U.S. foreign trade;

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Title:
U.S. foreign trade;
Series Title:
Its Summary report FT 930-E
Alternate title:
United States foreign trade; export trade by commodity
Physical Description:
v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Washington

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Sept. 1955-Dec. 1966.
General Note:
Supplements accompany some numbers.

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University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 023118293
oclc - 27948979
System ID:
AA00013019:00068

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U.S. foreign trade; trade by commodity


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Full Text


C3 ?5i 3


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
Luther H. Hodges, Secretary


-y9W/1_


CESUSI


STATESS FOREIGN TRADE


FOR FELASE
February 20, 1961


TRADE BY COMMODITY


The Bureau of the Censu, Department of Commerce, announced
today that the increase in United States calendar year exports
of dameetic merchandise from $17,438.1 million in 1959 to
$20,29.7 million 1 in 1960 a gain of about 16 percent, re-
fieetuli increase in annual exports of all the economic classes
aof eimdities as follows: sedimanufactures, from $2,466.5 to
,S 1A million; finished manufactures, from $10,533.3 to
U435.4 million; crude materials, from $1,912.6 to $2,585.9
... lSag crude foodstuffs, from $1,448.1 to $1 639.5 million;
ad manufactured foodstuffs, from $1,077.5 to $1,116.5 million.
These totals include data on M.S.P. (military) shipments, which
were valued at $1,227.1 million in 1959 and $949.2 million in
1960.

With M.S.P. (military) shipments excluded, exports of do-
mestic merchandise during calendar year 1960 amounted to
$19,350.6 million, 19 percent more than the calendar year 1959
total of $16,211.0 million.

The bureau stated that December exports of domestic mer-
chandise, including M.S.P. (military) shipments, were valued at
$1,777.7 million 2, slightly lower than the November total of
$1,782.8 million, but about six percent higher than the December




Bavisead fra n be total of $20,299.5 million reported in the IDcember
1960 iese ad f report lo. FT 900-E.
Bluviaed fro th figure of $1,777.4 million reported in the December
1960 issue of Beort No. FT 900-E.
aSe the hDoember 1960 issue of Deport 1o. FT 900-E for seasoally-
sdjusted figures on total exports, excluding U.S.P. (military) shipments.
Seasanally-edjustad data are not available on a camndity basis.


1959 total of $1,669.5 million. With H.S.P. military) ship-
ments excluded, exports of domestic merchandise for December
were $1,724.4 million, about one percent higher than the Novem-
ber total of $1,709.7 million 3

From November to December, exports of finished manufactures
fell from $966.9 to $947.6 million due largely to lower levels
of exports of commodities included in this economic class as
follows: aircraft, parts and accessories, from $101.0 to $89.3
million; passenger cars, from $32.7 to $22.8 million; metal
manufactures, from $37.1 to $32.9 million; ammunition components
and parts, from $12.1 to $8.0 million and automobile parts for
assembly and replacement, from $48.5 to $45.4 million. However,
increases were noted in exports of other commodities included
in this economic class as follows: metalworking machines and
parts, except machine tools and parts, from $12.2 to $17.5
million; railway transportation equipment, from $11.6 to $15.8
million; and office, accounting, and computing machines and
parts, from $20.3 to $24.3 million. Exports of crude foodstuffs
decreased slightly from $146.9 to $144.1 million.

Exports of semimanufactures increased from $286.0 to
$292.7 million reflecting, in part, a sizable rise in exports
of copper semimanufactures from $21.1 to $30.3 million, which
was partly offset by a drop in exports of iron and steel plate-,
sheets and strips, from $21.1 to $17.1 million. Exports of
manufactured foodstuffs rose from $99.9 to $106.2 million as
small increases were reported in exports of most of the indi-
vidual commodities included in this economic class. The slight
increase in exports of crude materials from $283.2 to $287.0
million resulted from a sizable increase in exports of unmanu-
factured cotton, from $98.4 to $134.7 million being largely
offset by decreases in exports of unmanufactured tobacco, from
$62.5 to $33.8 million, and oilseeds, from $55.0 to $48.1
million.


EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


COVERAGE: Export statistics include government as well as
nn-govermenet shipanemnt_ o foreign coamtries. The export sta-
tietics, therefore, include Mutual Security Program military
aid, IMtual Security Program economic aid and Department of the
Azry Civilian Supply shipments. Separate figures for Mutual
Security Program military aid are show in the footnotes of this
report. Shipments to United States armed forces and diplomatic
missions abroad for their on use are excluded from export sta-
tistics. United States trade with Puerto Rico and United States
poesessions is not included in this report, but the export trade
of Puerto Rico with foreign countries is included as a part of
the United States export trade. Merchandise shipped in transit
through the United States between foreign countries is not in-
cluded in export statistics.
VALUTIUn: The valuation definition used in the export
statistics is the value at the seaport, border point, or air-
port of exportatim. It is based on the selling price (or coat
if not sold) and includes inland freight, insurance, and other
charges to the port of exportation. Transportation and other
aosts beyond the United States port of exportation are excluded.
Bmwever, in sae instances the valuation may not be reported in
aneordance with this definition, particularly where the export
value is difficult to determine or must be estimated. None of
the values have been adjusted for changes in price level.


EFFECT OF SAMPLING: The value of export shipments individ-
ually valued at $100-$499 (about five percent of total export
value) is estimated by sampling. Effective with the statistics
for January 1960, the previous sample ratio of 10 percent has
been increased to a 50 percent sample for countries other than
Canada with the 10 percent sample being retained for Canada.
The estimated values are distributed among the individual com-
modity totals. For the 1960 export figures in this report, the
probable variability due to sampling is less than $50,000 or
less than a trivial percentage which can be ignored. For pe-
riods prior to 1960, the probable variability due to sampling
is less than $50,000 or less than two percent of the individual
totals shown. The largest variation from rcundiag of figures
is $50,000. For further information regarding sampling pro-
cedures, see the September 1953, February 1954, January and
June 1956, and the October-December 1959 issues of Foreign
Trade Statistics Notes.


Further information regarding coverage, valuation, etc.,
sl contained in the "General Explanation" in foreword of Report
No. FT 410. For complete statement, see foreword in Foreign
Commerce and Navigation of the United States.


Prepared in the Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division
For sale by the Bureau of the Census. Washington 25, D. C. Price 10f, annual subscription $1.00
for both FT 930-E and FT 930-1
USCOSM-DC


BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Robert W. Burges, Director









UNITEr STATS REPORTS OF DOMESTIC MERCHANDISE, BT ECONOMIC CLASSES AND LEADING COMODITIES:
DECEMBER 1960 AND SELECTED PERIODS
(Quantity in units indicated; value in millions of dollars. Data revised to re f4l'corrections published with the
statistics through those for December 1960. Totals represent sum of. aTues, hence may vary slightly
from sum of rounded amounts. See "Explanation of Statistics" for i n L ro sa ng procedures and effect
thereof on data shown.) 4 .


Monthly average -
Economl olasrs and commodity December November December
1960 1960 1959
1959 1958
-----------------------------------------_____________________ -------____ ---____---_ __-------__ I--- ___________


Total.........................................value..

Crude aterial.................................value..
Hides and skin, raw, except fure.................value..
Anial and fish oils and greases, inedible.......1,000 lb..
value..
Oilseed..........................................value..
Tobacco, unmanufactured.........................1,000 b..
value..
Cotton, unmnufaetured .......................1,000 bales..
value..
Coal.........................................1,000 s.tons..
value..
Crude petroleum................................1,000 bbl..
value..
All other crude material...........................value..

Crude foodstuffs..................................value..
Corn............................................1,000 bu..
value..
Wheat...........................................1,000 bu..
value..
Other grains ........................................value..
Vegetables, fresh or dried.......................1,000 Ib..
value..
Fruits, fresh or frozen.........................1,000 lb..
value..
Crude foodstuffs exported for relief or charity by
individuals and private agencies...................value..
All other crude foodstuffs..........................value..

Manufactured foodstuffs........................value..
Meat and meat products..........................1,000 lb..
value..
Lard............................................. 1,000 lb..
value..
Dairy product................. .................1,000 lb..
value..
Fish, canned, prepared, etc.....................1,000 lb..
value..
Milled rice..................................1,000,000 lb..
value..
Wheat flour....................................1,000 cwt..
value..
Vegetables, canned and prepared....................value..
Fruits, dried and evaporated.....................1,000 Ib..
value..
Canned fruits.................................. 1,000 b..
value..
Fruit Juices...................................1,000 gal..
value..
Vegetable oils, fats and waxes, refined...........1,000 lb..
value..
Sugar and related products.........................value..
Manufactured foodstuffs exported for relief or charity
by individuals and private agencies................value...
All other manufactured foodstuffs..................value..

