U.S. foreign trade;

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Material Information

Title:
U.S. foreign trade;
Series Title:
Its Summary report FT 930-E
Alternate title:
United States foreign trade; export trade by commodity
Physical Description:
v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Washington

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Sept. 1955-Dec. 1966.
General Note:
Supplements accompany some numbers.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 023118293
oclc - 27948979
System ID:
AA00013019:00066

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Preceded by:
U.S. foreign trade; trade by commodity


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Full Text



C r. /3-


U.S. DEPAMENT OF COMMERCE
rm H. Mll, SemS





UNITED STATES FOREIGN


JULY 1960


EXPORT TRADE BY COMMODITY


he Bureau of the Census, Department of Commeroe, announced
t hWat the decline in United States exports of domestic
Irndlse from $1,721.7 million in June, to $1,682.5 million
m aiS, a change of about two percent, reflected lower levels
of exports of all at the economic classes of commodities except
aols materials. July exports of domestic merchandise vere,
laomer, about 16 percent higher than the July 1959 total of
1453.0 dlllion. These totals include data an M.S.Pr (military)

'Inth M.S.P. (military) shipments excluded, exports of do-
melatO merchandise during July mounted to $1,612.3 million,
a Ifil lightly lower than the June total of $1,621.7 alllin,3
tat about 20 parent higher than the July 1959 total of $1,338.4
=s[11an.

Reports of soeminnufacntres fell from $333.3 million in
Jame to $33.5 million in July largely as a result of decreases


SBhle from the figr of $1,700.6 miBlion plblLehd in the June 1960
lie pf thbis liasar. Me ny 160 dastio merBhaniise total ma rerised
fest 1t;775.6 to $1,793.5 million. See foaotnte a1 an pae four t this
on* the opentg of ths Saint Immimra Same in the spring of 1959,
@&00*lm, dela dlelowpd In tu.u-tting Ma d1ipper's Ezpor Bclln-stio
(th ula ara of the aport tatitios) to the Bin As a remit, the
JSs~a'ViiS atfiguas included about $15.0 million wohi noilly would
hes tea n earlier m othb (iHe or June, 1959). die $15.0 million me
oa tMteA i lergly in export of oil e.ds, worn, and "other gainss"
\23fn LBo.


in exports of individual cumodities included in this econdmie
class as follows: reude vegetable oils and fate, from $15.1 to
$6.6 million; iron and steel plates, sheets and strips, from
$40.3 to $36.1 million; distillate and residual fuel oil, from
$9.3 to $5.6 million; and alundium semdmanufactures, from $14.7
to $11.7 million. The drop In exports of finished manufacture
from $975.7 to $962.6 million reflected a sizeable decrease in
exports of automobile parts for assembly and replacement, from
$47.2 to $34.2 million, and lesser decreases in exports of other
individual commodities included in this eoncmic class as
follows: motor truok and busses, from $35,4 to $29.5 ml!lioan
railway transportation equipment, fr 14.3 to $9.4 0n11ias;
steel mill meufacture, from $14.5 to 10.2 ullion and
construction, excavatig, mining, oil field, and related a-
chinery, from $68.6 to 65.5 million. A decline in exports of
milled rice, from $10.7 to $7.8 mllian, vas the chief factr
in the decrease in exports of .,armp acted foodstuffs from $90.5
to $83.3 million.

Lower levels of exports of' fresh or dried vegetables,
from $10.9 to $6.4 million, and corn, frm $24.4 to $20.5
million, accounted for the bulk of the decrease in exports of
rude fdodsutffs from $130.43 to $126.6 million.

During the period, exports of crude material climbed fro
$191.93 to $196.6 million as a substantial increase in exports
of unmamfaatured cotton from $65.4 to $86.5 million was partly
offset by a decrease in exports of unmamnfatured tobacco, fram
$22.2 to $14.7 dmllion.


EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


00V3MEU : Export statistics include government as well as
an-govemnt shipdante to foreign countries. The export sta-
tistics, therefore,- -nclude Artual Seourity Program military
aid, xtual Secuity Program eemamic aid and Department of the
AfW Civilian Supply shalpnte. Separate figures for Mutual
Security Program military aid are shown in the footnotes of this
morurt. Bhipment to United States armed forces and diplomatic
disione abroad far their an use are excluded from export sta-
tisties. waited States trade with Puerto Rico and United States
possessions is not Included in this report, but the export trade
of Puerto Rico with foreign countries is included as a part of
the waited States export trade. Merchandise shipped in transit
through the United States between foreign countries is not in-
aluded in export statistics.
VATIIATI: The valuation definition used in the export
statistics in the value at the seaport, border point, or air-
port of exportatian. It is based on the selling price (or cost
If not sold) and inclndee Island freight, insurance, and other
charges to the port of exportation. Transportation and other
costs beyond the United States port of exportation are excluded.
Fewer, in soe instances the valuation may not be reported in
seeardance with this definitim, particularly where the export
value is difficult to determine or must be estimated. None of
the values have been adjusted for changes in price level.


EFFECT OF SHAPLING: The value of export shipments individ-
ually valued at $100-$499 (about five percent of total export
value) is estimated by sampling. Effective with the statistics
for January 1960, the previous sample ratio of 10 percent has
been increased to a 50 percent sample for countries'other then
Canada with the 10 percent sample being retained for Canada.
The estimated values are distributed among the individual com-
modity totals. For the 1960 export figures in this report, the
probable variability due to sampling is less than $50,000 or
less than a trivial percentage which can be ignored. For pe-
riods prior to 1960, the probable variability due to sampling
is less than $50,000 or less than two percent of the individual
totals shown. The largest variation from rounding of figures
is $50,000. For further information regarding sampling pro-
cedures, see the September 1953, February 1954, January and
June 1956, and the October-December 1959 issues of Foreign
Trade Statistics Notes.

Further information regarding coverage, valuation, etc.,
is contained in the "General Explanation" in foreword of Report
No. FT 410. For complete statement, see foreword in Foreign
Comerce and Navigation of the United States.


CNSUs


Prepared in the Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division
For sale by the Bureau of the Census, Washingtoo 25. D. C. Price 10#, annual subscription $1.00
or both FT 930-E and FT 930-1
USCOMMDC








W D STA nS qO v DOISTIC iEMlrCBaM -, B I mOOIKMe CLASSES AmD ImADIDM COOD S:
JULY 1960 AND SCUWEED PERIOD
(Quantity' n units indicated; value it iillions of dollars. Figures for 1960 have not been revised to include published
correcting, except for special gorrectiona published with the July 1960 reports. Figures for 1959 include revi-
slapublished with the Deeambr 1959 reports, or earlier, but do not include revisiLom published during 1960.
Total repr e ent sum of un~Bui e figures, hence my vary slightly frcm sa of rounded mounts. See Explanation
of Statistics" for information on sampling procedures and effect thereof on data shown.)


Mnatly average
Boano o alus and o rmdlty July June JUl
1960 1960 1959
1959 1958


Ttal..........................................value..

Crde matcrials.................................value..
Hides and iMan, ra, empt fur .................. almu..
Animal and fish oil and greases, inedible.......1,000 Ib..
value..
Oileeds ...................................... value..
tobacco, mmiuftwed .......................... 1,000 lb..
value..
Cotton, uianufatured ........................1,000 bales..

Coal. ................... .................. 1,000 .tns..
value..
rude petle............................. ....... 1,000 bbl..
value..
All other crse materials...........................value..



other foodtu ...................................value..
, reh .................ied.......................1,000 bu..
value..
ruWheat......... reh .. ..........................1,000 bu..
value..



