United States foreign trade

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Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Portion of title:
Import trade by commodity
Alternate Title:
FT 930-I
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Exports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Sept. 1955-
General Note:
"Summary report FT 930-I."
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 023107048
oclc - 24440593
System ID:
AA00013018:00007

Related Items

Preceded by:
United States foreign trade. Trade by commodity


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Full Text


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
Frederick H. Mueller, Secretary


BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Robert W. Burgess, Director


CENSUS


UNITED STATES FOREIGN TRADE

SUMMARY REPORT ANAR FOR RELEASE
FT 930-I April 6, 1960


IMPORT TRADE BY COMMODITY


The Bureau of the Census, Department of Commer' ,
announced today that the decrease in United State
imports for consumption from $1,431.6 million i
December 1959 to $1,162.5 million in January 1
a' drop of about 19 percent, reflected decrease
imports of all of the economic classes of co di ies.
The January imports for consumption total was bo
three percent higher than the January 1959 to
$1,133.9 million.

Imports of finished manufactures fell from 8.1
million in December 1959 to $410.3 million in Janua
1960 as decreases were reported in imports of most of
the individual commodities included in this economic
class. The more noticeable of these were auto-
mobiles and parts, from $88.4 to $61.3 million; news-
print, from $65.1 to $48.2 million; and steel mill
products, from $39.0 to $34.2 million. A notable
exception, however, was imports of wool manufactures,
which rose from $11.6 to $22.4 million. The decrease
in imports of crude foodstuffs from $189.5 to $111.4
million was due primarily to declines in imports of


2coff fm 113.3 to $56.6 million and cocoa, from
$23.L to .5 million. Imports of crude materials
fell fr6im,-~ 3.3 to $245.0 million as sizable decreases
were rebor in imports of crude petroleum, from $79.1
,to $61.5 mrrI on; crude rubber, from $36.0 to $27.2 mil-
wion; iror and concentrates from $27.3 to$21.5 mil-
1)in and ssed furs, from $20.1 to $16.1 million.

The d ine in imports of semimanufactures from
$322.7 9.9 million reflected decreases-in im-
on and steel semimanufactures, from $43.8*
to $ million; aluminum, from $15.4 to $8.9
on; and wood pulp, from $26.0 to $22.3 million
which were partly offset by a rise in imports of
nickel and alloys from $13.9 to $18.5 million.
Declines in imports of whisky from $18.4 to $10.1
million and meat products from $32.2 to $26.7 million
accounted for the bulk of the drop in imports of
manufactured foodstuffs from $127.9 to *ll5.9
million. However, imports of sugar, also included
in this economic class, rose from $26.2 to $32.2
million.


EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


COVERAGE: Import statistics include merchandise
imported by government agencies as well as by pri-
vate importers, but exclude American goods returned
by the United States armed forces for their own use.
United States trade with Puerto Rico and United
States possessions is not included in this report,
but the import trade of Puerto Rico with foreign
countries is included as a part of the United States
import trade. Merchandise shipped in transit through
the United States between foreign countries is not
included in import statistics.

VALUATION: Import values are, in general, based
on market price or selling price, and are, in general,
f.o.b, the exporting country. Import values also ex-
clude United States import duties. None of the values
have been adjusted for changes in price level.


EFFECT OF SAMPLING: Formal entry shipments
valued less than $100 and informal entry shipments
valued $250 or less (less than one percent of total
import value) are estimated by sampling. These
estimated values are shown in the tables of this
report as "Estimated value $1-$99 formal and $1-$250
informal entry shipments" and are arbitrarily included
in the total for "Finished manufactures." The largest
variation from rounding of figures is $50,000.



Further information regarding coverage, valua-
tion, etc., is contained in the "General Explanation"
in foreword of Report No. FT 110. For complete
statement, see the foreword in Foreign Commerce and
Navigation of the United States.


USCONM-DC


Prepared in the Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division
For sale by the Bureau of the Census, Washington 25, D. C. Price 10, annual subscription $1.00
for both PT 930-E and PT 930-I




rLi -71--


2
UIITTED STATES IMPORTS FOR CONSUMPTION OF MERCHANDISE, BY ECONOMIC CLASSES AND LEADING COMMODITIES:
JANUARY 1960 AlD' SELECTED PERIOD
(Quantity in units indicated; value in millions of dollars. Imports for consumption are a total of imports for immediate con-
sumption plus withdrawals for consumption from bonded warehouses. Figures for 1960 are as originally issued and have not
been revised to include published corrections. Figures for 1959 include revisions published with the December 1959 reports,
or earlier, but do not include revisions published during 1960. Totals represent sum of unrounded figures, hence may vary
slightly from sum of rounded amounts. See the "Explanation of Statistics" for information on sampling procedures and effect
thereof on data shown.)


