United States foreign trade

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Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Portion of title:
Import trade by commodity
Alternate Title:
FT 930-I
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Exports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Sept. 1955-
General Note:
"Summary report FT 930-I."
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 023107048
oclc - 24440593
System ID:
AA00013018:00008

Related Items

Preceded by:
United States foreign trade. Trade by commodity


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Full Text

C 3, >:9 -i

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
Frederick H. Mueller, Secretary


/ .


BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Robett W Burgess, Dirctor


CENSUS]


UNITED STATES FOREIGN TRADE


SUfMARY REPORT
FT 930-I


FEBRUARY 1960


April 26, 1 ,,


IMPORT TRADE BY COMMODITY


The Bureau of the Census, Department of Conmrrerce,
announced today that the increase in United '."tes
imports for consumption from $1,162.5 million in
January to $1,2-'-'.6 million in February, a gain of
about 11 percent, resulted from higher levels of im-
ports of all of the economic classes of commodities.
The February l'r.u imports for consumption total was
about 16 percent more than the February 1959 total of
$1,113.6 million. It should be noted that February
1960 had one more day than February 1959.

The Bureau pointed out that the bulk of the
over-all increase of about $126 million in imports
for consumption from January to February was accicnted
for by noticeable increases in imports of two of lhe
five economic classes of commodities, finished man$-
factures and crude foodstuffs. A part of the rise',\
in imports of finished manufactures from $410.3 to \
$465.1 million was the result of increases in imports
of automobiles and parts, from $61.3 to $80.6 mil-
lion; newsprint, from $48.2 to $53.6 million; and
agricultural machinery and implements, from $12.1 to
$16.1 million. Imports of coffee rose from $56.6 to
$101.7 million largely accounting for the increase
in imports of crude foodstuffs from $111.4 to $165.9
million.


A sizable increase in imports of iug;jr, from
$32.2 to $42.4 million was the primary factor in the
rise in imports of manufactured foodstuffs from
tl0'.9 to $117.3 million. F.-bruLry imports of _.;mi-
manufactures, valued at $293.5 million, were slightly
higher than the January total of $2.4.9 million. Re-
flected in the increase were gains in imports of
.sarebsd-bea9s, plnks and deals, from $18.9 to ?.-9.9
million; v. Fulp, from $22.3 to $26.9 million; and
"frrtln iersi' materials, from $3.5 to $6.6 ril ion,
which were part' offset by a declir:. in imports of
nickel and a11 from $18.5 to $13.9 million.


Although the advance in imports of crude mate-
rials from Janut p to February was small, $245.0 to
$246.8 million', there were some appreciable counter-
balancLng c6han s in imports of several of the indi-
viqval 'co mo(ties included in this economic class.
Tniateges n imports of crude petroleum, from $61.5
to $69.1 million; crude rubber, from $27.2 to $32.9
million; and copper, from $1.7 to $6.4 million, were
largely offset by declines in imports of tin, from
$5.5 to $1.4 million; lead, from $4.9 to $1.1 mil-
lion, and undressed furs, from $16.1 to $12.6 mil-
lion.


EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


COVERAGE: Import statistics include merchandise
imported by government agencies as well as by pri-
vate importers, but exclude American goods returned
by the United States armed forces for their own use.
United States trade with Puerto Rico and United
States possessions is not included in this report,
but the import trade of Puerto Rico with foreign
countries is included as a part of the United States
import trade. Merchandise shipped in transit through
the United States between foreign countries is not
included in import statistics.

VALUATION: Import values are, in general, based
on market price or selling price, and are, in general,
f.o.b. the exporting country. Import values also ex-
clude United States import duties. None of the values
have been adjusted for changes in price level.


EFFECT OF SAMPLING: Formal entry shipments
valued less than $100 and informal entry shipments
valued $250 or less (less than one percent of total
import value) are estimated by sampling. These
estimated values are shown in the tables of this
report as "Estimated value $1-$99 formal and $1-$250
informal entry shipments" and are arbitrarily included
in the total for "Finished manufactures." The largest
variation from rounding of figures is $50,000.



Further information regarding coverage, valua-
tion, etc., is contained in the "General Explanation"
in foreword of Report No. FT 110. For complete
statement, see the foreword in Foreign Commerce and
Navigation of the United States.


USCON4- DC


Prepared in the Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division
For sale by the Bureau of the Ceases, Washingtoi 25, D. C. Price lIt, manual subscription $1.00
for both FT 930-E and rF 930-I










UNITED STATES IMPORTS FOI CONUMPTION OF F'.v" *'',T 1 'J BY ECONOMIC CLA.ES AND LEADING COMODITIES:
FE)2RUARY 1 9b, AND SELECTED PERIODS
Q .'tity in units indicated; vslu in: milli os of dollars. Impo rts for con. nMsption are a total of imports for immediate con-
:;ption plus vi thdrawals for cnr. option from b onte wareho use,. Figures for 190 are as originally issued and have not
been revised to include published corrections. ..'ures for 195 include revisions published with the December 19') reports,


or earlier, but do not include revisions p blished during 1960.
slightly from sum of rounded am iunts.)




Economic class and commodity



Total ................................................ value..

Free..................................................value..

Dutiable ..............................................value..

Crude materials.......................................... value..

Hides and skins.............................................value..
Undressed furs..............................................value..
Crude rubber........................................1,000,000 lb..
value..
Copra ...................................................1,000 lb..
value..
Tobacco, unmanufactured................................. 1,000 lb..
value..
Cotton, unmanufactured................................. 1,000 lb..
value..
Jute and jute butts..................................... long tons..
value..
Sisal and henequen.....................................long tons..
value..
Wool, unmanufactured, free.........(1,000,000 lb.)..actual weight..
clean content..
value..
Wool, unmanufactured, dutiable.....(1,000,000 lb.)..actual weight..
clean content..
value..
Pulpwood..............................................1,000 cords..
value..
Crude petroleum.......................................1,000 bbl..
value..
Diamonds, rough or uncut.............................1,000 carats..
value..
Diamonds, for industrial use.........................1,000 carats..
value..
Iron ore and concentrates.........................1,000 long tons..
yalue..
Ferroalloying ores..........................................value..
Copper (copper content) ................................1,000 lb..
value..
Lead (lead content)...................................... 1,000 lb..
value..
Tin (tin content).......................................long tons..
value..
Zinc (zinc content)......................................1,000 lb..
value..
Other nonferrous ores and concentrates......................value..
All other crude materials.................................. value..

Crude foodstuffs.........................................value..

Fish and shellfish...................................... 1,000 lb..
value..
Cattle, except for breeding............................ thousands..
value..
Grains......................................................value..
Vegetables, fresh and dried ................................value..
Bananas............................................1,000 bunches..
value..
Cocoa or cacao beans................................1,000,000 lb..
value..
Coffee, raw or green.................................1,000,000 lb..
value..
Te .......................................................1,000 lb..
value..
B lck r pppr, unground..................................1,000 lb..
value..
All other crude f
See footnotes at end of table.


rotals repre:ent stun of


February
1963


1,288.6

502.1

786.5

246.8

4.7
12.6
92
32.9
45,766
4.2
12,753
9.5
14,348
1.1
10,244
2.0
10,840
1.8
17
13
9.3
14
9
10.1
136
2.8
31,181
69.1
117
6.3
595
2.2
2,516
23.0
9.5
21,901
6.4
9,632
1.1
526
1.4
62,471
2.4
7.1
27.3

165.9


30,292
11.5
65
6.4
2.7
8.7
5,260
7.0
40
11. 6
284
101.7
11,416
5.4
8,173


January
1960


1,162.5

417.3

745.3

245.0

5.3
16.1
79
27.2
40,338
3.8
14,675
10.0
9,987
0.7
10,044
1.7
10,270
1.8
16
12

14
9
9.5
103
2.1
47,407
61.5
147
5.5
1,762
5.4
2,370
21.5
9.6
6,015
1.7
46,497
4.9
2,452
5.5
135,531
7.0
6.2
29.1

111.4


42,612
13.5
46
4.4
2.0
6.8
4,053
5.5
32
9.5
163
56.6
9,644
4.7
2,524
0.8


unrounded figures, hence may vary


February
1959


1,113.6

457.6

656.0

243.8


5.5
9.6
1.10
29.7
36,214
3.5
11,804
8.5
8,999
0.5
8,851
1.7
10,103
1.4
18
14
8.1
17
11
10.6
125
2.4
33,403
82.0
124
10.7
656
3.5
1,482
12.6
8.3
9,011
2.5
17,921
1.9
48
0.1
81,663
3.4
6.1
31.4

165.6


41,331
12.1
69
7.6
1.9
6.2
4,224
5.7
34
12.7
301
108.2
8,635
4.3
.013


Monthly average


19';Q


1,248.9

485.2

763.8

257.7


7.3
8.0
108
32.1
808
5.7
12,640
9.3
.,760
2.1
5,740
1.0
10,432
1.7
21
16
10.3
13
9
8.4
104
2.2
31,841
72.2
133
7.9
1,089
5.2
2,969
26.0
11.0
6,700
1.9
22,861
2.3
898
1.9
74,855
3.3
6.5
31.4

151.9


45,752
13.5
57
6.8
3.2
3.5
4,518
6.5
40)
13.7
2'.5
91.1
9,140
4.3
2,914
0.7
8.7


1958

1,061.6

445.1

616.5

230.0


4.5
6.7
39
20.9
50,102
4.0
11, '43
8.7
12,193
2.5
3,121
0.7
9,767
1.3
13
10
6.6
9
6
7.1
114
2.4
31,976
78.3
94
6.0
839
3.3
2,296
19.3
11.4
16,884
3.8
39,772
4.3
455
0.9
90,091
4.3
6.2
26.9

161.4


39,847
12.2
94
10.8
4.2
3.8
4,064
'.8
37
14.4
222
97.5
.618
4.0
2,889
0.6
8.1





I


I










UNITED SPATE! IMPO)R 8I CONiUMPTION OF 'i" ,it. I BY ECONOMIC Ll;F;; ANND LEADIW .i 1 I4 ;:
FEBRU1ARY 19b0AND SELECTED PERIOD[1 < 'it ii..'.

Mi'r )0i l y >'/;ra(?'-
Economic class and coinodlity i. ,5, 195u


Manufactured foodstuffs ..................................value.. 117.3 :.'.

Meat products........................................... 1,000 b..
value.. 26.7 ;.
Cheese...................................... .......1,000 b.. 4, 167 4,
value.. 2. 2.2 2.
Fish and shellfish canned, prepared, etc .................1,000 lb.. 3239, 11 31,4 ,
value.. 9. 11.3 9.
Fodders and feeds ...........................................value.. 1.7 .6 .1
Cane sugar ...........................................1,000,000 lb.. 797 630 687 7'6
value.. 42.4 32.2 .7 41.3
Molasses................................................1,000 gal.. 26,102 16,851 17,324 2 4,2
value.. 2.4. 1. 2.4
Whisky ......................................................value.. .4 10.1 9..7 14.8
All other manufactured foodstuffs ...........................value.. 24.4 20.5 19.4 24.8

Semimanufactures.........................................value.. 293.5 289.9 255.8 27 20.4

Leather ....................................................value.. 3.8 3.4 2.8 4. 2.
Bristles.................................................1,000 lb.. 183 303 211 13 3 24(
value.. 0.4 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.5
Expressed oils, inedible.....................................value.. 2.6 3.2 3.8 4.7 4.1
Quebracho...............................................1,000 lb.. 9,906 6,770 8,654 9,285 9, X)
value.. 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.7
Wool semimanufactures ......................................value.. 5.4 4.9 4.1 5.2 3.7
Sawed boards, planks, deals, etc.................1,000,000 bd. ft.. 305 214 259 339 283
value.. 24.9 18.9 20.5 28.1 21.8
Wood pulp......................................1,000 short tons.. 302 173 186 203 175
value.. 26.9 22.3 24.4 26.2 23.1
Gas and fuel oil........................................1,000 bbl.. 25,555 27,645 28,710 19,833 17, 03
value.. 52.4 56.7 62.8 42.1 41.5
Asbestos...............................................long tons.. 46,442 48,882 43,443 48,928 43,706
value.. 5.0 4.7 4.2 4.6 4.0
Diamonds, cut but not set............................1,000 carats.. 61 69 73 77 60
value.. 6.3 5.7 7.1 7.2 5.7
Iron and steel semimanufactures.............................value.. 34.6 36.0 10.3 23.2 7.5
Aluminum.................................................. value.. 8.0 8.9 7.1 12.6 11.8
Copper (copper content) ..............................1,000,000 lb.. 98 102 38 62 56
value.. 31.2 32.7 10.7 18.6 13.7
Lead (lead content)...................................... 1,000 lb.. 33,502 50,776 32,084 46,556 61,159
value.. 5.6 6.1 4.5 6.2 6.6
Nickel and alloys....................................... 1,000 lb.. 21,875 25,489 18,839 19,370 15,448
value.. 13.9 18.5 11.9 12.3 10.2
Tin..................................................... 1,000 b.. 8,120 7,744 10,338 8,744 8,275
value.. 7.7 7.2 9.8 8.6 7.5
Zinc.....................................................1,000 lb.. 19,338 21,267 14,376 27,583 31,111
value.. 2.4 2.5 1.4 2.8 3.0
Coal-tar products ..........................................value.. 4.6 3.8 5.1 4.9 3.9
Industrial chemicals...................................... ..value.. 7.7 7.4 8.0 7.8 6.0
Fertilizers and materials ........................1,000 short tons.. 177 86 147 158 128
value.. 6.6 3.5 5.6 5.2 4.9
All other semimanufactures ..................................value.. 43.1 42.4 50.4 49.4 37.4

