United States foreign trade

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Portion of title:
Import trade by commodity
Alternate Title:
FT 930-I
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Exports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Sept. 1955-
General Note:
"Summary report FT 930-I."
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 023107048
oclc - 24440593
System ID:
AA00013018:00009

Related Items

Preceded by:
United States foreign trade. Trade by commodity


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text






U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
Frederick H. Mueller. Secretary

CENSUS,


UNITED STATES FOREIGN


SUIIMARY REP)R I
FT -30-I


APRIL 196(0


IMPORT TRADE BY COMMODITY


The Bureau of the Census, rD-artment of Com-
merce, announced today that the decrease in United
States imports for consumnition from $1,366.1 mil-
lion in March to $1,246.3 million in April, a
decline of about nine percent, was primarily the
result of sizeable decreases in imports of semi-
manufactures, finished manufactures and crude
foodstuffs. April imports for consumption were,
however, about three percent more than the April
1959 total of $1,209.1 million.

The Bureau stated that for the first four
months of 1960, imports for consumption amounted
to $5,063.5 million, an increase of about seven
percent over the $4,724.5 million reported for
the corresponding period of 1959.

From March to April, imports of semimanufac-
tures fell from $308.3 to $254.8 million owing
chiefly to decreases in imports of individual items
included in this economic class as follows: gas
and fuel oil, from $53.6 to $43.6 million; iron and
steel semimanufactures, from $32.4 to $23.1 million;
aluminum, from $11.2 to $6.3 million; nickel and
alloys, from $14.5 to $10.3 million; copper, from
$23.9 to $20.6 million; and wood pulp, from $26.7
to $23.5 million. lower levels of imports of auto-


mobiles and parts, from $83.5 to $71.9 million;
steel mill products, from 136.9 to i.9 million;
wool manufactures, from $19.0 to $14.2 million, and
newsprint, from $58.1 to '...6 million, largely
accounted for the decline in imports of finished
manufactures from $498.5 to $457.5 million. Im-
ports of crude foodstuffs fell from tl'~.2 to
'140.0 million owing chiefly to a substantial de-
crease in imports of coffee from $95.1 to $74.7
million.


Imports of crude materials fell from .tr.! .3
million in March to $255.1 million in April. Re-
flected in this change were decreases in imports of
ferroalloying ores, from $16.8 to $10.0 million,
unmanufactured wool, from $13.5 to $9.0 million and
less noticeable decreases in imports of many other
items included in this class, which were largely
offset by increases in imports of crude petroleum
from $70.1 to $76.8 million and zinc, from $1.7 to
$7.0 million.

During the period, imports of manufactured
foodstuffs advanced from $131.8 to 1'2.'? million
largely as a result of an increase in imports of
meat products, from $22.1 to $30.1 million.


EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


COVERAGE: Import statistics include merchandise
imported by government agencies as well as by pri-
vate importers, but exclude American goods returned
by the United States armed forces for their own use.
United States trade with Puerto Rico and United
States possessions is not included in this report,
but the import trade of Puerto Rico with foreign
countries is included as a part of the United States
import trade. Merchandise shipped in transit through
the United States between foreign countries is not
included in import statistics.

VALUATION: Import values are, in general, based
on market price or selling price, and are, in general,
f.o.b. the exporting country. Import values also ex-
clude United States import duties. None of the values
have been adjusted for changes in price level.


EFFECT OF SAMPLING: Formal entry shipments
valued less than $100 and informal entry shipments
valued $250 or less (less than one percent of total
import value) are estimated by sampling. These
estimated values are shown in the tables of this
report as "Estimated value $1-$99 formal and $1-$250
informal entry shipments" and are arbitrarily included
in the total for "Finished manufactures." The largest
variation from rounding of figures is $50,000.



Further information regarding coverage, valua-
tion, etc., is contained in the "General Explanation"
in foreword of Report No. FT 110. For complete
statement, see the foreword in Foreign Commerce and
Navigation of the United States.


