Area and industrial development publications

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Title:
Area and industrial development publications
Physical Description:
10 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
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United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. -- Office of Industry and Commerce
Publisher:
Office of Industry and Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
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Industrialization -- Bibliography -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
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federal government publication   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

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Dates or Sequential Designation:
No. 13 (Apr. 1951)-no. 22 (Apr. 1953).
General Note:
No. 13-22 issued as Business information service.
General Note:
Title from caption.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 026322205
oclc - 10576983
Classification:
ddc - 016.33891 U47
System ID:
AA00013027:00001

Related Items

Preceded by:
Projects and publications of interest to planning and development agencies
Succeeded by:
Area and industrial development aids


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Full Text

s I RESEARCH


Business Information Service


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

CHARLES SAWYER, Secretary


BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE
OFFICE OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE
H. B. MICOY, Director


Washington, D. C. 10 cents January 1952



AREA AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT PUBLICATIONS

(No. 17)
AREA DEVELOPMENT DIVISION
Victor Roterus, Chief

DEFENSE FACILITIES EXPANSION

A recent release by the Defense Production Administration shows action on applica-
tions for Certificates of Necessity by region, state, and certain cities, and by Standard
Industrial Code groups, through November 30, 1951. These breakdowns are for total
approvals as of that date amounting to 4,882 in number and representing proposed invest-
mant in new or expanded facilities of $11.5 billion, of which $9.0 billion was for conti-
nental United States. Following the moratorium on such applications which ended October
19, an order of priority was established for the treatment of pending applications, and
the most urgent category was determined to be machine tools, cutting tools, dies, gauges,
jigs and fixtures. The second category in order of priority comprises critical ores such
as copper, lead, and zinc ores.
The distribution of approved certificates among those states which received 2 percent
or more of the total value approved for continental United States is as follows:


State
Pennsylvania.........
Texas ................
Ohio..................
Michigan..............
Illinois ..............
New York..............
Indiana...............
California...........
Louisiana.............
Connecticut...........
New Jersey...........
Washington.............
Alabama...............
Kentucky..............


Amount
approved
(proposed
investment)
thousands of
dollars
1,272,345
1,076,145
753,264
713,995
497,903
467,531
443,509
438,292
385,712
374,948
192,341
188,164
187,536
176,751


Colm-DC-35146


Percent of
grand total
14.1
11.9
8.3
7.9
5.5
5.2
4.9
4.8
4.3
4.1
2.1
2.1
2.1
2.0







AREA AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT PUBLICATIONS


When a private lending agency is unable to extend the required capital requested by a
defense prime or subcontractor without a Federal guarantee, the contractor may have the
lending institution apply for the guarantee through the Federal Reserve Bank in his dis-
trict, which then refers it to the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System,
whence it goes to the delegate agency for action. inder this procedure, authorized in
Section 301 of the Defense Production Act of 1950, 776 applications for Federal guarantees
have been granted through October 31, 1951, for a total of $1,219 million in private
loans.
Defense Programs: Pederal Aids for Facilities Expanston, December 29, 1951, a 24-page booklet published by the Office
of Staff Service, Defense Production Administration, Washington 25, D.C. A very limited number of copies are avail-
able without charge.

MILITARY PRIME CONTRACT AWARDS BY STATES

The Munitions Board has reported, in separate quarterly releases, breakdowns by state
of prime military procurement and construction contracts awarded in continental United
States during (1) the fiscal year 1951 and (2) during the 15-month period July 1950
through September 1951, and the 3-month period July 1951 through September 1951. The
listing is alphabetical by states, showing total value of contracts and percentage of
total, and is broken down also by contracts awarded by Army, Navy, Air Force, and the
Armed Services Petroleum Purchasing Agency.
It is pointed out that for the majority of the contracts with manufacturers, this
statistical distribution merely reflects the location of the plant where the product will
be finally processed and assembled; also that for some contracts with large companies
having more than one plant, and for contracts with service, wholesale, or other distri-
bution firms, the location indicated is usually the address of the contractors's main
office. As prime contracts only are covered, the report does not reflect the considerable
amount of material, component fabrication, and other contract work done outside the states
where final assembly or delivery takes place.
Munitions Production Report: Military Prime Contract Awards, By State.(1) for the fiscal year 1951 and (2) for
July-September 1951, report No. 3B, my both be obtained without charge from the Munitions Board, Pentagon Buildins,
Washington 25, D.C. Such information is regularly released quarterly by the Board.