Economic class and commodity


Total ..............................................value..

Free...................................................value..

Dutiable..............................................value..

Crude materials..........................................value..

Hides and skins.............................................value..
Undressed furs..............................................value..
Crude rubber........................................ 1,000,000 lb..
value..
Copra................... ............................... 1,000 lb..
value..
Tobacco, unmanufactured.................................. 1,000 lb..
value..
Cotton, unmanufactured....................................1,000 lb..
value..
Jute and jute but4s ..................................... long tons..
value..
Sisal and henequen......................................long tons..
value..
Wool, unmanufactured, free.........(1,000,000 lb.)..actual weight..
clean content1..
value..
Wool, unmanufactured, dutiable.....(1,000,000 Ib.)..actual weight..
clean contenti..
value..
Pulpwood.............................................1,000 cords..
value..
Crude petroleum .........................................1,000 bbl..
value..
Diamonds, rough or uncut .............................1,000 carats..
value..
Diamonds, for industrial use......................... 1,000 carats..
value..
Iron ore and concentrates.........................1,000 long tons..
value..
Ferroalloying ores.......................................... v lue..
Copper (copper content)..................................1,000 lb..
value..
Lead (lead content) ...................................... 1,030 lb..
value..
Tin (tin content)...................................... long tons..
value..
Zinc (zinc content)...................................... 1,000 id..
v alue..
Other nonferrous ores and concentrates ...................... value..
All other crude materials .................................. v lue..

Crude foodstuffs.........................................value..

Fish and shellfish...................................... 1,00 lb..
value..
Cattle, except for breeding..............................thousands.
value..
Grains.......................................................value..
Vegetables, fresh and dried .................................value..
Bananas............................................1,000 bunches..
value..
Cocoa or cacao beans.................................1,000,000 lb..
value..
Coffee, raw or green................................. 1,000,00 lb..
value..
Tea.......................................................1,000 b..
value..
Black pepper, unground ................................... 1,000 b..
value. .
All other crude foodstuffs .................................value..

See footnotes at end of table.


January
1960


1,162.5


December
1959


1,431.6


January
1959


1,133.9


Monthly average

1959 1958


1,248.9


1,061.6


417.3 550.7 448.7 485.2 445.1

745.3 880.9 685.2 763.8 616.5

245.0 2S3.3 262.1 257.7 230.0

5.3 5.4 6.4 7.3 4.5
16.1 20.1 14.6 8.0 6.7
73 107 124 108 89
27.2 36.0 33.0 32.1 20.9
40,338 39,560 53,799 58,809 50,102
3.8 3.8 5.0 5.7 4.0
14,675 10,647 13,024 12,640 11,543
10.0 7.6 10.0 9.3 8.7
9,987 7,811 7,666 12,760 12,190
0.7 0.4 0.4 2.1 2.5
loj,C0 7,168 7,057 5,740 3,121
S17 1.4 1.0 0.7
10,'70 9,694 10,271 10,432 9,767
1.8 1.7 1.9 1.7 1.3
16 14 20 21 13
12 11 20 16 10
8.8 7.3 11.6 10.3 6.6
14 15 15 13 9
9 10' 11 9 6
9.5 1j.S 9.7 8.4 7.1
103 93 105 104 114
2.1 1.8 2.0 2.2 2.4
27,437 36,258 31,156 31,841 31,976
61.5 7?.1 75.1 72.2 78.3
147 90 7 133 94
.5 5.5 4.9 7.9 6.0
1,762 1,157 637 1,089 839
5.4 5.1 2." 5.2 3.3
,370 ? ,03s5 1,9?7 2,969 2,296
21.- 27.3 15.9 2.0O 19.3
9.c l.7 14.7 11. 11.4
o,lf 7, r' 9,77- 6r,7l; 16,884
1.7 .1 2.7 1 3.8
6,41 77,1: 51,16-? 22,861 39,772
.I 0.7 5.2 2.3 4.3
2,-52 i' ,41.5 3' 455
5.5 0. 6.7 1.9 0.9
135,5 51,',J 91,E1,, T.. ,855 90,091
.: i. 3.31 4.3
7. t.. 6 6.2
2 .1 .,1. 27.0 31.1. 26.9

111.4 1i.5 i-.,.4 151." 161.4


-',,12
13.5


2. ,"

,053
5. 5

9.5
163
I-,
9,rJ 44
4.7

0.8
C)


49,15





2 i
3.0

.1


Ll3.'
113.2'
11.0,24
5.t
3,247


4:,,.23
12.1

9.Q4
1.9
3.Y
3,645
5.o
5)
113.3
21'-
79.o
3,498
4.1
2,9Q '.


10". 1


45, ".2
13.5

o.8

3.
3.5

c.
1I-'
12.7

91.1
9,1 ,0
-
2,914
0.7
8.7


39,847
12.2
:4
10.8
4.2
3.8
4,064
5.8
37
14.4
222
97.5
8,618
4.0


8.1






FT 930-I


3
UNITED STATES IMPORTS FOR CONSUMPTION OF MERCHANDISE, BY ECONOMIC CLASSES AND LEADING COMMODITIES:
JANUARY 1960 AND SELECTED PERIODS--Continued


January December January Monthly average
Economic class and commodity 1960 1959 1959
1959 1958

Manufactured foodstuffs..................................value.. 105.9 127.9 120.1 133.2 125.3

Meat products........................................... 1,000 lb.. 64,048 80,979 80,386 81,209 70,817
value.. 26.7 32.2 34.3 32.8 27.9
Cheese..................................................1,000 lb.. 4,167 8,753 5,320 5,322 4,645
value.. 1.9 4.5 2.4 2.6 2.3
Fish and shellfish canned, prepared, etc................. 1,000 lb.. 39,118 48,651 47,542 43,453 39,886
value.. 11.3 13.2 12.7 12.3 11.0
Fodders and feeds...........................................value.. 1.6 1.7 2.5 1.7 1.8
Cane sugar.......................................... 1,000,000 b.. 630 486 648 756 772
value.. 32.2 26.2 35.9 41.3 43.3
Molasses...............................................1,000 gal.. 16,851 18,019 19,104 24,205 28,698
value.. 1.8 2.3 2.2 3.0 3.7
Whisky......................................................value.. 10.1 18.4 9.0 14.8 13.2
All other manufactured foodstuffs ................... ..........value.. 20.5 29.5 21.1 24.8 22.2

Semimanufactures.........................................value.. 289.9 322.7 242.6 275.4 220.2

Leather ..... ......... .................................... ...... value.. 3.4 4.3 3.6 4.0 2.6
Bristles................................................ 1,000 lb.. 303 323 344 303 200
value.. 0.6 0.6 0.8 0.6 0.5
Expressed oils, inedible. ................................. value.. 3.2 4.1 3.2 4.7 4.1
Quebracho. ................................................1,000 lb.. 6,770 10,564 10,076 9,285 9,300
value.. 0.6 0.9 0.8 0.8 0.7
Wool semimanufactures......................................value.. 4.9 4.8 4.5 5.2 3.7
Sawed boards, planks, deals, etc................1,000,000 bd. ft.. 214 271 257 339 283
value.. 18.9 23.5 19.7 28.1 21.8
Wood pulp........................................1,000 short tons.. 173 204 216 203 175
value.. 22.3 26.0 27.1 26.2 23.1
Gas and fuel oil.......................................1,000 bbl.. 27,645 23,794 28,558 19,833 17,503
value.. 56.7 51.1 61.1 42.1 41.5
Asbestos...............................................long tons.. 48,882 42,215 40,524 48,928 43,706
value.. 4.7 4.3 3.6 4.6 4.0
Diamonds, cut but not set............................1,000 carats.. 69 107 63 77 60
value.. 5.7 7.3 6.4 7.2 5.7
Iron and steel semimanufactures .............................value.. 36.0 43.8 9.9 23.2 7.5
Aluminum.......................... .........................value.. 8.9 15.4 8.5 12.6 11.8
Copper (copper content).............................. 1,000,000 lb.. 102 110 31 62 56
value.. 32.7 34.9 8.6 18.6 13.7
Lead (lead content) ......................................1,000 lb.. 50,776 19,824 39,362 46,556 61,159
value.. 6.1 3.7 5.7 6.2 6.6
Nickel and alloys........................................1,000 lb.. 25,489 21,687 6,940 19,370 15,448
value.. 18.5 13.9 4.6 12.3 10.2
Tin......................................................1,000 lb.. 7,744 7,363 7,393 8,744 8,275
value.. 7.2 7.4 7.0 8.6 7.5
Zinc.....................................................1,000 lb.. 21,267 19,728 35,225 27,583 31,111
value.. 2.5 2.4 3.4 2.8 3.0
Coal-tar products...........................................value.. 3.8 5.7 4.7 4.9 3.9
Industrial chemicals........ ................................value.. 7.4 9.1 6.4 7.8 6.0
Fertilizers and materials........................1,000 short tons.. 85 166 76 153 123
value.. 3.5 6.3 3.0 5.2 4.9
All other semimanufactures .................................value.. 42.4 53.4 49.9 49.4 37.4