Semimanufactures, exclusive of Special Category
Type 16......................................value..
Leather.............................................value..
Synthetic rubber..................................1,000 lb..
value..


*'1,777.7


21,782.8


3.1,669.5


41.453.2


'5.478.8


287.0 283.2 245.4 159.4 178.2
7.1 8.8 4.4 5.2 4.6
153,059 120,024 158,718 120,900 92,427
10.0 8.0 11.0 9.3 8.0
48.1 55.0 42.4 26.5 18.0
44,574 84,587 57,518 38,801 40,191
33.8 62.5 43.0 28.9 29.5
1,007 754 775 332 398
134.7 98.4 88.9 37.7 55.1
2,432 3,057 3,031 3,253 4,381
23.1 28.7 29.3 31.5 43.8
512 ... 258 210 362
1.4... 0.5 .0.6 1.2
28.9 21.8 25.8 19.7 17.9

144.1 146.9 125.4 120.7 106.6
28,532 27,683 25,920 18,343 14,986
35.0 33.5 32.7 23.9 19.7
41,004 42,171 26,589 29,781 27,520
69.7 71.3 44.4 51.2 47.5
18.4 20.5 23.7 23.1 19.9
95,744 101,497 124,781 141,027 118,444
5.6 6.1 7.5 7.9 6.1
96,734 84,609 120,007 125,300 110,949
8.7 6.6 9.5 9.0 8.9

0.1 0.6 0.3 0.3 0.3
6.7 8.3 7.2 5.2 43

106.2 99.9 92.2 89.8 91.8
39,680 44,814 31,344 29,246 19,702
11.7 13.5 9.0 8.8 6.9
49,381 32,995 36,585 50,347 32,404
5.3 3.7 3.5 5.0 4,4
43,031 38,403 21,381 40,725 40,495
7.7 7.5 6.7 7.9 8.4
4,800 4,959 5,449 5,670 3,437
2.0 2.3 1.5 1.9 1.3
246 206 94 125 103
16.4 14.1 5.9 8.3 8.0
3,817 3,227 3,906 2,273 2,259
14.2 12.3 13.8 8.6 9.6
3.4 3.2 3.7 3.4 3.6
21,759 17,856 15,390 11,654 16,305
4.2 4.0 3.3 2.7 3.4
40,323 22,789 15,311 29,003 30,514
5.6 3.3 2.3 4.4 4.7
1,853 1,914 1,984 2,676 3,024
2.4 2.4 2.4 3.6 3.9
34,663 23,182 33,026 58,289 66,807
4.1 3.0 4.7 8.6 10.6
1.6 2.3 2.2 1.9 2.0

11.7 10.4 7.6 8.9 12.6
15.7 17.8 25.6 15.7 12.3


292.7 286.0 259.5 205.5 189.8


3.2
52,634
13.6


3.2
52,373
13.5


3.0
73,002
19.2


2.2
54,796
14.2


2.1
36,716
9.8


See footnotes at end of table.






3

UNITED STATES EXRTS OF DOMESTIC MERCHANDISE, BY ECONOMIC CLASSES AND LEADING COMMODITIES:
DECEMBER 1960 AND SELECTED PERIODS-Continued

Monthly average
Economic class and commodity December November December
1960 1960 1959
1g1959 1958


