U.S. foreign trade;

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Title:
U.S. foreign trade;
Series Title:
Its Summary report FT 930-E
Alternate title:
United States foreign trade; export trade by commodity
Physical Description:
v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Washington

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Sept. 1955-Dec. 1966.
General Note:
Supplements accompany some numbers.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 023118293
oclc - 27948979
System ID:
AA00013019:00064

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U.S. foreign trade; trade by commodity


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C9 3. /^; f p


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMME E
Frederick H. Mueller, Secretary


UNITED STATES FORE


UNITED STATES FORE


SUMMARY REPORT
FT 930-E


EXPORT TRADE BY COMM


The Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce, announced
today that the decline in United States exports of domestic
merchandise from $1,454.0 million in July' to 1i,384.1 million.
in August, a decrease of about five percent, resulted mainly
from lower levels of exports of finished manufactures, crude
foodstuffs, crude materials, and semimanufactures. Exports of
manufactured foodstuffs increased slightly during the period.
The August 1959 domestic merchandise export total was at approx-
imately the same level as the August 1958 total of $1,382.0
million. M.S.P. (military) shipments are included in these
totals.

Excluding M.S.P. (military) shipments, the August domestic
merchandise export total was $1,287.0 million, a level ab.ut
four percent less than tne $1,339.4 million reported in July,
but a little higher than the August 1958 total of $1,268.8
million.

Exports of finished manufactures fell from $867.8 million
in July to $828.7 million in August owing chiefly t.:. declines

JAs a result of increased shipments at Great lakes ports with the jpen-
ing of the Saint lawrence Seamy, some abnormal delays developed in the
truanmittal of Shipper's Export Declarations from which the export, statis-
tics are compiled. An attempt to overcome this delay was started in July.
As a result the July export figures include about $15.0 million which
would nocally have been in earlier months (Way or June). This 115.0
million is concentrated largely in reportss of oil seeds, corn and "other
grains." It appears that the sibuatbon has now been remedied and the
a' ust statistics do not contain a more than normal amount of carry-over
of shipments from prior months.


in ex-po.rts .f individual commodities included in this economic
class as f.-liows: Special Category Type 1 commodities, from
$54.1 t.o $41.7 mili.:n; steel mill manufactures, from 812.7 to
55.? million: military automobiles, trucks, busses, and parts,
from $12.0 to $5.3 million; c.-mnmercial motor truc ki and busses,
from 530.8 t- -2.'5 miliii.n, aircraft, parts anrd accessories,
from 71. i t.:. 66. 1 rrLdii.rin, tracto.rc, from $i20.0 t.: 15.-.
miili..n; and n.rnmilitary passenger cars, from i3.4 tL-. S9.1
million. rnese decreases were partiL' ..ffset, however, by ani
appreciable rise in exp.;.rts :f anmurniti-in, cocmpcnents and parts,
frc.m *.il.7 tr. 20.3 million. The decline in -e)rp.'rt of crude
f'.odstuffs from $1i3.9 tc 3117.2 milli.-n resulted from lower
ie'.els -f exports o.f wneat, from 5C".2 to. $5.2 million and
corn, from 32.'t t, S19.ci mii.-nri. LE-po.rt. -f crude materials
fell from i33'.6 t.. 813.6 million as deciines in exp:rtr cf
cil seeds, from i30.( t 1iS5.-. million aid u~rranufacture~d
cotton, from $Si5. to $11.6 million were part: .ffret by anr
Increase in exTocrts of manufactured t:.accc.:., frcm rt17.- to
$29.3 million. The decline in exports of semimnnufactures
from 5213.5 to 208.3 million was due in part t..u decrease in
exports :.f ir.on an-d steel plates, sheets, and strips, from
.i13.t t.. S..3 million and vegetable .:-il a nd fats, from l'.4
to 3O.4 million.

The Elight increase reported in expo-rts *.f manufactured
C'oodstuffrs from $9-.i t.o 1c9.3 million was due in part t.- gains
in exports .'.f canned fruits, from 54.i to 3S.? million an.n
milled rice, from $9.2 to 3i2.7 miillicn. However, exports .:.f
refined vegetable oils, fats and waxxes, aiso included in thni
economic class, dropped from t17.4 to $12.3 million.


EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


COViRGE: Export statistics include government as well as
non-govement shipments to foreign countries. The export sta-
tistics, therefore, include Ittual Security Program military
aid, IMatual Security Program economic aid and Department of the
Ary Civilian Suppl shipments. Separate figures for Mutual
Security Program military aid are shown in the footnotes of
this report. Shipments to United States armed forces and dip-
lomatic missions abroad for their own use are excluded from ex-
port statistics. United States trade with Puerto Rico, Hawaii,
and United States possessions is not included in this report,
but the export trade of Puerto Rico and Hawaii with foreign
countries is included as a part of the United States export
trade. Merchandise shipped in transit through the United
States between foreign countries is not included in exports.

VALUATION: The valuation definition used in the export
statistics is the value at the seaport, border point, or air-
port of exportation. It is based on the selling price (or cost
if not sold) and includes inland freight, insurance, and
other charges to the port of exportation. Transportation and
other costs beyond the United States port of exportation are


excluded. However, in some instances the valuation may not be
reported in accordance with this definition, particularly where
the export value is difficult to determine or must be estimat-
ed. None of the values have been adjusted for changes in price
level.
EFFECT OF SAMPLING: The value of export shipments indi-
vidually valued at $100 to $499 (about five percent of total
export value) is estimated by sampling. The estimated values
are distributed among the individual commodity totals shown in
the table. The probable variability in the export figures due
to sampling is less than two percent of the individual totals
shown, or less than $50,000. The largest variation from round-
ing of figures is $50,000. For further information regarding
the sampling procedures, see the September 1953, February 195',
and the January and June 1956 issues of Foreign Trade Statis-
tics Notes.
Further information regarding coverage, valuation, et... if
contained in the "General Explanation" in foreword of Report
No. FT 410. For complete statement, see foreword in Foreign
Commerce and Navigation of the United States.


BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Robert W. Burgess, Director


Prepared in the Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division
Inr saii by thp Bureau of the Census, Washington 25. D. C. Price lUe. annual subscription <1.00
for both FT 930-E and IT 930-1




FT 930-E
2


UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC MERCHANDISE, BY ECONOMIC CLASSES AND LEADING COMMODITIES:
AUGUST 1959 AND SELECTED PERIODS
(Quantity in units indicated; value in millions of dollars. Figures for 1959 are as originally issued and have not been
revised to include published corrections. Figures for 1958 include revisions published with the December 1958 re-
ports, or earlier, but do not include revisions published during 1959. Totals represent sum of unrounded figures,
hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts. See "Explanation of Statistics" for information on sampling
procedures and effect thereof on data shown.)


Monthly average
Economic class and commodity August July August
1959 1959 1958
1958 1957


Total.........................................value..

Crude materials...................................value..
Hides and skins, raw, except furs ..................value..
Animal and fish oils and greases, inedible.......1,000 lb..
value..
Oil seeds..........................................value..
Tobacco, unmanufactured..........................1,000 lb..
value..
Cotton, unmanufactured .......................1,000 bales..
value..
Coal.........................................1,000 s.tons..
value..
Crude petroleum.................................1,000 bbl..
value..
All other crude materials ..........................value..

Crude foodstuffs................................value..
Corn...........................................1,000 bu..
value..
Wheat............................................1,000 bu..
value..
Other grains.......................................value..
Vegetables, fresh or dried.......................1,000 lb..
value..
Fruits, fresh or frozen..........................1,000 lb..
value..
Crude foodstuffs exported for relief or charity by
individuals and private agencies...................value..
All other crude foodstuffs..........................value..

Manufactured foodstuffs..........................value..
Meat and meat products...........................1,000 lb..
value..
Lard............................................ 1,000 lb..
value..
Dairy products..................................1,000 lb..
value..
Fish, canned, prepared, etc......................1,000 lb..
value..
Milled rice...................................1,000,000 lb..
value..
Wheat flour....................................1,000 cwt..
value..
Vegetables, canned and prepared.....................value..
Fruits, dried and evaporated....................1,000 lb..
value..
Canned fruits.....................................1,000 lb..
value..
Fruit juices, canned and frozen.................1,000 gal..
value..
Vegetable oils, fats and waxes, refined..........1,000 lb..
value..
Sugar and related products..........................value..
Manufactured foodstuffs exported for relief or charity
by individuals and private agencies................value..
All other manufactured foodstuffs...................value..

Semimanufactures, exclusive of Special Category
Type 16.........................................value..
Leather.............................................value..
Synthetic rubber..................................1,000 lb..
value..


11,384.1


* 1,454.0


31,382.0


41,474.5


51,722.6


130.6 138.6 160.4 178.0 259.2
5.3 5.6 3.9 4.6 5.6
117,964 123,105 82,587 92,402 114,861
9.2 9.4 7.2 8.0 10.0
15.4 30.6 18.9 18.0 20.5
38,865 23,562 39,831 40,195 41,746
29.3 17.2 28.2 29.5 29.9
129 153 220 398 602
11.6 15.9 28.4 55.1 88.3
4,110 3,797 5,642 4,380 6,731
39.2 36.1 55.1 43.8 69.1
237 174 334 361 4,187
0.7 0.5 1.2 1.2 14.4
20.0 23.3 17.4 17.8 21.4

117.2 137.9 120.0 106.7 111.0
14,989 22,263 13,306 14,942 14,833
19.9 28.9 17.7 19.6 20.9
25,634 33,439 33,345 27,484 34,664
45.2 57.2 57.6 47.5 61.2
31.4 29.1 26.3 20.0 9.0
118,068 125,775 89,423 118,444 117,439
6.5 7.4 4.2 6.1 5.7
114,656 156,896 126,056 110,949 133,813
10.3 11.9 9.4 8.9 9.1

0.6 0.2 0.4 0.3 (W.)
3.4 3.3 4.4 4.3 5.1

99.3 96.1 77.3 91.8 96.9
35,113 28,708 19,386 19,702 28,757
10.2 8.4 6.7 6.9 9.2
39,535 58,365 26,778 32,212 41,781
3.8 5.6 3.8 4.3 6.2
48,763 63,272 38,430 39,530 46,895
8.2 11.4 8.6 8.4 10.0
4,556 6,229 2,461 3,437 5,807
1.6 1.4 0.9 1.3 1.4
205 141 112 103 133
12.7 9.2 8.0 8.0 10.1
1,862 1,253 1,711 2,259 2,207
7.2 5.1 7.5 9.6 9.4
2.9 3.5 3.2 3.6 3.8
4,349 3,443 9,201 16,305 17,198
1.0 0.9 1.8 3.4 3.0
66,841 26,088 31,591 30,514 26,313
9.8 4.1 5.0 4.7 3.9
2,720 2,447 2,163 3,024 3,134
4.0 3.4 3.5 3.9 3.3
80,976 112,732 31,762 66,807 42,901
12.3 17.4 5.1 10.6 7.2
1.9 1.6 1.9 2.0 2.3

9.1 10.5 9.3 12.5 (iw)
14.4 13.4 12.1 12.4 27.0


208.3 213.5 186.6 189.6 270.2


2.0
53,152
13.7


1.8
58,824
15.3


2.2
28,835
8.0


2.1
36,716
9.8


1.8
38,335
10.2


See footnotes at end of table.





FT 930-E


UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC MERCHANDISE, BY ECONOMIC CLASSES AND LEADING COMMODITIES:
AUGUST 1959 AND SELECTED PERIODS-Continued

Monthly average
Economic class and commodity August July August
1959 1959 1958
1958 1957


Semimanufactures, exclusive of Special Category Type 16-Continued
Naval Stores, gums and resins................................value.. 4.3 4.2 3.1 3.0 3.5
Vegetable oils and fats......................................1,000 Ib.. 85,640 120,066 70,185 28,801 69,707
value.. 9.4 13.4 8.3 3.5 9.8
Cotton semimanufactures....................................1,000 lb.. 30,102 26,652 23,779 24,573 27,406
value.. 4.3 3.9 3.5 3.8 5.0
Wool semimanufactures.....................................1,000 lb.. 11,548 12,865 9,242 9,392 13,327
value.. 2.0 2.1 1.7 1.7 2.4
Rayon, nylon and other man-made textile
semimanufactures .........................................1,000 lb.. 12,121 11,325 9,204 9,105 8,956
value.. 10.0 7.9 7.4 7.1 6.6
Sawmill products....................................... 1,000 bd.ft.. 70,181 66,833 77,962 60,596 68,903
value.. 8.5 7.9 7.6 6.5 7.4
Wood pulp............................................. 1,000 s.tons.. 57 57 36 43 52
value.. 8.0 8.5 5.3 6.5 8.0
Gas and fuel oil........................................1.. ,000 bbl.. 2,598 2,690 3,562 3,313 6,496
value.. 8.3 7.1 10.9 9.8 23.2
Sulfur................................................ 1,000 l.tons.. 178 175 149 131 132
value.. 4.4 4.3 3.7 3.3 3.7
Steel mill products, semifinished............................ value.. 0.2 0.6 0.5 1.3 6.7
Iron and steel bars, including bar size shapes............1,000 Ib.. 10,277 12,730 17,878 20,516 35,772
value.. 1.1 1.4 1.8 2.0 3.1
Iron and steel plates, sheets and strips...................1,000 Ib.. 28,453 107,988 104,161 157,053 276,051
value.. 4.3 13.6 10.6 15.0 25.6
Tin mill products, including tin mill black plate..........1,000 Ib.. 49,590 94,613 98,460 82,467 133,750
value.. 3.6 7.3 7.5 6.5 12.2
Other iron and steel semimanufactures.........................value.. 20.3 18.3 7.0 10.3 34.2
Aluminum semimanufactures ...................................................value.. 6.5 4.6 3.9 3.6 3.1
Copper semimanufactures...................................... value.. 10.2 6.9 21.0 16.9 20.2
Coal-tar and other cyclic chemical products..................value.. 8.5 7.8 8.2 8.4 7.6
Plastics and resin materials..............................1,000 Ib.. 58,704 56,285 44,485 46,907 41,112
value.. 21.5 21.4 16.9 17.4 15.6
Industrial chemicals, exclusive of Special Category Type 16...value.. 22.1 19.3 16.2 17.9 18.4
Pigments ............................ ......................1,000 Ib.. 55,457 55,536 43,006 52,026 56,000
value.. 5.3 5.5 4.6 5.0 5.9
Nitrogenous fertilizer materials..........................1,000 Ib.. 70,440 125,286 91,522 106,124 179,727
value.. 2.1 2.8 2.5 3.0 4.0
All other semimanufactures, excl. Special Category Type 16....value.. 27.9 27.6 724.1 '25.2 '32.1

Finished manufactures..................................... value.. 828.7 867.8 837.7 908.3 985.3
Truck, bus, and automobile tires (casings), new...........thousands.. 91 79 111 102 8146
value.. 3.5 3.2 5.2 4.7 85.3
Other rubber manufactures.................................... value.. 7.8 7.0 7.5 7.8 8.7
Cigarettes ...................................................millions.. 2,041 1,938 1,788 1,506 1,416
value.. 8.8 8.4 7.5 6.4 5.6
Other tobacco manufactures................................... value.. 1.1 0.4 0.5 0.7 0.5
Cotton cloth..........................................1,000 sq.yd.. 938042 932 882 943 229 941,746 45,65?
value.. 9.5 49.3 49.5 911.3 12.3
Other cotton manufactures.................................... value.. 7.6 7.4 7.6 8.1 8.7
Wool manufactures.............. .........................value 0.6 0.5 0.7 0.7 0.7
Rayon, nylon and other man-made textile manufactures..........value.. 12.6 11.2 11.7 12.4 14.5
Other textile manufactures .................................. value.. 5.5 5.1 4.8 4.8 5.1
Wood manufactures, advanced.................................value.. 3.0 2.4 2.2 2.6 2.7
Paper and manufactures.,......................................value.. 20.0 18.3 18.5 18.3 18.4
Motor fuel and gasoline, including jet fuels (all types)......value.. 5.6 10.3 12.4 10.9 16.1
Lubricating oil ............................................ value.. 15.1 15.6 19.1 15.5 16.2
Glass and products......................... ...................value.. 7.1 6.2 7.6 6.6 6.7
Steel mill manufactures..................................... value.. 5.7 12.7 15.0 19.9 32.0
Metal manufactures, n.e.e ...................................value.. 35.6 38.2 38.1 40.0 43.1
Electric household refrigerators and freezers................ number.. 29,667 32,633 29,884 32,383 31,716
value.. 4.4 4.9 4.4 4.9 5.0
Radio and television apparatus..........................value.. 20.6 20.3 21.0 23.3 20.9
Other electrical machinery and apparatus.....................value.. 52.8 52.8 50.8 55.7 59.9
Power generating machinery, n.e.e..................... .......value.. 19.4 16.7 17.7 18.9 19.7
Construction, excavating, mining and related machinery........value.. 59.1 59.0 54.5 57.9 74.5
Machine tools (including metal-forming machine tools) and
parts, exclusive of Special Category Type 16................value.. 12.1 8.9 13.1 14.4
Metalworking machines and parts, except machine 26.2
tools and parts...........................................value.. 12.8 12.8 14.6 13.8
Textile, sewing and shoe machinery ...... .....................value.. 7.2 8.8 6.6 7.9 10.4
Other industrial machinery and parts.........................value.. 66.5 73.0 71.6 75.6 77.8

See footnotes at end of table.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

l I I 111111 11 I 1 111 I0 I B1 Bll I II 1111iil
3 1262 08587 1647


FT 930-E


UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC MERCHANDISE, BY ECONOMIC CLASSES AND LEADING COMODITIES:
AUGUST 1959 AND SELECTED PERIODS-Continued

Monthly average.
Economic class and commodity August July August
1959 1959 1958
1958 1957

Finished manufactures-Continued
Office, accounting, and computing machines and parts..........value,. 10.5 11.1 9.7 11.1 1010.6
Agricultural machines, implements and parts...................value.. 11.7 15.1 8.7 10.3 11.1
Tractors....................................................number.. 2,731 4,901 2,719 4,183 4,392
value.. 15.4 20.0 13.1 15.8 20.7
Tractor parts and accessories...............................value.. 12.1 12.3 10.0 10.1 11.0
Motor trucks and busses, commercial (new) ...................number.. 11,351 14,274 9,928 12,200 16,040
value.. 25.5 30.8 19.9 24.5 36.2
Passenger cars, nonmilitary (new)...........................number.. 4,588 6,858 3,909 10,146 11,923
value.. 9.1 13.4 8.1 21.5 25.1
Automobile parts for assembly and replacement.................value.. 38.3 39.1 31.4 39.3 42.0
Military automobiles, trucks, busses, trailers, parts,
accessories and service equipment; commercial maintenance
and repair trucks (new).....................................value.. 5.3 12.0 19.9 18.1 14.3
Aircraft, parts and accessories.............................value.. 66.1 71.1 76.7 81.0 85.7
Merchant ships, nonmilitary, n.e.c...........................number.. 17 8 3 11 28
value.. 3.1 1.8 0.5 5.7 8.1
Railway transportation equipment ............................value.. 5.9 6,9 18.7 17.4 12.1
Antibiotics.................................................value.. 5.9 7.2 4.0 5.5 6.9
Other medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations...............value.. 15.1 19.0 17.6 17.7 16.8
Soap and toilet preparations................................value.. 1.8 1.8 1.9 1.8 2.0
Small arms, machine guns, parts and accessories, n.e.c........value.. 2.8 3.1 3.3 6.4 3.1
Ammunition, components and parts............................value.. 20.3 11.7 19.5 15.6 17.5
Special Category Type 16.....................................value.. 41.7 54.1 33.5 42.2 37.9
All other finished manufactures, exclusive of Special
Category Type 16............................................value.. 134.5 124.4 119.1 121.1 133.2

*See footnote one on front page of this report.
**Data for periods prior to January 1958 not available. IIncludes $97.1 million of Military Mutual Security Pro-
gram shipments ($54.0 million to Western Europe). 2Includes $114.6 million of Military Mutual Security Program
shipments ($56.7 million to Western Europe). 3Includes $113.2 million of Military Mutual Security Program ship-
ments ($45.1 million to Western Europe). Includes $128.6 million of Military Mutual Security Program shipments
($58.6 million to Western Europe). 5Includes $113.0 million of Military Mutual Security Program shipments
($59.4 million to Western Europe). 6See the April 1958 issue of Foreign Trade Statistics Notes for explanation of
Special Categories and list of commodities included. 7For security reasons, data on exports of all forms of uranium,
thorium and special nuclear material (Schedule B commodity numbers 62510-62590) are excluded from export statistics.
8Data for periods prior to January 1958 also include new and used motorcycle tires and used truck, bus, and automobile
tires. 9Includes data for Schedule B commodity numbers 30399 and 30855, converted to square yards on the basis of
four square yards per pound; and B number 30610, converted to square yards on the basis of three square yards per pound.
1Data for periods prior to January 1958 do not include exports of electronic computers and parts. us coEM-DC




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