Vegetable situation

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Material Information

Title:
Vegetable situation
Physical Description:
213 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, Commodity Economics Division
Place of Publication:
Washington
Frequency:
quarterly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Vegetables -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Vegetable trade -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Vegetable trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
TVS-6 (June 1937) - TVS-218 (Nov. 1980).
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-TVS-218, Nov. 1980.
Issuing Body:
Vols. for 1937-Nov. 1953 issued by Bureau of Agricultural Economics; 1954-Jan. 1961, by Agricultural Marketing Service; Apr. 1961- by Economic Research Service; Feb. 1978- by Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service; Nov. 1980 by Economics and Statistics Service, each a subdivision of the United States Department of Agriculture; Nov. 1980 approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board.
General Note:
MONTHLY CATALOG NUMBER: gp 81007565

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 026013012
oclc - 08029461
lccn - 78643830
issn - 0042-3084
Classification:
lcc - HD9220.U5 U57a
ddc - 380.1/41/50973
System ID:
AA00013012:00006

Related Items

Preceded by:
Vegetable situation
Succeeded by:
Vegetable situation
Succeeded by:
Vegetable outlook & situation


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Full Text


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76.e


VEGETABLE

SITUATION

TVS- 136


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thi js~e: Ce~rak~i P_ pocesn
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prod -


POTATOES: MARCH 1 INTENTIONS
COMPARED WITH PLANTINGS
Late Summer and Fall Crops


1950


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Potato growers in the late summer
and fall States since 1951 have gener-
allyplantedclose to the acreage indi-
cated in March 1 intentions reports.
In 1958, however, plantings were
moderately above March intentions,
ahd in 1959 slightly above.
Growers in these States report
intentions to increase acreage about


1955 1960
NEG. 7112-60 (3) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE


1 percent over 1959. The intended
acreage likely would result in over-
production and relatively low prices.
To avoid this probabili the Depart-
ment recomme s plant
3 percent lesAsum-
mer harvest i in 1959, eer-
cent lessjfor fall harvest.


Published qua rN
AGRICULTURAL
UNITED STATES DE


*\70. 1 1%1


April 1960
FOR RELEASE
APR. 29, P.M.


AGRICULTURE








Table l.--''c-etblles and melons for fresh market: Reported commercial acreage and production
of principal crops, selected seasons, average 1949-58, 1959 and indicated 1)60

Acreage Production
S:960 : : : 1960

Seasonal
group :Average :1 :. : Indi- :Percent-:Percent-:Average: 1959 : Indi- :Percent-Percent-
and crop 1 -58 : : cated : age of :age of :1'-58: : cated : age of: age of
:average : 1 5, :average: 1959
: : : ~ ~: :


1,000 1,000 1,000
Acres Acres Pet. Pet. cwt. cwt cwt.


236,810 238,660


Pet. Pet.


92 101 30,771 30,337 32,180 105 106


Asparagus
early and mid 1
late /
Penns, lima
Beans, snap
early and mid 2~
Beets
Broccoli 1/ /
Cabbage
early 1
late Y
Cantaloups
Carrots
Cauliflower 3/
Celery
Corn, sweet '
Cucumbers i
Eggplant
Lettuce 3/
Onions
earl
late
Peas, green /
Peprpers, green
Shallots
Spinach
Tomatoes 3j
Watermelons
late


85,060
56,810
4,930

37,100
250
10, .40

19,460
9,770
39,340
2,540
7,080
6,670
33,110
11,270
1,220
47,180

35,780
14,760
6,540
7,830
2,280
10,150
54,400

89,680


94, ,O;
65,000
2,700

27,900
550
13,300

15,450
8,200
32,900
1,500
7,900
8,300
37, 3'
10,500
1,000
51,950

33,000
12,400
3,900
6,700
1,600
6,590
46,800


91,900
64,400
2,600

31,700
400
13,700

13,800
7,800
29,500
1,700
8,400
8, 2C,
37,500
11,000
1,100
41,450

28,500
10,750
3,000
7,100
1,1uo
6,600
35,300


b0,700 80,600


108
113
53

85
42
126

71
80
75
67
119
123
113
98
90
88

80
73
46 *
91
57
65
65


97
99
96

114
73
103

89
95
90
113
106
99
101
105
110
80

86
87
77
106
81
100oo
75


2,073



581
98
659

2,414


537
1,130
3,501
2,175
867
136
5,937

2,296

215
488
60
632
3,764


2,251


2,215


107 98


335 544 94 162
46 36 37 78
998 890 135 89


1,844


368
1,343
3,602
2,423
772
115
7,201

2,145

160
302
26
392
4,041


1,785


366
1,386
4,230
2,452
768
121
5,952

2,565

105
355
32
416
2,775


90 100


Summer:


early 1l
late 17
Garlic
Onions
early
late
Watermelons
early
late


8,850
: 22, (0,j
2,140

7,770
:59,670

:293,030
:24,540


8,000
18,550
3,200


8,160
18, ,uC
5,000


10,750 11,590 149
57,280 56,700 95


277,200 297,800
31,000 34,500


I/ Indludes processing.
Production for early spring only.
i Acreage and production for early spring only.

Vegetables-Fresh Market Report, USDA, AIr, issued monthly.


Winter l

Spring:


SAcres

:258,670


TVS-1 -


APRIL 1960


- 2 -


--- --- --- ---

--- --- --- ---






TVS-136 3 APRIL 1960


THE VEGETABLE SITUATION



Approved by the Outlook and Situation Board, April 25, 1960




: CONTENTS

Page Page:

: Summary .................... 3 Potatoes ...................... 12
: Commercial Vegetables for Sweetpotatoes ................ 13
: Fresh Market ............... 4 Dry Edible Beans ............. 4 :
: Processed Vegetables ......... 8 Dry Field Peas ............... 16 :
: List of Tables .... ..... ....... .............. 30


: Special Article

: Trends in the Geographic Pattern of Production of Tomatoes for
: Processing .................. ........ .............. ... ....... 18 :



SUMMARY

Early production estimates for vegetables which make up the bulk of
spring tonnage indicate that supplies of fresh vegetables will be moderately
smaller this spring than last, and probably slightly smaller than the 1949-58
average. Crops in the Southeast were delayed by cold, wet weather, and some
Texas crops were damaged by the late February freeze. However, growth of
vegetables in California and Arizona has been stimulated somewhat by above
normal temperatures, and early supplies from these areas compensate to some
extent for delayed harvest in other areas.

Overall supplies of fresh vegetables are expected to pick up rapidly
during the next few weeks, and prices are likely to continue their seasonal
decline. Late planting and delayed growth in some sections are likely to
result in late spring in more than the usual overlap of harvest between areas.

Indications are that agregate holdings of canned vegetables are substan-
tially smaller than the large holdings of a year earlier, with declines for
most items. However, except for sauerkraut which is in a tight position,
supplies of other major items are above the recent 10-year average and fully
ample. Frozen holdings also are somewhat smaller than a year earlier.





APRIL 1960


Processors apparently are aiming for about the same overall pack of
vegetables this year as last. Recent intentions reports for 9 major crops
for processing indicate that processors plan to plant or contract about 2 per-
cent more acreage than last year. Should this acreage materialize and grow-
ing conditions are near average, the total tonnage for processing would be
about the same as in 1959. Total supplies of canned vegetables likely would
be a little smaller in the 1960-61 season than in the current season because
of expected lighter stocks at the beginning of the coming season. Aggregate
supplies of frozen items probably would be moderately larger.

Supplies of potatoes available for the spring as a whole are likely to
be a little smaller than last spring. Holdings of fall crop potatoes on
March 1 were about 6 million hundredweight less than a year earlier. However,
estimated production for early spring harvest is up 9 percent, and indicated
acreage for late spring harvest is up 11 percent. Because of delayed plant-
ing and development of crops in the Southeast, more than the usual overlap
of harvest is likely among important areas. If this occurs, a substantial
price decline is likely in late spring.

Intentions reports indicate that potato growers plan to plant slightly
more acreage than last year to both the early summer crop and the late summer
and fall crops, combined.

Growers reported plans, as of March 1, to plant 16 percent less
acreage to sweetpotatoes than last year. If this occurs, production probably
will be down substantially from 1959, and prices to growers are likely to
average materially above those of the current season.

Intentions reports indicate that farmers plan to plant about the
same acreage to both dry edible beans and dry field peas this year as last.
If yields should be near the average of recent years, total supplies of dry
beans would be moderately smaller in the 1960-61 season than in the current
season. Supplies of dry peas would also be moderately smaller than in the
current season, but probably larger than needed for domestic and export
markets.


COMMERCIAL VEGETABLES FOR FRESH MARKET

Early reports for commercial vegetables, excluding melons, which
comprises about three-fourths of spring tonnage indicate that production of
vegetables for spring harvest is likely to be moderately smaller than last
year, and slightly below the 1949-58 average. Cold, wet weather delayed
planting and development of crops in the Southeast, and some Texas crops
were damaged by the late February freeze. On the other hand, growth of
vegetables in California and Arizona has been stimulated by above normal
temperatures.


TVS-136


- 4 -






APRIL 1960


Among the more important vegetables, substantially smaller tonnages
are indicated for early spring broccoli, lettuce and tomatoes, and a
slightly smaller tonnage for early spring asparagus and cabbage.
Substantially larger production than last year is indicated for early spring
snap beans and onions and for spring celery and green peppers. Also,
prospective tonnage is slightly larger for early spring cauliflower and
moderately larger for spring spinach. Overall supplies of fresh vegetables
are expected to increase rapidly during the next few weeks, and prices are
likely to continue their seasonal decline. More than the usual overlap of
marketing is expected among important producing areas, because of late
plantings and delayed growth in some areas. During the next 4 to 5 weeks
prices to growers may average somewhat below those of a year earlier.

Indicated acreage of watermelons for late spring harvest is about
the same as a year ago, while cabbage is 5 percent smaller, and onions 13
percent smaller. Intentions reports indicate that growers plan to plant 2
percent more acreage to cabbage for early summer harvest than in 1959, and
7 percent more watermelons. Growers also report intentions to plant 8 per-
cent more acreage of onions for early summer harvest than last year.
Intended acreage of onions for late summer harvest is down 1 percent.

Prospects for
Major Items

Cabbage. Supplies of cabbage in the winter of 1960 were materially larger
than in 1959. Demand was strong, partly as a result of light supplies of a
number of tender vegetables, and prices to growers in the early weeks of 1960
averaged somewhat above those of a year earlier. In late winter, the
larger supplies began to weigh on markets and for several weeks prices fell
below year earlier levels. However, shipping point prices in early April
averaged a little above the low levels of a year earlier.

Indications are that supplies of cabbage may be a little smaller this
spring than last. Prospective production of the early spring crop, which
typically furnishes about two-thirds of total spring tonnage, is 3 percent
smaller than last year. Although no production estimate is available on
cabbage for late spring harvest, prospective acreage is 5 percent smaller
than in 1959.

Prospective acreage of cabbage for early summer harvest is 2 percent
larger than last year, and that for late summer harvest 1 percent smaller.
Normal abandonment and yields near the average of recent years on the
indicated acreages would result in moderately less early summer tonnage
than in 1959, and about the same late summer tonnage as last year. With
kraut packers likely to be active bidders, prices to growers this summer are
expected to average much above current low levels, and probably near year
earlier levels.


TVS-136


- 5 -





APRIL 1960


Celery. Supplies of winter celery in 1960 were about a sixth smaller than the
record supplies of the previous winter, because of a cut in acreage. Prices,
though generally at moderate levels, averaged much above the low levels of a
year earlier.

During early April unloads of celery in the 38 cities remained
somewhat lighter than those of a year earlier. However, indicated spring
production is up 17 percent, so that remaining supplies are materially
larger than both a year ago and average. Most of the increase over 1959 is
in California, with Florida up only slightly. Because of heavy supplies
from California, prices received by growers in late spring are expected to
average below those of a year earlier.

Sweet Corn. Production of sweet corn for early spring marketing, which
usually makes up about three-fourths of the spring total, is estimated at
2.5 million hundredweight. This compares with 2.4 million hundredweight
in 1959 and a 1949-58 average of 2.2 million. Unload data in early April
indicated that marketing were running much smaller than those of a year
earlier. Movement is expected to pick up rapidly in the weeks ahead as
delayed plantings mature, and in late spring may exceed a year earlier.
Prices during the next 4 to 6 weeks are likely to average somewhat below
those for the corresponding weeks of 1959.

Tomatoes. Indications are that total supplies of tomatoes for fresh market
will be materially smaller this spring than last. Acreage of the important
early spring crop is about a fourth smaller than last year. All States
reported declines, with Texas down sharply. Condition of the Florida crop
varies considerably because of repeated weather damage. Much of the Texas
crop, which typically moves in volume in early April,was destroyed or severe-
ly damaged by freezing temperatures in late February. Texas production will
be relatively light, and several weeks late. Prospective total early spring
production is about a third smaller than last year, and a fourth below the
1949-58 average. Because of some replanting and delayed maturity, however,
remaining supplies probably are down somewhat less than production figures
indicate. No estimate is available on the less important late spring crop.
Prices to growers during the next 4 to 6 weeks probably will average above
those of a year earlier.

Lettuce. Market supplies of lettuce were a little larger this winter than
last mainly as a result of increased acreage and higher yields in Texas.
However, demand for lettuce was strong, partly because of light supplies of
a number of other salad items. Except in mid-winter, when supplies were
much heavier than in 1959, prices to growers averaged well above the
relatively low levels of a year earlier.

Indications are that supplies of lettuce this spring will be
materially smaller than the large supplies of last spring. Production for


TVS-136


- 6 -





APRIL 1960


early spring harvest, which typically makes up about four-fifths of the
total spring tonnage, is down 17 percent from last year. The reduction is
due to a substantially smaller acreage in the Salt River Valley of Arizona,
and to a sharply lower acreage and moderately lower yield in California.
Estimates are not yet available for the total late spring crop. Prices to
growers during the next 4 to 6 weeks probably will average materially
above those of a year earlier.

Onions. More onions are expected to be available this spring than last.
The early spring crop in Texas, estimated in early April at 2.6 million
hundredweight, is about a fifth above the light crop of 1959, and 12 percent
above the recent 10-year average. The larger output than last year is the
result of higher prospective yields, as acreage is smaller in all areas except
the Lower Valley which is unchanged. Movement of the crop through March was
relatively light because of adverse weather which hampered harvesting and
curing, though it was larger than a year ago when the season was several
weeks late. Seeders are a serious problem in the Lower Valley and are show-
ing up in the Winter Garden and Laredo areas. The crop in the Lower Valley
was further damaged by heavy rains around mid-April. With larger supplies
of storage onions from the late summer crop and larger prospective new crop
supplies, prices to growers for both old and new crop average much below
the high prices of a year earlier.

Acreage of onions for late spring harvest is 13 percent smaller than
last year. A small increase in California is more than offset by declines
in Arizona, Texas, North Carolina and Georgia. On the indicated acreage,
1956-59 yields by States would result in a production about a tenth less than
last year, but substantially above the 1949-58 average. With some overlap
from the early spring crop in prospect, such a late spring volume may
result in some marketing difficulties and relatively low prices.

Based on growers intentions reports of early February and early March,
prospective plantings of onions for early summer harvest are 8 percent above
a year ago, while intended plantings for late summer harvest are down 1
percent. Should the intended acreage materialize and growing weather be
about average, supplies of early summer onions, particularly from Texas and
New Mexico, probably would be burdensome. Also, supplies of late summer
onions probably would be moderately larger than anticipated trade demand.

Cantaloups. Acreage of cantaloups for spring harvest is down in all States
except Florida, which reports the same acreage as in 1959. The substantial
cut in California acreage resulted from a sharp reduction in the Blythe area
as Imperial County and Coachella Valley reported increases. In Texas, a
sharp cut in the Winter Garden area more than offset an increase in the
Laredo area. The crops in Florida and Texas were seriously damaged by
adverse weather, and much of the acreage was replanted. This will delay
harvest and probably will result in more than the usual amount of overlap of
harvest between areas. The crop in West Mexico, which exports substantial
quantities to this country in the spring, is also later than usual. The crop
in California is in generally good condition.


TVS-136


- 7 -







Watermelons. During the next 3 to 4 weeks supplies of watermelons are expected
to be materially smaller than a year ago. Acreage for late spring harvest is
about the same as a year ago, but crops are generally later. Although severe
damage from cold weather necessitated heavy replanting of the Florida crop,
yields may turn out better than last spring. Prospective early summer acreage
is about 7 percent larger than last year, with most of the increase in Texas.
Considerable acreage in the Lower Valley had to be replanted after the freeze in
late February. Cold weather also delayed plantings in other early summer States.
Should yields by States be near the 1955-58 average, production on the indicated
early summer acreage would be slightly largerthanboth1959 and the recent 10-year
average.
Indicated production of watermelons in late spring and early summer or-
dinarily would result in little or no marketing difficulties. However, because
of replanting and delay in planting, more than the usual amount of overlap of
harvest is likely between areas. If this happens, prices during such overlap
may be depressed. In any event, prices during the next 3 to 4 weeks probably
will average somewhat above those of a year earlier.



PROCESSED VEGETABLES

Supplies Smaller Than a Year
o But Generally Adequate
Stocks of canned vegetables on January 1 were almost a tenth smaller
than those of January 1, 1959, while stocks of frozen vegetables were about
the same as those of a year earlier. Demand for processed vegetables was
strong this winter, partly as a result of damage to Florida winter vegetables.
Recent stocks data indicate that the net outmovement since January 1 of both
canned and frozen vegetables has been somewhat larger than in the early months
of 1959. Recent canner holdings of sweet corn and spinach were materially
above the light holdings of a year earlier. But holdings of canned snap beans,
green peas, asparagus, lima beans, and beets were materially smaller, and sauer-
kraut much smaller. Indications are that remaining supplies of tomatoes, tomato
juice, and most tomato products are also significantly smaller than a year ago.
Except for sauerkraut, however, supplies of most major items are above the
1949-58 average, and fully ample to furnish markets until new pack becomes
available.

Movement of a number of frozen vegetables increased significantly as
adverse weather curtailed winter production of certain fresh items. Among ma-
jor frozen vegetables, January-March net outmovement of lima beans, snap beans,
corn and green peas was substantially above that of a year earlier. Net out-
movement of all frozen vegetables was moderately above that of last year.
Stocks of frozen vegetables on April 1 amounted to 613 million pounds, 5 per-
cent less than a year earlier. Stocks of spinach were materially larger than
on April 1, 1959, French fried potatoes moderately larger, and carrots and
frozen green peas slightly larger; but holdings of most other items were
smaller.


- 8 -


APRIL 1960


TVS-136






APRIL 1960


Demand for processed vegetables picked up considerably this winter com-
pared with the sluggish demand earlier in the season. Markets generally ad-
vanced as trading picked up, with f.o.b. prices of most items currently at or
above year earlier levels. Demand is expected to continue active, and most
processed items in the next 2 to 3 months are likely to move at firm to
moderately higher prices.

Carryover stocks of canned vegetables at the end of the current season
are expected to be substantially smaller than the heavy stocks of a year earlier,
and frozen stocks also are expected to be materially smaller. Early reports
indicate that canners in 1960 are likely to seek a pack close to that of 1959..
The overall frozen pack probably will be somewhat larger than last year as this
industry continues to expand.

March and April intentions reports indicate that processors plan to
plant or contract about 2 percent more acreage than last year. These reports
point to about the same acreage for canning as last year, and a materially
larger acreage for freezing. Total intended acreages of green lima beans and
contract acreage for kraut are up substantially, and snap beans, green peas
and beets for canning up moderately. Acreage of winter and early spring
spinach for processing was down from 1959. Also, prospective acreages of sweet
corn and cucumbers for pickles are down 3 percent, and tomatoes down 1 percent.
The reports of intentions are only tentative. A number of factors, including
the intentions reports, may cause processors to modify their plans. However,
should the intended acreage materialize and growing conditions be about average,
total tonnage of vegetables for processing would be about the same as in 1959.
Because of lighter stocks at the beginning of next season, supplies of canned
vegetables would be a little smaller in 1960-61 than in the current season.
Supplies of frozen vegetables probably would be slightly to moderately larger.

Snap Beans. Consumption of canned snap beans continues to increase. Dis-
appearance so far this season has been materially larger than a year earlier
and about a fourth above the 1949-58 average. During the first half of the
season green and wax beans generally sold lower than a year earlier. However,
since the first of the year, markets have advanced and most items are now
at or above year earlier levels. Carryover at the end of the current season
will be substantially smaller than the heavy carryover of a year earlier.
Canner stocks on April 1 were 7.1 million cases, 24/2 equivalents, compared
with 9.5 million on April 1, 1959, and a 1949-58 average of 5.5 million.
Frozen stocks on April 1 amounted to 47 million pounds, about a fifth less than
a year earlier.

April 1 intentions reports indicate that packers plan to plant or
contract 6 percent more acreage of snap beans for processing this year than
last. Intended acreage for canning, which makes up about three-fourths of the
total is up 4 percent, and acreage for freezing up 14 percent. Yields near
the average of recent years, on the indicated acreage, would result in at least
a moderately larger canned pack than last year, and a substantially larger
frozen pack. Such a production, with anticipated carryover would result in
about the same quantity of canned snap beans as the near record supply of the
current season, and somewhat larger frozen supplies.


TVS-136


- 9 -





TVS-136


- 10 -


APRIL 1960


Green Peas. Because of a smaller 1959 pack, supplies of canned green peas in
the 1959-60 season were moderately smaller than the large supplies of the past
two seasons. Also, disappearance this season has been somewhat larger than
last season. Nevertheless, supplies were above the recent 10-year average,
and prices have generally been below those of a year earlier. Canner stocks
on April 1 were down sharply from the high levels of a year earlier, about
9 million cases 24/2 equivalents, compared with 13 million cases on April 1,
1959. Stocks of frozen peas were slightly larger than a year ago.

Processors in early March reported intentions to plant or contract
5 percent more acreage of green peas than last year, with freezing up 10 per-
cent and canning up 2 percent. In recent years from a fourth to a third of
the total crop has gone into freezing. Major producing areas in the Mid-
west and Pacific Northwest are getting a late start because of cold, wet soil.
Yields near the 1958-59 average on the indicated acreage would result in about
the same tonnage of peas for canning as last year, and moderately more for
freezing. Because of a smaller carryover from the 1959 pack, supplies of
canned peas next season would be substantially smaller than in the current
season but fully ample. Supplies of frozen peas probably would be moderately
larger than this season.

Sweet Corn. Remaining supplies of canned corn on April 1 were 14 percent
larger than a year ago, but only moderately above the recent 10-year average.
Prices of most canned corn items in the East are near those of a year ago,
but prices in the Midwest generally are lower. Frozen stocks are somewhat
smaller than a year ago.

Growers' intentions, on April 1, indicate 5 percent less acreage of
sweet corn for canning than last year. But prospective acreage for freezing,
which typically takes about a sixth of the total production for processing,
is up 12 percent. The intended acreages, with 1956-58 average yields would
result in a materially smaller canned pack than last year. Because of the
larger expected carryover at the beginning of the 1960-61 season, total canned
supplies would be close to those of the 1959-60 season. Frozen supplies would
be materially larger.

Tomatoes. Supplies of tomatoes, tomato juice and most tomato products in the
current season were materially below the heavy supplies of the previous season,
but above average. Consumption of most of these items so far this season
appears to be running the same to a little ahead of last season, leaving cur-
rent holdings well below those of a year ago. Average f.o.b. prices of tomato
juice and puree in early April were about the same as a year ago, and tomatoes,
catsup, and paste were higher. Prices during the remainder of the season will
be influenced by remaining 1959 crop supplies, and also by the prospective
size and price of the 1960 pack.





APRIL 1960


According to the March 1 intentions reports, prospective acreage of
tomatoes for processing is 1 percent smaller than last year. Intended
acreage in the Mid-Atlantic States is about the same as last year, with an
increase in New Jersey roughly offset by a decline in Pennsylvania.
Prospective acreage in the Midwest is down slightly, though Indiana shows
a slight increase and Iowa a sharp increase. Ohio, Illinois, Michigan and
Missouri are down. The South Atlantic South Central area reports the
sharpest decline from 1959--14 percent. Among important producing States in
this area, only South Carolina reports an increase. Growers in California,
which produces about 60 percent of total U. S. tonnage, plan a 4 percent
increase in acreage. Utah also reports an increase, but Texas and Colorado
are down.

It is much too early to estimate probable production of tomatoes for
processing. Plantings and production will be influenced by weather, avail-
ability of plants and contract prices. However, the intended acreage with
1956-59 average yields would result in a production about the same as in 1959.
Production at this level should bring overall supplies about in balance with
trade demand.


Sauerkraut. Largely because of smaller available supplies, movement of
sauerkraut to date has been materially less than a year earlier and prices
considerably higher. Current supplies are tight. March 1 canners' stocks
were only 3.3 million cases, 24/2 equivalents, compared with 5.2 million cases
on March 1, 1959.

Intentions reports as of April 1 indicate that growers plan to plant or
contract 14 percent more acreage of cabbage for kraut than last year. Should
yields be near the 1954-58 average, production on the intended acreage would
be almost a fourth larger than in 1959. In addition to production from con-
tract acreage, kraut manufacturers typically purchase large quantities of
cabbage from open market supplies. Processors are likely to aim for a total
pack materially larger than the small pack of 1959.


Spinach. California canners' stocks of spinach on March 1 were about double
the light holdings of a year earlier and frozen stocks on April 1 were about
a third larger.

Early spring tonnage in California, which usually makes up about
40 percent of the total U. S. annual production of spinach for processing,
is slightly larger than last spring. Prospective acreage and production is
not yet available for the other seasonal spinach crops.


Cucumbers. April 15 indicated prospective acreage of cucumbers for pickles is
3 percent smaller than in 1959. This acreage with 1958-59 average yields by
States would result in a production almost a tenth below that of 1959, but
about the same as the 1949-58 average.


- 11 -


TVS-136






APRIL 1960


Beets. Prospective acreage of beets for canning is 7 percent larger than a
year ago, with substantial increases in New York and Oregon and a small increase
in Wisconsin. However, normal abandonment and 1957-59 average yields by States
would result in moderately less tonnage than in 1959, and materially less than
the 1949-58 average.


POTATOES

Supplies of potatoes available were materially smaller during the first
quarter of 1960, than the heavy supplies of a year earlier. Stocks of fall crop
potatoes on January 1, 1960 were smaller than the same date of 1959. Also, acre-
age for winter harvest was down sharply from the previous winter; the Florida
crop was severely damaged by cold weather, and yields were much lower. Total
winter production was 3 million hundredweight, 1 million less than in 1959.

Movement of potatoes to both fresh market and food processing outlets in
the period January-March was slightly to moderately larger than a year ago, and
prices to growers were about double the low levels of a year earlier. Largely
because of adverse weather which has delayed planting and development of the
spring crop in the Southeast and extended the season of heavy demand for the
moderate stocks of storage potatoes, f.o.b. prices moved up about a dollar per
hundredweight during March.

Spring Prospects

Total supplies of potatoes available probably will remain slightly to
moderately smaller this spring than last. Stocks of fall crop potatoes on
March 1 amounted to about 56 million hundredweight, 6 million less than a year
earlier. Acreage of potatoes for early spring harvest was about 12 percent
larger than in 1959. Damage from adverse weather was again heavy and indicated
yield per acre is relatively low. Prospective production of 3.4 million hundred-
weight is 9 percent above that of 1959. Indicated acreage for late spring har-
vest is up 11 percent from last year. Acreage in the Southeast and South Central
States is up 4 percent from 1959 with most of the increase in the Baldwin Alabama
area. In Alabama and other Southeastern States, planting was delayed or planted
fields damaged by cold, wet weather. Acreage in the Southwest--Oklahoma,
Texas and Arizona--is up 15 percent. Indicated acreage in California, which
typically produces about 60 percent of the total late spring tonnage, is up
19 percent. The crop in California has made good progress with harvesting in
early districts reportedly showing good yields. USDA's first production
estimate for late spring potatoes will be available May 10.

If weather conditions in the principal producing areas are near average
during the remaining weeks of spring, supplies of new crop potatoes will
increase rapidly. Domestic demand is expected to remain active, and demand
for export to Canada is likely to be unusually strong. During the next 4 to
5 weeks prices to growers probably will remain above both those of a year earlier


- 12 -


TVS-136





APRIL 1960


and average. In the closing weeks of spring, large supplies from California
and more than the usual bunching of supplies from other areas are likely to
result in a substantial price decline.


Summer and Fall

Acreage. Growers, in early February, reported intentions to plant a slightly
larger acreage of potatoes for early summer harvest than last year. March 1
intentions reports in the late summer and fall States combined, also indicate
about 1 percent increase in plantings over 1959.

Prospective acreage of potatoes for late summer and fall harvest in
the 8 eastern States is down 1 percent with a slight increase in Maine more
than offset by declines in New York and Pennsylvania. Intended acreage in
the 9 Central States is up 3 percent with moderate increases in North Dakota,
Minnesota and Indiana more than offsetting decreases in Ohio, Michigan and
Nebraska. Prospective acreage in the 9 Western States is 2 percent larger
than in 1959. Among the more important States in the area, planting inten-
tions are up in Idaho, Colorado and California, the same as a year ago in
Washington, and down in Oregon.


Production. The intended acreage of early summer potatoes and yields near
the average of recent years would produce a crop about the size of the 1959
crop. This would be at least moderately larger than recommended in the
Department's acreage-marketing guide.

The intended acreage of potatoes for late summer and fall harvest
combined is somewhat larger than recommended in the acreage-marketing guide.
Yields near the average of recent years, adjusted for upward trend, would
result in moderately more potatoes than last year, and more than needed to
supply regular trade channels. Overproduction of potatoes weighs heavily on
markets and seriously depresses prices. To keep production in line with
anticipated demand, the Department recommends that growers plant 3 percent
less acreage of potatoes for late summer harvest than in 1959, and 7 percent
less acreage for fall harvest.


SWEETPOTATOES


Prices at Relatively
Low Levels

The larger supplies of sweetpotatoes this season than last have
weighed heavily on markets. Most of the 1959 crop has returned a price to
growers about 15 percent lower than those of a year earlier, and more than
a fifth below the 1954-58 average. In mid-March prices to growers averaged
$3.46per hundredweight compared with $3.96 in mid-March 1959. The


- 13 -


TVS-136





APRIL 1960


Department of Agriculture in late February announced a sweetpotato purchase
program to assist growers in marketing their abundant supplies. Through
April 22, about 33,000 hundredweight had been purchased in New Jersey and
North Carolina. The purchase program expired in North Carolina on April 15,
and is scheduled to end in New Jersey on April 30. Sweetpotatoes purchased
are distributed to non-profit school lunch programs and other eligible outlets.


Substantial Cut in
Acreage Indicated

March 1 intentions reports indicate that growers plan to plant about
242,000 acres of sweetpotatoes, 16 percent less than last year and almost a
third less than the 1949-58 average. The cutback from 1959 is general, with
all States except Kansas reporting moderately to substantially less acreage.
Among the more important producing States, cuts of 20 percent or slightly
more were reported in Louisiana, South Carolina and Tennessee. Cuts of 10 to
17 percent were reported in New Jersey, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina,
Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi. California cut acreage 8 percent, and
Texas 5 percent.


Prospects for
1960-61 Season

If farmers plant close to the intended acreage, and yields are near
the average of recent years, supplies of sweetpotatoes in the coming season
will be materially smaller than in the current season, and probably the
smallest of record. Demand for sweetpotatoes in 1960-61 is not likely to
differ much from that of the current season. However, if production is
down as much as now seems likely, prices to growers in 1960-61 probably will
average substantially above the low levels of the current season.


DRY EDIBLE BEANS

Demand for Beans
Remains Strong

Because of the production pattern in 1959, the major classes of
colored beans have been in tight supply in the current season, while white
classes have been in generally large supply. Both domestic and export
demand have been strong this season. Domestic movement probably has been
about the same as the relatively high level of the previous season, and
exports to date have been considerably larger. Exports in the period
September-February were about double those of a year earlier. All of the
increase was accounted for by heavier exports of white classes, as exports
of colored beans were down.


- 14 -


TVS-136





APRIL 1960


Prices of the principal colored classes have averaged much above those
of last season. White classes have averaged below those of a year earlier,
but generally above support levels. However, about 180,000 hundredweight of
pea. beans in Michigan were delivered to CCC under the support program. These
beans were made available on the CCC monthly sales list for April. On
March 31, about 480,000 hundredweight of beans were under the government loan
and purchase agreement program in States in which loans mature on April 30.
However, relatively few of these beans are expected to be delivered to CCC.
Demand is expected to continue active, and prices during the remainder of the
season are likely to average close to current levels.


Little Change in
Acreage Indicated

March 1 intentions reports indicate that producers plan to plant about
1 percent less acreage to dry beans than last year and 2 percent less than
the 1949-58 average. Prospective acreage is a little larger in the Northeast
because of a 3 percent increase in Michigan, which produces most of the nation's
pea beans. Intended acreage in New York State, principal producer of red
kidney beans is down 4 percent.

Growers in the Northwest, leading area in the production of great
northern and small red types, reportedly plan to plant 8 percent less acreage
than in 1959. Only Idaho plans as much acreage as last year. In addition
to large quantities of great northern and small reds, Idaho produces about a
fourth to a third of the country's pinto crop. Prospective acreage in the
Southwest, which produces over half the pinto crop is up slightly from 1959.

Intended acreage of lima beans in California is down 5 percent from a
year ago. Acreage of "other beans," mostly blackeye, pink and small white
is down 2 percent.


Prospects for the
Coming Season

Because of a smaller 1959 crop, carryover stocks of dry beans at the end
of the current season are expected to be at least moderately smaller than those
of a year earlier, and substantially below most other recent years. Carryover
of white beans probably will be substantially larger than the previous season,
but carryover of colored classes will be much smaller.

If farmers plant the intended acreage, 1955-59 average yields by States
would result in a production of 17.3 million bags compared with 18.2 million
bags in 1959. With smaller overall stocks likely at the end of the current
season, supplies in the 1960-61 season would be moderately smaller than in
the current season. Supplies of white and colored classes next season likely
would be in somewhat better balance than in 1959-60, but supplies of colored
beans still would be below utilization in a number of recent years.


TVS-136


- 15 -






APRIL 1960


Domiestic demand next season probably will be close to that of the current
season. Foreign demand is expected to be good, but barring a poor crop in
Europe may be somewhat below that of the current season. If the prospective
supply-demand situation materializes, prices to growers for colored beans
next season probably will average materially lower than for the current
season, and white beans higher. Overall prices are likely to average mate-
rially above the National average support level of $5.35 per hundredweight.

The Deparment of Agriculture, in early March, announced the removal
of dry edible beans from the list of crops designated as surplus on lands
leased from U. S. Government agencies. A surplus crop produced in violation
of a restrictive lease on land leased from a U. S. Government agency is not
eligible for price support. The surplus designated list now includes cotton
(upland and extra long staple), barley, corn, grain sorghums, flaxseed, oats,
rice, rye, soybeans, wheat, peanuts, and tobacco.



DRY FIELD PEAS

Movement Good, Rema i i ng
Supplies Large

Domestic use of dry peas in the current season has been materially
larger than the disappearance from the light supplies of the previous season.
Export demand also has been unusually active. Exports of dry peas from
September through February amounted to 1.3 million hundredweight, 40 percent
more than in the same months last season. While exports in the last half of
the current season are expected to be much smaller than in the'first half,
the total for the season is expected to exceed those of 1958-59-

Total supplies of peas available in 1959-60 were about a third larger
than the previous season. Despite the good rate of movement into both domestic
and export markets so far this season, remaining supplies of dry peas are sub-
stantially larger than a year ago. Considering the large supplies available,
prices have held up fairly well, though Alaskas and other smooth green kinds
have moved at prices much below the high levels of a year earlier.


About the Same
Acreage, Smaller
Procdction Likely in 1960

Intentions reports on :larch 1 indicated that dry pea producers plan
to plant about the same acreage as in 1959. Although peas also are grown in
Minnesota, N-rth Dakota, Colorado, and Oregon, the great bulk of the crop is
grown in Idiai, and Washington. Growers in Idaho plan 10 percent less acreage,
but prospective plantings are up 5 percent in ':ashington and also up in


- 16 -


TVS-136





APRIL 1960


Minnesota, Colorado, and Oregon. Yields near the 1955-59 average and normal
abandonment on the intended acreage would result in a crop of 3.6 million
hundredweight. This compares with a production of 4.4 million hundredweight
in 1959 and a 1949-58 average of 3.1 million.


Supplies in the Coming
Season May Exceed Demand

Domestic outlets for dry peas in this country in 1960-61 probably
will take 2.5 to 2.7 million hundredweight. About 40 percent of this is
likely to be used for food, the remainder as seed for planting the green and
dry crops, livestock feed, and loss. Exports vary sharply from year to year,
but in recent years have shown an upward trend. Exports in the current
season are likely to exceed the 1.5 million hundredweight of 1958-59.

Carryover stocks at the beginning of next season are expected to be
much larger than the light carryover of a year earlier. However, should
farmers stay close to planting intentions, production probably would be
substantially smaller than in the previous season, and total supplies
moderately smaller. Total disappearance in the coming season probably would
permit some working down of stocks. However, unless export demand should
hold at record or near record levels, supplies probably would be somewhat
larger than needed for domestic and export markets. But with smaller supplies
available in the 1960-61 season than in the current season, prices to growers
probably would average moderately to substantially higher.









: The Vegetable Situation is published
: 4 times a year -- in January, April,
: July and October.



: The next issue is scheduled for
: release July 27.


- 17 -


TVS-136







TRENDS IN THE GEOGRAPHIC PATTERN OF PRODUCTION
OF TOMATOES FOR PROCESSING _/

During the past two decades, striking changes have occurred in the
acreage and yield of tomatoes for processing, and in the geographic pattern
of production. Without attempting to evaluate the complex forces which have
combined to bring about these changes, the following discussion is a resume
of important regional and intra-regional shifts.
Total production of tomatoes for processing more than doubled from
1935-38 to 1955-58, increasing from 1,839,000 tons to 3,880,000 tons. Acre-
age declined more than a fifth, but yield increased from 4.2 to 11.6 tons
per acre. Acreage increased about 80 percent in the Western States, but de-
clined in each of the other regions. Since early in the period, the West has
consistently obtained the highest yield per acre, and has shown the sharpest
increase in yield.

These acreage and yield changes caused very substantial shifts in the
geographic pattern of production. Most notable was the more than five-fold
increase in tonnage in the Western Region. This region increased its pro-
portion of the U. S. total, from 24 percent in the earlier years to 63 per-
cent in 1955-58. Despite increases in tonnages, the North Central Region lost
ground in relative importance, from 31 to 17 percent of the U. S. total.
The North Atlantic share fell from 21 to 12 percent. The South Atlantic and
South Central Regions declined both in terms of actual tonnage, and relative
importance.



TOMATOES FOR PROCESSING
Trend in Production by Regions

THOUS. TONS To

To ta l ...................
S..... ................


1935-38 1939-42 1943-46 1947-50 1951-54 1955-58 1959-62
*ALABAMA, ARIZONA. CONNECTICUT. GEORGIA. IDAHO, KANSAS. LOUISIANA. MINNESOTA, MISSISSIPPI,
MONTANA, NEBRASKA, NEW MEXICO, N. CAROLINA. OREGON, WASHINGTON, W. VIRGINIA; AND SINCE 1957
OKLAHOMA AND TENNESSEE
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NEG. 7741-60 (3) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE

1/ By Will M. Simmons, Division of Agricultural Economics, AMS.


- 18 -


--------------1--- ^vv~vv^ V ^^ -- ------
....... ... ."....'.'".'".'.'. :'.. ".'.. .'. .'.'.. '.. ".. ...V............







*. I. .*.*. *.*.*.*.*.*. -*.* .*.. *.o *. . .. . ..
S... .. ... .... .*" .... *. .* N.T.. .**.. .*. .*.

S. CENTRAL ^ SOUTH ATLANTIC gv REGIn"*
...S 5" ........


3,UUV



2,00C



1,00C


A


TVS-136


APRIL 1960


I






19 APRIL 1960

Table 2.--Tomatoes for processing: Trend in harvested acreage, yield and production,
United States, by regions, 1935-58


Acreage, by regions
Period :Not reported: North Sou+h : South North
by region: Western Central Central Atlantic Atlantic Total
1,000 acres 1,000 acres 1,000 acres 1,000 acres 1,000 acres 1,000 acres 000 acres

1935-38 : 7 80 142 38 100 67 434
1939-42 : 6 96 140 41 93 75 451
1943-46 : 5 137 135 55 102 96 530
1947-50 : 3 106 110 36 62 71 388
1951-54 2 116 82 21 48 71 3
1955-58 : 3 145 70 22 37 57 334


1935-38
1933-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58








1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58








1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58


Yield per acre, by regions /

:Not reported: North South South North
by gion : Western Central Central Atlantic Atlantic : Average
Tons Tons Tons Tons Tons Tons Tons

3.6 5.6 4.0 2.1 3.4 5.7 4.2
3.8 7.2 5.5 2.4 4.5 6.8 5.6
4.4 8.0 5.1 2.4 3.8 5.3 5.4
4.7 11.2 5.9 2.4 5.3 7.7 7.2
4.0 15.6 8.5 2.5 5.6 8.7 10.1
5.3 16.8 9.6 2/2.9 5.6 8.5 11.6

Production, by regions

Not reported: North : South South : North
by region : Western : Central Central Atlantic Atlantic : Total
1,000 tons 1,000 tons 1,000 tons 1,000 tons 1,000 tons 1,000 tons 1,000 tons

25 444 572 77 337 384 1,839
23 695 769 99 416 514 2,516
22 1,096 690 133 387 512 2,840
14 1,183 643 88 324 550 2,802
8 1,801 700 53 267 614 3,443
16 2,436 672 2/ 64 210 482 3,880

Production as percentage of U. S. total

:Not reported: North South South North
Sby gion Western : Central Central Atlantic Atlantic Total
Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent


1.4
.9
.8
.5
.2
.4


24.1
27.6
38.6
42.2
52.3
62.8


31.1
30.6
24.3
22.9
20.3
17.3


4.2
4.0
4.7
3.2
1.6
2/1.7


18.3
16.5
13.6
11.6
7.8
5.4


20.9
20.4
18.0
19.6
17.8
12.4


100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0


i/ Includes Alabama, Arizona, Connecticut, Georgia, Idaho, Kansas, Louisiana, Minnesota, Mississippi,
Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oregon, Washington and West Virginia; and since 1957
Oklahoma and Tennessee.
2/ Except Oklahoma and Tennessee for 1957 and 1958 in which years they are included in "not reported
by region."
3/ Computed from unrounded data.
Vegetables-Processing, USDA, AMS, annual report.


TVS-136





APRIL 1960


Production of tomatoes for processing in the Western Region increased
from 444,000 tons in 1935-38 to 2,436,000 tons in 1955-50. Tonnage in the
later period accounted for 63 percent of the U. S. total. About a fifth of
the West's increase in tonnage in the past 20 years was due to an increase in
acreage, and about four-fifths to the sharp increase in average yield. Acre-
ages in Colorado and Utah, which account for a small part of the regional
total declined, but acreage in California almost doubled. Yield per acre was
up in each of the three States, but the increase in California was particularly
sharp. Through the mid-1940's yield per acre averaged higher in Utah than in
California; but since that time California has gained a substantial edge.

These acreage and yield changes have resulted in a consistent and rapid
increase in production in California. Production in that State increased from
375,000 tons in the early period to 2,353,000 tons in 1955-58. This expansion
accounted for practically all of the increase in total U. S. tonnage, and
brought California's output up to more than 60 percent of the national total.

Production of tomatoes for processing also increased in Colorado and
Utah, but at a much slower rate than in California. Utah's share of the
region's total dropped from 11 to little more than 2 percent, and Colorado's
from 4 to 1 percent. California's proportion rose from 85 to 97 percent of
the regional tonnage.


TOMATOES FOR PROCESSING
Trend in Production, by States, Western Region


2,000





1,000


0 ,'Om"--sL
1935-38 1939-42


... ........ .. ...... ....... .. ........... ......

....:::::CALIFORNIA :::::::::::::'''' '' .' ..'.
:::;:::::::::::::::::;:::::::::::: COLORADO:
//.*.*.*..*.*..*.*. .*.*.*.*.*.*. ."*.*" ^ ^ .-- .. ************** **** .*.*.*.*.*/.*. "**..*..


1943-46 1947-50 1951-54


*EXCLUDES MINOR QUANTITIES IN THE FOLLOWING STATES FOR WHICH SEPARATE PRODUCTION FIGURES
ARE NOT AVAILABLE: ARIZONA. IDAHO, MONTANA, NEW MEXICO, OREGON AND WASHINGTON.


NEG. 738-60 (3) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE


1955-58 1959-62


- = -


c


TVS-136


- 20 -


::::::::::: : :::::::::::::: :::: U AH
.:*:.:*:.:*:.:*.:*:.*:*:. : .:* .:*:.* .:*:.:*:.:*:* ::.*. :.:. :-:'. .


1. CEPAPTfENT OF AGRICULTR E






APRIL 1960


Table 3.--Tomatoes for processing: Trend in harvested acreage, yield and
production, selected States, Western Region, 1935-58 1/


Acreage, Western Region
Period
California : Colorado :Utah : Total


1,000
acres

70.2
85.9
125.1
95.4
105.9
137.3


1,000
acres


1,000
acres


1,000
acres

79.9
96.0
137.6
105.6
115.6
145.3


7.7
6.9
6.7
5.1


Yield per acre, Western Region

California : Colorado : Utah : Average

Tons Tons Tons Tons

5.3 5.3 8.2 5.6
S7.1 6.6 9.4 7.2
S8.0 6.5 8.7 8.0
: 11.4 7.5 10.4 11.2
S 16.0 8.2 12.0 15.6
S 17.1 8.4 11.5 16.8

Production, Western Region

California : Colorado : Utah : Total

1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
tons tons tons tons

S 375.4 19.5 49.0 443.9
S 608.1 17.9 69.2 695.2
S 997.7 31.1 67.0 1,095.8
1,086.6 24.7 72.0 1,183.3
: 1,695.6 24.6 80.4 1,800.6
2,352.9 24.3 58.4 2,435.6

Production as percentage of Western Region

California : Colorado : Utah : Total


1935-38

1j- 3-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-.









1935-38

1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58








1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1)51-54
1955-58


Percent
4.4
2.6
2.8
2.1
1.3
1.0


Percent
11.0
9.9
6.1
6.1
4.5
2.4


Percent
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0


1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58


Percent

84.6
87.5
91.1
91.8
94.2
96.6


Y/ Does not include minor amounts in the following States for which separate acreage and
production fi,-ures are not available: Arizona, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Oregon and Washington.
Vegetables-Processing, USDA, MA, annual report.


TVS-136


- 21 -






TVS-136


- 22 -


APRIL 1960


The North Central Region is second in importance, after the Western
Region, in production of tomatoes for processing. From 1935-38 to 1955-58,
acreage in the North Central Region was reduced by one-half, but average yield
more than doubled. Although production in 1955-58, was somewhat lower than
in much of the preceding 15 years, it was materially above that in 1935-38.

Among the four leading States in the region, acreage declined almost
two-thirds in Indiana, increased about 50 percent in Michigan and 12 percent
in Illinois, and showed little change in Ohio.

Production in the North Central Region reached a peak of 769,000 tons
in the years 1939-42, then declined rather sharply in the following 4-year
period. Production has fluctuated, but has shown no definite trend since the
mid-194O's. Output of 672,000 tons in 1955-58 was well below the peak pro-
duction of the early 1940's, but 18 percent above the 1935-38 average.

Important shifts occurred in the pattern of production within the
region. Indiana's production declined from 352,000 tons in 1935-38 to
256,000 tons in 1955-58, and its share of the regional total fell from 61 to
38 percent. Even s, the State retained its position as number 1 producer.
Production in Ohio, which ranks second in importance, almost doubled and in-
creased from 19 to 30 percent of the regional total. Illinois and Michigan
also showed sharp gains in production and in relative importance. The minor
producing States in the region--Wisconsin, Iowa, and Missouri--lost consider-
able ground both in terms of tQnnage and relative importance.


~. CEPAQT.ET ~ A'~IC.LT RE NEG. 7737-80(3) AGRICULTURAL MARK ET".C. SERvICE


TOMATOES FOR PROCESSING
Trend in Production, by States, North Central Region

THOUS. TONS
-I Total


400
... ....... .. .
6 0 0 :'":" ...... .... ... '" '
.9.3.18 1 9. ....9-42 19 -4 1 L .. 1.-
EX.:tCL S MiN 'T.. '. '.''.'.' ..F.. E... LF O I". .S.E, .A:E::.:.::::
400 .O. A S
,MICHIGAN *


200 INDIANA
MISSOURI
WISCONSIN


1935-38 1939-42 1943-46 1947-50 1951-54 1955-58 1959-
EXCLUDES MINOR QUANTITIES IN THE FOLLOWING STATES FOR WHICH SEPARATE PRODUCTION FIGURES
ARE NWOT AVAILABLE KANSAS, MINNESOTA AND NEBRASKA.


62


). S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


NEG. 7737-60(3) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE







APRIL 1960


Table 4.--Tomatoes for processing: Trend in harvested acreage, yield
selected States, Norrth Central Region, 1935-58 1/


and production,


: Acreage, North Central Re'gion
Period :
: Ohio :Indiana : Illinois : Michigan : Wisconsin : Iowa : Missouri :Total
: : : :


1,000
acres

19.8
27.3
27.6
25.3
18.5
19.6


1,000
acres

85.3
77.3
73.3
57.3
39.7
29.6


1,000
acres

10.9
9.2
12.1
10.1
11.5
9.6


1,000
acres

5.0
5.9
6.4
7.7
7.1
7.4


1,000
acres

2.9
2.2
1.5
1.4
1.1
.8


1,000
acres

5.5
4.8
3.4
1.5
1.5
1.6


1,000
acres

12.5
13.6
10.9
6.4
3.1
1.5


1,000
acres

141.9
140.3
135.2
109.7
82.5
70.1


Yield per acre, North Central Region

SOhio : Indiana : Illinois : Michigan Wisconsin : Iowa : Missouri :Average


Tons Tons Tons Tons Tons Tons Tons Tons

S 5.5 4.1 3.3 5.0 3.8 3.2 1.7 4.0
6.8 5.5 4.6 6.8 5.7 4.7 2.7 5.5
6.5 4.9 5.1 5.8 5.3 4.3 2.8 5.1
: 6.9 5.5 6.7 7.3 6.1 5.3 2.0 5.9
: 10.3 7.8 9.5 8.6 8.1 6.4 2.7 8.5
: 10.3 8.6 12.3 9.7 9.4 8.2 2.3 9.6

Production, North Central Region

: Ohio Indiana : Illinois : Michigan : Wisconsin : Iowa : Missouri :Total


S1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
tons tons tons tons tons tons tons tons

109.6 351.7 35.9 24.9 10.9 17.8 21.1 571.9
S185.9 428.5 42.0 40.4 12.6 22.5 37.2 769.1
: 180.7 356.2 62.0 37.2 8.0 14.6 30.8 689.5
: 173.5 316.5 67.7 55.9 8.6 8.0 13.0 643.2
190.9 311.5 109.2 61.3 8.9 9.6 8.3 699.7
202.8 255.9 117.8 71.6 7.5 13.2 3.5 672.3

Production as percentage of North Central Region

Ohio Indiana : Illinois : Michigan Wisconsin : Iowa : Missouri : Total
:: :


Percent Percent Percent Percent


61.5
55.7
51.6
49.2
44.5
38.1


6.3
5.5
9.0
10.5
15.6
17.5


Percent Percent Percent


4.3
5.3
5.4
8.7
8.7
10.6


100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0


1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58


1935-38
193q-L2
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58










1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58


1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58


Percent

19.2
24.2
26.2
27.0
27.3
30.2


1/ Does not include minor amounts in the following States for which separate acreage and production
figures are not available: Kansas, Minnesota and Nebraska.
Vegetables-Processing, USDA, AMS, annual report.


TVS-136


- 23 -






APRIL 1960


Production of tomatoes for processing in the South Central Region
typically amounts to less than 2 percent of total U. S. tonnage. Acreage and
production increased sharply from the early-to the mid-1940's, and then de-
clined. Among the 5 States reporting commercial production, acreage in recent
years was sharply lower in Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, and Oklahoma. How-
ever, acreage in Texas in 1955-58 was about double that of 1935-38.

Yield per acre in the region increased more than a third in the past
20 years. But average yield remains much lower than in any other region and
only a fourth the national average.

Production in the region expanded rapidly from about 78,000 tons in
1935-38 to 134,000 tons in 1943-46. Production declined, and averaged only
64,000 tons in 1955-58. Production during the period declined sharply in most
of the States in the region, but increased from 18,000 tons to almost 51,000
tons in Texas. Texas' relative importance increased fairly consistently, from
less than a fourth of the regional total in 1935-38 to more than three-fourths
in recent years. Tonnage in Arkansas, leading State in the region in 1935-38,
dropped sharply after the early 1940's, with relative importance declining
from 33 percent of the regional total in 1935-38 to 13 percent in the most
recent period. Production also decreased sharply in Kentucky, and in Tennessee
and Oklahoma declined to the point that data for these two States are no longer
reported separately.


u. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICIJLTUF1I NEG. 7736-60 (3) AGRICULTURAL MARK ETING SERVICE


TOMATOES FOR PROCESSING
Trend in Production, by States, South Central Region

THOUS. TONS -

Total*





00-ARKANSAS---------* -- ---
10 0.:' .:.:: :-: :.TEX A S: ::*::*:::::::::::: ::"
100







SOKLAHOMA


1935-38 1939-42 1943-46 1947-50 1951-54 1955-58 195
EXCLUDES MINOR QUANTITIES IN THE FOLLOWING STATES FOR WHICH SEPARATE PRODUCTION FIGURES
ARE NOT AVAILABLE: ALABAMA. LOUISIANA AND MISSISSIPPI; AND SINCE 1957 OKLAHOMA AND TENNESSEE.