USCOMM-NC


BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Robert W vurgss, D~rector


.1I!11


Prepared in the Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division
For sale by the Bureau of the Cemsus, Washiamtoa 25, D. C. Price lot, mmual subscription $1.00
for both FT 930-E n- d FR 930-I


'^










UNITED STATES IMRThS F.T R COUIO"TN OF MlCHIAN:ISE, BY E 7,ONIC CLASCE AND LEA7ING COtMODITIES:
APRIL 196C AND SELECTED PERIODS

(Qurantity in units indicated; value in million of dollars. Imports for consumption are a total of imports for immediate con-
sumption plus withdrawals for consumption front bonded warehouse i Figures for 196C are as originally issued and have not
been revised to include published corrections. 1-ures for 1 59) include revisions published with the December 1959 reports,
or earlier, but do not include revisions published during 196C. Totals represent sum of unrounded figures, hence may vary
slightly from snum of rounded alunts. See the "Explanation of Statistics" for information on sampling procedures.)



SApril March April Monthly average
Economic class and comdity 1960 1960 1959 199
1959 1958

Total.............................................value.. ,.: .. 1,366.1 1,209.1 1..2'b.9 1, 1.

Free ..................................................value.. 4-1.9 526.6 484.2 485.2 445.1

Dutiable ............................................value.. 774.4 839.5 724.9 763.8 616.5

Crude materials...........................................value.. 255.1 261.3 2'.. 257.7 230.0

Hides and skins............................................value.. 7.9 8.9 8.9 7.3 4.5
Undressed furs..............................................value.. 8.6 8.8 7.6 8.0 6.7
Crude rubber.........................................1,000,000 lb.. 82 87 100 108 89
value.. *. 31.5 26.5 32.1 20.9
Copra................................................... 1,000 lb.. 66,107 54,432 76,622 58,808 i,'
value.. 6.4 5.2 7.9 5.7 4.0
Tobacco, unmanufactured..................................1,000 lb.. 12,734 13,115 11,429 12,640 11,543
value.. 9.2 9.7 8.4 9.3 8.7
Cotton, unmanufactured...................................1,000 lb.. 8,846 10,331 9,210 12,760 12,190
value.. 0.6 0.9 0.6 2.1 2.5
Jute and jute butts .....................................long tons.. 6,164 11,174 6,063 5,740 3,121
value.. 0.9 1.6 1.2 1.0 0.7
Sisal and henequen.....................................long tons.. 5,660 8,719 13,223 10,432 9,767
value.. 1.1 1.5 1.8 1.7 1.3
Wool, unmanufactured, free.........(1,000,000 lb.)..actual weight.. 16 24 26 21 13
clean content1.. 12 18 20 16 10
value.. 9.0 13.5 12.4 10.3 6.6
Wool, unmanufactured, dutiable.....(1,000,000 lb.)..actual weight.. 10 14 16 13 9
clean content'.. 7 10 11 9 6
value,. 8.2 10.4 9.5 8.4 7.1
Pulpwood..............................................1,000 cords.. 64 100 73 104 114
value.. 1.1 2.1 1.3 2.2 2.4
Crude petroleum........................ .................... ., bbl.. 34,501 30,160 25,022 31,841 31,976
value.. 76.8 70.1 57.3 72.2 78.3
Diamonds, rough or uncut..............................1,000 carats.. 94 118 93 113 94
value.. 6.8 8.3 6.7 7.9 6.0
Diamonds, for industrial use.........................1,000 carats.. 600 1,284 1,543 1,089 839
value.. 3.4 4.6 8.4 5.2 3.3
Iron ore and concentrates.........................1,000 long tons.. 2,334 2,217 1,963 2,969 2,296
yalue.. 21.5 19.6 16.9 26.0 19.3
Ferroalloying ores...........................................value.. 10.0 16,8 14.6 11.0 11.4
Copper (copper content)..................................1,000 lb.. 20,311 14,998 1,615 6,700 16,884
value.. 6.0 4.6 0.5 1.9 3.8
Lead (lead content)...................................... 1,000 lb.. 22,942 11,480 46,332 22,861 39,772
value.. 2.4 1.0 4.5 2.3 4.3
Tin (tin content).......................................long tons.. 766 861 18 898 455
value.. 1.7 1.9 (W) 1.9 0.9
Zinc (zinc content)......................................1,000 lb.. 122,323 40,206 100,620 74,855 90,091
value.. 7.0 1.7 4.8 3.3 4.3
Other nonferrour ores and concentrates......................value.. 7.6 7.0 4.7 6.5 6.2
All other crue materials...................................value.. 28.4 31.5 31.7 31.4 26.9

Crude fd o tuffs..........................................value.. 140.0 166.2 153.9 151.9 161.4

Finh and shellfish...................................... 1,000 lb.. 35,890 41,981 46,601 45,752 39,847
value.. 12.1 13.8 14.5 13.5 12.2
Cattle, except f r breedin.............................thousands.. 79 77 60 57 94
value.. 6.9 8.2 7.5 6.8 10.8
Grains. ....................................................value.. 1.9 3.2 1.8 3.2 4.2
Vegetable fr ; an ( dried.................................value.. 5.6 8.2 7.5 3.5 3.8
Banual .............................................1,000 bunches.. 5,314 5,100 4,607 4,518 4,064
value.. 7.8 7.4 7.1 6.5 5.8
Cocoa r caao ar. ................................. 1,000,000 lb.. 51 45 45 40 37
value.. 13.5 12.6 15.6 13.7 14.4
Coffee, raw or ,rrn .................................1,000,000 lb.. 217 267 236 255 222
value.. 74.7 95.1 84.2 91.1 97.5
Tea..................................................... 1,000 lb.. 9,536 11,593 10,949 9,140 8,618
value.. 4.6 6.1 5.1 4.3 4.0
Black p;pp r, ungr d .................................... .1,000 lb.. 5,890 3,870 4,626 2,914 2,889
value.. 3.3 1.9 1.0 0.7 0.6
All other crude frwituff r..................................value.. 9.7 9.7 9.6 8.7 8.1

See footnote, at end of table.










UNITED STATES IPRS FOR CO\NSUMPION OF MR CHANDISE, BY EPONRTIC ( 1CIA2F'. AN'I. 'Tl.AM I c(it[I)TIT ":
AmR.. 1't-:` A) .EI)KCTWD rKERrUa-'ii t Inuc


Economic class and coodi ty


Manufactured foodstuffs ................................. value..

Meat products............................................ 1,000 lb..
value..
Cheese................................................... 1,00 lb..
value..
Fish and shellfish canned, prepared, etc.................1,000 lb..
value..
Fodders and feeds...........................................value..
Cane sugar........................................... i, lb..
value..
Molasses..................................................1,000 gal..
value..
Whisky .................................................. value..
All other manufactured foodstuffs...........................value..

Semimanufactures.........................................value..

Leather....................................................value..
Bristles................................................. 1,000 lb..
value..
Exir-: sed oils, inedible....................................value..
Quebracho............................................... 1,000 lb..
value..
Wool semimanufactures.......................................value..
Saved boards, planks, deals, etc.................1,000,000 bd. ft..
value..
Wood pulp.......................................1,000 short tons..
value..
Gas and fuel oil.......................................1,000 bbl..
value..
Asbestos.. ..........................................long tons..
value..
Diamonds, cut but not set............................1,000 carats..
value..
Iron and steel semimanufactures.............................value..
Aluminum....................................................value..
Copper (copper content)..............................1,000,000 lb..
value..
Lead (lead content).....................................1,000 lb..
value..
Nickel and alloys ......................................1,000 lb..
value..
Tin......................................................1,000 lb..
value..
Zinc....................................................1,000 lb..
value..
Coal-tar products...........................................value..
Industrial chemicals ...................................... ..value..
Fertilizers and materials........................1,000 short tons..
value..
All other semimanufactures ..................................value..

Finished manufactures....................................value..

Leather manufactures........................................value..
Essential or distilled oils..................................value..
Cotton cloth........................................1,000 sq. yd..
value..
Other cotton manufactures...................................value..
Burlap.....................................................1,000 yd..
1,000 lb..
value..
Flax, hemp and ramie manufactures............................value..
Wool manufactures ...................... .......... ..........value..
Silk manufactures...........................................value..
Shingles...........................................1,000 squares..
value..
Newsprint........................................1,000 short tons..
value..
Other paper manufactures ....................................value..
Pottery .................................................. .....value..

See footnotes at end of table.


April




13.









48. 3

5.4
27.3
13.4


254. '

2.9
251
0.8
5.2
5,923
0.4
5.5
306
24.6
185
23.5
20,574
43.6
43,219
4.5
56
5.6
23.1
6.3
66
20.6
40,679
5.5
14,987
10.3
8,324
7.5
16,312
2.0
3.0
9.4
178
7.5
43.0

457.5


7.5
1.4
45,824
7.6
15.7
64,254
39,381
6.5
2.8
14.2
5.4
187
1.8
432
54.6
6.6
5.6


196




>.
11.8
5,245
2.6
3 ,264

1.9

5(.2

4.3
14.2
26.3

308.3




4.3
7,945
0.6
6.5
326
26.9
207
26.7
26,652
53.6
51,593
5.1
74
7.6
32.4
11.2
76
23.9
29,762
3.9
20,492
14.5
9,00C4
8.9
24,554
3.0
5.0
9.7
188
7.8
52.2

498.5


7.6
2.0
39,948
7.0
16.3
82,033
47,081
7.9
3.0
19.0
5.9
196
1.9
457
58.1
6.0
5.9


April



142.



