United States foreign trade

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Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Portion of title:
Import trade by commodity
Alternate Title:
FT 930-I
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Exports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Sept. 1955-
General Note:
"Summary report FT 930-I."
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 023107048
oclc - 24440593
System ID:
AA00013018:00014

Related Items

Preceded by:
United States foreign trade. Trade by commodity


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Full Text



C03,jbv ?30eLo-/?so

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
Frdedck H. Muellr, Secnery

CENSUS


UNITED STATES FOREIGN TRAD


IT 930-1


JUNE 1960


FOR RELEASE
August 10, 1960


IMPORT TRADE BY COMMODITY


The BureausG othe Census, Department of Cam-
a..es, announced today that the increase in United
8tiile. Imports for consumption frm $1,253.1 million
Si iay to $1,295.6 million in June, an advance of
abiut three percent, resulted frnm sizable increases
$j Sports of semimanufactures and crude materials.
. I, prta. of the three remaining economic classes of
'ie7modities, manufactured foodstuffs, crude food-
'!S)fef and finished manufactures, decreased
"4lghtly during the period. The June 1960 imports
A oansumptionr total, however, was about three per-
ea. less than the June 1959 total of $1,335.4 mil-

For the first six months of 1960, imports for
eon umption were valued at $7,612.2 million or
i e t four percent more than the $7,307.2 million
rsaorted for the corresponding period of 1959. The
i, au also stated that the imports for consumption
itil for fiscal year 1960 (July 1959-June 1960)
ip~inted to $15,292.1 million, a level about 10 per-
o.Sft higher than the $13,890.5 million reported for
filieal year 1959 (July 1958-June 1959). Fiscal year
140 "dury free" camnodities were valued at $5,887.4
a Wion, or about 39 percent of the total as can-
: #ed to $5,517.3 million, or about 40 percent of
.1, total, reported for fiscal year 1959.
Imports of semimnufab u res climbed from $243.3
million in May to $269.2 million in June


due mainly to increases in imports of individual com-
modities included in this economic class as follows:
gas and fuel oil, from $33.7 to $37.4 million;
nickel and alloys, from $8.1 to $11.7 million; and
copper, from $23.3 to $26.5 million. The rise in
imports of crude materials from $256.3 to $281.8
million largely reflected increases in imports of
crude petroleum, fram $69.5 to $87.0 million; un-
manufactured wool, from $7.9 to $12.7 million; and
diamonds for industrial use, from $2.7 to $5.6 mil-
lion.

Imports of manufactured foodstuffs declined from
$144.9 million in May to $140.6 million in June as a
drop in imports of cane sugar from $58.3 to $49.9
million was partly offset by a rise in imports of
meat products from $24.3 to $29.7 million. The
slight decline in imports of crude foodstuffs from
$155.6 to $152.6 million reflected, in part,
decreases in imports of cattle, except for breeding,
from $6.9 to $4.0 million and fresh and dried
vegetables, frnm $3.5 to $1.4 million. Imports of
finished manufactures decreased slightly from $453.0
to $451.4 million owing chiefly to a substantial
decrease in imports of automobiles and parts, from
$62.7 to $49.6 million and to a decline in imports of
steel mill products from $27.5 to $24.1 million
which were largely offset by small, scattered in-
creases in imports of many of the other commodities
included in this economic class.


EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


COVERAG: Import statistics include merchandise
imported by govef nent agencies as well as by pri-
Vate Importers, but exclude American goods returned
by the Inited States armed forces for their own use.
United States trade with Puerto Rico and United
States possessions is not included in this report,
but the Import trade of Puerto Rico with foreign
countries is included as a part of the United States
iport trade. Merchandise shipped intransit through
the United States between foreign countries Is not
Included in import statistics.
VAIAfTIO t Import values are, in general, based
a ..maret price or selling price, and are, in gener-
al, fo.b, the exporting country. Import values also
emnlude United States Import duties. None of the
tabi have been adjusted for changes in price level.


;
if ;...-~
";'
';"


;Sil


i'


EFFECT OF SAMPLING: Formal entry shipments
valued less than $100 and informal entry shipments
valued $250 or less (less than one percent of total
Impart value) are estimated by sampling. These es-
timated values are shown in the tables of this re-
port as "Estimated value $1-$99 formal and $1-$250
informal entry shipments" and are arbitrarily in-
cluded in the total for "Finished manufactures."
The largest variation from rounding of figures is
$50,000.

Further information regarding coverage, valua-
tion, etc., is contained in the "General Explanation"
in foreword of Report No. FT 110. For complete state-
ment, see the foreword in Foreign Cammerce and Navi-
gation of the United States.


Prepared in the Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division
For sale by the Bureau of the Census, Washington 25, D. C. Price 10#, annual subscription $1.00
for both FT 930-E and FT 930-1


~- ----~---r----r--- -----i--- -rr---


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2
UNITED) STATES IMPORTS FOR CONSUMPTION OF MERCHANDISE, BY ECONCIC CLASSES AND LEADING COMW ITIES:
JUNE 1960 AND SK.ECTED zPERIO

(Quantity unit indicated; value in millions of dollars. Imports for consumption are a total of imports for immediate con-
sumptin plus withdrawals for'ectumption from bonded warehouses. Figures for 1960 are as originally Issued and have not
ben revised to include published corrections. Figures for 1959 include revisions published with the December 1959 reports,
or earlier, but do not ineclle revisions published during 1960. Totals represent sum of unrounded figures, hence may vary
l8 ghtl from sum of rounded amounts. See the "Explanation of Statistics" for information on sampling procedures.)

'. June My June Monthly average
** ,Eonoam class and commodity 1960 1960 1959
1959 1958


Total .............................................value6.

Free..................... ........... ..............value..

Dutiable..............................................value..

Crude materials .........................................value..

Hides and skins ............................................value..
Undressed furs.............................................value..
Crude rubber.......................................1,000,000 lb..
value..
Copra...................................................1,000 lb..
value..
Tobacco, unmanufactured.................................1,000 lb..
value..
Cotton, unmanufactured..................................1,000 lb..
value..
Jute and Jute butts...................................long tons..
value..
Sisal and henequen.....................................long tons..
value..
Wool, unmanufactured, free.........(1,000,000 lb.)..actual weight..
clean content1..
value..
Wool, unmanufactured, dutiable.....(1,000,000 lb.)..actual weight..
clean content1..
value..
Pulpwood...............................................1,000 cords..
value..
Crude petroleum...........................................1,000 bbl..
value..
Diamonds, rough or uncut.............................1,000 carats..
value..
Diemonds, for Industrial use.........................1,000 carats..
'value..
Iron ore and concentrates ........................1,000 long tons..
value..
Ferroalloying ores .........................................value..
Copper (copper content)................................. 1,000 b..
value..
Lead (lead content)...................................... 1,000 lb..
value..
Tin (tin content)......................................long tons..
value..
Zinc (zinc content).....................................1,000 lb..
value..
Other-nonferrous ores and concentrates.....................value..
All other crude materials....................... .............value..

Crude foodstuffs.........................................value..

Fish and shellfish..................................... 1,000 b..
value..
Cattle, except for breeding..............................thousands..
value..
Grains..................................................... value..
Vegetables, fresh and dried.................................value..
Bananas............................................1,000 bunches..
value..
Cocoa or cacao beans...............................1,000,000 lb..
value..
Coffee, raw or green................................1,000,000 lb..
value..
Tea....................................................1,000 lb..
value..
Black pepper, uground...................................1,000 lb..
value..
All other crude foodstuffs................................. value..

See footnotes at end of table.


1,295.6


1,253.1


1,335.4


1,248.9


1,061.6


530.6 509.2 507.9 485.2 445.1

765.0 743.9 827.5 763.8 616.5

281.8 256.3 287.8 257.7 230.0

8.0 8.0 9.0 7.3 4.5
7.2 5.7 7.5 8.0 6.7
71 72 104 108 89
27.1 27.1 29.3 32.1 20.9
69,708 69,922 51,998 58,808 50,.102
5.9 6.6 5.4 5.7 4.0
14,783 13,062 12,671 12,640 11,543
10.6 9.8 9.0 9.3 8.7
6,411 6,773 6,595 12,760 12,190
0.5 0.5 0.5 2.1 2.5
3,319 5,835 6,592 5,740 3,121
0.5 0.9 0.8 1.0 0.7
7,276 6,050 11,355 10,432 9,767
1.3 1.1 1.8 1.7 1.3
22 14 24 21 13
17 11 18 16 10
12.7 7.9 11.9 10.3 6.6
10 7 12 13 9
7 5 8 9 6
7.0 5.9 6.9 8.4 7.1
102 74 91 104 114
2.0 1.3 1.8 2.2 2.4
39,153 31,291 42,391 31,841 31,976
87.0 69.5 94.6 72.2 78.3
92 110 140 .133 94
7.4 9.7 6.1 7.9 6.0
1,614 521 1,170 1,089 839
5.6 2.7 5.5 5.2 3.3
4,221 3,717 4,125 2,969 2,296
40.0 34.7 35.9 26.0 19.3
11.9 10.1 11.8 11.0 11.4
22,563 35,103 4,842 6,700 16,884
6.9 10.1 1.4 1.9 3.8
8,019 41,435 5,284 22,861 39,772
0.7 4.4 0.6 2.3 4.3
1,801 1,267 3,783 898 455
4.0 2.8 8.6 1.9 0.9
41,026 62,128 46,693 74,855 90,091
1.7 3.0 1.9 3.3 4.3
6.5 8.4 7.3 6.5 6,2
27.4 26.3 30.3 31.4 26.9

152.6 155.6 136.5 151.9 161.4


52,422
16.9
37
4.0
4.1
1.4
5,766
8.9
70
17.4
252
84.3
9,940
4.8
2,188
1.2
9.4


49,223
16.4
76
6.9
2.7
3.5
5,537
7.8
68
16.7
240
82.3
10,588
5.2
2,364
1.4
12.6


43,386
15.3
64
9.2
2.4
1.1
5,463
7.4
42
14.9
199
73.1
8,983
4.1
2,341
0.5
8.5


45,752
13.5
57
6.8
3.2
3.5
4,518
6.5
40
13.7
255
91.1
9,140
4.3
2,914
0.7
8.7


39,847
12.2
94
10.8
4.2
3.8
4,064
5.8
37
14.4
222
97.5
8,618
4.0
2,889
0.6
8.1













UITED STATES IMPORTS FOR CONSUMPTION OF MERCHANDISE, BY ECONOMIC CLASSES AND LEADING COMMODITIES:
JUNE 1960 AND SELECTED PERIOD--Continued


June May June Monthly average
Bconamic class and commodity 1960 1960 1959 1959 58
1 ______ 1959 1958


Manufactured foodstuffs..................................value..

Neat products ...........................................1,000 lb..
value..
Cheese..................................................1,000 lb..
value..
Fish and shellfish canned, prepared, etc................ 1,000 lb..
value..
Fodders and feeds...........................................value..
Cane sugar.........................................1,000,000 lb..
value..
Molasses................................................1,000 gal..
value..
hisky......................................................value..
All other manufactured foodstuffs .................... ........value..

Semimanufactures........................................value..

Lea ter.................................................value..
Bristles...............................................1,000 lb..
value..
Expressed oils, inedible....................................value..
Quebracho..............................................1,000 lb..
value..
Wool semimanufactures.......................................value..
Sawed boards, planks, deals, etc................. 1,000,000 bd. ft..
value..
Wood pulp......................................1,000 short tons..
Svalue..
Gas and fuel oil................... ............... ...... 1,000 bbl..
value..
Asbestos.................................................long tons..
value..
Diamonds, cut but not set............................1,000 carats..
value..
Iron and steel semimanufactures ......... ......................value..
Aluainum ...................................................value..
Copper (copper content).............................. 1,000,000 Ib..
value..
Lead (lead content)...................................... 1,000 lb..
value..
Nickel and alloys.......................................1,000 lb..
value..
Tin......................................................1,000 lb..
value..
Zinc................................................... 1,000 b..
value..
Coal-tar products.........................................value..
Industrial chemicals........................................value..
Fertilizers and material.........................1,000 short tons..
value..
All other semimanufactures.................................value..

Finished manufactures......................... ........... value..

Leather manufactures........................................value..
Essential or distilled oils.................................value..
Cotton cloth....................................... ....1,000 sq. yd..
value..
Other cotton manufactures...................................value..
Burlap ............................... ..............1,000 yd..
1,000 Ib..
value..
Flax, hemp and ramie manufactures...........................value..
Wool manufactures ..........................................value..
Silk manufacture......................... ......... .........value..
Shingles..........................................1,000 squares..
value..
Nevsprintl.....................................1,000 short tons..
value..
Other paper manufactures....................................value..
Pottery. ...................................................value..

See footnotes at end of table.


140.6


144.9


147.7


133.2


125.3


66,692 57,313 101,070 81,209 70,817
29.7 24.3 38.5 32.8 27.9
4,494 4,670 5,148 5,322 4,645
2.2 2.1 2.4 2.6 2.3
33,893 32,485 36,670 43,453 39,886
10.3 9.5 11.9 12.3 11.O
1.4 1.4 2.0 1.7 1.8
921 1,089 964 756 772
49.9 58.3 52.3 41.3 43.3
41,568 60,560 25,880 24,205 28,698
3.5 5.7 3.1 3.0 3.7
15.8 14.7 13.0 14.8 13.2
27.8 29.0 24.5 24.8 22.2

269.2 243.3 306.2 275.4 220.2

3.7 3.3 4.0 4.0 2.6
353 324 349 303 200
0.8 1.0 0.8 0.6 0.5
5.9 3.8 5.0 4.7 4.1
17,718 3,085 11,022 9,285 9,300
1.1 0.2 0.9 0.8 0.7
6.8 5.6 6.2 5.2 3.7
418 408 490 339 283
32.8 29.9 40.5 28.1 21.8
211 193 214 203 175
27.1 25.1 27.5 26.2 23.1
17,522 16,313 16,172 19,833 17,503
37.4 33.7 34.3 42.1 41.5
61,465 45,226 57,262 48,928 43,706
5.3 4.4 5.8 4.6 4.0
77 75 101 77 60
7.3 7.6 7.7 7.2 5.7
14.7 15.4? 23.4 23.2. 7.5
10.1 7.9 18.2 12.6 11.8
83 77 70 62 56
26.5 23.3 21.1 18.6 13.7
40,187 30,613 49,333 46,556 61,159
5.3 4.4 6.0 6.2 6.6
14,870 11,391 25,466 19,370 15,448
11.7 8.1 16.1 12.3 10.2
9,353 7,297 12,282 8,744 8,275
9.2 7.0 12.2 8.6 7.5
31,194 13,761 26,432 27,583 31,111
3.8 1.7 2.5 2.8 3.0
5.7 4.8 5.6 4.9 3.9
8.2 8.0 8.6 7.8 6.0
109 156 127 158 128
4.1 6.4 4.9 5.2 4.9
41.7 41.6 55.0 49.4 37.4

451.4 453.0 457.2 430.7 324.8


7.2
1.5
50,720
8.8
14.5
87,488
51,273
8.8
2.6
16.0
6.4
212
2.0
476
60.5
6.2
5.3


6.7
1.3
35,877
6.5
13.8
92,716
53,000
9.0
2.4
13.2
4.8
215
2.0
481
61.0
6.6
5.3


5.7
1.1
16,595
3.6
12.5
93,492
56,195
8.6
2.4
16.0
6.2
231
2.3
458
59.5
6.7
4.9


7.0
1.5
20,031
4.3
12.5
80,623
49,485
7.6
2.6
14.3
6.1
178
1.8
437
55.5
6.5
4.8


5.1
1.3
11,750
3.2
9.3
70,910
40,641
6.3
2.3
10.9
4.8
178
1.6
407
51.2
5.0
3.9





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

1111 111 IIIIII111111MI iI
3 1262 08587 0672


UNITED STATES IMPORTS OR CONSHPTION OF MECHANDISE, BY ECONOMIC CLASSES AND LEADMI CG DITIES
JUNE 1960 AND SELCTED PERIODS-Continued

June May June Monthly average
Economic class and commodity 1960 1960 1959
1959 1958

Finished manufacturea-Continued
Steel mill products.........................................value... 24.1 27.5 31.8 28.8 13
Iron and steel advanced manufacture........................value.. 11.3 9.9 9.2 9.3 6,
Agricultural msohinery and implements.......................value.. 1.0 13.3 18.1 14.1IJ
Automobiles and parts ..................................... value.. 49.6 62.7 74.6 70.3 46.
Other machinery..................... ......... .........value.. 50.3 47.4 41.8 40.0
Vehicles, except automobile ...............................value.. 13.5 12.0 10.6 10.2 l1.
Photographic goods .........................................value.. 5.0 4.6 4.2 4.2 3.A
Scientific and professional instruments.....................value.. 3.6 3.5 3.3 3.1 2j4
Musical instruments and parts..............................value.. 2.2 1.9 2.2 2.4 1.6
Toys and sporting goods...................................value.. 6.0 5.7 5.4 4.9 3.4
Vatches and watch movements, except parts...................value.. 4.5 4.5 4." 4.7 3.9
American goods returned.....................................value.. 19.9 18.5 21.2 19.5 16.4
All other finished manufactures2 ...........................value.. 96.5 98.2 89.7 84.8 65.1
Estimated value $1499 formal and $1-$250 informal entry
shipment ................................................value.. 11.1 10.8 11.0 10.2 8.3


lIncludes the actual vefght of carbonized wool.
aFor an explanation of the sampling procedures, see "Effect of Sampling" on front page.


aN









44






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POSTAGE AMD FO IPAM.
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF CAOM E


DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
WASHINGTON 25, D. C.


OFFICIAL BUSINESS


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UNIV OF FLORIOA LIUHS
DOCUMENTS DEPT
GAINESVILLE FLA


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