U.S. foreign trade;

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Title:
U.S. foreign trade;
Series Title:
Its Summary report FT 930-E
Alternate title:
United States foreign trade; export trade by commodity
Physical Description:
v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Washington

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Sept. 1955-Dec. 1966.
General Note:
Supplements accompany some numbers.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 023118293
oclc - 27948979
System ID:
AA00013019:00021

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U.S. foreign trade; trade by commodity


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United States


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
Luther H. Hodges, Secretary

BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Richard M. Scammon, Director


SUMMARY REPORT
FT 930-E


FOR RELEASE
June 18, 1962


EXPORT TRADE BY COMMODITY


The Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce, announced
today that the increase in United States exports of domestic
merchandise from $1,822.5 million in March1, to $1,857.5 million
in April2, a gain of about two percent, was primarily due to an
increase in exports of finished manufactures which was partly
offset by decreases in exports of manufactured foodstuffs and
crude materials. The April 1962 domestic merchandise export
total is about ten percent higher than the April 1961 total of
$1,688.8 million. These totals include data on Department of
Defense Military Assistance Program-Grant-Aid shipments.

With Military Assistance Program-Grant-Aid shipments excluded,
the April domestic merchandise export total amounted to $1,775.1
million, slightly higher (about one percent) than the March
total of $',76C,. million and about nine percent higher than the
April 1961 total of $1,630.3 million.

Exports of finished manufactures rose from $1,097.4 million in
March3 to $1,156.2 million in April reflecting in part increases
sewised from the figure of $1,794.4 million published in the March
1962 issue of this report. The Feruery 1962 over-all damcatio aeraban-
dise epart total nea revised fro $1,731.4 to $1,753.6 million. See
footnote B aon page 4 of this report.
2See the April 1962 issue of Report No. FT 900-E far seasomnlly-
adjusted figures aon total exports, exiling lflitary Assistance Program--
Orant-Aid shipments. Seasonally adjusted data are not available on a
coodity baels.
33levised.


in exports of individual items included in this economic class
as follows: construction, excavating, mining, oil field, and
related machinery, from $67.8 to $75.7 million; office, ac-
counting, and computing machines and parts, from $25.6 to $33.1
million; passenger cars, from $22.8 to $29.2 million; lubri-
cating oil, from $16.0 to $22.0 million; and radio and televi-
sion apparatus, from $26.5 to $30.8 million. However, decreases
were reported in exports of textile, sewing, and shoe machinery,
from $20.8 to $14.2 million; and metalworking, machines and
parts, except machine tools and parts, from $18.4 to $12.4
million. April exports of crude foodstuffs, valued at $176.9
million, were slightly higher than the March total of $176.0
million.

Exports of manufactured foodstuffs declined from $122.3 to
$107.7 million partly due to decreases in exports of manufac-
tured foodstuffs, exported for relief or charity, from $20.3 to
$13.6 million; dairy products, from $8.7 to $4.9 million;
wheat flour, from $13.8 to $10.0 million; and canned fruits,
from $7.7 to $4.0 million. However, exports of refined vege-
table oils, fats and waxes, also included in this economic
class, rose from $6.7 to $11.6 million. A drop in exports of
unmanufactured cotton, from $55.0 to $42.6 million, was the
chief factor in the decline in exports of crude materials from
$171.2 to $161.8 million. Exports of semimanufactures decreased
slightly from $255.5 to $254.9 million.


EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


COVERAGE: Export statistics include government as well as nongovernment ship-
meats to foreign countries. The export statistics, therefore, include Department of
Defense Military Assistance Program-Grant-Aid shipments (for which separate fig.
re are shown in the footnotes of this report), Mutual Security Progrpm economic as-
sistance shipments, and shipments of agricultural commodities under P.L. 480 (The
Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954, as amended) and related laws. (The
separate information which is available on exports under P.L. 480 and related laws
may be obtained from the Economic Research Service and the Foreign Agricultural
Service of the Department of Agriculture. Shipments to United States armed forces
and diplomatic missions abroad for their own use are excluded from export statistics.
United States trade with Puerto Rico and United States possessions is not included in
this report, but the export trade of Puerto Rico with foreign countries is included as a
pan of the United States export trade. Merchandise shipped in transit through the
United States between foreign countries, not entered as imports, is not included in ex-
port statistics.
VALUATION: The valuation definition used in the export statistics is the value at
the seaport, border point, or airport of exportation. It is based on the selling price
(or cost if not sold) and includes inland freight, insurance, and other charges to the
port of exportation. Transportation and other costs beyond the United States port of
exportation are excluded. None of the values have been adjusted for changes in
price level.


RELIABILITY: The statistics presented in this report are based partly on sample
data and therefore are subject to sampling variation that may cause them to differ
somewhat from the results which would have been obtained from processing all export
documents. For the figures shown in this report the sampling variability can be ig-
nored since the probable variability due to sampling is either less than $50,000 (the
largest variation from rounding of figures) or less than a trivial percentage of the in-
dividual totals shown. In addition to the effects of sampling variation, the data in
this report are subject to errors from such sources as the carry-over of data from
month to month, errors in reporting or processing, the estimation of shipments valued
under $100 (estimated data for such shipments are included in the over-all export
total and in the totals for "Finished manufactures' and "All other finished manufac-
tures, exclusive of Special Category Type 1* but excluded from other totals), and the
omission of parcel post shipments valued under $50. Although the effect of such
errors on the rounded totals in this report is probably small, the possibility of inac-
curacy should be taken into account, particularly in using figures of relatively small
magnitude.

Further information regarding coverage, valuation, compilation procedures and preci-
sion of export data is contained in the foreword of Report No. FT 410. For complete
statement, see foreword in Foreign Commerce and Navigation of the United States.


USCcNM.DC Prepared in the Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division


USCOMM-DC


Prepared in the Bureau of the Cenasuse, Foreign Trade Division









UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC MERCHANDISE, BY ECONOMIC CLASSES AND LEADING COMMDITIzS:
APRIL 1962 AND SELECTED PERIODS

t luantir, in units indicated, value in millions of dollars Figures for 1962 are as originally issued andhave not been revised to include published corrections except
as noted in the footnotes on page 4 of this report Figures for 1961 include revisions published with the December 1961 report, or earlier, but do not include
revisions published during 1962 Totals represent sum of unrounded figures, herce may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts.)




April March April Maithly
Economic class and cmodity1 1962 1962 1961 average
1961


Total........................................ value..

Crude materials..................................value..
Hides and skins, raw, except furs...................value..
Animal and fisn oils and greases, inedible.......1,000 lb..
value..
Oilseeds........................................... value..
Tobacco, unmanufactured ..........................1,000 lb..
value..
Cotton, urmanufactured ........................1,000 bales..
value..
Coal........................................ 1,000 s.tons..
value..
Crude petroleum.................................1,000 bbl..
value..
All other crude materials...........................value..

Crude foodstuffs.................................value..
Corn.......................................... ... 1,000 bu..
value..
Wheat.... ......................................1,000 bu..
value..
Other grains....................................... value..
Vegetables, fresh or dried.......................1,000 lb..
value..
Fruits, fresh or frozen..........................1,000 lb..
value..
Crude foodstuffs exported for relief or charity by
individuals and private agencies...................value..
All other crude foodstuffs ......................... value..

Manufactured foodstuffs ..........................value..
Meat and meat products...........................1,000 lb..
value..
Lard............................................ 1,000 lb..
value..
Dairy products...................................1,000 lb..
value..
Fish, canned, prepared, etc......................1,000 lb..
value..
Milled rice..................................1,000,000 lb..
value..
Wheat flour.....................................1,000 cwt..
value..
Vegetables, canned and prepared..................... value..
Fruits, dried and evaporated.....................1,000 lb..
value..
Canned fruits....................................1,000 lb..
value..
Fruit juices................................... 1,000 gal..
value..
Vegetable oils, fats and waxes, refined..........1,000 lb..
value..
Sugar and related products ......................... value..
Manufactured foodstuffs exported for relief or charity
by individuals and private agencies ................value..
All other manufactured foodstuffs................... value..

Semimanufactures, exclusive of Special Category
Type 16......................................... value..
Leather............................................. value..
Synthetic rubber.................................1,000 lb..
value..


21,857.5


*31,822.5


41,688.8


=1.719.0


161.8 171.2 187.4 212.2
5.7 6.3 6.5 7.2
123,140 117,752 135,884 149,670
8.4 8.2 10.6 10.9
30.2 29.1 21.1 30.5
30,767 28,491 25,110 41,741
22.7 21.6 17.9 32.6
326 416 634 560
42.6 55.0 79.8 73.7
2,908 2,604 2,549 3,043
27.4 25.4 23.9 28.5
87 215 316 269
0.3 0.6 0.9 0.7
24.5 24.9 26.7 28.1

176.9 176.0 154.0 158.1
36,012 37,062 24,648 24,413
45.3 46.8 31.5 30.3
49,168 49,156 48,941 52,388
86.4 86.5 84.7 92.9
23.4 22.5 18.1 13.8
149,265 99,511 127,952 108,582
8.4 6.9 6.5 5.7
108,039 98,969 97,161 126,876
7.5 7.4 7.2 9.9

0.6 1.1 0.5 0.6
5.2 4.8 5.5 5.0

107.7 122.3 88.6 96.4
39,630 39,482 31,931 41,833
12.0 11.6 9.6 12.3
42,365 33,560 26,065 34,886
4.3 3.3 3.3 3.9
26,592 53,720 31,152 37,629
4.9 8.7 6.4 7.3
1,962 3,678 1,715 2,381
1.2 1.3 1.1 1.1
230 236 180 147
14.8 15.5 10.0 8.7
2,704 3,647 2,219 2,511
10.0 13.8 9.5 9.5
2.7 3.5 2.7 3.4
12,009 22,180 9,107 17,191
2.7 4.4 2.0 3.4
29,587 56,375 21,942 37,190
4.0 7.7 3.2 5.1
3,503 3,129 3,411 2,877
3.8 3.4 4.3 3.8
80,793 46,126 58,712 44,497
11.6 6.7 8.8 6.7
1.4 1.4 1.4 1.6

13.6 20.3 13.0 13.3
20.7 20.6 13.3 16.2


254.9 255.5 266.4 273.9


2.8
57,789
15.7


2.8
62,699
15.6


3.6
52,633
13.3


3.9
55,437
14.3


See footnotes at end of table.








UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC NERCHAiADISE, f ECONMXC CLASSESS AND LEADING COMMODITIES:
APRIL 1962 AND SELECTED PERIODS-Continued


April March April Monthly
Economic class and commodity1 1962 i 1962 1961 average
1961


Semimanufactures, exclusive of Special Category Type l6-Continued
Naval Stores, gums and resins ................................value.. 3.2 4.0 4.1 4.4
Vegetable oils and fats, crude.............................1,000 lb.. 101,818 34,137 86,866 44,921
value.. 12.2 4.3 11.3 5.8
Cotton semimanufactures....................................1,300 lb.. 26,182 31,097 25,748 27,916
value.. 4.2 4.8 3.6 4.0
Wool semimanufactures......................................1,000 lb.. 11,446 11,352 10,343 11,901
value.. 1.7 2.0 1.6 1.8
Rayon, mylon and other man-made textile
semimanufactures......................................... 1,000 lb.. 17,983 17,139 17,504 15,663
value.. 14.3 14.9 12.6 12.0
Sawmill products....................................... 1,000 bd. ft.. 57,646 69,582 56,483 64,358
value.. 7.0 8.3 6.8 7.2
Wood pulp..............................................1,000 s.tons.. 87 83 100 98
value.. 11.7 11.0 13.6 13.3
Fuel oil, distillate and residual........................ 1,000 bbl.. 1,473 2,251 1,803 1,738
value.. 4.3 6.6 5.1 4.8
Sulfur.................................................1,000 l.tons.. 129 139 166 132
value.. 3.0 3.2 3.6 2.9
Steel mill products, semifinished............................ value.. 1.2 1.1 0.9 1.7
Iron and steel bars, including bar size shapes............. 1,000 lb.. 16,843 11,846 11,886 15,219
value.. 2.1 1.7 1.6 1.9
Iron and steel plates, sheets and strips...................1,000 lb.. 95,323 112,942 83,245 110,625
value.. 12.5 14.0 11.4 12.9
Tin mill products, including tin mill black plate .......... 1,000 lb.. 69,247 74,906 84,911 80,085
value.. 5.3 5.5 6.6 6.3
Other iron and steel semimanufactures........................ value.. 14.3 14.4 29.3 32.9
Aluminum seimamnufactures.....................................value.. 9.2 10.9 8.1 9.4
Copper semimanufactures...................................... value.. 16.5 18.0 22.9 23.0
Coal-tar and other cyclic chemical products................... value.. 13.8 13.5 14.5 15.5
Plastics and resin materials.............................. 1,000 lb.. 72,453 78,496 60,335 69,744
value.. 22.6 25.1 20.7 22.8
Industrial chemicals, exclusive of Special Category Type 16...value.. 26.7 26.6 22.6 24.9
Pigments.................................................. 1,000 Ib.. 48,946 55,085 59,781 55,870
value.. 5.3 5.7 6.0 5.6
Nitrogenous chemical fertilizer materials7.................1,000 lb.. 255,025 103,239 54,239 62,553
value.. 4.6 2.8 2.1 2.0
All other semimanufactures, excl. Special Category Type 16,7..value.. 40.6 38.7 40.5 40.6

Finished manufactures......................................value.. 1,156.2 **1,097.4 992.4 978.4
Truck, bus, and automobile tires (casings), new...........thousands.. 75 86 85 81
value.. 2.5 2.9 3.1 2.8
Other rubber manufactures.....................................value.. 10.0 9.9 8.8 8.7
Cigarettes................................................ millions.. 2,166 2,097 1,887 1,861
value.. 9.5 9.3 8.3 8.1
Other tobacco manufactures................................... value.. 0.6 1.0 0.6 0.9
Cotton cloth................................................. value.. 11.8 12.0 10.5 10.5
Other cotton anmufactures.....................................value.. 8.9 8.2 9.5 8.1
Wool manufactures.............................................value.. 0.6 0.7 0.6 0.7
Rayon, nylon and other man-made textile manufactures.......... value.. 15.0 14.4 13.2 13.2
Other textile manufactures................................... value.. 6.6 6.1 6.2 6.3
Wood manufactures, advanced...................................value.. 2.7 2.9 2.7 3.0
Paper and manufactures....................................... value.. 25.2 24.0 21.9 23.4
Motor fuel and gasoline, including jet fuels (all types)......value.. 2.7 0.6 6.1 3.9
Lubricating oil...............................................value.. 22.0 16.0 18.4 18.2
Glass and products.............. ; .............................value.. 7.4 8.0 6.7 7.0
Steel mill manufactures...................................... value.. 11.3 9.6 9.4 11.0
Metal manufactures, n.e.c.................................... value.. 41.0 39.2 33.3 35.6
Electric household refrigerators and freezers................number.. 23,421 22,519 33,159 22,428
value.. 3.7 3.2 5.0 3.5
Radio and television apparatus............................... value.. 30.8 26.5 26.8 28.1
Other electrical machinery and apparatus......................value.. 79.3 69.3 64.4 61.9
Power generating machinery, n.e.c.............................value.. 28.5 27.5 19.7 20.1
Construction, excavating, mining, oil field, and related
machinery....................................................value.. 75.7 67.8 65.4 64.6
Machine tools (including metal-farming machine tools) and
parts, exclusive of Special Category Type 16.................value.. 26.7 29.7 26.9 24.8
Metalworking machines and parts, except machine
tools and parts..............................................value.. 12.4 18.4 13.9 15.2
Textile, sewing and shoe machinery.............................value.. 14.2 20.8 17.6 15.0
Other industrial machinery and parts..........................value.. 101.6 101.2 90.8 88.8


See footnotes at end of table.








UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC MERCHANDISE, BY ECONOMIC CLASSES AND LEADING COCMDITIES:
APRIL 1962 AND SELECTED PERIODS-Continued



Economic class and commodity April Marh A1961 averageon
1961


Finished manufactures-Continued
Office, accounting, and computing machines and parts..........value.. 33.1 25.6 26.1 25.9
Agricultural machines, implements and parts...................value.. 16.6 14.3 16.3 12.0
Tractors.....................................................number.. 6,350 11,213 9,158 5,536
value.. 19.8 17.3 22.4 17.3
Tractor parts and accessories.................................value.. 14.5 12.9 12.9 12.6
Motor trucks and busses, commercial (new)....................number.. 8,272 9,432 13,245 12,651
value.. 19.8 21.7 26.0 24.3
Passenger cars, nonmilitary (new)........................... number.. 14,573 11,591 8,887 8,704
value.. 29.2 22.8 17.6 17.9
Automobile parts for assembly and replacement.................value.. 57.0 58.3 47.2 46.1
Military automobiles, trucks, busses, trailers, parts,
accessories and service equipment; commercial maintenance
and repair trucks (new)..................................... value.. 8.7 **4.7 9.3 5.5
Aircraft, parts and accessories...............................value.. 130.2 146.7 98.6 102.8
Merchant ships, nonmilitary, n.e.c...........................number.. A 5 13 10
value.. 0.6 0.4 3.3 2.2
Railway transportation equipment..............................value.. 15.4' 13.6 15.6 13.6
Antibiotics................................................ value.. 6.3 5.2 5.9 5.8
Other medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations...............value.. 18.8 16.6 17.i 17.1
Soap and toilet preparations..................................value.. 2.3 1.9 1.8 2.0
Small arms, machine guns, parts and accessories, n.e.c ........value.. 5.8 2.4 1.9 3.4
Ammunition, components and parts..............................value.. 22.3 12.4 8.6 16.7
Special Category Type 16......................................value.. 37.2 29.2 27.3 25.2
All other finished manufactures, exclusive of Special
Category Type 16 .............................................value.. 167.7 162.2 144.9 144.5

revisedd. _See footnote I on front page of this report. "Pel'lects revisions made subsequent to the release of the March 1962 issue of this report. See
ioornote 8 belo, for similar revisions to the February 1962 dat3.
IBased on commodity classifications in Schedule B. Statistical Classification of Domestic and Foreign Commodities Exported from the United States. A
Supplement to Heport No FT 930-E showing the Schedule B numbers included in the individual economic class and commodity totals is available on request.
Includes SP2.4 million of Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments (128.0 million to Western Europe) 3Includes S61.' million of Military Assistance
Program Grant-Aid shipments (528." million to Western Europe) 4]ncludes $58. million of Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments (8$25.5 million to
Western Europe) 5Includes S67 5 million of Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments ($27.5 million to Western Europe). See the January 1961 issue
of Report No FT 410 for explanation of Special Category commodities and list of commodities included 7In issues of this report prior to January 1962. informna-
tion on exports of merchandise reported under Schedule B commodity number 82721 (Vulcanized fiber sheets, rolls, strips, rods, tubes, and other shapes solely
made therefrom) was erroneously included in "Nitrogenous chemical fertilizer materials" instead of "All other semimanufactures." The 1961 figures shown in this
report have teen revised to correct ih. error. 8The Februarn In(2 figures originally published for the following economic classes and leading commodities have
beer, icised as indicated: Finished manulactrueS, from $1,0?,6. to 11,049.0 million, military automobAles, trucks, busses, trailers, and parts, etc., from $16.1 to
518.5 million- aicraft., pF rt and acceEsories, from S]')..< to Sl"4.5 million, and small arms, machire guns, parts and accessories, n.e.c., from $2.3 to 2.9 million.






NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS


A survey was recently conducted to determine possible improvements in the
distribution of FT 900 reports to avoid increased costs to subscribers.
Since this study revealed that the majority of subscribers to the FT 900
group purchased three or more report series and that a major operating
expense was incurred by the maintenance of separate mailing lists for each
series, the following changes in subscriptions will become effective
immediately:

1. While they will continue to be published separately, the following re-
port series will be distributed as parts of a single subscription:

FT 900 U.S. Foreign Trade: Total Export Trade (FT 900-E) and
Total Import Trade (FT 900-I)
FT 930 U.S. Foreign Trade: Export Trade by Commodity (FT 930-E)
and Import Trade by Commodity (FT 930-I)
FT 950 U.S. Foreign Trade: Export Trade by Country (FT 950-E)
and Import Trade by Country (FT 950-1)
FT 970 U.S. Foreign Trade: Export Trade by Customs District
(FT 970-E) and Import Trade by Customs District (FT 970-1)
FT 975 Vessel Entrances and Clearances: Calendar Year 1961
FT 985 Waterborne Foreign Trade Statistics
FT 986 U.S. Exports of Domestic and Foreign Merchandise by Air;
District by Continent (New report)

2. All subscriptions will cover 12 months and will expire with the publi-
cation of data for each calendar year, that is, with the report covering
December. If annual summaries are published, they will be included in the
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900 group will receive all the series without additional charge at this
time. Subscriptions will not be accepted for more than one year. All exist-
ing subscriptions will be automatically extended to include reports for the
remainder of 1962 at no added cost to the subscriber.

3. Subscriptions received before July 1, 1962 will be entered as of the
start of the year and back issues will be furnished. Subscription orders
received on or after July 1, 1962 will be honored immediately but will be
extended to cover the publication of data through 1963 at no extra cost.

4. The annual subscription rate for all series in the FT 900 group will be
$5.00 per year ($7.50 for foreign addresses).

5. Subscription orders and correspondence regarding subscriptions should
be addressed to the Office of Publications Management, U.S. Department of
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