Finished manufactures...................................value.. 465.1 410.3 337.6 430.7 324.8

Leather manufactures........................................ value.. 7.3 5.5 4.4 7.0 5.1
Essential or distilled oils.................................value.. 1.5 1.7 1.3 1.5 1.3
Cotton cloth........................................1,000 sq. yd.. 41,454 38,472 14,012 20,031 1, 750
value.. 7.5 7.6 3.4 4.3 3.2
Other cotton manufactures...................................value.. 13.7 13.5 9.7 12.5 9.3
Burlap.................................................. 1,000 yd.. 82,631 59,802 67,207 80,623 70,910
1,000 lb.. 48,439 36,856 38,763 49,485 4, 641
value.. 7.8 6.3 6.0 7.6 6.
Flax, hemp and ramie manufactures...........................value.. 2.8 2.8 2.1 2.6 .3
Wool manufactures...........................................value.. 23.3 22.4 8.9 14.3 10.9
Silk manufactures...........................................value.. 5.4 6.8 4.1 6. 4.8
r. ........................................ 1,000 squares.. 164 124 169 178 178
value.. 1.6 1.2 1.6 1.8 1.6
Newsprint........................................1,000 short tons.. 428 371 332 437 407
value.. 53.6 48.2 44.2 55.51.2
Other paper manufactures......................................value.. 5.8 5.7 4.6 65 5.
Pottery ................................................... value.. 4.4 4.6 3.4 4.8 .

See footnotes at end of table.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

:II .I I I 1 I I IlIll I
3 1262 08587 1118

UNITED STATES IMORTS FOR CONSUMPTION OF MERCHANDISE, BY ECONOMIC CLASSES AND LEADING CCOODITIES
FEBRUARY 196 AND SELECTED ERIODS-Continued


Economic class and commodity


Finished anufactures--Continued
S eel ill products.........................................value..
Irn Id steel advanced manufactures.........................value..
Agricultural machinery and implemrnts.......................value..
Aut oobiles and parts.....................................value..
Other machinery........ ......................................value..
Vehicles, except automobiles ................................value..
Pho tographic gods..........................................value..
Scientific and professional Instruments.....................value..
Musical instruments and parts...............................value..
Toys and sorting gods.....................................value..
Watches and watch m vements, except parts ...................value..
Americai g ods returned...................................value..
All otler finished manufactures2...........................value..
Estimated value $1-$99 formal and $1-$250 informal entry
shipments .................................................value..


February
I9)60


35.4
9.2
16.1
30.0
.3.1
9.8
3.9
3.0
2.0
4.0'
4.3
21.1
37.9

o10.1


January
1960


February
1959


Monthly average

1959 1958


.4--- J


34.2
9.0
12.1
61.3
36.7
8.8
3.3
2.8
1.9
4.7
2.5
16.7
80.1

9.5


20.5
6.8
14.9
60.5
28.7
8.4
2.7
2.2
1.4
3.3
3.6
14.0
68.6

8.3


28.8
9.3
14.1
70.3
40.0
10.2
4.2
3.1
2.4
4.9
4.7
19.5
84.8

10.2


13.4
6.4
10.2
46.0
28.8
10.5
3.4
2.4
1.6
3.4
3.9
16.6
55.1


*Indicates less than $50,000.
Includes the actual weight of carbonized wool.
2For an explanation of the sampling procedures, see "Effect of .'pii1:n" on front page.


U. 0. DOAMBW OO MM


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
WASHINGTON 25, D. C.

OFFICIAL IRJSUPMNE


iv t F FL I A I
..- y : r




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