U.S. foreign trade;

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Material Information

Title:
U.S. foreign trade;
Series Title:
Its Summary report FT 930-E
Alternate title:
United States foreign trade; export trade by commodity
Physical Description:
v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Washington

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Sept. 1955-Dec. 1966.
General Note:
Supplements accompany some numbers.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 023118293
oclc - 27948979
System ID:
AA00013019:00067

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Preceded by:
U.S. foreign trade; trade by commodity


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Full Text






U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
Fedec H. Muelkr, Sewy


~0


BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
ubend W. BaNur, DIndCr


4cE3


UNITED STATES FOREIGN


amiVa B930
s 930.B


SEPTEMBER 1960


EXPORT TRADE BY COMMODITY


The Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce, announced
today that the level of United States exports of domestic mer-
diae in September was $1,594.6 million. about the same as in
August, $1,594.7 million However, sizable counterbalancing
changes were reported in exports of three of the five economic
classes of commodities. A substantial decrease in exports of
aeaemanufasiures was largely offset by increases in exports of
crude materials and crude foodstuffs. The September 1960 do-
mestic merchandise export total was about nine percent higher than
the September 1959 total of $1 464.2 million. These totals in-
clude data on M.S.P. (military shipments.
Hth M.S.P (military) shipments excluded, exports of do-
mestic merchandise during September were valued at $1,541.0
million, a level slightly higher (about one percent) than the
August total of $1,532.1 million and about 11 percent higher
than the September 1959 total of $1,384.5 million.

Exports of semimanufactures fell from $337.0 million in
August to $287.8 million in September owing chiefly to decreases
in exports of individual commodities included in this economic
class as follows: copper semimanufactures, from $40.8 to $30.2
million; crude vegetable oils and fats, from $12.9 to $2.4 mil-
lion; iron and steel plates, sheets and strips, from $32.2 to
$22.8 million; aluminum semimanufactures, from $18.4 to $10.4
million; and synthetic rubber, from $17.2 to $14.1 million.

11 erisd fram the figue of $1,594.4 milli n phbliehed in the Septembe
1960 ise aof mart ao. FT 900-E.


During the period, exports of crude materials rose from
$163.7 to $188.3 million due largely to higher levels of exports
of unmanufactured tobacco, from $29.6 to $66.2 million and
unmanufactured cotton, from $15.9 to $26.3 million However,
exports of oilseeds, also included in this economic class, fell
from $34.9 to $20.7 million. Exports of crude fodstuffs rose
from $123.7 to $145.7 million as a sizable increase in exports
*of wheat, from $58.6 to $84.0 million, was partly offset by a
decrease in exports of corn, from $25.5 to $17.4 million.

Exports of manufactured foodstuffs advanced from $94.5 to
$96.8 million reflecting, in part, charges in the value of ex-
ports of individual items included in this economic class as
follows: canned fruits, from $5.7 to $11.2 million; dried and
evaporated fruits, from $2.2 to $5.9 million; meat and meat
products, from $10.7 to $13.7 million and refined vegetable
oils, fats and waxes, from $14.8 to $4.7 million. Exports of
finished manufacturers valued at $876.0 million in September,
were at approximately the same level as the $875.7 million
reported in August. This slight change reflected increases in
exports of some of the individual items included in this-ec-
onomic class which were offset by decreases in exports of others.
The more noticeable of these were aircraft, parts and acces-
sories, from $97.3 to $116.0 million; construction, excavating,
mining, oil field and related machinery, from $59.4 to $64.4
million; automobile parts for assembly and replacement, from
$35.5 to $40.3 million; motor trucks and busses, from $29.7
to $21.3 million; machine tools and parts, from $17.2 to $13.4
million; and steel mill manufacturers, from $11.7 to $8.3million.


EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


COVERYA: Export statistics include government as well as
non-government shipments to foreign countries. The export sta-
tistics, therefore, include MIatual Security Program military
aid, actual Security Progrm economic aid and Department of the
Army Civilian Supply shipments. Separate figures for Mutual
Security Program military aid are shown in the footnotes of this
report. Shipments to United States armed forces and diplomatic
missions abroad far their own use are excluded from export sta-
tistics. United States trade with Puerto Rico and United States
possessions is not included in this report, but the export trade
of Puerto Rico with foreign countries is included as a part of
the United States export trade. Merchandise shipped in transit
through the United States between foreign countries is not in-
cluded in export statistics.
VALUATION: The valuation definition used in the export
statistics is the value at the seaport, border point, or air-
part of exportation. It is based on the selling price (or cost
if not sold) and includes inland freight, insurance, and other
charges to the port of exportation. Transportation and other
Scouts beyFnd the United States port of exportation are excluded.
1twever, in sae instances the valuation may not be reported in
spordance with this definition, particularly where the export
inve Is difficult to determine or must be estimated. None of
tu values have been adjusted for changes in price level.


EFFECT OF SAMPLING: The value of export shipments individ-
ually valued at $100-$499 (about five percent of total export
value) is estimated by sampling. Effective with the statistics
for January 1960, the previous sample ratio of 10 percent has
been increased to a 50 percent sample for countries other than
Canada with the 10 percent sample being retained for Canada.
The estimated values are distributed amung the individual cam-
modity totals. For the 1960 export figures in this report, the
probable variability due to sampling is less than $50,000 or
less than a trivial percentage which can be ignored. For pe-
riods prior to 1960, the probable variability due to sampling
is less than $50,000 or less than two percent of the individual
totals shown. The largest variation from rounding of figures
is $50,000. For further information regarding sampling pro-
cedures, see the September 1953, February 1954, January and
June 1956, and the October-December 1959 issues of Foreign
Trade Statistics Notes.


Further information regarding coverage, valuation, etc.,
is contained in the "General Explanation" in foreword of Report
No. FT 410. For complete statement, see foreword in Foreign
Commerce and Navigation of the United States.


L__


Prepared in the Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division
For sale by the Bureau of the Census, Washington 25, D. C. Price 104, annual subscription $1.00
for both FT 930-E and FT 930-1
USCOMM-DC










2

tael D STn oS o F DOMESTIC MERCHANDISE, ST COoMXIC CLaSSE AND LKADID CoeDrITs:
SEPTEMBER 1960 AND SELECTED PERIODS
(Quantity in unite nd6ated; value in mq1Mon of dollars. Figures for 1960 are as originally issued and have not been
revised to include published oorreotio. Figures for 1959 include revisions published with the December 1959 re-
ports, or earlier, but do not include .releaons published during 1960. Total represent sum of unrounded figures,
hence my vary slightly from t s of rpouded amount. See plantationn of Statistics" for information on sampling
procedures and effect thereof on date shown.)
/- f
I-
Monthly average
oonaSa elas an couoly September August September
S. 1960 1960 1959
1959 1958


Total.........................................value..

Crude materials.................................value..
Hides and skins, raw, except furs.................. value..
Aniaal and fish oils and greases, inedible.......1,000 lo.
value..
Oilseeds...........................................value..
Tobacco, unmiufactured.........................1,000 Ib..
value..
Cotton, unmenufactured.......................1,000 bales..
value..
Coal........................................1,000 s.tons..
value..
Crude petroleum ................................1,000 bbl..
value..
All other crude materials ...........................value..

Crude foodstuffs.................................value..
Corn...........................................1,000 bu..
value..
Wheat........................................... 1,000 bu..
value..
Other grain....................................... value..
Vegetables, fresh or dried......................1,000 lb..
value..
Fruits, fresh or froen..........................1,000 lb..
value..
Crude foodstuffs exported for relief or charity by
individuals and private agencies..................value..
All other crude foodstuffs ........................value..

Iuufactured foodstuffs........................ value..
Meat and meat products..........................1,000 lb..
value..
Lard............................................1,000 Ib..
value..
Dairy products..................................1,000 lb..
value..
Fish, canned, prepared, etc .....................1,000 lb..
value..
Milled rice ..................................1,000,000 lb..
value..
Wheat flo ..................................... 1,000 ct..
value..
Vegetables, canned and prepared.....................value..
Fruit, dried and evaporated................... 1,000 lb..
value..
Canned fruit....................................1,000 lb..
value..
Fruit Juices.................................. 1,000 gal..
value..
Vegetable oils, fate and wazes, refined...........1,00'lb..
value..
Sugar and related products.........................value..
Manufactured foodstuffs exported for relief or charity
by individuals and private agencies...............value...
All other manufactured foodstuffs...................value..

Seamanufactures, exclusive of Special Category
Type 16.........................................value..
Leather.............................................value..
Synthetic rubber.................................1,000 lb..
value..


*11.594.6


21.594.7


'1.464.2


-1.448.6


1.-477-3


188.3 163.7 186.1 159.5 178.2
5.0 6.3 4.8 5.2 4.6
105,632 123,068 129,445 120,904 92,427
6.9 8.0 9.5 9.3 8.0
20.7 34.9 21.0 26.4 18.0
82,922 37,771 93,653 38,801 40,191
66.2 29.6 70.3 28.9 29.5
208 124 250 333 396
26.3 15.9 26.0 37.7 55.1
3,597 4,025 3,725 3,251 4,381
33.4 36.8 35.9 31.5 43.8
234 89 150 210 362
0.6 0.2 0.3 0.6 1.2
29.1 32.1 18.3 20.0 17.9

145.7 123.7 114.4 120.3 106.6
13,585 19,924 15,745 18,250 14,986
17.4 25.5 20.7 23.8 19.7
48,529 34,513 27,627 29,712 27,520
84.0 58.6 47.9 51.0 47.5
24.8 19.9 23.5 23.1 19.9
83,111 93,561 128,700 141,027 118,444
5.4 5.3 7.6 7.9 6.1
116,284 127,756 120,881 125,300 110,949
8.7 9.5 9.1 9.0 8.9

0.1 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3
5.4 4.5 5.3 5.2 4.3

96.8 94.5 102.5 89.7 91.8
47,128 36,341 36,365 29,244 19,702
13.7 10.7 10.6 8.8 6.9
42,319 51,186 57,279 50,347 32,404
4.5 5.5 5.2 5.0 4.4
27,837 33,649 56,035 40,548 40,495
6.2 7.3 12.5 7.9 8.4
6,295 2,278 7,655 5,670 3,437
3.4 1.5 3.8 1.9 1.3
69 43 90 125 103
4.2 2.6 6.5 8.3 8.0
2,281 1,724 2,379 2,236 2,259
8.3 6.3 8.9 8.5 9.6
3.4 3.6 3.8 3.4 3.6
36,717 12,334 9,394 11,654 16,305
5.9 2.2 2.1 2.7 3.4
83,185 41,833 48,711 29,003 30,514
11.2 5.7 6.6 4.4 4.7
2,295 2,754 2,046 2,676 3,024
2.8 3.4 3.0 3.6 3.9
34,673 117,447 54,343 57,600 66,807
4.7 14.8 7.8 8.6 10.6
1.6 1.4 2.3 1.9 2.0

11.2 15.0 10.8 9.0 12.6
15.7 14.4 18.3 15.7 12.3


287.8 337.0 226.7 205.2 189.8


2.6
54,398
14.1


2.8
68,417
17.2


2.0
68,620
17.6


2.2
54,784
14.2


:I


2.1
36,716
9.8


See footnotes at nd of table.


iI'i










UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC MERCHANDISE, BY ECONOMIC CLASSES AND LEADING COMMODITIES:
SEPTEMBER 1960 AND SELECTED PERIODS-Continued

Monthly average
Economic class and commodity September August September
1960 1960 1959
1959 1958


Semimanufactures, exclusive of Special Category Type 16-Continued
Naval Stores, gunm and resins ................................value.. 5.1 5.7 5.3 3.7 3.0
Vegetable oils and fate, orude............................1,000 lb.. 20,791 121,301 108,722 72,440 28,801
value.. 2.4 12.9 11.8 8.0 3.5
Cotton semimanufacturee............................. ...1,000 lb.. 26,924 23,847 41,366 29,090 24,573
value.. 3.8 3.3 5.6 4.2 3.8
VUi semimanufactures....................................1,000 lb.. 11,659 12,188 16,213 12,244 9,392
value.. 2.0 2.0 2.7 1.9 1.7
Ramn, nylon and other man-made textile
semamanufactures.........................................1,000 lb.. 14,956 17,352 14,857 12,014 9,105
value.. 11.7 12.9 11.2 9.2 7.1
Sawmill products......................................1,000 bd.ft.. 74,185 63,912 76,067 65,606 60,626
value.. 8.9 8.1 8.9 7.5 6.5
Wood pulp .............................................1,000 s.tons.. 107 99 76 54 43
value.. 14.3 13.1 11.4 7.9 6.5
Fuel oil, distillate and residual ........................1,000 bbl.. 1,829 2,637 2,345 2,833 3,325
value.. 4.8 6.9 6.4 7.7 9.8
Sulfur...............................................1,000 l.tons.. 165 209 146 134 131
value.. 3.6 4.6 3.6 3.3 3.3
Steel mill products, semifinished...........................value.. 1.0 2.0 0.1 0.4 1.3
Iron and steel bars, including bar size shapes.............1,000 lb.. 14,032 13,110 4,723 11,182 20,516
value.. 1.8 1.5 0.7 1.2 2.0
Iron and steel plates, sheets and strips...................1,000 lb.. 228,117 347,347 31,668 83,486 157,053
value.. 22.8 32.2 4.3 9.9 15.0
Tin mill products, including tin mill black plate..........1,000 lb.. 120,469 142,746 50,481 76,642 82,386
value.. 10.4 12,2 3.7 6.1 6.5
Other iron and steel semimanufactures.......................value.. 24.1 30.8 15.5 15.7 10.3
Aluminum semimanufactures.....................................value.. 10.4 18.4 9.0 6.4 3.6
Copper semimanufactures......................................value.. 30.2 40.8 5.9 8.4 16.9
Coal-tar and other cyclic chemical products...................value.. 15.2 12.8 9.4 8.7 8.4
Plastics and resin materials..............................1,000 lb.. 67,184 60,231 67,349 57,839 46,971
value.. 24.0 22.1 24.7 21.5 17.4
Industrial chemicals, exclusive of Special Category Type 16...value.. 24.9 26.8 26.2 21.2 17.9
Pigments..................................................1,000 lb.. 57,938 57,948 75,109 55,824 52,048
value.. 5.8 5.8 7.3 5.6 5.1
Nitrogenous chemical fertilizer materials..................1,000 lb.. 148,441 78,071 68,449 112,061 105,897
value.. 4.0 1.9 2.2 3.0 2.9
All other aemimanufactures, excl. Special Category Type 16....value.. '40.0 40.3. 731.0 727.3 725.3

Finished manufactures.....................................value.. 876.0 875.7 834.6 873.9 910.8
Truek, bus, and automobile tires (casings), new...........thousands.. 110 104 91 92 102
value.. 3.7 3.4 3.6 3.8 4.7
Other rubber manufactures....................................value.. 8.7 8.7 8.1 8.1 7.8
Cigarettes................................................millions.. 1,706 1,449 2,252 1,631 1,506
value.. 7.5 6.2 9.7 7.0 6.4
Other tobacco manufactures..................................value.. 1.0 0.8 1.9 0.8 0.7
Cotton cloth..........................................1,000 sq.yd.. 828 662 823 964 836 965 839,357 841,744
value.. 8.3 6.8 9.9 10.7 811.3
Other cotton manufactures....................................value.. 8.0 7.1 8.1 7.9 8.1
Wool manufactures......................... .....................value.. 0.7 0.7 1.0 0.7 0.7
Rayon, nylon and other man-made textile manufactures..........value.. 12.7 12.9 14.2 12.9 12.4
Other textile manufactures......................... ............ value.. 5.2 4.9 6.0 5.4 4.8
Wood manufactures, advanced.......................... ............value.. 2.6 3.1 2.9 2.6 2.6
Paper and manufactures........................................ .... value.. 21.0 23.2 23.5 19.5 18.3
Motor fuel and gasoline, including jet fuels (all types)......value.. 6.6 6.4 8.3 8.1 11.0
Lubricating oil..............................................value.. 17.0 18.4 14.4 15.2 15.5
Glass and products...........................................value.. 7.5 7.3 8.0 7.0 6.6
Steel mill manufactures.......................................value.. 8.3 11.7 4.9 11.3 19.9
Metal manufactures, n.e.c....................................value.. 35.3 35.1 40.5 37.1 40.0
Electric household refrigerators and freezerse...............number.. 17,325 25,232 27,923 28,871 32,383
value.. 2.9 4.0 4.3 4.5 4.9
Radio and television apparatus..............................value.. 24.4 24.0 22.4 21.0 23.3
Other electrical machinery and apparatus.....................value.. 53.1 50.5 54.9 54.0 56.8
Power generating machinery, n.e.c...........................value.. 14.6 16.6 20.1 20.6 19.2
Construction, excavating, lining, oil field, and related
achinery...................................................value.. 64.4 59.4 57.4 57.5 58.1
Ibnhine tools includingg metal-touing machine tools) and
parts, exclusive of Special Category Type 16................value.. 13.4 17.2 10.9 12.8 14.5
atsplvrwking meaonues and parts, except machine
tool and part....................... .............value.. 11.8 10.7 11.4 13.2 13.8
Textile, sewing and shoe menhinery........................ value.. 11.8 12.0 9.0 9.0 7.9
Otb industrial machinery and parts............,.......... valbe.. 77.5 77.6 69.6 70.8 75.6
See footeotes at mad ao table.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 1111261112 087 111111111144
3 1262 08587 1944


UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC MERCHANDISE BT ECONOMIC CLASSES AND LEADING COMMODITIES:
SEPTEMBER 1960 AND SELECTED PERIODS-Continued

Monthly average
Economic class and commodity September August September
1960 1960 1959
1959 1958

Finished mnufactures-Continued
Office, sqpounting, and computing machines and part ..........value,. 16.9 15.4 11.4 12.1 11.1
Agricullural machines, implements and parts ............. ... value.. 8.3 11.4 9.6 12.0 10.3
Tractors...;: ..... ................;........................ number.. 2,773 2,466 3,306 5,313 4,183
value.. 18.3 18.2 19.2 17.7 15.8
Tractor parts and acessories................................valu.. 11.5 11.5 13.7 11.9 10.1
Motor trucks and busses,commercial (new)................... number.. 9,070 26,870 10,185 13,495 12,322
value.. 21.3 29.7 21.7 26.7 24.7
Passenger cars, nonmilitary (new)................. .........number.. 4,321 3,885 5,859 8,699 10,203
value.. 9.0 7.4 12.1 18.3 21.6
Automobile parts for assembly and replacement.................value.. 40.3 35.5 45.6 44.4 39.3
Military automobiles, trucks, busses, trailers, parts,
accessories and service equipment; commercial maintenance
and repair trucks .(new......................................value.. 2.9 3.8 95.2 9.6 '18.1
Aircraft, parts and accessories...............................value.. 116.0 97.3 55.3 64.1 81.0
Merchant ships, nonmilitary, n.e.c.........................number.. 8 9 8 11 11
value.. 0.6 2.5 0.6 7.5 6.3
Railway transportation equipment...........................value.. 8.3 8.0 5.7 8.6 17.4
Antibiotcs.....................................................value.. 6.7 7.2 5.9 5.7 5.,
Other medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations..............value.. 14.8 17.7 20.3 17.9 17.7
Soap and toilet preparations................................value.. 2.2 1.8 2.1 1.9 18
Small arms, machine guns, parts and accessories, n.e.c........value.. 2.0 2.9 2.1 2.4 6.4
Ammunition, components and parts.............................value.. 15.0 17.9 10.8 16.7 15.6
Special Category Type 16.......................... .............value.. 22.0 24.7 38.8 46.8 42.2
All other finished manufactures, exclusive of Special
Category Type 16......................... ..............value.. 132.3 134.2 9129.9 127.7 9121.0

*Revised from the figure of $1,594.4 million published in the September 1960 issue of Report No. FT 900-E.
1Includes $53.6 million of Military Mutual Security Program shipments ($25.5 million to eastern Europe).
21ncludes $62.6 million of Military Mutual Security Program shipments ($27.6 million to Western Europe). 3[nludes
$79.7 million of Military Mutual Security Program shipments ($49.9 million to Western Europe). Includes #102.3
million of Military Mutual Security Program shipments ($54.9 million to Western Europe). Includes $128.6 million
of Military Mutual Security Program shipments ($58.6 million to Western Europe). 6See the April 1958 issue of
Foreign Trade Statistics Notes for explanation of Special Categories and list of commodities included. 7For security
reasons, data on exports of all forms of uranium, thorium and special nuclear material (Schedule B commodity numbers
62510-62590) are excluded from export statistics. Includes data for Schedule B commodity numbers 30399 and 30855,
converted to square yards on the basis of four square yards per pound; and B number 30610, converted to square yards on
the basis of three square yards per pound. 9Figures are revised to correct erroneous inclusion of data for Schedule B
commodity number 79080 (Commercial maintenance and repair trucks, new) in the totals for "All other finished manufa-
tures" rather than 'Military automobiles, trucks, busses, trailers, parts, accessories and service equipment; commercial
maintenance and repair trucks, new" in the issues of Report No. FT 930-E for periods prior to January 1960.









U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ..a ,S 5S -
BUJtAU OF THE CENW
WASHINGTON .S D. C.
O"L. minw


UNIV OF FLORIDA LIBRS
DOCUMENTS DEPT
GAINESVILLE FLA

ZF 0999 I


.




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