Finished manufactures.....................................value.. 410.3 -. 363.8 430.7 324.8

Leather manufactures.........................................value.. 5.5 8.5 4.2 7.0 5.1
Essential or distilled oils .................................value.. 1.7 1.7 1.5 1.5 1.3
Cotton cloth........................................ 1,000 sq. yd.. 33,472 41,325 9,102 20,031 11,750
value.. 7.6 7.7 2.7 4.3 3.2
Other cotton manufactures...................................value.. 13.5 12.7 9.9 12.5 9.3
Burlap..................................................1,000 yd.. 59,802 80,181 74,594 80,623 70,910
1,000 lb.. .,'. 45,899 46,225 49,485 40,641
value.. 6.3 7.6 7.3 7.6 6.3
Flax, hemp and ramie manufactures............................value.. 2.8 3.7 2.2 2.6
Wool manufactures ...........................................value.. 22.4 11.6 12.0 14.3 10.9
Silk manufactures.......................................... value.. 6.8 8.7 5.7 6.1 4.8
Shingles.............................................1,000 squares.. 124 175 116 178 178
value.. 1.2 1.7 1.1 1.8 1.6
Newsprint......................................1,000 short tons.. 371 513 342 437 407
value.. 48.2 65.1 43.1 55.5 51.2
Other paper manufactures................ ............ ........value.. 5.7 7.2 6.0 6.5 5.0
Pottery................... ....... ..... 0 ........ 0 ....... value.. 4.6 5.3 4.0 4.8 3.9

See footnotes at end of table.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

I 3 1262 llllllIlll lllllllllI08587 096111H 1111111
3 1262 08587 0961


FT 930-1


UNITED STATES IMPORTS FOR CONSUMPTION OF MERCHANDISE, BY ECONOMIC CLASSES AND
JANUARY 1960 AND SELECTED PERIODS-Continued


LEADING COMMODITIES


January December January Monthly average
Economic class and commodity 1960 1959 1959
1959 1958

Finished manufactures-Continued
Steel mill products........................................value.. 34.2 39.0 19.8 28.8 13.4
Iron and steel advanced manufactures .......................value.. 9.0 11.1 7.9 9.3 6.4
Agricultural machinery and implements.......................value.. 12.1 11.8 11.0 14.1 10.2
Automobiles and parts......................................value.. 61.3 88.4 68.2 70.3 46.0
Other machinery............................................value.. 36.7 51.8 32.2 40.0 28.8
Vehicles, except automobiles ...............................value.. 8.8 10.7 8.9 10.2 10.5
Photographic goods...................... ......................value.. 3.3 5.6 2.8 4.2 -3.4
Scientific and professional instruments.....................value.. 2.8 3.7 2.7 3.1 2.4
Musical instruments and parts..............................value.. 1.9 3.1 1.6 2.4 1.6
Toys and sporting goods ....................................value.. 4.7 5.5 4.0 4.9 3.4
Watches and watch movements, except parts ...................value.. 2.5 5.3 2.5 4.7 3.9
American goods returned.....................................value.. 16.7 21.9 15.1 19.5 16.6
All other finished manufactures2 ............................value.. 80.1 97.9 79.3 84.8 65.1
Estimated value $1-$99 formal and $1-$250 informal entry
shipments2................................................value.. 9.5 10.8 8.2 10.2 8.3


*Indicates less than $50,000.
Includes the actual weight of carbonized wool.
2For an explanation of the sampling procedures, see "Effect of Sampling"



























DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
WASHINGTON 25. D. C.

OFFICIAL BUSINESS


on front page.


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U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMIME




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