U.S. foreign trade;

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Title:
U.S. foreign trade;
Series Title:
Its Summary report FT 930-E
Alternate title:
United States foreign trade; export trade by commodity
Physical Description:
v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Washington

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Sept. 1955-Dec. 1966.
General Note:
Supplements accompany some numbers.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 023118293
oclc - 27948979
System ID:
AA00013019:00065

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Preceded by:
U.S. foreign trade; trade by commodity


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Full Text





I i S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
Frederick H. Mueller, Secretary




UNITED STATES

UNITED STATES


BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Robert W. Burgess, Director


FOREIGN


FT 930-E


EXPORT TRADE BY COMMON


The Bureau of the Census, Department of Commereq announced
today that the slight increase in exports of domestic merchan-
dise .Era $1,460.5 million in Octoberl to $1,462.4 million in
w reflected increases in exports of crude materials,
a factvures, and crude foodstuffs which were largely off-
st decreases in exports of finished manufactures and manu-
factued foodstuffs. These figures include M.S.P. (military)
sbi)aamts.

Excluding M.S.P. (military) shipments, exports of domestic
merehandiae during November were valued at $1,360.2 million,
about one percent less than the October total of $1,376.8 mil-
lion, and about two percent less than the November 1958 total
of $1,393.1 million.

Exports of crude materials rose from $184.7 million in
October to $232.5 million in November as increases occurred in


A dlable records indicate that there mas a inamee in Septmber in
h lumber of nasels loaded during that month but not departing until Lbe
zfip-t o the following month or later. hise indicates that accelerated
Swamqel loading took place at the end of September in anticipation of
.'lanbhreman' strike. .Scme of this accelerated loading probably
ie eflaed in the Septmaber totals, but merchandise loaded in September
ain vessels departing October first or later are included in the October
tales in accordance with regular compiling procedures.


exports of unmanufactured cotton, from 46.2 to $78.0 million
and oil seeds, from $32.6 to .51.1 million. These gains were
slightly offset by a decline in exports of coal, from $31.5 to
26.2 million. The increase in exports of semimanufactures
from 183.5 to $193.6 million was mainly due to gains in exports
of vegetable oils and fats, from $4.3 to $8.7 million, and
synthetic rubber, from S10.7 to $14.2 million. Exports of
crude foodstuffs increased from $107.2 to $117.1 million,
reflecting a sizeable gain in exports of corn, from $16.0 to
$29.4 million, which was partially offset by a decline in ex-
ports of wheat, from $42.5 to $36.6 million.


During this period, exports of finished manufactures fell
from $876.5 to $824.7 million. The bulk of this decrease was
due to declines in exports of automobile parts for assembly and
replacement, from $45.7 to $35.6 million; construction, excava-
ting, mining and related machinery, from $58.4 to $50.0 million;
non-military merchant ships, from $7.6 to $0.2 million; and
tractors, from $16.? to $11.2 million. These declines were
partly offset by gains in exports of commercial motor trucks and
busses, from $23.1 to $29.8 million, and aircraft, parts and
accessories, from $57.1 to $61.9 million. The decrease in ex-
ports of manufactured foodstuffs, from $108.7 to $94.4 million,
reflected decreases in exports of refined vegetable oils, fats
and waxes, from $10.6 to $3.8 million; milled rice, from $13.2
to $7.6 million, and canned fruits, from $7.7 to $3.4 million.


EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


C0WEUE: Export statistics include government as well as
amn-govemnent shipments to foreign countries. The export sta-
sMatte, therefore, include Iitual Security Program military
aid, ittual Security Program economic aid and Department of the
lapw Civilian Supply shipments. Separate figures for Mutual
Seenrity Program military aid are shown in the footnotes of
this report. Shipments to Onited States armed forces and dip-
leaatie missions abroad for their own use are excluded from ex-
port statistics. United States trade with Puerto Rico, Hawaii,
and WUited States 'possessions is not included in this report,
but the export trade of Puerto Rico and Hawaii with foreign
countries is included as a part of the united States export
.trade. Ibrchandise shipped in transit through the United
States between foreign countries is not included in exports.

-VALUATION: The valuation definition used in the export
statistics is the value at the seaport, border point, or air-
port of exportation. It is based on the selling price (or cost
if not sold) and includes inland freight, insurance, and
other charges to the port of exportation. Transportation and
other coats beyond the United States port of exportation are


excluded. However, in some instances the valuation may not be
reported in accordance with this definition, particularly where
the export value is difficult to determine or must be estimat-
ed. None of the values have been adjusted for changes in price
level.
EFFECT OF SAMPLING: The value of export shipments indi-
vidually valued at 410L to $499 (about five percent of total
export value) is estimated by sampling. The estimated values
are distributed among the individual commodity totals shown in
the table. The probable variability in the export figures due
to sampling is less than two percent of the individual totals
shown, or less than $50,000. The largest variation from round-
ing of figures is $50,000. For further information regarding
the sampling procedures, see the September 1953, February 1954,
and the January and June 1956 issues of Foreign Trade Statis-
tics Notes.
Further information regarding coverage, valuation, etc., is
contained in the "General Explanation" in foreword of Report
No. FT 410. For complete statement, see foreword in Foreign
Commerce and Navigation of the United States.


USCOM--DC


Prepared in the Bureau of the Census. Foreign Trade Division
Vor sale by the Bureau or the Census, Washingtom 25. D. C. Price ito, uam al subscription $1.00
for both FT 930-F mad FT 930-1










UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC MERCHANDISE, BY ECONOMIC CLASSES AND LEADING COMMODITIES:
NOVEMBER 1959 AND SELECTED PERIODS
(Quantity in units indicated; value in millions of dollars. Figures for 1959 are as originally issued and have not been
revised to include published corrections. Figures for 1958 include revisions published with the December 1958 re-
ports, or earlier, but do not include revisions published during 1959. Totals represent sum of unrounded figures,
hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts. See "Explanation of Statistics" for information on sampling
procedures and effect thereof on data shown.)


Monthly average
Economic class and commodity Nvember October November
1959 1959 1958
1958 1957


Total........................................value..

Crude materials.................................value..
Hides and skins, raw, except furs...................value..
Animal and fish oils and greases, inedible.......1,000 lb..
value..
Oil seeds...........................................value..
Tobacco, unmanufactured.........................1,000 lb..
value..
Cotton, unmanufactured.,......................1,000 bales..
value..
Coal.......................................1,000 s.tons..
value..
Crude petroleum................................1,000 bbl..
value..
All other crude materials..........................value..

Crude foodstuffs................................value..
Corn.............. ... .........................1,000 bu..
value..
Wheat...........................................1,000 bu..
value..
Other grains........................................value..
Vegetables, fresh or dried.......................1,000 lb..
value..
Fruits, fresh or frosen..........................1,000 lb..
value..
Crude foodstuffs exported for relief or charity by
individuals and private agencies...................value..
All other crude foodstuffs.........................value..

Manufactured foodstuffs........................value..
Meat and meat products..........................1,000 lb..
value..
Lard............................................1,000 lb..
value..
Dairy products................................. 1,000 lb..
value..
Fish, canned, prepared, etc......................1,000 lb..
value..
Milled rice..................................1,000,000 lb..
value..
Wheat flour....................................1,000 cwt..
value..
Vegetables, canned and prepared....................value..
Fruits, dried and evaporated.....................1,000 lb..
value..
Canned fruits...................................1,000 lb..
value..
Fruit Juices, canned and frozen................1,000 gal..
value..
Vegetable oils, fate and waxes, refined.......... 1,000 lb..
value..
Sugar and related products.........................value..
Manufactured foodstuffs exported for relief or charity
by individuals and private agencies.................value..
All other manufactured foodstuffs.....;.............value..

Semimanufactures, exclusive of Special Category
Type 16.........................................value..
Leather............................................value..
Synthetic rubber................................1,000 lb..
value..


11,462.4


*21,460.5


31,581.6


'1,722.6


232.5 184.7 195.8 178.0 259.2
6.9 6.1 5.1 4.6 5.6
130,715 148,443 110,654 92,402 114,861
9.3 10,7 9.3 8.0 10.0
51.1 32.6 35.7 18.0 20.5
49,748 50,144 54,713 40,195 41,746
37.3 39.2 40.7 29.5 29.9
677 427 336 398 602
78.0 46.2 45.6 55.1 88.3
2,694 3,290 4,285 4,380 6,731
26.2 31.5 41.9 43.8 69.1
132 258 275 361 4,187
0.4 0.7 0.7 1.2 14.4
23.2 17.8 16.8 17.8 21.4

117.1 107.2 109.0 106.7 111.0
23,340 12,835 20,453 14,942 14,833
29.4 16.0 25.8 19.6 20.9
21,818 25,527 25,927 27,484 34,664
36.6 42.5 44.1 47.5 61.2
23.8 21.6 20.9 20.0 9.0
138,888 163,947 106,447 118,444 117,439
8.5 8.7 5.7 6.1 5.7
115,148 142,575 93,799 110,949 133,813
9.0 10.3 7.5 8.9 9.1

0.1 0.1 0.2 0.3 (M)
9.7 7.9 4.7 4.3 5.1

94.4 108.7 87.9 91.8 96.9
37,958 34,487 27,096 19,702 28,757
10.9 9.7 9.3 6.9 9.2
70,722 67,845 40,352 32,212 41,781
6.5 6.1 5.4 4.3 6.2
39,575 53,141 52,378 39,530 46,895
10.1 10.4 11.3 8.4 10.0
9,556 6,258 5,805 3,437 5,807
4.5 1.9 1.8 1.3 1.4
108 201 61 103 133
7.6 13.2 5.3 8.0 ..3il
1,931 1,684 2,245 2,259 2,207
7.5 6.8 9.3 9.6 9.4
3.6 4.4 3.4 3.6 3.8
27,946 43,367 19,695 16,305 17,198
5.9 9.1 5.2 3.4 3,0
23,218 57,108 18,885 30,514 26,313
3.4 7.7 3.0 4.7 3.9
2,435 2,083 2,182 3,024 3,134
2.8 3.0 2.8 3.9 3.3
27,751 65,893 11,612 66,807 42,901
3.8 10.6 2.0 10.6 7.2
1.9 2.4 2.6 2.0 2.3

6.6 5.3 10.3 12.5 (em)
19.5 18.1 16.1 12.4 27.0


193.6 183.5 213.4 189.6 270.2


2.4
54,727
14.2


2.6
40,283
10.7


2.3
38,254
10.2


2.1
36,716
9.8


1.8
38,335
10.2


See footnotes at end of table.


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UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC MERCHANDISE, BY ECONOMIC CLASSES AND LEADING COMMODITIES:
NOVEMBER 1959 AND SELECTED PERIODS-Continued

Monthly average
Economic class and commodity November October November
1959 1959 1958
1958 1957


Semimanufactures, exclusive of Special Category Type 16-Continued
Naval Stores, gums and resins................................value.. 4.4 3.5 2.8 3.0 3.5
Vegetable oils and fats ...................................1,000 lb.. 87,415 39,894 31,058 28,801 69,707
value.. 8.7 4.3 3.5 3.5 9.8
Cotton semimanufactures....................................1,000 lb.. 33,468 30,230 27,625 24,573 27,406
value.. 4.9 4.2 4.2 3.8 5.0
Wool semimanufacture......................................1,000 lb.. 12,230 11,861 11,745 9,392 13,327
value.. 1.8 1.8 1.7 1.7 2.4
Rayon, nylon and other man-made textile
semimanufactures........................................1,000 lb.. 15,327 12,196 10,906 9,105 8,956
value.. 11.1 9.3 7.3 7.1 6.6
Sawmill products......................................1,000 bd.ft.. 68,081 70,934 56,648 60,596 68,903
value.. 8.0 8.6 6.5 6.5 7.4
Wood pulp..............................................1,000 s.tons.. 45 47 47 43 52
value.. 6.2 6.4 7.0 6.5 8.0
Oas and fuel oil......................................... 1,000 bbl.. 1,665 2,818 3,770 3,313 6,496
value.. 5.2 .. ... 7,2 ... 10.7. .. ... 232
Sul ................................................1,000 l.tons.. 141 125 143 131 132
value.. 3.5 3.1 3.6 3.3 3.7
Steel mill products, semifinished...........................value.. 0.3 0.1 0.8 1.3 6.7
Iron and steel bars, including bar eise shapes............1,000 lb.. 7,336 8,344 26,977 20,516 35,772
value.. 0.8 1.0 2.4 2.0 3.1
Iron and steel plates, sheets and stripe...................1,000 lb.. 48,105 23,214 198,349 157,053 276,051
value.. 6.0 3.8 18.2 15.0 25.6
Tin mill products, including tin mill black plate..........1,000 lb.. 40,841 36,720 104,688 82,467 133,750
value.. 3.3 2.8 8.6 6.5 12.2
Other iron and steel semimanufactures.........................value.. 18.9 16.3 9.3 10.3 34.2
Alumiau semimanufactures......................................value.. 10.8 8.2 3.6 3.6 3.1
Copper semimanufacturea...................................... value.. 2.5 3.2 26.0 16.9 20.2
Coal-tar and other cyclic chemical products...................value.. 7.3 7.4 9.3 8.4 7.6
Plastics and resin materials..............................1,000 lb.. 53,315 56,736 55,078 46,907 41,112
value.. 20.1 21.4 20.9 17.4 15.6
Industrial chemicals, exclusive of Special Category Type 16...value.. 19.4 20.9 18.0 17.9 18,4
Pigmente...................................................1,000 lb.. 49,618 50,780 57,442 52,026 56,000
value.. 5.2 5.0 5.4 5.0 5.9
Nitrogenous fertilizer materials..........................1,000 lb.. 125,023 49,056 136,235 106,124 179,727
value.. 3.3 1.7 4.0 3.0 4.0
All other semimanufactures; excl. Special Category Type 1 ....value.. 25.2 30.0 27.1 725.2 732.1

Finished manufactures......................................value.. 824.7 876.5 975.6 908.3 985.3
Truck, bus, and automobile tires (casings), new...........thousands.. 97 98 118 102 146
value.. 3.8 3.6 7.1 4.7 85.3
Other rubber manufactures....................................value.. 8.6 8.7 8.1 7.8 8.7
Cigarettes................................................ millions.. 1,567 1,038 1,525 1,506 1,416
value.. 6.8 4.5 6.6 6.4 5.6
Other tobacco manufactures............. .....................value.. 0.6 0.5 0.5 0.7 0.5
Cotton cloth ...........................................1,000 sq.yd.. 37,167 44,742 38,473 941,76 45,65?
value.. 11.0 10.8 10.5 '11.3 12.3
Other cotton manufactures.................................... value.. 9.1 8.7 7.9 8.1 8.7
VCobl mmnu~ rture .....'........ ;........................value.. 0.8 1.7 0.7 0.7 0.7
Rayon, nylon and other man-made textile manufactures..........value.. 14.1 15.5 12.2 12.4 14.5
Other textile manufactures....................................value.. 5.7 6.5 5.0 4.8 5.1
Vood manufactures, advanced................................... value.. 3.0 2.8 2.8 2.6 2.7
Paper and manufactures.......................................value.. 18.2 19.9 20.9 18.3 18.4
Motor fuel and gasoline, including jet fuels (all type) ......value.. 6.4 7.1 13.1 10.9 16.1
Lubricating oil.............................................................value.. 11.5 15.0 16.8 15.5 16.2
Glass and products......................................value.. 7.3 7.7 6.9 6.6 6.7
Steel mill manufactures.....................................value.. 5.3 4.3 18.1 19.9 32.0
Metal manufactures, n.e.c..................................... value.. 35.7 39.1 40.9 40.0 43.1
Electric household refrigerators and freezers ................number.. 21,843 22,596 31,053 32,383 31,716
value.. 3.5 3.6 4.8 4.9 5.0
Radio and television apparatus........................ ..value.. 21.4 21.6 25.6 23.3 20.9
Other electrical machinery and apparatus..................... alue.. 54.4 63.9 61.3 55.7 59.9
Power generating machinery, n.e.e.............................value.. 20.0 22.5 17.6 18.9 19.7
Construction, excavating, mining and related machinery........value.. 50.0 58.4 56.8 57.9 74.5
Machine tools (including metal-forming machine tools) and
parts, exclusive of Special Category Type 1 .................value.. 11.7 11.3 18.3 14.4
Mtalworking machines and parts, except machine 26.2
tools and parts............................................. value.. 11.1 10.9 14.9 13.8
iextile, sewing and shoe machinery ...........................value.. 9.8 10.1 7.6 7.9 10.4
Other industrial machinery and parts.........................value.. 70.9 69.8 72.9 75.6 77.8

See footnotes at end of table.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

IIIIIIInIIII lIIIIIll111111
3 1262 08587 1357

UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC MERCHANDISE, BY ECONOMIC CLASSES AND LEADING COMIDDITIES:
NOVEMBER 1959 AND SELECTED PERIODS--Continued


Monthly average
Economic class and commodity November October November
1959 1959 1958
1958 1957


Finished manufactures-Continued
Office, accounting, and computing machines and parts ..........value,.
Agricultural machines, implements and parts ...................value..
Tractors ................................................number..
value..
Tractor parts and accessories................................value..
Motor trucks and busses, commercial (new)....................number..
value..
Passenger cars, nonmilitary (new) ...........................number..
value..
Automobile parts for assembly and replacement.................value..
Military automobiles, trucks, busses, trailers, parts,
accessories and service equipment; commercial maintenance
and repair trucks (new)......................................value..
Aircraft, parts and accessories..............................value..
Merchant ships, nonmilitary, n.e.c...........................number..
value..
Railway transportation equipment .............................value..
Antibiotics ...................................................value..
Other medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations...............value..
Soap and toilet preparations.................................value..
Small arms, machine guns, parts and accessories, n.e.c........value..
Ammunition, components and parts .............................value..
Special Category Type 16..................................... value..
All other finished manufactures, exclusive of Special
Category Type 1 ............................................value..


11.9
8.9
3,321
11.2
12.6
15,175
29.8
9,932
20.5
35.6


10.6
61.9
3
0.2
14.4
4.9
16.7
2.1
2.3
10.8
47.1

122.7


13.5
8.2
3,573
16.7
12.0
10,629
23.1
10,261
22.3
45.7


9.8
57.1
26
7.6
11.9
6.3
18.7
2.3
3.0
20.9
43.1

125.6


11.2
8.1
3,205
11;.4
6.7
7,222
17.5
10,758
24.8
42.1


26.3
61.0
4
29.5
12.1
5.2
17.8
2.1
16.0
23.2
84.4

118.2


11.1
10.3
4,183
15.8
10.1
12,200
24.5
10,146
21.5
39.3


18.1
81.0
11
5.7
17.4
5.5
17.7
1.8
6.4
15.6
42.2

121.1


1010..6 ...
11.1
4,392
20.7

16,040
36.2
11,923
25.1
42.0


14.3
85.7
.28
8.1
12.1 1
6.9
16.8
2.0
3.1
17.
37.9.

133.2,


*See footnote one on front page of this report. **Data for periods prior to January 1958 not available. 1 In.
eludes $102.2 million of Military Mutual Security Program shipments(S69.9 million to Western Europe). 2Includes-$83.i
million of Military mutual Security Program shipments (836.1 million to Western Europe). 3Includes $188.5 million *.f'
Military Mutual Security Program shipments ($58.3 million to Western Euro e). 4Lncludes t128.6 million of Military
Mutual Security Program shipments (358.6 million to Western Europe). Includes $113.0 million of Military Mutual
Security Program shipments (859.4 million to Western Europe). 6See the April 1958 issue of Foreign Trade Statisties"
Notes for explanation of Special Categories and list of commodities included. 7For security reasons, data on exports
of all forms of uranium, thorium and special nuclear material (Schedule B commodity numbers 62510-62590) are excluded
from export statistics. 8Data for periods prior to January 1958 also include new and used motorcycle tires and used
truck, bus, and automobile tires. Includes data for Schedule B commodity numbers 30399 and 30855, converted to
square yards on the basis of four square yards per pound; and B number 30610, converted to square yards on the basis of
three square yards per pound. 1 Data for periods prior to January 1958 do not include exports of electronic cam-
puters and parts.


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