DESIGNATION OF CRITICAL DEFENSE HOUSING AREAS

The critical defense housing areas which are now being determined (approximately 140
designated to date).make them eligible to receive specially authorized Federal assistance
in meeting certain urgent defense housing and community facilities needs.
To assist in the provision of housing needed for defense in such areas, the Defense
Housing and Community Facilities and Services Act (Public Law 139) provides for suspension
of credit restrictions, a more liberal type of FHA mortgage insurance, and direct Federal
provision of housing, either temporary or permanent. Grants and loans are available to
help in the provision of community facilities in these areas. However, no grant will be
made without showing that the project cannot be otherwise provided when needed without an
"increased excessive tax burden or excessive increase in the debt limit" of the local
agency. No Federal loan will be made without showing that it cannot be obtained from
other sources on reasonable terms. No facility will be provided through Federal construc-
tion unless the local agency shows inability to provide it with the loan or grant assist-
ance just mentioned. The assurance is given, however, that designation as a critical
defense housing area will not restrict that area's participation in defense activities,
either with respect to the award of additional contracts or the location of additional
defense plants.
These critical areas are designated pursuant to Public Law 139, 82nd Congress, known
as the Defense Housing and Community Facilities and Services Act, which is designed to
bring Federal assistance to bear directly on housing and community facilities needs of the
greatest defense urgency. The Defense Production Act Amendments of 1951 (Public Law 96,
82nd Congress) provide that, to prevent excessive increases in rents resulting from
housing shortages caused by expanding defense activities, the Federal Government may under
certain conditions impose rent controls on housing in critical defense housing areas.
Both of these laws require, as a basis for determination of a critical housing area,-
a showing that the activities of a new or expanded defense installation in the area
requires substantial in-migration of defense workers or military personnel. In addition,
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AREA AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT PUBLICATIONS


Public Law 139 requires showing that a substantial shortage of housing for such workers or
personnel exists or impends which would impede these defense activities. For rent control
purposes Public Law 96 requires a finding that such a housing shortage has resulted or
threatens to result in excessive rent increases.
The administrative procedures whereby critical housing areas are determined are
described in a release by the Defense Production Administration. The Housing and Home
Finance Agency and the Federal Security Agency have announced jointly that instructions
for submitting information regarding community facilities and services, as well as appli-
cation forms for Federal assistance under Public Law 139 are now available to local agen-
cies in the HHFA and FSA regional offices. A summary of the housing programmed for
approximately 120 critical housing areas is available from HHFA.
"Critical Defense Housing Areas: An Explanation of How They are Determined and Certified," a 4-page leaflet, is avail-
able from the Advisory Committee on Defense Areas, Defense Production Administration, Washington 25, D.C.
Copies of the Defense Housing and Community Facilities and Services Act (Public Law 139, 82nd Congress) and of the
Defense Production Act Amendments of 1951 (Public Law 96, 82nd Congress) may be obtained from the U.S. Senate Document
Room, Washington 25, D.C.
"Summary of Housing Programmed in Critical Defense Housing Areas Pursuant to Certification under Public Law 139." Dec.
1. 1951, 11 pp., may be obtained without charge from the Information Division, Housing and Home Finance Agency, Wash-
ington 25, D.C.
"Information for Communicies Concerning Construction of Communaty Facilities under the Defense Housing and Comnunity
Facilities and Services Act of 1951, available from the Information Division, Housing and Home Finance Agency or the
Federal Security Agency, Washington 25, D.C., or from their field offices. 6 pp.

MANPOWER AND DEFENSE

An excellent summary picture of manpower development during the current period is
recorded by a report recently issued by the Department of Labor. It discusses progress in
building the three basic elements of the defense program: (1) the Armed Forces, (2)
defense output, and (3) productive power.

Manpolmr and Partial Mobilization, published by the Bureau of Employment Security, U. S. Department of Labor, Washing-
ton 25, D.C. September 1951. 55 pp. No charge.

