United States foreign trade

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Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Portion of title:
Import trade by commodity
Alternate Title:
FT 930-I
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Exports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Sept. 1955-
General Note:
"Summary report FT 930-I."
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 023107048
oclc - 24440593
System ID:
AA00013018:00016

Related Items

Preceded by:
United States foreign trade. Trade by commodity


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Full Text


C30


I6 y: ?


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE r
Frederick H. Mueller, Secreary




UNITED STATES FOREIGN TRADE


PT 930-1


AUGUST 1960 14, 1960


IMPORT TRADE BY COMMODITY


The Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce,
announced today that the increase in United States
Imports for consumption from $1,144.8 million in July
to $1,245.3 million in August, an increase of about
nine percent, reflected higher levels of imports of
all of the economic classes of commodities. The
August 1960 imports for consumption total was about
five percent higher than the August 1959 total of
$1,190.1 million.

The Bureau stated that, for the period January-
August 1960, total imports for consumption were
valued at $10,002.4 million, a level about three per-
cent higher than the $9,733.2 million reported for
the corresponding period of 1959.

Imports of crude materials rose from $236.5 mil-
lion in July to $290.7 million in August, mainly due
to increases in imports of the individual commodities
of this economic class as follows: crude petroleum,
from 063.5 to $83.3 million; unmanufactured cotton,
from $0.4 to $17.2 million; crude rubber, from $25.3
to $33.1 million; iron ore and concentrates, from
$35.8 to $40.7 million; and unmanufactured tobacco,
from $8.1 to $11.4 million. Higher levels of imports


of wood pulp, from $22.7 to $29.9 million; tin, from
$4.8 to $8.4 million; and copper, from $23.3 to $26.7
million, were largely responsible for the rise in im-
ports of semimanufactures from $228.3 million in July
to $248.2 million in August. The increase in imports
of crude foodstuffs from $127.4 to $142.6 million was
largely the result of a rise in imports of raw or
green coffee, from $77.9 to $91.8 million.

Imports of finished manufactures rose from $417.4
million in July to $426.2 million in August, reflecting
increases in imports of newsprint, from $52.9to $61.6
million; leather manufactures, from $8.2 to $11.9
million, and smaller increasesin imports of many other
commodities in this economic class. However, imports
of automobiles and parts, also included in this econ-
omic class, fell from $45.6 to $31.5 million. From
July to August, imports of manufactured foodstuffs
rose slightly from $135.3 to $137.6 million chiefly
as a result of increases in imports of meat products,
from $32.5 to $37.8 million; whisky, from $11.3 to
$14.9 million and smaller increases in imports of
other commodities in this economic class which were
largely offset by a decrease in imports of cane
sugar from $50.0 to $39.5 million.


EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


COVERAE: Import statistics include merchandise
imparted by government agencies as well as by pri-
vate importers, but exclude American goods returned
by the United States armed forces for their own use.
united States trade with Puerto Rico and United
States possessions is not included in this report,
but the Import trade of Puerto Rico with foreign
countries is included as a part of the United States
import trade. merchandise shipped intransit through
the United States between foreign countries is not
included in import statistics.
VAIDATIONz Import values are, in general, based
an market price or selling price, and are, in gener-
al, f.o.b. the exporting country. Import values also
exclude United States import duties. None of the
values have been adjusted for changes in price level.


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EFFECT OF SAMPLING: Formal entry shipments
valued less than $100 and informal entry shipments
valued $250 or less (less than one percent of total
import value) are estimated by sampling. These es-
timated values are shown in the tables of this re-
port as 'Estimated value $1-$99 formal and $1-$250
informal entry shipments" and are arbitrarily in-
cluded in the total for "Finished manufactures."
The largest variation from rounding of figures is
$50,000.

Further information regarding coverage, valua-
tion, etc., is contained in the "General Explanation"
in foreword of Report No. FT 110. For complete state-
ment, see the foreword in Foreign Comaerce and Navi-
gation of the United States.


30 -E


Prepared in the Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division
For sale by the Bureau of the Census, Washington 25, D. C. Price 10#, annual subscription $1.00
for both FT 930-E and FT 930-1


14, 1960


AUGUST 1960












UNITD STATES IM RTS FOR COtNSoPTION OF MERCHANDISE, BY ECONOMIC CLASSES AND LEADIM COMDUITIES:
AUGUST 1960 AND SELECTED FfRIDS

(Quantity in unite indicated; value in millions of dollars. Imports for consumption are a total of imports for mediate con-
umption plus withdrawals for consumption from bonded warehouses. Figures for 1960 are as originally issued aad have not
, been revised to include published corrections. Figures for 1959 include revisions published with the December 1959 reports,
or earlier, but do not include revisions published during 1960. Totals represent sum of unrounded figures, hence may vary
slightly from aB of rounded amounts. See the "Explanation of Statistics" for information on sampling procedures.)


Sglm July 1Auguomt M monthly average
od omic class and comodlty ugust 190 1959 1959 19rag
1960 1960 1959 1 : I


Total............................................value .

Free........................ .........................value..

Dutiable...............................................value..

Crude materials..........................................value..

Hides and skins............................................value..
Undressed furs................. ................. ............value..
Crude rubber.......................................1,000,000 lb..
value..
Copra...................................................1,000 lb..
value..
Tobacco, unmnufactured..................................1,000 lb..
value..
Cotton, unmanufactured.................................1,000 lb..
value..
Jute and Jute butts....................................long tons..
value..
Sisal and henequen......................................long tons..
value..
Wool, unmanufactured, free........(1,000,000 Ib.)..actual weight..
clean content1..
value..
Wool, unmanufactured, dutiable.....(1,000,000 lb.)..actual weight..
clean content1..
value..
Pulpwood.............................................1,000 cords..
value..
Crude petroleum...................... ...................1,000 bbl..
value..
Diamonds, rough or uncut ..........................1,000 carats..
value..
Diamonds, for industrial use.........................1,000 carats..
value..
Iron ore and concentrates.........................1,000 long tons..
value..
Ferroalloying ores.........................................value..
Copper (copper content)..................................1,000 lb..
value..
Lead (iead content)..................................... 1,000 lb..
value..
Tin (tin content)...................................... long tons..
value..
Zinc (zinc content)......................................1,000 lb..
value..
Other nonferrous ores and concentrates......................value..
All other crude materials..................................value..

Crude foodstuffs.........................................value..

Fish and shellfish.....................................1,000 lb..
value..
Cattle, except for breeding.............................thousands..
value..
Grains.................................. ......... ............value..
Vegetables, fresh and dried..................................value..
Bananas...........................................1,000 bunches..
value..
Cocoa or cacao beans................................1,000,000 lb..
value..
Coffee, raw or green.................................1,000,000 b..
value..
Tea.................................................... 1,000 b..
value..
Black pepper, unground..................................1,000 lb..
value..
All other crude foodstuffs................................value..

See footnotes at end of table.


1,245.3


1,144.8


1,190.1


1,248.9


1,061.6


505.9 466.9 459.0 485.2 445.1

739.5 677.9 731.1 763.8 616.5

290.7 236.5 251.4 257.7 230.0

4.9 5.9 5.6 7.3 4.5
3.6 4.3 3.0 8.0 6.7
89 64 102 108 89
33.1 25.3 32.2 32.1 20.9
49,168 83,191 67,012 58,808 50,102
3.7 6.6 6.4 5.7 4.0
14,919 11,325 13,324 12,640 11,543
11.4 8.1 9.7 9.3 8.7
46,809 6,694 53,145 12,760 12,190
17.2 0.4 16.5 2.1 2.5
1,173 1,633 2,547 5,740 3,121
0.1 0.3 0.3 1.0 0.7
8,191 7,236 10,868 10,432 9,767
1.6 1.5 1.8 1.7 1.3
17 18 16 21 13
13 14 12 16 10
9.4 10.5 8.3 10.3 6.6
9 7 10 13 9
6 5 7 9 6
7.9 5.0 6.4 8.4 7.1
135 95 104 104 112
2.7 1.9 2.8 2.2 2.4
38,622 28,577 29,635 31,841 31,976
83.3 63.5 66.8 72.2 78.3
64 97 166 133 94
5.3 6.8 10.0 7.9 6.0
997 742 536 1,089 839
3.8 3.3 2.8 5.2 3.3
4,299 3,746 3,154 2,969 2,296
40.7 35.8 27.2 26.0 19.3
12.0 12.1 8.7 11.0 11.4
15,223 7,070 15,007 6,700 16,884
4.7 2.1 4.3 1.9 3.8
8,581 46,474 11,291 22,861 39,772
0.9 4.9 1.0 2.3 4.3
1,555 1,160 61 898 455
2.9 2.6 0.1 1.9 0.9
56,451 119,859 62,270 74,855 90,091
2.2 5.8 2.4 3.3 4.3
8.7 5.8 6.2 6.5 6.2
30.6 24.3 28.9 31.4 26.9

