United States foreign trade

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Portion of title:
Import trade by commodity
Alternate Title:
FT 930-I
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Exports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Sept. 1955-
General Note:
"Summary report FT 930-I."
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 023107048
oclc - 24440593
System ID:
AA00013018:00006

Related Items

Preceded by:
United States foreign trade. Trade by commodity


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

C. 3 i 4 y t 3 a -.T

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMER
Frederick H. Mueller, Secretary


BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Robert W. Burgess, Director


UNITED STATES FOREIGN TRADE


SUMMARY REPORT
FT 930-I


DECEMBER 1959


IMPORT TRADE BY COMMOI


The Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce,
announced today that the increase in United States
annual imports for consumption from $12,739.4 million
in 1958 to the record total of $14,987.1 million in
1959 reflected substantial increases in imports of
all of the economic classes of commodities, except
crude foodstuffs. From 1958 to 1959 finished manufac-
tures rose from $3,897.1 to $5,168.1 million; semi-
manufactures, from $2,641.9 to $3,304.8 million;
crude materials, from $2,760.0 to $3,092.8 million;
and manufactured foodstuffs, from $1,504.1 to $1,598.5
million. Imports of crude foodstuffs fell from
$1,936.3 million in 1958 to $1,822.8 million in 1959.

Imports of dutiable commodities increased from
47,397.9 million in 1958 to $9,178.1 million in 1959.
Imports of duty free commodities advanced from
$5,341.6 to $5,809.0 million. Dutiable commodities
represented about 61 percent of total imports for con-
sumption during 1959 as compared to about 58 percent
of the total during 1958.
The Bureau pointed out that December imports
for consumption, also at a record high of $1,431.6
million, were about 14 percent more than the November
total of $1,261..4 million and about 16 percent higher
than the December 1958 total of $1,230.8 million.


Imports of crude foodstuffs rose
from $129.2 million in November to
$189.5 million in December reflecting sizable in-
creases in imports of coffee, from $74.5 to $113.3
million and cocoa beans, from $10.2 to $23.0 million.
The bulk of the rise in imports of finished manufac-
ture, from $471.1 to $508.1 million, resulted from
increases in imports of automobiles and parts, from
$66.3 to $88.4 million and newsprint, from $60.9 to
$65.1 million. Imports of crude materials advanced
from $251.9 to $283.3 million as increases occurred
in imports of undressed furs, from $4.6 to $20.1
million; crude petroleum, from $68.2 to $79.1
million, ferroalloying ores, from $11.4 to $16.7
million; and unmanufactured wool, from $5.9 to $10.8
million. Imports of iron ore and concentrates, also
included in this economic class, dropped from $34.0
to $27.3 million. Higher levels of imports of gas
and fuel oil, from $43.3 to $51.1 million and alumi-
num, from $10.8 to $15.4 million, were the chief
factors in the rise in imports of semimanufactures,
from $299.2 to $322.7 million. Imports of manufac-
tured foodstuffs rose from $109.9 to $127.9 million
primarily as a result of increases in imports of meat
products, from $23.0 to $32.2 million and cane sugar
from $17.9 to $26.2 million.


EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


COVERAGE: Import statistics include merchandise
imported by government agencies as well as by pri-
vate importers, but exclude American goods returned
by the United States armed forces for their own use.
United States trade with Puerto Rico, Hawaii, and
United States possessions is not included inthis re-
port, but the import trade of Puerto Rico and Hawaii
with foreign countries is included as a part of the
United States import trade. Merchandise shipped in-
transit through the United States between foreign
countries is not included in import statistics.
VALUATION: Import values are, in general, based
on market price or selling price,and are, in general,
f.o.b. the exporting country. Import values also ex-
clude United States import duties. None of the values
have been adjusted for changes in price level.
EFFECT OF SAMPLING: Effective January 1958 for-
mal entry shipments valued less than $100 and infor-
mal entry shipments valued $250 or less (less than
one percent of total import value) are estimated by


sampling. These estimated values are shown in this
table as "Estimated value $1-$99 formal and $1-$250
informal entry shipments" and are arbitrarily in-
cluded in the total for "Finished manufactures".
Prior to 1958 all imports valued $250 or less whether
reported on formal or informal entries were esti-
mated by sampling and were shown separately by eco-
nomic class. For convenience these estimates for
1957 are now included in the "All other" category'
for each economic class. For an indication of the
effect the change in coverage and the change in
presentation of sampled transactions have on the
economic classes and commodity totals shown in this
report effective with data for 1958, see the January
1958 issue of FT 930-I.

Further information regarding coverage, valua-
tion, etc., is contained in the "General Explanation"
in foreword of Report No. FT 110. For complete
statement, see the foreword in Foreign Commerce and
Navigation of the United States.


USCOHN-DC


Prepared In the Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division
FPr sale by the Bureau of the Census, Washlngton 25, D. C. Price 10t, manrul subscription $1.00
for both PT 930-E and FT 930-I









UNITED STATES IMPORTS FOR CONSUMPTION OF MERCHANDISE, BY ECONOMIC CLASSES AND LEADING COMMODITIES:
DECEMBER 1959 AND SELECTED PERIODS


(Quantity in units indicated; value in millions of dollars. Imports for consumption are a total of imports for immediate con-
sumption plus withdrawals for consumption from bonded warehouses. Data revised to reflect all corrections published with
statistics through those for December 1959. Totals represent sum of unfounded figures, hence may vary slightly from mm of
rounded amounts. See the "Explanation of Statistics" for information on sampling procedures and effect thereof on data
shown.)


Economic class and commodity


Total.............................................value..

Free......................................... ......value..

Dutiable..............................................value..

Crude materials..........................................value..

Hides and skins............................................value..
Undressed furs.............................................value..
Crude rubber.......................................1,000,000 lb..
value..
Co ra........................................ .............1,000 lb..
value..
Tobacco, unmanufactured..................................1,000 lb..
value..
Cotton, unmanufactured..................................1,000 lb..
value..
Jute and jute butts...................................long tons..
value..
Sisal and henequen....................................long tons..
value..
Wool, unmanufactured, free.........(1,000,000 Ib.)..actual weight..
clean content1..
value..
Wool, unmanufactured, dutiable.....(1,000,000 Ib.)..actual weight..
clean content1..
value..
Pulpwood............................................1,000 cords..
value..
Crude petroleum.......................................1,000 bbl..
value..
Diamonds, rough or uncut.............................1,000 carats..
value..
Diamonds, for industrial use.........................1,000 carats..
value..
Iron ore and concentrates.........................1,000 long tons..
yalue..
Ferroalloying ores..........................................value..
Copper (copper content).................................1,000 lb..
value..
Lead (lead content).....................................1,000 lb..
value..
Tin (tin content) ......................................long tons..
value..
Zinc (zinc content) .....................................1,000 lb..
value..
Other nonferrous ores and concentrates......................value..
All other crude materials2 ................................ value..

Crude foodstuffs.........................................value..

Fish and shellfish.....................................1,000 lb..
value..
Cattle, except for breeding ............................thousands..
value..
Grains.....................................................value..
Vegetables, fresh and dried................................value..
Bananas...........................................1,000 bunches..
value..
Cocoa or cacao beans...............................1,000,000 lb..
value..
Coffee, raw or green...............................1,000,000 lb..
value..
Tea....................................................1,000 lb..
value..
Black pepper, unground...................................1,000 lb..
value..
All other crude foodstuffs2 ................................value..

See footnotes at end of table.


December
1959


1,431.6


November
1959


1,261.4


December
1958


1,230.8


Monthly average


1958


1,061.6


1957


1,079.2


550.7 468.4 516.6 445.1 503.0

880.9 793.0 714.3 616.5 576.2

283.3 251.9 266.3 230.0 267.6

5.4 5.9 5.2 4.5 4.1
20.1 4.6 20.7 6.7 6.6
107 110 123 89 104
36.0 36.6 31.1 20.9 29.4
39,560 88,552 49,707 50,102 53,713
3.8 7.9 4.2 4.0 3.4
10,647 12,719 10,607 11,543 10,345
7.6 9.6 7.8 8.7 8.0
7,811 7,303 7,907 12,190 13,692
0.4 0.3 0.4 2.5 5.2
7,168 5,194 2,998 3,121 4,977
1.4 0.8 0.7 0.7 1.2
9,694 9,410 12,176 9,767 10,409
1.7 1.5 1.7 L.3 1.5
14 12 19 13 14
11 9 16 10 10
7.3 6.1 8.8 6.6 8.5
15 9 15 9 10
10 6 10 6 7
10.8 5.9 9.2 7.1 9.1
93 93 104 114 147
1.8 1.9 1.8 2.4 3.0
36,258 30,272 35,542 31,976 32,150
79.1 68.2 87.0 78.3 81.7
90 179 190 94 83
5.5 8.0 8.3 6.0 6.4
1,157 920 773 839 1,051
5.1 4.5 3.8 3.3 4.3
3,035 3,813 1,882 2,296 2,806
27.3 34.0 14.8 19.3 23.8
16.7 11.4 8.3 11.4 18.5
7,268 416 11,934 16,884 18,994
2.1 0.1 3.2 3.8 5.5
7,156 24,671 21,642 39,772 39,676
0.7 1.9 2.2 4.3 5.3
138 430 94 455 8
0.3 1.0 0.2 0.9 (M)
51,300 49,407 84,704 90,091 113,656
1.5 2.0 3.5 4.3 7.4
7.2 7.0 6.3 6.2 6.0
41.3 32.3 37.0 26.9 28.7

189.5 129.2 192.6 161.4 168.4


49,157
15.0
62
5.9
4.8
4.8
4,666
7.1
74
23.0
313
113.3
11,042
5.6
3,247
0.8


38,637
12.7
59
6.0
4.8
2.1
4,346
6.1
32
10.2
214
74.5
8,131
4.3
1,692


46,034
14.4
121
12.9
4.3
2.2
4,028
6.0
92
34.1
269
103.4
11,121
5.3
2,286
0.5
9.6


39,847
12.2
94
10.8
4.2
3.8
4,064
5.8
*37
14.4
222
97.5
8,618
4.0
2,889
0.6
8.1


32,738
10.2
59
5.5
5.8
2.2
3,976
5.8
43
11.2
230
114.7
8,536
4.2
2,713
0.6
8.1









UNITED STATES IMPORTS FOR CONSUMPTION OF MERCHANDISE, BY ECONOMIC CLASSES AND LEADING COMMODITIES:
DECEMBER 1959 AND SELECTED PERIODS-Continued


December November December Monthly average
Economic class and commodity 1959 1959 1958 1958 1957


Manufactured foodstuffs...................................value.. 127.9 109.9 128.3 125.3 106.0

Meat products........................................... 1,000 lb.. 80,979 54,293 84,676 70,817 34,084
value.. 32.2 23.0 34.0 27.9 15.3
Cheese.................................................1,000 lb.. 8,753 6,576 6,648 4,645 4,240
value.. 4.5 3.3 3.2 2.3 2.2
Fish and shellfish canned, prepared, etc.................1,000 lb.. 48,651 48,272 32,841 39,886 37,175
value.. 13.2 13.8 9.0 11.0 10.6
Fodders and feeds ...................... ................. value.. 1.7 1.4 2.6 1.8 1.7
Cane sugar.......................................1,000,000 Ib.. 486 330 589 772 690
value.. 26.2 17.9 32.1 43.3 38.3
Molasses................................................1,000 gal.. 18,019 16,422 25,354 28,698 20,076
value.. 2.3 2.3 3.6 3.7 3.3
Whisky .... .......................................... value.. 18.4 21.7 17.2 13.2 12.5
All other manufactured foodstuffs2........................value.. 29.5 26.6 26.5 22.2 22.2

Semimanufactures......................................value.. 322.7 299.2 261.9 220.2 243.3

Leather....................................................value.,. 4.3 3.8 3.7 2.6 2.6
Bristles................................................1,000 lb.. 323 302 250 200 208
value.. 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.5 0.6
Expressed oils, inedible...................................value.. 4.1 4.9 4.2 4.1 4.2
Quebracho...............................................1,000 lb.. 10,564 7,077 10,293 9,300 10,296
value.. 0.9 0.6 0.8 0.7 0.8
Wool semimanufac tures ..................................... value.. 4.8 4.2 4.7 3.7 4.0
Sawed boards, planks, deals, etc................1,000,000 bd. ft.. 271 312 310 283 245
value.. 23.5 26.1 23.4 21.8 20.2
Wood pulp...................................1,000 short tons.. 204 233 198 175 175
value.. 26.0 29.5 26.2 23.1 22.8
Gas and fuel oil.......................................1,000 bbl.. 23,794 21,262 25,423 17,503 15,431
value.. 51.1 43.3 54.6 41.5 41.4
Asbestos.............................................long tons.. 42,215 40,429 42,021 43,706 46,670
value.. 4.3 4.0 4.2 4.0 4.2
Diamonds, cut but not set...........................1,000 carats.. 107 60 80 60 51
value.. 7.3 6.3 7.9 5.7 5.5
Iron and steel semimanufactures..............................value.. 43.8 40.9 12.5 7.5 4.8
Aluminum..................................................value.. 15.4 10.8 14.2 11.8 10.8
Copper (copper content)........ ....................1,000,000 lb.. 110 117 51 56 79
value.. 34.9 36.6 13.9 13.7 23.7
Lead (lead content)....... .......................... ..... 1,000 lb.. 19,824 42,447 49,825 61,159 56,519
value.. 3.7 6.5 5.9 6.6 7.6
Nickel and alloys.......................................1,000 lb.. 21,687 21,352 7,724 15,448 23,133
value.. 13.9 13.7 5.1 10.2 16.8
Tin..................................................... 1,000 lb.. 7,363 6,728 10,426 8,275 11,422
value.. 7.4 6.7 9.7 7.5 10.9
Zinc................ .....................................1,000 Ib.. 19,728 22,702 27,984 31,111 44,907
value.. 2.4 2.6 2.5 3.0 5.4
Coal-tar products...................................... ....... .......... value.. 5.7 3.2 2.7 3.9 3.9
Industrial chemicals........................................value.. 9.1 7.5 7.4 6.0 5.8
Fertilizers and materials........................1,000 short tons.. 166 65 130 128 132
value.. 6.3 2.7 4.7 4.9 5.0
All other semimanufactures .................................value.. 53.4 44.6 52.8 37.4 42.5

Finished manufactures................... ............. value.. 508.1 471.1 381.7 324.8 293.9

Leather manufactures........................................value.. 8.5 9.7 5.2 5.1 4.0
Essential or distilled oils.................................value.. 1.7 1.6 1.3 1.3 1.7
Cotton cloth................... ....................1,000 sq. yd.. 41,325 33,791 9,481 11,750 10,208
value.. 7.7 6.5 2.5 3.2 2.9
Other cotton manufactures.................. ................ value.. 12.7 13.1 7.7 9.3 8.1
Burlap.................................................. 1,000 yd.. 80,181 77,369 67,813 70,910 71,349
1,000 lb.. 45,899 46,980 41,859 40,641 41,253
value.. 7.6 8.0 7.0 6.3 6.7
Flax, hemp and ramie manufactures..........................value.. 3.7 3.1 3.1 2.3 2.5
Wool manufactures.......................................... value.. 11.6 14.1 7.2 10.9 11.3
Silk manufactures....................................................... value.. 8.7 7.4 5.4 4.8 4.7
Shingles ............ ................... .......... 1,000 squares.. 175 221 212 178 159
value.. 1.7 2.3 1.9 1.6 1.6
Newsprint .......................................1,000 short tons.. 513 489 432 407 435
value.. 65.1 60.9 54.5 51.2 54.8
Other paper manufactures .......................... .... value.. 7.2 6.1 5.7 5.0 4.9
Pottery.......................... .......................value.. 5.3 5.2 3.5 3.9 3.7

See footnotes at end of table.








UNITED STATES IMPORTS FOR CONSUMPTION OF MERCHANDISE, BY ECONOMIC CLASSES AND
DECEMBER 1959 AND SELECTED PERIODS-Continued


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

1111111111111 111l111111 1111i11II1 11111
3 1262 08587 0664
LEADING COMWDITIES


December November December Monthly average
Economic class and commodity 1959 1959 1958
1958 1957

Finished manufactures-Continued
Steel mill products ........................................value.. 39.0 35.1 18.3 13.4 14.7
Iron and steel advanced manufactures........................value.. 11.1 10.3 8.1 6.4 6.1
Agricultural machinery and implements.......................value.. 11.8 12.6 11.7 10.2 6.6
Automobiles and parts.......................................value.. 88.4 66.3 67.4 46.0 28.1
Other machinery............................................value.. 51.8 48.7 34.9 28.8 28.1
Vehicles, except automobiles ...............................value.. 10.7 12.1 8.7 10.5 8.0
Photographic goods.........................................value.. 5.6 4.6 3.6 3.4 3.3
Scientific and professional instruments.....................value.. 3.7 3.4 2.8 2.4 2.2
Musical instruments and parts...............................value.. 3.1 3.5 1.8 1.6 1.7
Toys and sporting goods...................................value.. 5.5 4.8 3.3 3.4 3.5
Watches and watch movements, except parts....................value.. 5.3 7.2 3.9 3.9 4.7
American goods returned....................................value.. 21.9 20.7 18.7 16.6 15.8
All other finished manufactures2 ...........................value.. 97.9 92.7 82.3 65.1 64.1
Estimated value $1-$99 formal and $1-$250 informal entry
shipments2 .................................................value.. 10.8 11.2 11.1 8.3 XX


*Indicates lees than $50,000.
Includes the actual weight of carbonized wool.
2For an explanation of the sampling procedures, see "Effect of Sampling" on front page.


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
WASHINGTON 25. D. C.
OmCIAL UlINESM


u. a. new MrAuAreM=i=l




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID ER08JGL77_6JQGE0 INGEST_TIME 2013-02-07T18:34:25Z PACKAGE AA00013018_00006
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES