U.S. foreign trade;

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Material Information

Title:
U.S. foreign trade;
Series Title:
Its Summary report FT 930-E
Alternate title:
United States foreign trade; export trade by commodity
Physical Description:
v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Washington

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Sept. 1955-Dec. 1966.
General Note:
Supplements accompany some numbers.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 023118293
oclc - 27948979
System ID:
AA00013019:00075

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Preceded by:
U.S. foreign trade; trade by commodity


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Full Text


CI 3'.(^^^/^


U. L DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
uther H. Hodges Secretary


lIMlT~n _~CTATFS FCt hl& CL-


UIIITEDl STATEt PFOREIG D


BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Ihrd AM Scanmon, Diredr


n wn.w-eggf -

S OR NOVEMBER 1961 \MR REXs
S93 V January 15, 1962



EXPORT TRADE BY COMA


ik Bureau of the Census, Department of Ccmerce, announced today
that the decrease in United States exports of domestic merchan-
di, from $1,866.6 million in October to $1,797.9 million In
IvTemberl, a drop of about four percent, resulted from decreases
in exports o finished manufactures, manufactured foodstuffs,
maildmufactures, and crude foodstuffs. November exports of
meetic merchandise were slightly higher than the November 1960
total of $1,782.8 million. Data on M.S.P. (military) exports
am Included in these totals.
XmOlndlng M.S.P. (military) shipments, the November domestic mer-
ahadiae export total was $1,739.6 million, about three percent
heslr the October total of $1,793.6 million, but about two per-
cent higher than the November 1960 total of $1,709.7 million.
Imparts of finished manufactures fell from $1,035.6 million in
October to $997.8 million in November owing chiefly to decreases
in exports of construction, excavating, mining, oilfield, and re-
lated machinery, from $68.6 to $60.7 millloo; railway transporta-
tion equipment, from $20.8 to $14.1 million; and tractors, from
ase tGb liaaer 19s1 lean of Repart No. 7T 90O-~ far an medical
trt figure ms total eiart. snuiug MS.P. (milita-) shients.
Smlmmrr ly-uiJnt dat -re nob malable a an omadlty 1~ea.


$19.1 to $13.2 million. These decreases were partly offset,
however, by increases in exports or passenger cars, from $18.6
to $25.1 million and aircraft, parts and accessories, from $99.1
to $105.5 million. Decreases in experts of refined vegetable
oils, fats, and waxes, from $10.8 to $3.1 million and caned
fruits, from $11.3 to $5.1 million were the chief factors in the
drop in exports of manufactured foodstuffs from $119.6 to $106.6
million. Exports of crude foodstuffs fell from $189.4 to $180.9
million as decreases in exports of wheat, from $122.7 to $105.6
million and fresh or frozen fruits, from $13.3 to $10.0 million
were partly offset by an increase in exports of corn, from $28.7
to $39.6 million. Exports of semimanufactures declined from
$272.7 to $262.5 million.
Although the change in the dollar value of exports of crude
materials from October to November was small, $249.3 toi50.2
million, sizable counterbalancing changes were reported in ex-
ports of some of the individual commodities included in this
economic class. Increases in exports of unmanufactured cotton,
from $43.0 to $58.8 million and oilseeds, from $52.1 to $59.8
million were largely offset by decreases in exports of unmenu-
factured tobacco, from $73.1 to $54.8 million; and coal from
$35.5 to $32.2 million.


EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


COVERAB: Export statistics include government as well as
nmi-govermnt shipments to foreign countries. The export sta-
tiaties, therefore, include Ritual Security Program military
aid, tual Security Pr gram economi aid and Department of the
Amy Civilian Supply ahipments. Separate figures for Mutual
Security Program military Bid are shown in the footnotes of this
report. Shipments-taohited States aimed forces and diplomatic
missions abroad for their amn use are excluded from export sta-
tistics. United States trade with Puerto Rioo and United States
poesesioan is not included in this report, but the export trade
of Puerto Rico with foreign countries is included as a part of
the United States export trade. merchandise shipped in transit
through the United States between foreign countries is not in-
eluded in export statistics.
VTAWITI0N: The valuation definition used in the export
statistics is the value at the seaport, border point, or air-
part of exportaton. It is based on the selling price (or oest
if not sold) and includes inland freight, insurance, and other
charges to the port o exportation. Transportation and other
aoste beyond the United States port of exportation are excluded.
HUwger, In same instances the valuation may not be reported in
accordance with this definition, particularly where the export
value is diffiult to determine or must be estimated. Ne of
the value have been adjusted far changes in price level.


EFFECT OF SAPLING: The value of export shipments individ-
ually valued at $100-$499 (about five percent of total export
value) is estimated by sampling. Effective with the statistics
for January 1960, the previous sample ratio of 10 percent has
been increased to a 50 percent sample for countries other than
Canada with the 10 percent sample being retained for Canada.
The estimated values are distributed among the individual com-
modity totals. For the 1960 export figures in this report, the
probable variability due to sampling is less than $50,000 or
less than a trivial percentage which oan be ignored. For pe-
riods prior to 1960, the probable variability due to sampling
is less than $50,000 or less than two percent of the individual
totals sha,. The largest variation from rounding of figures
is $50,000. For further information regarding sampling pro-
cedures, see the September 1953, February 1954, January and
June 1956, and the October-December 1959 issues of Foreign
Trade Statistics Notes.

Further information regarding coverage, valuation, etc.,
is contained in the "General Explanation" in foreword of Report
No. FT 410. For complete statement, see foreword in Foreign
Commerce and Navigation of the United States.


Prepared in the Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division
For sale by the Bureau of Ihe Census, Washingtan 25, D. C. Price 10#, annual subscription $1.00
or both FT 930-E and FT 930-1
USCOMu-DC









2


UNIT S IS EXORT OF D STIC MICHADIS, BI ECONOUC CLASSES AlND IEADIMI C EDmTIES:
NOEMER 1961 AND SELECTED PERIODS
(Quantity in unite indicated; value in millions of dollars. Figures for 1961 are as original issued and have not been
revised to include published corrections. Figures for 1960 include revisions published with the December 1960 re-
ports, or earlier, but do not include revisions published during 1961. Totals represent sum of unrounded figures,
heune my vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts. See "Explanation of Statistics" for information on sampling
procedures and effect thereof on data shon.)


monthly average
Economic class and comodity November October NoveMber
1961 1961 1960
1960 1959.


Total........................................ value..

Crude materials.......................... .......value..
Hides and skins, raw, except furis...................value..
Animal and fish oils and greases, inedible.......1,000 lb..
value..
Oilseeds..........................................value..
Tobacco, uannufactured........................1,000 Ib..
value..
Cotton, unmanufactured.......................1,000 bales..
value..
Coal.........................................1,000 e.tons..
value..
Crude petroleum.................................1,000 bbl..
value..
All other crude materials......................... value..

Crude foodstuffs.............................value..
Corn.............................................1,000 bu..
value..
heat.........................................1,000 bu..
value..
Other grains.......................................value..
Vegetables, fresh or dried......................1,000 Ib..
value..
Fruits, fresh or frosen.........................1,000 lb..
value..
Crude foodstuffs exported for relief or charity by
individuals and private agencies...................value..
All other crude foodstuffs..........................value..

Manufactured foodstuffs.........................value..
Meat and meat product..........................1,000 lb..
value..
Lard............................................1,000 lb..
value..
Dairy products..................................1,000 lb..
value..
Fish, canned, prepared, etc......................1,000 lb..
value..
Milled rice.................................. 1,000,000 b..
value..
Wheat flour................................... 1,000 cut..
value..
Vegetables, canned and prepared......................value..
Fruits, dried and evaporated.....................1,000 lb..
value..
Canned fruits.................................. 1,000 b..
value..
Fruit Juices...................................1,000 gal..
value..
Vegetable oils, fats and waxes, refined..........1,000 Ib..
value..
Sugar and related products.........................value..
Manufactured foodstuffs exported for relief or charity
by individuals and private agencies................value..
All other manufactured foodstuff...................value..

Semimanufactures, exclusive of Special Category
Type 16.........................................value..
Leather............................................value..
Synthetic rubber................................1,000 lb..
value..


11.797.9


21.866.6


'1.782.8


'1.691.6


'1.453.2


250.2 249.3 283.2 215.5 159.4
7.4 7.2 8.8 6.4 5.2
149,954 133,273 120,024 140,701 120,900
10.0 9.4 8.0 9.3 9.3
59.8 52.1 55.0 30.1 26.5
69,484 90,316 84,587 41,264 38,801
54.8 73.1 62.5 31.5 28.9
428 320 754 651 332
58.8 43.0 98.4 82.3 37.7
3,426 3,857 3,058 3,160 3,253
32.2 35.5 28.7 29.5 31.5
400 190 ... 257 210
1.2 0.4 ... 0.7 0.6
26.2 28.5 21.8 25.8 19.7

180.9 189.4 146.9 136.6 120.7
32,233 23,686 27,683 18,353 18,343
39.6 28.7 33.5 23.4 27.9
58,146 64,835 42,171 41,975 29,781
105.6 122.7 71.3 71.0 51.2
14.3 12.3 20.5 20.2 23.1
77,046 98,464 101,497 131,802 141,027
5.0 6.2 6.1 7.1 7.9
125,544 174,161 84,609 119,890 125,300
10.0 13.3 6.6 8.9 9.0

0.6 0.9 0.6 0.3 0.3
5.8 5.3 8.3 5.8 5.2

106.6 119.6 99.9 93.0 89.8
49,440 58,440 44,814 35,733 29,246
14.3 16.7 13.5 10.4 8.8
64,451 34,400 32,995 51,667 50,347
6.1 3.5 3.7 5.1 5.0
43,260 31,592 38,403 34,133 40,725
7.2 6.2 7.5 7.2 7.9
3,871 2,570 4,959 4,058 5,670
1.9 1.2 2.3 1.6 1.9
138 98 206 160 125
8.4 5.9 14.1 10.5 8.3
2,176 2,344 3,227 2,613 2,273
8.5 9.0 12.3 9.6 8.6
3.5 4.3 3.2 3.7 3.4
31,920 46,796 17,856 17,734 11,654
5.8 9.1 4.0 3.5 2.7
37,287 85,349 22,789 32,307 29,003
5.1 11.3 3.3 4.7 4.4
2,602 2,550 1,915 2,776 2,676
3.7 3.4 2.4 3.4 3.6
20,030 76,236 23,182 48,740 58,289
3.1 10.8 3.0 6.1 8.6
1.5 1.5 2.3 1.8 1.9

15.9 18.8 10.4 10.5 8.9
21.5 18.0 17.8 15.0 15.7


262.5 272.7 286.0 293.5 205.5


3.6
54,703
14.0


4.3
55,366
14.3


3.2
52,373
13.5


2.7
64,377
16.7


2.2
54,796
14.2


See footnotes at end of table.


'1






I
'I











UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC MERCHANDISE BY ECONOMIC CLASSES AND LEADING COMMODITIES:
NOVEMBER 1961 AND SELECTED PERIODS-Continued

Monthly average
Economic class and commodity November October November
1961 1961 1960
1960 1959


Semimanufactures, exclusive of Special Category Type 16-Continued
Naval Stores, gua and reeins.................................value... 3.6 4.7 5.5 5.7 3.7
Vegetable oils and fate, crude .............................1,000 lb.. 55,489 27,322 113,191 90,662 71,750
value.. 6.8 3.5 11.7 9.2 7.9
Cotton semimanufactures................................... 1,000 Ib.. 28,231 28,948 29,975 30,949 29,090
value.. 4.1 4.2 4.4 4.5 4.2
Wool emianufactures....................................1,000 lb.. 11,128 11,055 13,911 12,278 12,244
value.. 1.8 1.8 2.0 1.9 1.9
R ayo, nylon and other man-made textile
semdianufactures......................................... 1,000 b.. 17,328 16,996 15,268 16,043 12,014
value.. 13.8 12.8 11.2 12.4 9.2
Sawill products......................................1,000 bd.ft.. 70,141 65,601 61,855 71,673 65,726
value.. 7.6 7.3 7.0 8.7 7.5
Wood pulp..............................................1,000 a.tons.. 95 94 98 95 54
value.. 13.3 12.7 13.0 12.8 7.9
Fuel oil, distillate and residual.........................1,000 bbl.. 1,552 1,941 1,972 2,380 2,835
value.. 4.3 5.7 5.6 6.6 7.7
Salfur............................................... 1,000 l.tons.. 128 157 151 148 134
value.. 3.0 3.6 3.3 3.4 3.3
Steel mill products, semifinished............................value.. 3.6 4.4 1.8 1.2 0.4
Iron and steel bars, including bar slze shapes.............1,000 Ib.. 15,691 19,637 12,016 14,140 11,182
value.. 2.0 2.3 1.5 1.7 1.2
Iron and steel plates, sheets and strips...................1,000 lb.. 137,549 109,168 233,618 237,428 83,493
value.. 14.3 12.9 21.1 24.3 9.9
Tin mill products, including tin mill black plate..........1,000 lb.. 87,459 74,226 89,006 114,329 76,642
value.. 7.0 5.6 6.9 9.7 6.1
Other iron and steel semi~anufactures........................value.. 26.0 31.0 28.1 22.6 15.9
Aluminum seminufacture..................................... value.. 9.0 9.4 14.3 14.5 6.4
Copper setmianufactures.......................................value.. 16.1 16.9 21.1 25.7 8.4
Coal-tar and other cyclic chemical products...................value.. 16.8 15.7 14.6 13.9 8.7
Plastics and resin materials.............................1,000 lb.. 72,870 73,982 70,501 65,624 57,669
value.. 22.5 22.8 24.3 23.5 21.5
Industrial chemicals, exclusive of Special Category Type 16...value.. 24.2 27.6 24.6 25.9 21.5
Pigments.................................................. 1,000 Ib.. 58,087 61,317 61,765 57,660 55,824
value.. 5.4 6.0 6.0 5.8 5.6
Eitrogenous chemical fertilizer material...................1,000 lb.. 123,983 67,741 75,629 86,724 112,061
value.. 3.6 2.3 2.2 2.5 3.0
All other semimanufactures, excl. Special Category Type 16....value.. 36.0 40.9 '39.2 737.9 '27.3

Finished manufactures......................................value.. 997.8 1,035.6 966.9 952.9 877.8
Truck, bus, and automobile tires (casings), new...........thousands.. 66 85 76 117 92
value.. 2.5 2.8 2.6 3.7 3.8
Other rubber manufactures.....................................value.. 8.8 9.5 9.5 9.0 8.1
Cigarettes................................................millions.. 1,987 1,872 1,989 1,686 1,631
value.. 8.7 8.2 8.6 7.3 7.0
Other tobacco manufactures...................................value.. 1.1 1.0 1.2 0.8 0.8
Cotton cloth...........................................1,000 sq.yd.. 839,475 40,354 834 350 836,396 39,351
value;. 10.7 '10.4 *9.9 810.8 810.7
Other cotton manufactures.....................................value.. 8.4 8.4 8.6 8.4 7.9
Wool manufactures...........................................value.. 0.8 1.0 0.9 0.6 0.7
Regon, nylon and other man-made textile manufactures..........value.. 14.5 14.9 14.3 13.6 12.9
Other textile manufactures...................................value.. 6.4 6.3 6.1 5.5 5.4
Wood manufactures, advanced..................................value.. 3.6 3.2 3.1 2.7 2.6
Paper and manufactures........................................value.. 25.9 24.7 21.1 21.3 19.5
Motor fuel and gasoline, including Jet fuels (all types)......value.. 4.9 2.9 4.1 6.0 8.1
Lubricating oil.......................... .....................value.. 19.3 18.4 17.8 17.3 15.2
Glass and products...........................................value.. 6.7 7.7 7.5 7.0 7.0
Steel mill manufacture.......................................value.. 11.7 12.8 10.5 11.8 11.3
Metal manufactures, n.e.c ..................................... value.. 36.7 39.7 37.1 35.2 37.1
Electric household refrigerators and freezerse...............number.. 16,871 17,573 22,130 25,030 28,871
value.. 2.6 2.7 3.5 4.0 4.5
Radio and television apparatus................................value.. 30.3 33.0 26.1 23.6 21.0
Other electrical machinery and apparatus......................value.. 72.3 68.7 65.0 55.7 56.6
Power generating machinery, n.e.c............................value.. 21.3 23.8 18.7 19.0 20.7
Construction, excavating, mining, oil field, and related
machine............ ..........................................value.. 60.7 68.6 62.1 63.0 57.7
N Ihine tools includingg metal-ftoaing machine tools) and
S parts, exclusive of Special Category Type 1................. value.. 27.3 24.0 25.0 18.2 12.9
etalarking machines and parts, except machine
tools and parts.............................................value.. 13.4 15.5 12.2 12.5 U.2
Textile, sewing and shoe manhiney ............. ............value.. 13.0 15.6 15.7 12.9 9.0
Other industrial machinery and part........ ................... value.. 92.5 99.4 86.8 83.2 70.9
See footnotes at end o table.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

nIIIIMI|~IM Migl
43 1262 0887 2207

UNITED STATES EfBRTS OF DWMSTIC MERCHANDISE BY ECONOMIC CLASSES AM) LEADING COMODITEI :
NOVBER 1961 AND SLECED PERIWDS-Continued

monthly amrag
Economic class and comodity November October November
1961 1961 1960 .
1960 1959

Finished anufa.tree-Cotinued -
Office, accounting, and computing machines and parts...........value,. 28.4 24.7 20.3 17.4 12.1.
Agricultural machines, implaents and parts..................value.. 9.4 8.8 8.8 12.1 12.0
ratr................................................... ... number.. 3,523 3,349 3,680 5,586 5,33.
value.. 13.2 19.1 17.6 19.8 17.7
Tractor part and accessories..............................value.. 11.4 13.8 10.8 12.4 11.9
Hotor trucks and busses, commercial (new)................... number.. 9,634 10,208 10,230 16,913 13,761
value.. 23.0 22.9 24.2 30.2 27.1
Passenger cars, nonmilitary (new)...........................number.. 11,803 8,370 15,112 9,760 8,869
value.. 25.1 18.6 32.7 19.6 18.6
Automobile parts for assembly and replacement................ value.. 50.1 51.8 48.5 46.0 44.4
Military automobiles, trucks, busses, trailers, parts,
accessories and service equipment; commercial maintenance
and repair trucks (new).....................................value.. 4.2 7.7 8.7 6.7 9.6
Aircraft, parts and accesaories..........................val..value.. 105.5 99.1 101.0 110.8 64.0
Merchant ships, nonmilitary, n.e.c...........................number.. 8 11 2 8 11
value.. 0.6 2.5 0.1 2.1 7.5
Railway transportation equipnt...............................value.. U.1 20.8 11.6 11.5 8.8
Antibiotics.................................................. value.. 5.5 5.8 5.9 6.1 5.7
Other medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations..............value.. 16.3 17.5 16.2 16.8 17.9
Soap and toilet preparations...................... .......value.. 2.0 2.2 2.0 2.1 1,9
Small armed, machine guns, parts and accessories, n.e.c........value.. 5.0 2.9 2.3 2.7 2.4
A nation, components and parts..............................value.. 13.9 17.6 12.1 16.4 16.7
Special Category Type 16.....................................value.. 21.8 25.8 27.4 29.8 46.7
All other finished manufactures, exclusive of Special
Category Type 1 .............................................value.. 144.6 150.8 138.8 137.4 127.9

Includes *58.3 million of Military Mutual Security Program shipments ($16.6 million to Western Europe).
2ancludes $73.0 million of Military Mutual Security Program shipments ($30.5 million to Western rope). Inalunt
$73.1 million of Military Mutual Security Program shipments ($34.1 million to Western Europe). 4Includes $79.1
million of Military Mutual Security Program shipments ($33.3 million to Western Europe). 5Includes $102.3 milasa
of Military Mutual Security Program shipments ($54.9 mll1on to Western Europe). 6See the April 1958 issue of
Foreign Trade Statistics Notes for explanation of Special Categories and list of commodities included.
7Data for periods prior to January 1961 exclude information on exports of uranium, thorium and special nuclear
material Schedule B commodity numbers 62510-62590 and deuterium oxide (heavy water) included under Schedule B
commodity number 83990. *Includes data for Schedule B commodity numbers 30399 and 30855, converted to
square yards on the basis of four square yards per pound; and B number 30610, converted to square yards on the basis
of three square yards per pound.




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