Crude foodstuff- exported for relief or charit by
lndividuuld and private ageniee ................... value..
A31 otber crude foodstuf. s ........................... valu..
Other oainf ............ .........................value..
Vegetable, fresh or d ri........................ 1,000 b..
value..
Fruit, fresh or fron......................... 1,000 Ib..
value..
Crude foodstuffs exported for relief or charity by
individuals and private agencies...................value...
All other crtde foodstuff.s**...............*.value..

MHzufaetured foodstuffs....................... ..value..


Dat ai d eat product.. ................ ..........1,000 lb..
value..

Lshrd....................... ...................1,000 b..
value..
Dairy products...................................1,000 lb..
value..






Vegetables, canned and prepared ..................... valuU..
Fi, candied, prepared, ete.....................1,000 Ib..
valueI..
Called rie ............................... 1,000,000 Ib..
value..



Wheat floor ....................................1,000 wgt..
value..
Vegetables, nd related ad prepared........................value..





rlmuran ttumd fooetuffs exported vr relief o"r charity
bFruit, dried and evaprate d..................1..000 b..
l other mnut d foo .................. value..






Samiummfmtures, % elueive of Spmecal Category
s16 .................r .... ..................... vlalue..
Canted fruit......................................,000 Ib..
value..
Fruit Jubbes..................................1,000 gal.
value..
Vegetable oils, fat. and waxes, refined..........1,000 lb..
value..
Sugar and related products..........................value.
Manufactured foodstuffs exported far relief or charity
by individuals and private agencies................value...
All other manufactured foodstuffs...................value..

Ssamsnmfafetures, 'hxolnsive of Special Category
Type 1.........................................value..
Leater...........................value..
Synthetic rubber...................... ........1,000 lb..
value..


*2-1 "1 -7


41.448-6


196.6 1m191.9 138.1 159.5 178.2
6,1 5.2 5.6 5.2 4.6
147,763 120,016 123,105 120,904 92,427
9.7 7.9 9.4 9.3 8.0
23.6 "*27.9 30.6 26.4 18.0
20,560 29,574 23,070 38,801 40,191
14.7 22.2 16.8 28.9 293.
681 518 153 333 398
86.5 65.4 15.9 37.7 55.1
3,392 3,897 3,797 3,251 4,381
31.0 35.9 36.1 31.5 43.8
247 436 174 210 362
0.7 1.1 0.5 0.6 1.2
24.4 "*26.2 23.2 20.0 17.9

126.6 *130.4 138.1 120.3 106.6
15,876 **19,029 22,263 1s,250 14,986
20.5 "*24.4 28.9 23.8 19.7
37,411 **36,801 33,542 29,712 27,520
63.9 **61.0 57.4 51.0 47.5
19.4 **17.1 29.1 23.1 19.9
125,375 232,839 125,775 141,027 118,444
6.4 10.9 7.4 7.9 6.1
169,178 153,866 156,895 125,300 110,949
11.8 11.6 11.9 9.0 8.9

0.4 0.5 0.2 0.3 0.3
4.2 4.7 3.3 5.2 4.3

83.3 90.5 96.0 89.7 91.8
26,431 26,734 28,665 29,244 9,702
8.3 8.0 8.4 8.8 6.9
42,939 62,724 58,365 50,347 32,404
4.4 6.0 5.6 5.0 4.4
44,399 38,329 63,272 40,548 40,495
7.9 9.0 11.4 7.9 8.4
2,086 1,503 6,229 5,670 3,437
1.0 0.8 1.4 1.9 1.3
130 165 141 125 103
7.8 10.7 9.2 8.3 8.
1,548 1,957 1,253 2,236 2,259
6.0 7.5 5.1 8.5 9.6
3.9 4.6 3.5 3.4 3.6
7,876 7,312 3,442 11,654 16,305
1.7 1.6 0.9 2.7 3.4
19,830 19,740 26,087 29,003 30,514
3.1 3.1 4.1 4.4 4.7
3,580 3,727 2,447 2,676 3,024
3.5 4.4 3.4 3.6 3.9
56,393 67,139 112,732 57,600 66,807
7.1 7.6 17.4 8.6 10.6
2.2 1.6 1.6 1.9 2.0

13.1 11.4 10.5 9.0 12.6
13.4 14.1 13.4 15.7 12.3

313.51 0*333.31 213.01 205.2 189.8


2.3
64,467
17.1


.2.2
66,097
16.8


1.8
58,834
15.3


2.2
54,784
14.2


2.1
36,716
9.8


See footnotes at end of table.










WirID SBiTES E US OF DOMESTIC MCHANDISE, BY ECONIC CLASSES AND LEADING COUODITIES:
JULY 1960 AND SELECTED PFIODS-Continued

Monthly average
Econmc class and Coemdity July7 Jmue July
1960 1960 1959
1959 1958

Serlmaina tures, exclusive of Special Category Type 16-Continued
Nval Stores, gum and reinse ................................value... 5.7 5.6 4.2 3.7 3.0
Vegetable oils and fate, crude.............................1,000 Ib.. 63,943 158,583 120,066 72,440 28,801
value.. 6.6 15.1 13.4 8.0 3.5
Cotton seBmnufanotures ....................................1,000 Ib.. 33,837 36,031 26,440 29,090 24,573
value.. 5.5 5.2 3.9 4.2 3.8
0ool seeamanufatures .................. ................1,000 lb.. 12,356 12,738 12,864 12,244 9,392
value.. 1.9 1.9 2.1 1.9 1.7
Raymn, spln and other man-ade textile
eaUminuifatures ...... .. ............................ 1,000 Ib.. 18,069 16,729 11,325 12,014 9,105
value.. 15.3 12.8 7.9 9.2 7.1
S i products ........................................ 1,000 bd.ft.. 68,899 83,094 66,833 65,606 60,626
value.. 8.5 10.2 7.9 7.5 6.5
Wood pilp..............................................1,000 a.tons.. 102 111 57 54 43
value.. 13.4 14.5 8.5 7.9 6.5
KeOl oil, distillate a e residual .........................1,000 bbl.. 1,776 3,221 2,690 2,833 3,325
value.. 5.6 9.3 7.1 7.7 9.8
Sulfur............................................... 1,000 1.tons.. 107 169 175 134 131
value.. 2.6 4.1 4.3 3.3 3.3
Steel =ill products, semifiniahed.............................value.. 1.1 0.8 0.6 0.4 1.3
Iron and steel bars, including bar else shapes.............1,000 Ib.. 9,844 19,516 12,730 11,182 20,516
value.., 1.3 2.3 1.4 1.2 2.0
Iron and steel plates, sheets and stripe..................1,000 Ib.. 387,645 426,543 107,987 83,486 157,053
value.. 36.1. 40.3 13.6 9.9 15.0
Tin mill products, including tin mill black plate..........1,000 Ib.. 152,375 164,131 94,613 76,642 82,386
value.. 13.6 14.4 7.3 6.1 6.5
Other iron and steel seiminufactures........................value.. 18.8 *22.7 18.2 15.7 10.3
Alumlmm seaimumfactures.....................................value.. 11.7 14.7 4.6 6.4 3.6
Copper mdeml uftature ......................................value.. 32.6 28.4 6.9 8.4 16.9
Coal-tar and other cyclic chemical product.................value.. 15.7 14.2 7.8 8.7 8.4
Plastics and resin pterials...............................1,000 lb.. 67,471 61,557 56,285 57,839 46,971
value.. 24.3 22.5 21.4 21.5 17.4
Madustrial chemicals, exclusive of Special Category Type 16...value.. 25.2 28.3 19.3 21.2 17.9
Pimnts ............... .................. .................1,000 b.. 50,454 59,064 55,536 55,824 52,048
value.. 5.3 5.7 5.5 5.6 5.1
Nitrogenous cbahicl tertilser mteriala ..................1,000 lb.. 94,080 86,624 125,286 112,061 105,897
value.. 2.3 2.4 2.8 3.0 2.9
All other seminuamactures, exol. Special Category Type 16....value.. '41.1 738.7 727.2 727.3 '25.3

Finished manufaSotues......................................value.. 962.6 975.7 867.8 873.9 910.8
Truck, bus, and autambile tires (casings), new...........thousands.. 119 146 79 92 102
value.. 3.6 4.3 3.2 3.8 4.7
Other rubber maufactures.....................................value.. 8.7 9.2 7.0 8.1 7.8
Cigarettes..................................................illioae.. 1,622 1,805 1,938 1,631 1,506
value.. 7.1 7.8 8.4 7.0 6.4
Other tobacco manufactre.................................... value.. 0.6 0.7 0.4 0.8 0.7
Cotton cloth...........................................1,000 sq.yd.. 40,914 33,497 832 882 839,357 41,744
value.. 11.8 '10.0 9.3 810.7 s11.3
Other cotton anufactures......................................value.. 8.1 8.3 7.4 7.9 8.1
bl mnrfacmues.................................................value.. 0.7 0.5 0.5 0.7 0.7
Rayon, lacn ana other man-mde textile manufactures..........value.. 12.4 12.5 11.2 12.9 12.4
Other textile manfactures............ ..... ....................value.. 4.9 4.8 5.1 5.4 4.8
Wood nma ctures, advaneed..................................value.. 2.6 2.6 2.4 2.6 2.6
aper and rnumractures........................................value.. 20.6 21.1 18.3 19.5 18.3
btor fuel and gpoll, including et fuels (all types)......value.. 6.2 7.2 10.3 8.1 11.0
Lubricating oil.............................................. value.. 18.0 19.9 15.6 15.2 15.5
ass and product........................... ............ ........value.. 6.7 6.1 6.2 7.0 6.6
Steel mill anufactures...................................... value.. 10.2 14.5 12.7 11.3 19.9
ebtal ammufactures, n.e.c.....................................value.. 33.4 35.2 38.2 37.1 40.0
Electri household refrigerators and freesersa.............. nuber.. 21,983 24,563 32,633 28,871 32,383
value.. 3.7 3.9 4.9 4.5 4.9
radio and television apparatus................................value.. 25.2 20.7 20.3 21.0 23.3
Other electrical ainmry and apparatus.....................value.. 60.2 51.1 52.8 54.0 56.8
Po p generating mlhinery, n.e.c ............................value.. 22.9 19.6 16.7 20.6 19.2
Camatrsutlon, emavating, mining, oil field, and related
mdhimyi............................... ...................v... la .. 65.5 68.6 59.0 57.5 58.1
Ibhin tool (Siumlasig matal-tamoin imo e tool) and
pets, eoXlaeo Ot Special Catega y T pe 1................value.. 19.7 19.2 8.9 12.8 14.5
utpamkbing mains anmd parts, except emdbla
teooa and petas................... ..... ...g...4d.J .. ,.. ..lVp 12.3 10.7 12.8 13.2 13.8
'i lD; g ad& shoe Mhinery..... ..... ...... StM3i.. 11.0 11.4 8.8 9.0 7.9
ta ta.lu*ri l A h aid Parts ....... 89.3 84.1 73.0 70.8 75.6
See footate at d of table. *
ri f ?









ONIT) STATES EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC MERCHANDISE, BT CONOIC CLASSES AND LEAD( bDITIES:
JULY 1960 AND SELECTED PERIODS-Cntined

Monthly average
Economic class and commodity 1960 1960 195
1959 1958

Finished manufactures-Continued
Office, accounting, and computing machines and parta..........value,. 16.7 17.2 11.1 12.1 1 t.'-
Agricultural machines, implements and parts ...................alue.. 11.9 14.6 15.1 12.0 14'0
Tractors .................................................... number.. 3,030 4,201 4,901 5,313 4,183
value.. 18.0 18.6 20.0 17.7 13.@
Tractor parts and accessories .............................vale.. 12.1 12.6 12.3 11.9 10.1
Motor trucks and busses, commercial (new)...................number.. 19,425 21,557 14,274 13,495 12,322
value.. 29.5 35.4 30.8 26.7 24.7
Passenger cars, nonmilitary (new) ...........................number.. 5,679 6,671 6,858 8,699 10,20'
value.. 10.6 13.0 13.4 18.3 21,6
Automobile parts for assembly and replacement................value.. 34.2 47.2 39.1 44.4 39.3
Military automobiles, trucks, busses, trailers, parts,
accessories and service equipment; commercial maintenance
and repair trucks (new)....................................value.. 6.9 6.4 '12.2 9.6 '18.1
Aircraft, parts and accessories..............................value.. 135.4 136.4 71.1 64.1 81,0
Merchant ships, nonmilitary, n.e.c................. ........number.. 9 19 8 11 rM.
value.. 0.7 2.1 1.8 7.5 6.3
Railway transportation equipment .............................value.. 9.4 14.3 6.9 8.6 17i
Antibiotics..................................................value.. 5.9 5.2 7.2 5.7 5.3
Other medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations...............value.. 18.1 15.6 19.0 17.9 LY.'
Soap and toilet preparations................................value.. 2.0 2.1 1.8 1.9 13A8
Small arms, machine guns, parts and accessories, n.e.c........value.. 2.1 3.3 3.1 2.4 6.4
Ammunition, components and parts.............................value.. 11.4 11.3 11.7 16.7 15 6
Special Category Type 16......................................value.. 37.1 26.3 54.1 46.8 42.2
All other finished manufactures, exclusive of Special
Category Type 16 .......................................value.. 135.1 139.8 '124.2 127.7 9121.0

*Revised. See footnote one on. front page of this report. *EReflects revisions made subsequent to the release of the
June 1960 issue of this report. See footnote 10, below, for similar revisions to the May 1960 data. fSee footnote 2
on front page of this report. Includes $70.2 million of Military Mutual Security Program shipments ($31.0 million to
Western Europe). 2Includes $100.0 million of Military Mutual Secruity Program shipments ($31.8 million to Western
Europe). 'Includes $114.6 million of Military Mutual Security Program shipments ($56.7 million to Western Europe).
4Includes $102.3 million of Military Mutual Security Program shipments ($54.9 million to Western Europe). "Includea
$128.6 million of Military Mutual Security Program shipments ($58.6 million to Western Europe). 6See the April 1958
issue of Foriegn Trade Statistics Notes for explanation of Special Categories and list of commodities Included. '7ar
security reasons, data on exports of all forms of uranium, thorium and special nuclear material (Schedule B commodity
numbers'62510-62590) are excluded from export statistics. Includes data for Schedule B commodity numbers 30399 and 30855,
converted to square yards on the basis of four square yards per pound; and B number 30610, converted to square yards on the
basis of three square yards per pound. 9Figures are revised to correct erronious inclusion of data for Schedule B .
commudity number 79080 (Commercial maintenance and repair trucks, new) in the totals for "All other finished mamnfacturee"
rather than 'Military automobiles, trucks, busses, trailers, parts, accessories and service equipment; commercial main-
tenance and repair trucks, new" in the issues of Report No. FT 930-E for periods prior to January 1960. 10The 1ay 1960
totals originally published for the following economic classes and leading commodities have been revised as indicated:
crude materials, from $191.3 to $197.2 million; oil seeds from $33.2 to $36.0 million; "all other crude materials", fr i
$22.5 to $25.5 million; crude foodstuffs. from $141.4 to $153.1 million; corn, from $20.3 to $23.3 million; heat, from
$81.6 to $84.5 million; "other grains", from $14.5 to $20.2 million; semimanufactures, from $310.0 to $310.4 million; and
crude vegetable oils and fats, $11.0 to $11.5 million.




mramm ,smoSe .
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ....,muwuam
BUREAU OF THE CENiU
WASHINGTON 25. & C.
MLOWSIAB MIgME


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