available for distribution, may be consulted. An annual supplement to the catalog will be
published by the Department of Commerce in order to keep the information as nearly current
as possible.
United States Department of Commerce Publications-A Catalog and Index, is sold by the Superintendent of Documents,
U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C., and most field offices of the Department of Commerce. 1952.
.795 pp. $2.75.
-13357

Sterling R. March, Editor
Area Development Division


JANUARy 1953





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 3 1262 08748 9638


Field Service


INTERNAL USE ONLY


LIST OF FIELD OFFICES


January 5, 1953
(Supersedes List of
November I, 1952)


ALBUQUERQUE, N. HEX.
204 13th St. S. W.
Thomas L. Moore
District Manager
SATLANTA 3, GA.
716 Forsyth Bldg.
86 Forsyth St. N. W.
Merrill C. Lofton
Regional Director
BALTIMORE 2. MD.
Court Square Bldg.
200 E. Lexington St.
John Weber
District Manager
* BOSTON, MASS.
40 Broad St.
Paul G. Carney
Regional Director
BUFFALO 3, N. Y.
504 Federal Bldg.
117 Ellicott St.
John J. Love
District Manager
BUTTE, MONT.
306 Federal Bldg.
William G. Haloney
District Manager
CHARLESTON 4, S. C.
Area 2 Sergeant Jasper
Bldg.
West End Broad St.
C. W. Martin
District Manager
CHEYENNE, WYO.
307 Federal Office Bldg.
21st St. & Carey Ave.
Albert B. Kahn
District Manager
*CHICAGO I, ILL.
1763 LaSalle-Wacker Bldg.
221 N. LaSalle St.
George C. Payne
Regional Director
CINCINNATI 2, OHIO
1404 Federal Reserve Bank
Bidg.
105 H. Fourth St.
Robert M. Luckey
District Manager



*Regional Offices.


*CLEVELAND 14, OHIO
410 Union Commerce Bldg.
925 Euclid Ave.
George A. Moore
Regional Director
*DALLAS 2, TEX.
Room 1114
1114 Commerce St.
Ernest L. Tutt
Regional Director
'*DENVER 2, COLD.
142 New Custom House
19th & Stout St.
Charles E. Brokaw
Regional Director
DETROIT 26, MICH.
7th Floor Griswold Bldg.
1214 Griswold St.
William T. Hunt
District Manager
EL PASO, TEX.
Chamber of Commerce
Bldg.
Thomas U. Purcell
District Manager
HARTFORD I, CONN.
224 Post Office Bldg.
135 Pigh St.
Frank J. Madden, Jr.
District Manager
HOUSTON 2, TEX.
Room 2 Federal Land Bank
Bldg.
430 Lamar Ave.
Warren G. Brown
District Manager
JACKSONVILLE I, FLA.
425 Federal Bldg.
311 West Monroe St.
Rufe B. Newman, Jr.
District Manager
*KANSAS CITY 6, MO.
700 Pickwick Bldg.
903 McGee St.
Kenneth V. James
Regional Director
LOS ANGELES 15, CALIF.
502 Rives Strong Bldg.
112 West 9th St.
Edwin Bates
District Manager
LOUISVILLE 2, KY.
631 Federal Bldg.


LOUISVILLE 2, KY.-Con.
Prentiss H. Terry
District Manager
MEMPHIS 3, TENN.
229 Federal Bldg.
John M. Fowler
District Manager
MIAMI 32, FLA.
947 Seybold Bldg.
36 N. E. First St.
Marion A. Leonard
District Manager
MILWAUKEE 2, WIS.
225 Mitchell Bldg.
207 E. Michigan St.
John G. Desmond
District Manager
MHINNEAPOLIS 2, MINN.
207 Hinn. Federal Savings
& Loan Bldg.
607 Marquette Ave.
Silas H. Bryan
Regional Director
MOBILE 10, ALA.
308 Federal Bldg.
109-13 St. Joseph St.
Halcolm Laws
District Manager
NEW ORLEANS 12, LA.
I111 Masonic Temple
Bldg.
333 St. Charles Ave.
Harold C. Jackson
District Manager
*NEW YORK 13, N. Y.
346 Broadway
John F. Sinnott
Regional Director
OKLAHOMA CITY 2, OKLA.
408 Insurance Bldg.
114 N. Broadway
George R. Phillips
District Manager
OMAHA, NEBR.
105 Federal Office Bldg.
15th & Dodge
Marvin K. Hicks
District Manager
'PHILADELPHIA 7, PA.
Jefferson Bidg.
1015 Chestnut St.
John J. Lennon
Regional Director


PHOENIX, ARIZ.
Harber Bldg.
311 N. Central Ave.
Wayne N. Baskin
Acting District Manager
PITTSBURGH 22, PA.
1021 Clarke Bldg.
717 Liberty Avenue
Charles A. Carpenter
District Manager
PORTLAND 4, OREG.
217 Old U.S. Court House
520 S. H. Morrison St.
Ralph W. Sullivan
District Manager
PROVIDENCE 3, R. I.
304 Post Office Annex
Herbert J. Denner
District Manager
RENO, NEV.
1479 Wells Avenue
Ben Maffi
District Manager
* RICPMOND, VA.
400 East Main St.
C. Roy Mundee
Regional Director
ST. LOUIS I, MO.
910 New Federal Bldg.
I114 Market St.
Clyde Hiller
District Manager
SALT LAKE CITY I, UTAH
528 Dooly Bldg.
109 W. Second St., SO.
Kenneth B. Dyer
District Manager
*SAN FRANCISCO 2, CALIF.
315 Flood Bldg.
870 Market St.
John J. Judge
Regional Director
SAVANNAH, GA.
218 U. S. Court House &
Post Office Bldg.
125-29 Bull St.
Joseph G. Stovall
District Manager
*SEATTLE 4, WASH.
123 U. S. Court House
5th Ave. & Madison St.
Philip h. Crawford
Regional Director


Department Field Offices by Region


REGION I
* Boston
Hartford
Providence
REGION II
CNew York
Buffalo


*Regional Offices.


REGION III
SPhiladelphia
Pittsburgh
REGION IV
SRichmond
Baltimore
REGION V
*Atlanta
Charleston, S.C.
Jacksonville


REGION V-Con.
Memphis
Hiami
Mobile
Savannah
REGION VI
SCleveland
Cincinnati
Detroit
Louisville


REGION VII
SChicago
Milwaukee
REGION VIII
*Minneapolis
Butte
REGION IX
*Kansas City
Omaha
St. Louis


REGION X
*Dallas
El Paso
Houston
New Orleans
Oklahoma City
REGION XI
*Denver
Albuquerque
Cheyenne


REGION XI-Con.
Salt Lake City
REGION XII
:San Francisco
Los Angeles
Phoenix
Reno
REGION XIII
*Seattle
Portland




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