4,879
2.2

43,8 0
11.4
1.9
877
46.6
52,239
6.1
13.3
23.2

257.3


*1-.

5.8
12,948
1.1
5.5
338
27.4
211
27.4
16,327
35.2
52,121
4.9
64
6.9
18.0
9.5
45
13.4
57,241
6.0
24,361
15.8
9,463
9.4
24,430
2.4
4.0
6.8
186
7.5
45.7

419.3


+


4.7
1.5
12,338
3.2
11.9
99, 504
59,708
9.1
2.2
13.5
4.7
219
2.1
431
54.1
6.5
4.5


i'i t.hly ewv ra(v<*


;> .8

'2.6
43, 453
12.3
1.8
756
41.3
4,285
5.2
14.8
2.8













203?
275.4




4.7
9,285
0.8

339
28.1













46,556
203



48,928













8,.
4.6
77
7.2
23.2
12.6
62
18,6
46,556
6.2
19,37(
12.3
8,744

27,583

4.9
7.8
158
5.2
49.4

430.7


7.0
1.5
20,031
4.3
12.5
80,623
49,485
7.6
2.6
14.3
6.1
178
1.8
437
55.5
6.5
4.8


1. '. 3

1


3i.*
27.9


39,886
0,.
11.
1.8




1772
13.2
22.2






4.1
9,30)
0.7
3.7
283
21.8
175
23.1
17,503

43,706
4.0
60
5.7
7.5
11.8
56
13.7
61,159
6.6
15,448
10.2
8,275
7.5
31,111
3.0
3.9
6.0
128
4.9
37.4

324.8

5.1
1.3
11,750
3.2
9.3
70,910
4 ,641
6.3
2.3

4.8
178
1.6
407
51.2
5.0
3.9





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08587 0979
3 1262 08587 0979


UNITED STATES IMPORTS FOR CONSUMPTION OF MERCHANDISE, BY ECONOMIC CLASSES AND LEADING CCMMODITTES
APRIL 1960 AND SELTED PERIODS-Continued


Economic class and commodity


Finished anufactures--Continued
Steel mi1l products.........................................value..
Iron nd steel advanced manufactures.........................value..
Agricultural machinery and implements.......................value..
Automobiles and parts.......................................value..
Other machinery...............................................value..
Vehicles, except automobiles.................................value..
h" ,-r~ I goods..........................................value..
Scientific and professional instruments.....................value..
Musical instruments and parts................................value..
Toys and sporting goods..................................value..
Watches and watch movements, except parts...................value..
American goods returned.....................................value..
All other finished manufactures ........................... value..
Estimated value $1-$99 formal and $1-$250 informal entry
nrli r,.; .......... ........................ ..................value..


April
1960


March
1960


April
1959


+ +ii


28.9
11.0
16.4
71.9
44.6
10.5
4.3
3.5
2.2
5.5
4.0
20.2
94.3

10.4


36.9
12.1
17.4
83.5
45.1
10.8
4.1
3.3
2.5
5.7
4.3
22.8
99.9

9.4


26.8
8.9
22.6
71.2
35.3
11.7
3.7
2.9
1.7
4.6
3.7
18.8
80.8

8.8


Monthly average

1959 195b


28.8
9.3
14.1
70.3
40.0
10.2
4.2
3.1
2.4
4.9
4.7
19.5
84.8

10.2


13.4
6.4
10.2
46.0
28.8
10.5
3.4
2.4
1.6
3.4
3.9
16.6
65.1

8.3


__________________________________ A S S ______


*Indicates less than $50,000.
1Includes the actual weight of carbonized wool.
2For an explanation of the sampling procedures, see "Effect of Sampling" on front page.


U & aG aMTW Ccomnb


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
WASHINGTON 25. D. C


OCPCIAL MUWINt


~I




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EFRENM3AP_TLF7BM INGEST_TIME 2013-02-07T17:18:49Z PACKAGE AA00013018_00009
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES