U.S. foreign trade;

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Title:
U.S. foreign trade;
Series Title:
Its Summary report FT 930-E
Alternate title:
United States foreign trade; export trade by commodity
Physical Description:
v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Washington

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Sept. 1955-Dec. 1966.
General Note:
Supplements accompany some numbers.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 023118293
oclc - 27948979
System ID:
AA00013019:00069

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U.S. foreign trade; trade by commodity


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Full Text


K346q4 ci


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
Luther H. Hodges, Secretary


BUREAU OF THE CENSUS


UNITED STATES FOREIGN TRADE


ST 904 JANUARY 1961 Farc 20,
F!T'rcb 20, 1961


EXPORT TRADE BY COMMODITY


The Bureau of the Census, Department of Comerce, announced
today that the decrease in United States exports of domestic mer-
handise from $1,777.7 million in December to $1,618.7 million
in eaumary, a drop of about nine percent, reflected decreases in
parts of all of the economic classes of commodities. The Jan-
uary 1961 domestic merchandise export total was about five per-
cent higher than the January 1960 total of $1,543.2 million.
'These figures include data on M.S.P. (military) shipments.

With M.S.P. (military) shipments excluded, exports of domes-
tie merchandise were valued at $1,510.8 million1 in January, a
level about 12 percent lower than the December 1960 total of
1,7i24.4 million but about three percent higher than the January
1960 total of $1,465.5 million

Exports of crude materials fell from $287.0 million in
December to $236.3 million in January largely as a result of sub-
stantial decreases in exports of oilseeds from $48.1 to $21.6
m llian and manufactured tobacco, from $33.8 to $16.7 million;
and lesser decreases in exports of unmanufactured cotton, from
134.7 to $130.4 million and coal, from $23.1 to $19.1 million.
Exports of finished manufactures dropped considerably from $947.6




1 S the Je.as r IWT61 Iiee of Beport No. FT 90-E for seasonally-
eduated fatigues an total exports, exsluding I.S.P. (military) haipmente.
SMeaallyedJsed data are not mailable an a oanodity basis.







EXPLANATION

COVEURC: Export statistics include government as well as
no-government shipments to foreign countries. The export sta-
tistics, therefore, include Mutual Security Program military
aid, MUtual Security Program ecoanaic aid and Department of the
Aniy Civilian Supply shipments. Separate figures for Mutual
Security Program military aid are shown in the footnotes of this
report. Shipments to United States armed farces and diplomatic
missions abroad for their own use are excluded from export sta-
tistios. United States trade with Puerto Rico and United States
possession s not included in this report, but the export trade
of Puerto Rico with foreign countries is included as a part of
the United States export trade. Merchandise shipped in transit
through the United States between foreign countries is not in-
cluded in export statistics.
SVATLUTION: The valuation definition used in the export
statistics is the value at the seaport, border point, or air-
'port of exportation. It is based on the selling price (or cost
if not sold) and includes inland freight, insurance, and other
charges to the port of exportation. Transportation and other
costs beyond the United States port of exportation are excluded.
boever, in some instances the valuation may not be reported in
accordance with this definition, particularly where the export
value is difficult to determine or must be estimated. None of
the values have been adjusted for changes in price level.


to $902.6 million reflecting in part decreases in exports of most
of the leading commodities included in this economic class. The
:more notable of these decreases were as follows: aircraft, parts
and accessories, from $89.3 to $79.3 million; metalworking
machines and parts, except machine tools and parts, from $17.5
to $9.8 million; commercial motor trucks and busses, from $25.3
to $19.2 million; railway transportation equipment, from $15.8
to $10.4 million; machine tools and parts, from $28.9 to $24.7
million; and metal manufactures, from $32.9 to $28.8 million.
However, exports of ammunition, components and parts, also in-
cluded in this economic class, increased from $8.0 to $50.8
million.

The drop in exports of semimanufactures from $292.7 to
$258.2 million was primarily due to lower levels of exports of
individual commodities included in this economic class as fol-
lows: industrial chemicals, from $24.1 to $19.0 million; iron
and steel plates, sheets and strips, from $17.1 to $12.1 mil-
lion; aluminum semimanufactures, from $16.8 to $11.9 million;
crude vegetable oils and fats, from $13.1 to $9.0 million and
coal-tar and other cyclic chemical products, from $14.7 to
$11.5 million. Decreases in exports of wheat flour, from
$14.2 to $7.9 million and milled rice, from $16.4 to $13.0
million were mainly responsible for the drop in exports of
manufactured foodstuffs from $106.2 to $89.0 million. The
decrease in exports of crude foodstuffs from $144.1 to $132.6
million was largely due to a drop in exports of corn from
$35.0 to $24.4 million and "other grains" from $18.4 to $12.0
million. These decrag e partly offset by an increase
in exports to $78.5 million.
ini





C
OF STA AT f iT ..
EFFsEC'iftZW. .T hva e of export shipments individ-
ually value d $10 A o4. out five percent of total export
value) is esti g g *n. Effective with the statistics
for January 1960, the previous sample ratio of 10 percent has
been increased to a 50 percent sample for countries other than
Canada with the 10 percent sample being retained for Canada.
The estimated values are distributed among the individual com-
modity totals. For the 1960 export figures in this report, the
probable variability due to sampling is less than $50,000 or
less than a trivial percentage which can be ignored. For pe-
riods prior to 1960, the probable variability due to sampling
is less than $50,000 or less than two percent of the individual
totals shown. The largest variation from rounding of figures
is $50,000. For further information regarding sampling pro-
cedures, see the September 1953, February 1954, January and
June 1956, and the October-December 1959 issues of Foreign
Trade Statistics Notes.

Further information regarding coverage, valuation, etc.,
is contained in the "General Explanation" in foreword of Report
No. FT 410. For complete statement, see foreword in Foreign
Commerce and Navigation of the United States.


Prepared in the Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division
For sale by the Bureau of the Census, Washington 25, D. C. Price 10f, annual subscription $1.00
far both FT 930-E and FT 930-1
USCOMM-DC









UNITE STARS EPORTS OF DOMESTIC MtRCHADISE, BT ECONOMIC CLASSES AND LEADING COuDITIES:
JANUARY 1961 AND SELECTED PERIODS


(Qiantities in unite indicated; values n millions of dollars. Figures for 1961 areas originally issued and have not been
revised to include published corrections. Figures for 1960 include revisions published with the December 1960 re-.
ports, or earlier, but do not include revisions published during 1961. Totals represent sum of unrounded figure, -
henoe y vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts. See "Explanation of Statistics" for information on sapling
procedures and effect thereof on data shown.)


Monthly average
Economic olass and commodity January December January
1961 1960 1960
1960 1959


Total.......................................value..

Crude materials................................ value..
Hides and skins, raw, except furs...................value..
Animl and fish oils and greases, inedible........1,000 Ib..
value..
Oilseeds........................................... value..
Tobacco, unmanufactured..........................1,000 lb..
value..
Cotton, umnufactured........................1,000 bales..
value..
Coal........................................1,000 s.tons..
value..
Crude petroleum................................1,000 bbl..
value..
All other crude materiale...........................value..

Crude foodstuffs ...............................value..
Corn...........................................1,000 bu..
value..
Wheat...........................................1,000 bu..
value..
Other grains........................................value..
Vegetables, fresh or dried......................1,000 Ib..
value..
Fruits, fresh or fromen.........................1,000 b..
value..
Crude foodstuffs exported for relief or charity by
individuals and private agencies.............. ....value..
All other crude foodstuffs........................value..

Manufactured foodstuffs........................value..
Meat and meat products..........................1,000 lb..
value..
Lard..........................................1,000 lb..
value..
Dairy products.................... ............41,000 lb..
.' value..
Fish, canned, prepared, etc......................1,000 lb..
value..
Milled rice..................................1,000,000 lb..
value..
Wheat flour....................................1,000 cwt..
value..
Vegetables, canned and prepared....................value..
Fruits, dried and evaporated....................1,000 lb..
value..
Canned fruits....................................1,000 lb..
value..
Fruit Juices....................................1,000 gal..
value..
Vegetable oils, fate and waxes, refined..........1,000 lb..
value..
Sugar and related products......................... value..
Manufactured foodstuffs exported for relief or charity
by individuals and private agencies................value,.
All other manufactured foodstuffs.................value..

Semlmanufactures, exclusive of Special Category
Type 1.........................................value..
Leather.............................................value..
Synthetic rubber.................................1,000 b..
value..


1 _61R 7


21 777 7


3 541 9


4,1 AQ1 A


51 r4 .3


236.3 287.0 242.6 215.5 159.4
7.8 7.1 5.1 6.4 5.2
135,619 153,059 150,579 140,701 120,900
8.8 10.0 10.4 9.3 9.3
21.6 48.1 24.0 30.1 26.5
22,422 44,574 23,072 41,264 38,801
16.7 33.8 16.9 31.5 28.9
1,012 1,007 1,144 651 332
130.4 134.7 137.5 82.3 37.7
2,001 2,432 2,150 3,160 3,253
19.1 23.1 21.1 29.5 31.5
135 512 264 257 210
0.5 1.4 0.7 0.7 0.6
31.3 28.9 26.9 25.8 19.7

132.6 144.1 122.2 136.6 120,7
19,463 28,532 13,614 18,353 18,343
24.4 35.0 17.8 23.4 23.9
44,800 41,004 33,502 41,975 29,781
78.5 69.7 57.0 71.0 51.2
12.0 18.4 23.8 20.2 23.1
96,244 95,744 142,361 131,802 141,027
4.9 5.6 8.2 7.1 7.9
91,491 96,734 122,017 119,890 125,300
7.8 8.7 9.0 8.9 9.0

0.1 0.1 0.6 0.3 0.3
4.9 6.7 5.9 5.8 5.2

89.0 106.2 82.7 93.0 89.8
34,419 39,680 30,696 35,733 29,246
10.2 11.7 8.5 10.4 8.8
40,461 49,381 68,800 51,667 50,347
4.7 5.3 6.2 5.1 5.0
38,519 43,031 20,255 34,133 40,725
7.3 7.7 5.6 7.2 7.9
2,519 4,800 6,573 4,056 5,670
1.1 2.0 1.8 1.6 1.9
244 246 169 160 125
13.0 16.4 10.2 lu.5 8.3
2,127 3,818 2,805 2,613 2,273
7.9 14.2 9.9 9.6 8.6
2.7 3.4 4.4 3.7 3.4
13,665 21,759 19,068 17,734 11,654
2.5 4.2 4.0 3.5 2.7
20,767 40,323 18,035 32,307 29,003
3.1 5.6 2.7 4.7 4.4
2,639 1,853 2,971 2,776 2,676
4.0 2.4 3.5 3.4 3.6
47,493 34,663 33,294 48,740 58,289
6.6 4.1 4.3 6.1 8.6
1.5 1.6 1.6 1.8 1.9

10.8 11.7 4.4 10.5 8.9
13.7 15.7 15.6 15.0 15.7


258.2 292.7 240.2 293.5 205.5


3.4
58,897
15.7


3.2
52,634
13.6


2.3
65,594
17.0


2.7
64,377
16.71


2.2
54,796
14.2


I


See footnotes at end of table.


i


''I


I
il



1








UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC MERCHANDISE, BY ECONOMIC CLASSES AND LEADING COMMODITIES:
JANUARY 1961 AND SELECTED PERIODS-Continued

Monthly average
January December January
Economic class and oodity 1961 1960 1960
1960 1959


Semaunufactures, exclusive of Special Category Type 6--Continued
Haval Stores, gus and resins ................................value.. 4.6 6.6 7.3 5.7 3.7
Vegetable oils and fats, crude.............................1,000 lb.. 79,811 119,100 73,361 90,662 71,750
value.. 9.0 13.1 7.4 9.2 7.9
Cotton semianufacture.... ......................... 1,000 Ib.. 26,885 29,939 32,724 30,949 29,090
value.. 3.9 4.2 4.7 4.5 4.2
Wool seam inufactures................................... 1,000 Ib.. 10,693 11,648 10,901 12,278 12,244
value.. 1.6 1.8 1.6 1.9 1.9
Rayon, nylon and other man-made textile
eamanufactures................ .......... .......1,000 b.. 16,022 16,133 13,501 16,043 12,014
value.. 12.8 11.9 10.6 12.4 9.2
Samill products........................................1,000 bd.ft.. 49,888 69,354 64,823 71,673 65,726
value.. 6.3 7.6 7.9 8.7 7.5
Wood pulp...............................................1,000 s.tons.. 88 95 69 95 54
value.. 11.4 12.9 9.8 12.8 7.9
Fuel oil, distillate and residuald........................1,000 bbl.. 1,875 2,146 2,509 2,380 2,835
value.. 5.2 6.0 6.7 6.6 7.7
Sulft ................................................ 1,000 l.tons.. 95 105 117 148 134
value.. 2.0 2.2 2.9 3.4 3.3
Steel mill products, semifinished.............................value.. 0.7 1.8 1.0 1.2 0.4
Iron and steel bare, including bar sise shapes............. 1,000 Ib.. 10,966 10,754 15,646 14,140 11,182
value.. 1.6 1.6 1.7 1.7 1.2
Iron and steel plates, sheets and strips..................1,000 lb.. 97,106 126,406 89,417 237,428 83,493
value.. 12.1 17.1 12.3 24.3 9.9
Tin mi11 products, including tin mill black plate..........1,000 lb.. 71,015 89,606 74,982 114,329 76,642
value.. 5.7 7.3 6.2 9.7 6.1
Other iron and steel semimanufacture......................value.. 22.9 23.0 15.6 22.6 15.9
Aluminmi seimamnufactures.....................................value.. 11.9 16.8 13.7 14.5 6.4
Copper seimanufatures.......................................value.. 30.9 30.3 8.8 25.7 8.4
Coal-tar and other cyclic chemical products..................value.. 11.5 14.7 11.7 13.9 8.7
Plastios and resin materials..............................1,000 lb.. 59,657 68,339 63,593 65,624 57,669
value.. 21.0 23,4 23.0 23.5 21.5
Industrial chemicals, exclusive of Special Category Type 16...value.. 19.0 24.1 27.0 25.9 21.5
Pigment .................................................. 1,000 lb.. 49,287 56,897 69,622 57,660 55,824
value.. 5.2 5.5 6.7 5.8 5.6
Nitrogenous chemical fertilizer material ..................1,000 lb.. 37,891 85,571 62,532 86,723 112,061
value.. 1.2 3.0 2.0 2.5 3.0
SAll other semimanufactures, excl. Special Category Type 16....value.. 38.8 740.9 732.6 737.9 727.3

Finished manufactures.....................................value.. 902.6 947.6 855.5 952.9 877.8
Truck, bus, and automobile tires (casings), new............thousands.. 79 88 145 117 92
value.. 2.7 3.4 4.4 3.7 3.8
Other rubber manufactures.....................................value.. 7.5 8.1 8.2 9.0 8.1
Cigarettes.................................................millions.. 1,733 1,967 1,442 1,685 1,631
value.. 7.6 8.6 6.1 7.2 7.0
Other tobacco manufactures...................................value.. 0.5 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.8
Cotton aloth........................ ....................1,000 sq.yd.. 842,236 840,705 847,468 836,396 839,351
value.. 13.4 12.1 12.8 10.8 10.7
Other cotton manufactures.................................... value.. 6.9 8.5 7.0 8.4 7.9
Wool manufactures..........................................value.. 0.6 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.7
Bayon, nylon and other man-made textile manufactures..........value.. 11.6 13.4 12.1 13.6 12.9
Other textile manufactures............ ...... .............value.. 5.4 5.6 5.4 5.5 5.4
Wood manufactures, advanced..................................value.. 2.3 2.7 2.7 2.7 2.6
Paper and manufactures........................................value.. 20.1 22.9 19.9 21.3 19.5
tbtar fuel and gasoline, including Jet fuels (all types)......value.. 5.6 3.3 4.7 6.0 8.1
aIbricating oil................................. ................ value.. 14.6 17.7 16.0 17.3 15.2
Glass and products............................................value.. 6.8 7.0 6.7 7.0 7.0
teel mill manufactures.......................................value.. 8.7 9.4 12.3 11.8 11.3
Vital manufactures, n.e.c.................................... value.. 28.8 32.9 32.2 35.2 37.1
Electric household refrigerators and freesers................number.. 16,494 22,873 23,611 25,030 28,871
value.. 2.5 3.4 3.8 4.0 4.5
Radio and television apparatu................... o .......value.. 26.4 26.0 17.9 23.6 21.0
Oter electrical machinery and apparatus.....................value.. 53.3 53.2 52.3 55.7 56.6
Pwver generating machinery, n.e.............................value.. 17.0 19.7 17.6 19.0 20.7
Comslrtion, excavating, mining, oil field, and related
m abe .. ................................. ...........value.. 55.6 59.2 55.6 63.0 57.7
3hoz tools (ineldiang metaltozaing manchie tools) and
excpa elusive of Special Category Type 16................ value.. 24.7 28.9 13.1 18.2 12.9
elaurnig a Mines and parts, emxept saMihne
toLa and parts............ ............................ value.. 9.8 17.5 11.4 12.5 13.2
seeing and above aehiniery,........... ... ....... value.* 14.3 18.1 10.3 12.9 9.0
n austrial Bm ilnery and parts... .........................value. 79.6 87.8 73.3 83.2 70.9
ee footaotes at and of table.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

lNIIMMIIIl IIII |
4 3 1262 08687 1936

UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC MERCHANDISE, BY ECONOMIC CLASSES AND LEADING COMMODITIES:
JANUARY 1961 AND SELECTED PERIODS-Continued

IMonthlyave


Economic class and commodity


January
1961


December
1960


January
1960


1960


19'1,


I 4 + 4


Finished manufactures-Continued
Office, accounting, and computing machines and parts..........value,.
Agricultural machines, implements and parts...................value..
Tractors.....................................................number..
value..
Tractor parts and accessories................................value..
Motor trucks and busses, commercial (new)................... number..
value..
Passenger cars, nonmilitary (new) ...........................number..
value..
Automobile parts for assembly and replacement................ value..
Military automobiles, trucks, busses, trailers, parts,
accessories and service equipment; commercial maintenance


22.1
10.6
6,728
18.1
10.8
9,276
19.2
9,533
19.6
43.9


24.3
8.9
6,442
18.3
12.3
18,236
25.3
11,452
22.8
45.4


14.1
9.8
5,270
21.2
11.5
12,143
24.8
11,684
24.5
51.1


17.4
12.1
5,586
19.8
12.4
16,913.
30.2
9,760
19.6
46.0


and repair trucks (new).......................................value.. 6.1 6.6 7.6 6.7 9:.I
Aircraft, parts and accessories.............................value.. 79.3 89.3 68.5 110.8 64.4 r
Merchant ships, nonmilitary, n.e.c...........................number.. 4 4 7 8 l
value.. 2.5 2.2 0.9 2.1 75.
Railway transportation equipment............................value.. 10.4 15.8 12.4 11.5 8.
Antibiotics..................................................value.. 6.2 5.7 5.8 6.1 .l ,
Other medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations...............value.. 15.7 17.2 16.2 16.8 17.9
Soap and toilet preparations.................................value.. 1.4 1.8 1.8 2.1 i
Small arms, machine guns, parts and accessories, n.e.c........value.. 1.6 2.9 2.7 2.7 2.4 i
Ammunition, components and parts.............................value.. 50.8 8.0 12.3 16.4 16.70
Special Category Type 16......................................value.. 25.5 25.3 35.5 29.8 46.
All other finished manufactures, exclusive of Special
Category Type 16...................... 4....................v.alue.. 132.5 145.0 128.1 137.4 i2.9 :


Includes $107.9 million of Military Mutual Security Program shipments ($70.4 million to Western Europe).
2Includes $53.3 million of Military Mutual Security Program shipments ($24.5 million to Western Europe). .Inesags i
$77.7 million of Military Mutual Security Program shipments ($25.8 million to Western Europe). Includes *).1.
million of Military Mutual Security Program shipments ($33.3 million to Western Europe). 5Includes $102.3 mini3a* %
of Military Mutual Security Program shipments ($54.9 million to Western Europe). 6See the January 1961 issue oZ." .
Report No. Ft 410 for list of Special Category commodities. 7Data for periods prior to January 1961 exclude
information on exports of uranium, thorium and special nuclear material (Schedule B commodity numbers 62510-62590).
8Includes data for Schedule B commodity numbers 30399 and 30855, converted to square yards on the basis of four square.
yards per pound; and Schedule B number 30610, converted to square yards on the basis of three square yards per pound.










U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE u... 5nrmsrceSSumS
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
WASHINGTON 25. D. C.
orincia. muwra


A. :
: i;. ,




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