142.6 127.4 144.7 351.9 161.4


57,222
14.6
9
1.3
1.9
1.2
4,94:"
6.5
45
11.6
269
91.8
9,132
4.2
2,127


53,887
14.4
12
1.5
3.5
0.7
4,145
5.9
42
10.7
218
77.9
8,584
4.0
1,389
0.8
7.9


47,470
11.6
22
3.0
2.0
1.1
3,937
5.4
28
9.4
286
99.3
8,228
3.7
2,330
0.6
8.7


45,752
13.5
57
6.8
3.2
3.5
4,518
6.5
40
13.7
255
91.1
9,140
4.3
2,914


39,847
12.2
94
10.8
4.2
3.8
4,064
5.8
37
14.4
222
97.5
8,618
4.0
2,889
0.6
8.1













ITED STATES DIMRTS FOR 00OHSPfICMO OF MERCHANDISE, BY ECONOMIC CLASSES AND LEADING COCDITIES:
AgOUST 1960 AND SELECTED PRIODS-Continued

Monthly average
ENonomic class and commodity Ag ut July August
1960 1960 1959 1959 1958


Manufactured foodstuffs............................value..

Neat products............................................1,000 Ib..
value..
Cheese...................................................1,000 Ib..
value..
Fiah and shellfish canned, prepared, eta................1,000 Ib..
value..
Fodder and feeds........................................value..
Cane sugar.........................................1,000,000 Ib..
value..
olassee...............................................1,000 gal..
value..
Whieky........................................ ............. value..
All other manufactured foodstuffs .................. .......value..

Semisanufactures.........................................value..

Leather............................. ......... ........ .......value..
Bristles.............................................. 1,000 lb..
value..
EBpressed oils, inedible.......................... ...........value..
Quebracho...............................................1,000 lb..
value..
Wool semmmanufacturee.......................................value..
Sawed boards, planks, deals, etc................1,000,000 bd. ft..
value..
Wood pulp................ ......................1,000 short tans..
value..
Oas and fuel oil......................................1,000 bbl..
value,.
Asbesto.................................... ..............long tone..
value..
Dimmnds, cut but not set ............................1,000 carats..
value..
Iron and steel semimanufacture.............................. value..
AlumItnu..................................................v.alue..
Copper copperr content) ............................1,000,000 lb..
value..
Lead (lead content).....................................1,000 b..
value..
Nickel and alloys........................................1,000 lb..
value..
Tin..............................................................1,000 lb..
value..
Zinc.....................................................1,000 lb..
value..
Coal-tar products...........................................value..
Industrial chemicals........................................value..
Fertilisers and materiale........................1,000 short tons..
value..
All other semimanufacturee..................................value..

Finished manufactures...................................value..

Leather manufactures .......................................value.,
Essential or distilled oils.................................value..
Cotton cloth........................................1,000 sq. yd..
value..
Other cotton manufactures..................................value..
Burlap.................................................1,000 yd..
1,000 lb..
value..
Flax, hemp and ramie manufactures............................value..
Vool manufacture.............................................value..
Silk manufacture...........................................value..
Shingles...........................................1,000 squares..
value..
Newsprint........................................1,000 short tons..
value..
Other paper manufactures ...................................value..
Pottery..................................... ..............value..

See footnotes at end of table.


-I I I 4 6


137.6


135.3


137.0


133.2


93,534 76,954 87,863 81,209 70,817
37.8 32.5 34.9 32.8 27.9
4,382 3,430 3,614 5,322 4,645
2.3 1.7 1.8 2.6 2.3
40,763 38,357 38,442 43,453 39,886
12.9 10.9 11.0 12.3 11.0
1.0 1.1 1.0 1.7 1.8
709 899 875 756 772
39.5 50.0 48.3 41.3 43.3
44,982 51,697 25,829 24,205 28,698
4.2 5.0 3.0 3.0 3.7
14.9 11.3 14.4 14.8 13.2
25.0 22.8 22.6 24.8 22.2

248.2 228.3 253.8 275.4 220.2

3.5 2.7 4.2 4.0 2.6
304 318 350 303 200
0.8 0.8 0.7 0.6 0.5
3.6 4.0 4.6 4.7 4.1
10,073 7,931 8,396 9,285 9,300
0.5 0.5 0.7 0.8 0.7
4.8 4.5 5.2 5.2 3.7
371 366 372 339 283
29.0 28.8 31.1 28.1 21.8
230 178 190 203 175
29.9 22.7 25.2 26.2 23.1
15,099 14,309 12,546 19,833 17,503
32.8 30.8 25.9 42.1 41.5
50,510 41,016 47,297 48,928 43,706
4.5 4.0 4.4 4.6 4.0
60 65 55 77 60
5.3 6.8 5.8 7.2 5.7
S12.0 12.3 20.0 23.2 7.5
9.0 8.5 18.2 12.6 11.8
86 74 47 62 56
26.7 23.3 14.4 18.6 13.7
51,126 35,279 40,123 46,556 61,159
6.8 4.5 5.0 6.2 6.6
18,802 21,128 19,652 19,370 15,448
14.0 14.1 12.7 12.3 10.2
8,472 4,909 6,783 8,744 8,275
8.4 4.8 6.7 8.6 7.5
16,525 6,359 17,538 27,583 31,111
2.0 0.8 1.8 2.8 3.0
4.3 4.3 5.2 4.9 3.9
8.5 6.4 7.7 7.8 6.0
66 124 234 158 128
3.0 4.2 6.5 5.2 4.9
38.7 39.3 47.5 49.4 37.4

426.2 417.4 403.1 .430.7 324.8


11.9
1.6
37,632
6.7
16.6
59,544
37,189
6.9
2.7
20.0
6.4
242
2.1
486
61.6
6.4
6.0


8.2
2.0
38,348
6.9
15.6
65,449
39,402
7.0
2.3
18.2
6.0
211
1.9
411
52.9
6.0
5.5


9.1
1.3
17,244
3.4
13.5
76,841
45,399
7.1
2.2
15.1
6.7
62
0.7
434
54.9
6.2
4.8


7.0
1.5
20,031
4.3
12.5
80,623
49,485
7.6
2.6
14.3
6.1
178
1.8
437
55.5
6.5
4.8


5.1
1.3
11,750
3.2
9.3
70,910
40,641
6.3
2.3
10.9
4.8
178
1.6
407
51.2
5.0
3.9




I"l".-r"C r-I -


UNITED STATES IMPORTS FOR CONSUMPTION OF MERCHANDISE, BI ECONOMIC CLASSES IAND LEDING COMmDITI
AUGUST 1960 AND SELECTED PERIODS-Continued


Monthly average
Economic class and commodity August July August hly
1960 1960 1959 1959 1958


Finished manufactures-Continued
Steel mill products.........................................value..
Iron and steel advanced manufactures........................value..
Agricultural machinery and implements ......................value..
Automobiles and parts ..................................... value..
Other machinery.............v............................ value..
Vehicles, except automobiles ..............................value..
Photographic goods ........................................value..
Scientific and professional instruments.....................value..
Musical instruments and parts...............................value..
Toys and sporting goods....................................value..
Watches and watch movements, except parts...................value..
American goods returned....................................value..
All other finished manufactures2...........................value..
Estimated value $1-$99 formal and $1-$250 informal entry
shipments2.................................................value..


18.7
9.3
8.9
31.5
50.0
9.3
4.7
3.8
2.1
6.5
4.1
17.3
99.5

11.5


17,9
8.8
11.1
45.6
44.5
10.6
4.8
3.6
1.9
5.4
4.1
21.9
93.0

11.5


29.1
8.5
9.8
58.2
37.9
9.6
4.7
2.7
2.3
5.1
4.3
18.8
76.2

10.7


28.8
9.3
14.1
70.3
40.0
10.2
4.2
3.1
2.4
4.9
4.7
19.5
84.8

10.2


13.4
536
10.2
A6.0
2.a

3.4
23,

3.4


04.


-n ~a


'Includes the actual weight of carbonized wool.
2For an explanation of the sampling procedures, see "Effect of Sampling" on front page.


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