S.am inufactures, exclusive of Special Category Type 16-Continued
Navl Stores, gums and resins................................value... 6.6 5.5 4.7 3.7 3.0
Vegetable oils and fate, crude................. ...........1,000 lb.. 119,100 113,191 52,288 71,750 28,801
value.. 13.1 11.7 5.3 7.9 3.5
Cotton Beaimanufactures....................................1,000 lb.. 29,939 29,974 33,607 29,090 24,573
value.. 4.2 4.4 4.7 4.2 3.8
Wool mneimanufacture............. ........................ 1,000 lb.. 11,648 13,911 11,281 12,244 9,392
value.. 1.8 2.0 1.9 1.9 1.7
Ieaon, nylon and other man-made textile
nmiMnufactures ........................................1,000 b.. 16,133 15,268 19,676 12,014 9,105
value.. 11.9 11.2 16.7 9.2 7.1
Samill products....................................... 1,000 bd.ft.. 69,354 61,855 76,662 65,726 60,626
value.. 7.6 7.0 8.9 7.5 6.5
Vood pulp..............................................1,000 s.tons.. 95 98 80 54 43
value.. 12.9 13.0 11.4 7.9 6.5
Fuel oil, distillate and residual.........................1,000 bbl.. 2,146 1,972 2,125 2,835 3,325
value.. 6.0 5.6 6.2 7.7 9.8
Sulur.................................................1,000 l.tons.. 105 151 160 134 131
value.. 2.2 3.3 4.0 3.3 3.3
Steel mill products, semifinished...........................value.. 1.8 1.8 1.0 0.4 1.3
Iron and steel bars, including bar size shapes.............1,000 Ib.. 10,754 12,016 11,267 11,182 20,516
value.. 1.6 1.5 1.2 1.2 2.0
Iron and steel plates, sheets and strips.................1,000 lb.. 126,406 233,618 74,438 83,493 157,053
value.. 17.1 21.1 9.8 9.9 15.0
Tin mill products, including tin mill black plate..........1,000 lb.. 89,606 89,006 83,251 76,642 82,386
value.. 7.3 6.9 6.7 6.1 6.5
Other iron and steel semimanufactures ......................value.. 23.0 28.1 23.9 15.9 10.3
Alumium semimanufactures....................................value.. 16.8 14.3 13.3 6.4 3.6
Copper semimanufacture .......................................value.. 30.3 21.1 4.9 8.4 16.9
Coal-tar and other cyclic chemical products................value.. 14.7 14.6 13.1 8.7 8.4
Plastics and resin materials..............................1,000 lb.. 68,339 70,501 70,692 57,669 46,971
value.. 23.4 24.3 26.3 21.5 17.4
Industrial chemicals, exclusive of Special Category Type 16...value.. 24.1 24.6 29.5 21.5 17.9
Pigments................................................. 1,000 lb.. 56,897 61,765 65,098 55,824 52,048
value.. 5.5 6.0 6.8 5.6 5.1
Nitrogenous chemical fertilizer rateriala...................1,000 lb.. 85,571 75,629 138,356 112,061' 105,897
value.. 3.0 2.2 3.7 3.0 2.9
All other seimanufactures, excl. Special Category Type 16....value.. '40.9 739.2 733.3 '27.3 '25.3

Finished manufactures...................................... value.. 947.6 966.9 947.0 877.8 912.3
Truck, bus, and automobile tires (casings), new...........thousands.. 88 76 108 92 102
value.. 3.4 2.6 3.4 3.8 4.7
Other rubber manufactures.....................................value.. 8.1 9.5 9.0 8.1 7.8
Cigarettes..................................................millions.. 1,967 1,989 1,663 1,631 1,506
value.. 8.6 8.6 7.2 7.0 6.4
Other tobacco manufactures.................................... value.. 0.8 1.2 0.7 0.8 0.8
Cotton cloth...........................................1,000 sq.yd.. 40,705 834 350 844,436 839,351 841,744
value.. e12.1 9.9 813.7 10.7 81.3
Other cotton manufactures...... .......................... value.. 8.5 8.6 8.6 7.9 8.1
Wool manufacture....................................... ..... ......value.. 0.6 0.9 0.7 0.7 0.7
Raeon, nylon and other man-made textile manufactures..........value.. 13.4 14.3 14.4 12.9 12.4
Other textile manufactures...................................value.. 5.6 6.1 6.1 5.4 4.8
Wood manufactures, advanced...................................value.. 2.7 3.1 2.8 2.6 2.6
Paper and manufactures........................................value.. 22.9 21.1 24.0 19.5 18.3
Motor fuel and gasoline, Including Jet fuels (all types)......value.. 3.3 4.1 8.3 8.1 11.0
Lubricating oil..............................................value.. 17.7 17.8 18.1 15.2 15.5
Glass and products ........................................value.. 7.0 7.5 7.0 7.0 6.6
Steel mill manufactures......................................value.. 9.4 10.5 8.7 11.3 19.9
Metal manufactures, n.e.c....................................value.. 32.9 37.1 35.2 37.1 40.0
Electric household refrigerators and freezers................number.. 22,873 22,130 31,010 28,871 32,383
value.. 3.4 3.5 5.0 4.5 4.9
Radio and television apparatus..............................value.. 26.0 26.1 21.9 21.0 23.3
Other electrical machinery and apparatus......................value.. 53.2 65.0 57.7 56.6 56.8
Power generating machinery, n.e.c...........................value.. 19.7 18.7 22.3 20.7 19.2
Construction, excavating, mining, oil field, and related
mair .................... ..........................value.. 59.2 62.1 59.2 57.7 58.1
bihnine tools (including metal-foming main tools) and
parts, exclusive of Special Category Type 16................value.. 28.9 25.0 12.0 12.9 14.5
lhtalvorkJng meahlnes and parts, except machine
tools and part....................................... ........ value.. 17.5 12.2 15.3 13.2 13.8
Textile, se ing and shoe machinery. .........................value.. 18.1 15.7 14.8 9.0 7.9
Other industrial mhinery and parts .....................value.. 87.8 86.8 78.8 70.9 75.6
L See footabtes at end of table.


~7'~1





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


4 3 1262 08587 2082

UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC MERCHANDISE, BY ECONOMIC CLASSES AND LEADER COMMODITIES:
DECEMBER 1960 AND SELECTED PERIODS-Continued

Monthly average
Economic class and commodity DecemI November December
I160 1960 1959
196 1959 1959 1958


Finished manufacturee-Continued
Office, accounting, and computing machines and parts .........value,. 24.3 20.3 16.9 12.1 11.1
Agricultural machines, implements and parts...................value.. 8.9 8.8 8.8 12.0 10.3
Tractors....................................................number.. 6,442 3,680 4,698 5,313 4,183
value.. 18.3 17.6 14.4 17.7 15.8
Tractor parts and accessories................................value.. 12.3 10.8 12.2 11.9 10.1
Motor trucks and busses, commercial (new)................... number.. 18,236 10,230 -12'687 13,761 12,322
value.. 25.3 24.2 26.0 27.1 24.7
Passenger cars, nonmilitary (new)...........................number.. 11,452 15,112 9,433 8,869 10,203
value.. 22.8 32.7 19.0 18.6 21.6
Automobile parts for assembly and replacement................value.. 45.4 48.5 49.3 44.4 39.3
Military automobiles, trucks, busses, trailers, parts,
accessories and service equipment; commercial maintenance
and repair trucks (new).....................................value.. 6.6 8.7 98.3 9.6 '18.1
Aircraft, parts and accessories..............................value.. 89.3 101.0 84.5 64.0 82.4
Merchant ships, nonmilitary, n.e.c..........................number.. 4 2 5 11 11
value.. 2.2 0.1 0.2 7.5 6.3
Railway transportation equipment.............................value.. 15.8 11.6 10.3 8.8 17.4
Antibiotics.................................................value.. 5.7 5.9 5.8 5.7 5.5
Other medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations...............value.. 17.2 16.2 19.4 17.9 17.7
Soap and toilet preparations................................value.. 1.8 2.0 2.2 1.9 1.8
Small arms, machine guns, parts and accessories, n.e.c........value.. 2.9 2.3 4.4 2.4 6.4
Ammunition, components and parts..............................value.. 8.0 12.1 28.2 16.7 15.6
Special Category Type 16........... ...........................value.. 25.3 27.4 38.5 46.7 42.2
All other finished manufactures, exclusive of Special
Category Type 16 ...........................................value.. 145.0 138.8 '143.5 127.9 '121.0

*Revised from the figure of $1,777.4 million published in the December 1960 issue of Report No. FT 900-E.
'Includes $53.3 million of Military Mutual Security Program shipments ($24.5 million to Western Europe).
2Includes $73.1 million of Military Mutual Security Program shipments ($34.1 million to Western Europe). 3Iholude
$105.2 million of Military Mutual Security Program shipments ($63.0 million to Western Europe). 'Inludes $102.3
million of Military Mutual Security Program shipments ($54.9 million to Western Europe). Includes $128.6 million
of Military Mutual Security Program shipments ($58.6 million to Western Europe). 6See the April 1958 issue of
Foreign Trade Statistics Notes for explanation of Special Categories and list of commodities included. TFor security
reasons, data on exports of all forms of uranium, thorium and special nuclear material (Schedule B commodity numbers
62510-62590) are excluded from export statistics. Includes data for Schedule B commodity numbers 30399 and 30855,
converted to square yards on the basis of four square yards per pound; and B number 30610, converted to square yards on
the basis of three square yards per pound. 9Figures are revised to correct erroneous inclusion of data for Schedule B
commodity number 79080 (Commercial maintenance and repair trucks, new) in the totals for "All other finished mnufac-
tures" rather than 'Military automobiles, trucks, busses, trailers, parts, accessories and service equipment; commercial
maintenance and repair trucks, new" in the issues of Report No. FT 930-E for periods prior to January 1960,

USCOI--DC


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE u.. .mncrrwa ern-u
BUREAU OF THE CENHUS
WASHINGTON 25. D. C.
anmama




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