V-LOANS FOR DEFENSE PRODUCTION

A helpful description of the so-called V-Loan program and the procedure for obtaining
such loans is now available. These loans are part of the Government lending program to
expedite the production of material and services required for the national defense, and
may be guaranteed by designated agencies engaged in defense procurement. They are gener-
ally made for the purpose of providing working capital to carry out defense prime contracts
or sub-contracts and differ from other types of Government guaranteed loans in that they
are made solely by private banks and financial institutions. Guarantees may be for 50
percent or more, but a full guarantee is granted only in extraordinary cases where the
borrower's products are essential to national defense, and other means of financing are
not available.

Defense Production Aid 417: .-Loans for Defense Production is available without charge from the Office of Small Bust-
ness, National Production Authority, Department of Commerce, Washington 25, D.C. October 1951. 3 pp.
Other methods of production financing are discussed in Defense Production Aid *10: Defense Production Loans for Small
Business, which may be obtained from the same source.

WALSH-HEALEY ACT AND DEFENSE CONTRACTS

A bulletin has been prepared by the U.S. Department of Labor for the purpose of
alerting manufacturers and suppliers to salient provisions of the Walsh-Healey Public
Contracts Act, as many firms which have never before sought Government work are submitting
their bids in the present emergency. In most cases Government supply contractors will be
affected by this Act, which applies, generally, to all contracts in excess of $10,000 let
by the Government for "materials, supplies, articles, or equipment."
Effective last June the Secretary of Labor moderated the Act so as to permit con-
tracts to be awarded directly to production pools formed by small manufacturers who want
to utilize their collective facilities for defense production. The bulletin presents a
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AREA AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT PUBLICATIONS


summary of some of the Act's major provisions, with attention directed in some cases to
how they differ from corresponding Fair Labor Standards Act requirements.
"flow the Walsh-Healey Public Contracts 4ct Affects overnuent Supply Contractors," by Wm. R. McComb, Administrator,
Wage and Hour and Public Contracts Divisions, U.S. Department of Labor, is available as Business Information Service
Defense Production tld No. 15 from the Division of Printing Services, U.S. Department of Commerce, Washington 25, D.C.
September 1951. 3 pp. No charge.

WHERE WE STAND IN DEFENSE MOBILIZATION PROGRAM

The progress made in the defense mobilization program over the year which has passed
since the President proclaimed the existence of a national emergency are termed "tremen-
dous" in the report to the President made by the Director of Defense Mobilization for the
last quarter of 1951. During the year more than 1 million men and women were added to our
Armed Forces; the rate of approximately $2 billion a month in military deliveries and
construction, or more than three times the rate of a year ago, was reached; $45 billion
were obligated for procurement and construction, bringing the cumulative obligations to
$63 billion; our annual industrial capacity was increased by 4 million ingot tons of
steel, 75,000 tons of aluminum, and over 7 million kilowatts of electric power; and the
foundation was laid for a much greater expansion in 1952 of both military production and
basic industry. This is described as part of a 3- or 4-year program, for the decision to
produce weapons of the most advanced design means that they will be produced over an
extended period which will allow for provision of the necessary facilities and the
specific "know-how."
It is announced that the period of the severest pinch in the allocation of critical
materials and consumer goods has arrived and will continue into 1953. It is pointed out,
however, that the opportunities in our economy for substituting plentiful materials,
including certain kinds of steel, for scarce materials are almost unlimited. The subjects
covered in this report include the expansion of military production and the basic economy,
the impact of material shortages, meeting transportation needs, providing manpower for
defense, meeting the inflation challenge, building the collective strength of the free
world, minimizing the effects of enemy attack, and mobilization for defense in the year
ahead.
The Battle for Production, Fourth Quarterly Report to the President by the Director of Defense Mobilization, Janaary 1,
1952, is sold by the Supertendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D.C. 52 pp. 35 cats.

GUIDE FOR INDUSTRIAL AND RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT PLANNING

Anyone concerned with the planning or construction of industrial or resource develop-
ment projects will find highly interesting and directly useful as a day-to-day reference
book on related problems a 1950 hUited Nations compilation of lectures by American and foreign experts
in this field. For the government planner and administrator of industrial and resource
development projects, such chapters in Book I as Organization and Administration, Apprais-
ing Costs and Benefits of Development Projects, and Methods of Economic Forecasting, are
perhaps of chief interest and usefulness. Book II deals with specific projects and prob-
lems in certain foreign areas. Beyond the utility of these lectures in the daily planning
and administrative task, the reports provide a much needed picture of the total problem
and challenge involved in resource and development planning. This 2-volume work consti-
tutes a handbook of information and background which would be a part of every complete
library on resource development problems.
Formulation and Econovic Appraisal of Development Projects, a 2-volume United Nations publication. Book I, Major
Course Lectures Delivered at the Asian Center on Agricultural and Allied Projects, Lahore. Pakistan, Oct.-Dec. 1950,
473 pp. $3.00; Book II, Lectures on Special Problems Delivered at the Asian Center an Agricultural and Allied Projects,
Oct.-Dec. 1950, 308 pp. $2.50. Sold by International Document Service, Columbia University Press, 2960 Broadway. New
York 27, N.Y.

EXPANSIONS ACCOMPANYING NEW STEEL PLANT

The expansions in a steel-using industry which accompany the erection and operation
of a new steel plant are indicated in a recent study describing the experience of Utah.
During the 1940-50 decade which has elapsed since the planning and erection and initial
operation of the Geneva steel plant, the following growth in the steel-using industry of
that State is reported:
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AREA AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT PUBLICATIONS


Percent
2940 1950 increase
Number of steel-using companies ............. 37 57 54
Average number total employees.............. 1,500 3,200 113
Annual sales volume, dollars................ 18,500,000 50,100,000 171
Annual steel consumption, net tons.......... 66,000 228,000 245
Plant and equipment valuation............... 9,600,000 25,800,000 169

The Steel Fabricating and Steel-Using Industries of Utah is published and sold by the Bureau of Economic and Business
Research, College of Business, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah. September 1951. 122 pp. $1.

WATER AND INDUSTRIAL LOCATION
Water supply problems in principal industrial areas are reviewed in the first bulle-
tin to be issued as an activity of the Industrial Council sponsored by the Urban Land
Institute in conjunction with the Society of Industrial Realtors and the National Associ-
ation of Real Estate Boards. Features of this publication include maps of the United
States which indicate specific water supply problems in the most important industrial
areas; amount of water used daily for municipal supply and for industrial supply from pri-
vate sources; ground water areas; and ground water use in metropolitan areas in 1945. An
appendix presents a summary of water conditions in the various states and important indus-
trial areas, and a.directory of sources of local water data by states.
Urban Land Institute technical Bulletin So. 17: aVter for Industry, may be obtained from the Urban Land Institute,
1737 K St., N.W., Washington, D.C. November 1951. 32 pp. $5.

SEATTLE DATA FOR INDUSTRIAL DISPERSION
The City of Seattle Planning Commission and the King County Planning Commission have
made final measurements of the 1950 land area and population density of Seattle Census
tracts, an'action related to application of the national industrial dispersion policy with
reference to densely populated areas.
Area in square miles was measured by planimeter from large-scale maps of the Seattle
Metropolitan Area. Both gross area and net area (total less certain categories of
non-residential land) were computed and the final 1950 U.S. Census population counts were
used in computing tract densities.
"Land Area and Population Density of the Seattle Standard Metropolitan Area, By Census Tracts: April 1, 1950," Cur-
rent Planning Research No. 7, a 10-page processed report issued by the Seattle City Planning Coamission, 503
County-City Building. Seattle 4, Washington.

INDUSTRIAL SITES GUIDE
A recently released industrial locations guide for the San Francisco Bay Area affords
a convenient summarization of such basic information as rail, highway and commuting facil-
ities, tax rates, labor supply, wage rates, availability of utility services, water supply
and costs, sub-soil quality, insurance rates, land values, population, topography, and deep
water facilities. A large map folded into the pocket at the back of the book facilitates
comparison of various sections of this area. Maps in color accompany the text discussion
of most of the subjects.
A Guide to Industrial Locations in the San Francisco Bay Area is prepared for and sold by the San Francisco Bay Area
Council, 130 Montgomery St., San Francisco 4, California. November 1951. 54 pp. $2.50.

TENNESSEE INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS ACT UPHELD
The Supreme Court of Tennessee has held as constitutional the Industrial Buildings
Revenue Bond Act enacted by the 1951 General Assembly of the State (discussed in the
November 1951 issue of this Bulletin in connection with the action of Elizabethton, Ten-
nessee, in acquiring land and building and equipping a textile mill for a lessee pursuant
to provisions of this Act).
Holly v. City of Eliaabethton at al, Supreme Court of Tennessee, Nashville, August 31, 1951, 241 S.W. 2d 1001.

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AREA AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT PUBLICATIONS


A STATE STUDY OF AN INDUSTRIAL POTENTIAL (SALT)
A recent study of the industrial potential of the salt deposits in Kansas offers a
good example of the service which may be rendered by such surveys in focusing light on
opportunities for area development. The report shows that this State has been endowed
with an estimated salt reserve of billions of tons, mostly located at minable depths close
to fuel, water and other raw materials, but that less than a million tons of salt are
mined in the State annually, and little or none of this is used for chemical production.
The study proposes the use of this resource as the foundation for development of a basic
chemical industry, and treats in detail the various factors and production methods under-
lying such an undertaking.
Salt: An Industrial Potential for Kansas, by Arthur E. Inman, is available from the publishers, the University of Kan-
sas Research Foundation, Lawrence, Kansas; or from the sponsors, the Kansas Industrial Development Commission, Topeka,
kansas. 1951. 83 pp.

STATE AND INSTITUTIONAL COLLABORATION IN AREA STUDY
A recent study of the 7-county Terre Haute labor market area is a good example of the
research possibilities afforded by cooperation between institutions of a state and its
economic development organization. The Indiana Economic Council carefully allocated its
very limited financial assistance funds among two universities of the State. In turn, the
heads of the university departments and their staffs related the projects to their poli-
cies and plans, and selected suitable graduate students who could utilize the research
results for theses or other credit. As earlier studies had shown a long-standing labor
surplus in Terre Haute, that area was chosen for this initial report, which give a careful
and well-presented description of the area's physical geography and its significance, eco-
nomic development and population growth, water resources and agriculture. It is proposed
in later studies to deal with other aspects of the area's economy.
Economic Survey of the Terre Saute Area, Part I, Bulletin No. 14, is published by the Indiana Economic Council, 140
North Senate Ave., Indianapolis, Indiana. July 1951. 70 pp.

FIRST COMPLETE PERSONAL INCOME ESTIMATES FOR N.Y. COUNTIES
The first complete breakdown of estimated income payments to individuals for New York
counties has appeared in the new statistical series for the years 1948, 1949, and 1950.
This information has been prepared as a partial answer to the persistent and growing
demand for economic information on counties and other subdivisions of the State.
The method used and discussed in these studies can be described as one of allocating
among the counties, by use of appropriate indicators, the income payments for the State as
a whole as estimated by the National Income Division of the U.S. Department of Commerce.
However, in cases where the indicators used represented almost complete coverage, the
method may be better described as one of building up county totals from available data and
then adjusting them to agree with the state-wide estimates. The report states that while
the county estimates have admitted weaknesses, they are the best available for the State
and have wide acceptance and use.
Total income and income by type and source are estimated on a "where earned" basis
except in the case of income from dividends and interest, which is allocated on the basis
of the residence of the recipient. For the two areas where the commutation problem is
greatest-the New York Metropolitan Area and the Albany District, per capital income has
been based on county of residence.
"Income Payments to Individuals in New York State Counties," an 8-page article giving 1948 and 1949 county income eti-
mates, appears in the August 1951 issue of the New Fork State Commerce Review, 112 State St., Albany 7, New York. 'In-
come Payments in 1950" is a 4-page article in the November 1951 issue of the same publication, which is without charge.

COMPARATIVE IMPACT OF STATE AND LOCAL CORPORATE TAXES STUDIED
Areas concerned with the relative level of state and local taxes and their effect on
industry will be interested in the methodology employed in a study made during the past
year by the Massachusetts Special Commission on Taxation. This study was devoted exclu-
sively to a comparison of state and local taxes paid by manufacturing corporations, for
the latter are, for the most part, engaged in interstate competition, and the effect of
such taxes may influence their competitive position. The Commission contacted a large
number of such companies with a view to their possible participation in the study, and
from the volunteers it selected twenty as a representative cross section of the State's
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AREA AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT PUBLICATIONS


industrial base. Seven states (Pennsylvania, Indiana, New York, North Carolina, Connect-
icut, New Jersey and Michigan) were chosen for comparison. Cities were selected in each
of these seven states which reflected conditions comparable in many respects to those
found in Massachusetts.
Report of the Special Commission on Taxation, Part IF, The Comparative Impact of Corporate Taxes in MAssciusetts,
House Document No. 2611, June 1951, House of Representatives, State House. Boston, Massachusetts. 86 pp.
"The Comparative Tax Study as a Guide for Corporate Tax Policy: A Massachusetts Experience," by Joseph P. Healey,
Executive Director of the Massachusetts Special Commission on Taxation, an article appearing in the December 1951
issue of the Nonthly Review published by the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, Boston, Massachusetts. Both the Commis-
sion report and this article discuss limitations of the data and conclusions.

CLEVELAND'S DIAGNOSIS AND REMEDY FOR PARKING HEADACHE
All cities concerned with downtown parking problems should find helpful and sugges-
tive a recent study by the Cleveland City Planning Commission. That city's traffic "head-
ache" is a critical area of 34 blocks which was visited in the course of a single day by
38,177 motor vehicles, or 130 miles of cars with an average space of 18 feet each. The
problem was analyzed in terms of the percentage distribution of parkers by type (business
37 percent, work 30 percent, shopping 16 percent, etc.) and according to long-time and
short-time parkers (63 and 37 percent, respectively). It was realized that there was no
possibility of providing close-in spaces for all parkers, for even if they could be sup-
plied, the resulting evening traffic jam would be intolerable.
Among the remedies cited is the Inner Belt Freeway, now about to be constructed, and
its system of new parking lots, all of which will benefit most the long-time parker (more
than 4 hours). This belt will loop south around the downtown area and will connect with
all main traffic arteries and all future freeways into the city. For the benefit of the
short-time parker a higher-than-ordinary scale of parking fees, increasing with parking
time, is proposed as a means of inducing long-time parkers to leave their cars elsewhere
and thus keep more of the present spaces open. In addition detailed recommendations are
made as to the amount and location of additional parking spaces required to relieve the
downtown congestion.
Oor Downtown Parking Beadache and Bow We Can Cure It, a preliminary report published by the Cleveland City Planning
Commission, Cleveland, Ohio. October 1951. 12 pp.

CENSUS CHANGES
The 1953 Census will cover at the same time the Census of Manufactures (last covered
for 1947), the Census of Mineral Industries (not taken since 1939), and the Census of
Business (last taken for 1948). A Census of Construction, last taken for 1939, is author-
ized, but is not required under the new legislation.
A number of changes have been made in order to reduce the cost of the Census Bureau's
Monthly Trade Reports Program. The report for August 1951 marked the substitution of a
single Monthly Retail Trade Report for the former nine regional reports and one United
States summary report. This consolidated report includes tables showing the percentage
change in sales of large retail stores by kind of business, for the United States and for
selected areas, also a table showing the percentage change in sales for large retail
stores in selected cities and areas. In each instance the percentage changes apply to the
month of the report as compared with the preceding month and the same month a year ago.
The principal eliminations are data for the year to date compared with the same period a
year ago, and separate data by kind of business for large cities and their respective
areas.

STATE REPORTS 1950 CENSUS OF POPULATION
Separate state reports, presenting data from the 1950 Census of population which will
eventually appear as chapters in Volume I, have been issued to date for the following:
Arizona Idaho Montana North Dakota Vermont
Arkansas Iowa Nebraska Oklahoma Virginia
California Kansas Nevada Rhode Island West Virginia
Connecticut Maine New Hampshire South Carolina Wisconsin
Delaware Maryland New Mexico South Dakota Wyoming
District of Columbia Minnesota North Carolina Utah
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AREA AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT PUBLICATIONS


These releases, known as Series A Bulletins (Number of Inhabitants), will supersede
preliminary reports based on' the field counts which were issued in late 1950, and also the
Series PC-8 Advance Reports on Final Population Counts.
These Series A Bulletins range in price from 15 to 30 cents each. They may be obtained from field offices of the U.S.
Department of Commerce or from the Superintendent of Documents. U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D.C.

GUIDE TO CENSUS DATA ON SMALL AREAS
A key to published and tabulated data for small areas has been designed to serve as
a guide to the large volume of Information based on the 1950 Censuses of Population and
Housing. It presents in tabular form, for particular types of localities and for
specific subjects, both the amount of detail tabulated and the published portion thereof.
Thus the great amount of tabulated but unpublished data are identified simultaneously with
the published material. Among the "small areas" covered are: standard metropolitan
areas, urbanized ari urban places of 10,000 or more, urban places of 2,500 to 10,000,
counties, places or 1,000 to 2,500, rural-nonfarm portions of counties, rural-farm por-
tions of counties, minor civil divisions, Census tracts, wards in untracted cities of
50,000 or more, and blocks in cities of 50,000 or more.
Key to Published and Tabulated Data for Small Areas, published by the Population and Housing Division, Bureau of the
Census, is sold by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D.C. 1951. 50 pp.
30 cents.

INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTIVITY TRENDS
Output per man-hour in the United States between 1949 and 1950 rose in 27 of 29
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries for which statistics are currently avail-
able, and for 19 of these industries was the highest on record, according to a recent
study. Industries included in this report do not constitute a representative sample of
the entire economy or of manufacturing, as important manufacturing industries such as
automobiles, lumber and furniture products, tires and tubes, basic steel, transportation
equipment, textile mill products, and petroleum are not included.
Productivity Trends in Selected Industries: Indexes Through 1950, Bulletin No. 1046, published by the U.S. Department
of Labor, is sold by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D.C. 1951.
83 pp. 45 cents.

HISTORICAL DATA SUPPLEMENTING CURRENT BUSINESS STATISTICS
Those concerned with research on a national basis will welcome the recently published
statistical handbook giving historical data and description of sources and scope of the
2600 different series which are covered currently in the monthly Survey of Current Busi-
ness. This supplement gives monthly data from January 1947 through December 1950, and
annual averages of monthly data from 1935 through 1950. Earlier data will be found in
previous supplements, which appear at two-year intervals.
Business Statistics, 1951 Edition: A Supplement to the Survey of Current Business, prepared by the Office of Busi-
ness Economics, U.S. Department of Commerce, is sold by the Superintendent of Public Documents, U.S. Government
Printing Office, Washington 25, D.C. 1951. 309 pp. 11.50.

HANDBOOK ON REGIONAL TRENDS
A helpful reference on regional trend data covers the following: income payments to
individuals, total and per capital, by regions; relative importance of major industries in
the economy of the various regions; population trends; regional distribution of cash
receipts from marketing of major groups of farm products; average value added by manu-
facture per production worker, by region and industry; average annual production worker
wages in manufacture, by wage groups and by region; and regional studies of retail sales.
The publication is profusely illustrated.
Regional Trend in the United States Economy, Office of Business Economics, U.S. Department of Commerce, is sold by the
Superintendent of Public Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D.C. 1951. 121 pp. $1.

MINERALS YEARBOOK
The Minerals Yearbook, now out for 1949, is a useful compilation of data on produc-
tion, distribution and consumption of mineral commodities in the United States and abroad.
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AREA AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT PUBLICATIONS


Minerals Yearbook, 1U#9, published by the Bureau of Mines, Department of the Interior, is sold by the Superintendent
of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D.C. 34.50.

REGIONAL DATA GIVEN IN NEW STATISTICAL ABSTRACT
The 1951 Statistical Abstract of the United States, recently published, presents a
great deal of data, by region and state, essential to those concerned with area problems,
in addition to national summaries. This work is designed to serve as a convenient refer-
ence volume for quantitative summary information and also as a guide to various important
sources of statistical data. Each statistical table carries a description of source to
which the reader may refer if more details are desired. Dati from the 1948 Census of
Business and preliminary material from the 1950 Census of Housing are included.
Statistical Abstract of the United States: 1951, prepared by the Bureau of the Census, U.S. Department of Commerce,
is sold by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D.C. 1047 pp. $3.

DRAINAGE BASIN REPORTS ON WATER POLLUTION
The U.S. Public Health Service has now released nine of its series of state-Federal
water pollution reports which will ultimately deal with fifteen major basin areas through-
out the country. Drainage basins covered to date are: The Tennessee, North Atlantic, New
England, California, Colorado, Lake Erie, Great Basin (portions of California, Idaho,
Nevada, Utah, and Wyoming), Missouri, and Pacific Northwest. It is expected that reports
on the following will be available within a month or so: Ohio, Upper Mississippi, Lower
Mississippi, Western Great Lakes, Southeast, and the Western Gulf.
These reports are developed pursuant to the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, Pub-
lic Law 845, passed by the 80th Congress in June of 1948, which requires the Surgeon
General of the Public Health Service to cooperate with other Federal agencies, with State
and interstate water pollution control agencies, and with municipalities and industries in
the preparation or adoption of comprehensive programs for eliminating or reducing the pol-
lution of interstate waters and their tributaries, and improving the sanitary conditions
of surface and underground waters.
These reports may be obtained without charge from (1) the State Water Pollution Control Agency of the respective area
or (2) the river drainage basin office of the applicable Division of Water Pollution Control, U.S. Public Health Serv-
ice.
A national summary, Vater Pollution in the United States, Public Health Service Publication No. 64, mentioned in aur
previous bulletin, is sold by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D.C.
1951. 4 pp. 35 cents.

LAWS AND REGULATIONS RELATING TO INDUSTRIAL WATER POLLUTION
In view of the large amount of legislation which has accompanied the growing concern
over the pollution of our waterways, it is of interest that a firm of consulting engineers
and economists has extracted and published the essential aspects of legislation which
relates to water pollution by industrial establishments. An appendix provides a tabula-
tion of the standards of agencies which affect more than one state. The usefulness of
this digest as a reference work will be limited by the fact that it does not include
interpretations of the laws and regulations by the courts.
Industrial Vater Pollution: Survey of Legislation and Regulations, compiled by R. S. Aries & Associates, is sold by
Chemonomics, Inc., 400 Madison Ave., New York 17, New York. 1951. 142 pp. $5.

EFFECTS OF DISPOSAL OF CHEMICAL WASTE AT SEA
A study has been made of the chemical and biological effects of continuous dumping of
acid waste in the offing of New York Harbor, including studies of the sport fishery of the
area and the circulation of water in the New York bight.
A Study of the Disposal of Chemical Vaste at Sea: Report of the Committee for Investigation of Waste Disposal, by
Alfred C. Redfield and Lionel A. Walford, may be obtained from the National Research Council, 2101 Constitution Ave.,
Washington 25, D.C. 1951. 52 pp. $1.

AMERICAN LUMBER INDUSTRY AND FOREST SITUATION
A bibliography listing government and private sources of information on the American
lumber industry is available, also publications and an address reappraising the forest
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JANUARY 1952








AREA AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT PUBLICATIONS


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08748 3497


situation in the United States. With the exception of the bibliography, these publica-
tions are not new, but they nevertheless represent the latest published information on a
national basis.


i ........
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The American Limber Industry, a Business Information Service bibliography compiled by the Lumber and Wood Product*
Division, NPA and revised by Catherine Rippey, may be obtained from the Division of Printing Services, U.S. Departul"'ii
of Commerce, Washington 25, D.C. May 1951. 12 pp. 15 cents.

Forests and National Prosperity: A Reappraisal of the Forest Situation in the United States, Miscellaneous Publicae
tion No. 668, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, is sold by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Gverm-
ment Printing Office, Washington 25, D.C. 1948. 99 pp. 40 cents. A summary of this publication as well as a be*klst
Some Plain Pacts about Forests, Miscellaneous Publication No. 543, revised May 1949, may be obtained without cast fra
the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington 25, D.C.
"Public Forest Policy in an Emergency." address by E. C. Crafts, Assistant Chief, U.S. Forest Service, before Soclaty
of American Foresters at Biloxi, Miss., Dec. 14, 1951. Available from the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agri-
culture, Washington 25, D.C.


Sterling R. March, Editor
Area Development Division


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