TVS-136


- 24 -


1


?-62


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


NEG. 7736-60 (3) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE






APRIL 1960


Table 5.--Tomatoes for processing: Trend in harvested acreage, yield and
production, selected States, South Central Region, 1935-58 /

: Acreage, South Central Region
Period
: Kentucky : Tennessee : Arkansas Oklahoma Texas : Total


1,000 acres 1,000 acres 11000 acres 1,000 acres 1,000 acres

4.8 9.3 14.3 0.8 8.2
4.7 6.8 16.4 1.0 11.7
4.3 5.1 15.8 2.2 27.2
2.7 3.7 9.2 1.8 19.0
1.4 1.2 3.4 .2 15.1
1.2 --- 2,8 --- 17.5


1,000 acres

37.4
40.6
54.6
36.4
21.3
21.9


: Yield per acre, South Central Region

: Kentucky : Tennessee : Arkansas :Oklahoma : Texas Average

S Tons Tons Tons Tons Tons Tons

: 2.5 2.2 1.8 1.6 2.2 2.1
: 3.0 2.0 2.4 1.3 2.5 2.4
: 2.4 1.6 2.3 2.1 2.7 2.4
: 2.8 3.1 2.0 1.7 2.5 2.4
: 3.7 2.3 2.7 2.0 2.4 2.5
: 4.0 --- 2.9 --- 2.9 2.9

Production, South Central Region

: Kentucky : Tennessee : Arkansas : Oklahoma : Texas : Total

1,000 tons 100 tons 1000 tons 1,000 tons 1,000 tons 1,000 tons

: 11.9 20.6 25.6 1.3 18.1 77.5
: 14.0 13.7 40.0 1.3 29.5 98.5
: 10.4 8.2 36.0 4.6 74.3 133.5
: 7.6 11.5 18.6 3.0 47.8 88.5
: 5.2 2.8 9.1 .4 35.7 53.2
: 4.8 --- 8.1 -- 50.6 64.3

Production as percentage of South Central Region

:Kentucky : Tennessee : Arkansas :Oklahoma : Texas :Total
: :


Percent


Percent


Percent


Percent


Percent


Percent


1935-38 : 15.4 26.6 33.0 1.7 23.3 100.0
1939-42 : 14.2 13.9 40.6 1.3 30.0 100.0
1943-46 7.8 6.1 27.0 3.4 55.7 100.0
1947-50 : 8.6 13.0 21.0 3.4 54,0 100.0
1951-54 : 9.8 5.3 17.1 .7 67.1 100.0
1955-58 : 7.4 --- 12.6 --- 78.7 100.0
1/ Does not include minor amounts in the following States for which separate
acreage and production figures are not available: Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi;
and since 1957 Oklahoma and Tennessee.
Vegetables-Processing, USDA, A]S, annual report.


1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58


1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58







1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947 -50
1951-54
1955-58


TVS-136


- 25 -






APRIL 1960


The North Atlantic Region like other areas has experienced increasing
competition from rapidly expanding production in the Western Region. The im-
pact of such competition has been especially telling in recent years. Produc-
tion for processing in the North Atlantic Region showed a substantial upward
trend from the mid-1930's to the early 1950's but then declined.

Acreage of tomatoes reached a peak in the mid-1940's, and has since
declined. Acreage in all three producing States, New York, New Jersey, and
Pennsylvania, has declined sharply from their peaks, but in 1955-58 acreage in
Pennsylvania was still above the 1935-38 average. Average yield for the region
increased about 50 percent, with the sharpest increase in New Jersey.

Production in the region increased sharply from 385,000 tons in 1935-38
to 614,000 tons in 1951-54. But output subsequently declined, and in 1955-58
averaged 482,000 tons. Inspection of yearly data suggests that the drop re-
sulted from an erratic but sharp decline in acreage.

In each of the 4-year period New Jersey ranked first in production,
though New York ranked first in a number of individual years. Tonnage in New
York declined almost a fourth and its share of the regional total fell from
37 to 23 percent. Pennsylvania's output more than doubled and its share rose
from 20 to 34 percent of the total. New Jersey about retained its share of the
regional total, at a little over 40 percent, as production expanded from
168,000 tons to 208,000 tons.



TOMATOES FOR PROCESSING
Trend in Production, by States, North Atlantic Region

THOUS. TONS
Total*

600

........ = 1.%1.%.717 PENNSYLVANIA ............v.v..




..... .... 0---------
NEW JERSEY
200

NEW YORK

1935-38 1939-42 1943-46 1947-50 1951-54 1955-58 1959-62
EXCLUDES MINOR QUANTITIES IN THE FOLLOWING STATE FOR WHICH SEPARATE PRODUCTION FIGURES
ARE NOT AVAILABLE: CONNECTICUT.


FPARTMrNT OF AGR)CULTURE NF(,. ?74~-8~) (3) AGRICULTUPAt MAPI(ETIHG SERVICE


TVS-136


- 26 -


NEG. 7740-60 (3) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE


. 5. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE







APRIL 1960


Table 6--Tomatoes for processing: Trend in harvested acreage,
selected States, North Atlantic Region, 1935-58 1/


yield and production,


Acreage, North Atlantic Region
Period
: New York : New Jersey : Pennsylvania : Total


1,000
acres


19.3
20.5
24.9
21.8
16.8
13.5


1,000
acres


33.7
33.5
37.1
27.7
30.1
22.6


1,000
acres


14.2
21.5
34.0
21.9
24.0
20.6


1,000
acres

67.2
75.5
96.0
71.4
70.9
56.7


1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1847-50
1951-54
1955-58








1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58









1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58








1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58


Percent

36.7
31.2
29.9
29.9
28.3
22.6


Percent


43.7
42.2
39.6
40.1
40.7
43.1


Percent


19.6
26.6
30.5
30.0
31.0
34.3


Percent


100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0


Yield per acre, North Atlantic Region

New York : New Jersey : Pennsylvania : Average

Tons Tons Tons Tons

7.3 5.0 5.3 5.7
7.8 6.5 6.3 6.8
6.1 5.5 4.6 5.3
7.5 8.0 7.5 7.7
10.4 8.3 7.9 8.7
8.1 9.2 8.0 8.5

Production, North Atlantic Region

New York : New Jersey : Pennsylvania : Total

S 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
tons tons tons tons

S 141.3 168.0 75.2 384.5
S 160.5 216.6 136.5 513.6
S 152.8 202.8 156.2 511.8
164.1 220.4 165.2 549.7
S 173.9 250.0 190.3 614.2
S 109.0 207.5 165.1 481.6

Production as percentage of North Atlantic Region

New York : New Jersey : Pennsylvania : Total


D/ Does not include minor amounts in the following State for which separate acreage and
production figures are not available: Connecticut.
Vegetables-Processing, USDA, AMS, annual report.


TVS-136


- 27 -






TVS-136 28 APRIL 1960

The South Atlantic Region has declined in importance as a production
area of tomatoes for processing. Yield increased sharply and in 1955-58
averaged 5.6 tons per acre compared with only 3.4 tons in 1935-38. But
acreage declined drastically, and production declined from 337,000 tons to
210,000 tons. This meant a big loss in the region's share of the national
total--from 18 percent to little more than 5 percent.

Among individual States in the region, acreage was down 80 percent in
Maryland, 66 percent in Delaware and 49 percent in Virginia, South Carolina
showed no significant change, while acreage in Florida about doubled.

The acreage and yield trends also altered the regional pattern of pro-
duction. Maryland, the largest producer in the region, lost much ground both
in actual tonnage, and in terms of its relative importance. Production in
Maryland decreased about 60 percent from 206,000 to 80,000 tons, and relative
importance declined from 61 to 38 percent of the regional total. Production
in Virginia declined from 72,000 to 48,000 tons during the period, a decrease
of a third, but continued to account for a little over a fifth of the regional
total. Tonnage in Delaware was down about a fifth but, because of the much
sharper cut in Maryland, increased its share of the regional total. Pro-
duction in Florida was sharply higher in 1955-58 than in the earlier period.
Florida's relative importance jumped from 4 to 22 percent of the regional total.





TOMATOES FOR PROCESSING
Trend in Production, by States, South Atlantic Region

THOUS. TONS
Total -
0 /N

4UL


30C


20C


100


n


1935-38 1939-42 1943-46 1947-50 1951-54 1955-58 1959-62
EXCLUDES MINOR QUANTITIES IN THE FOLLOWING STATES FOR WHICH SEPARATE PRODUCTION FIGURES
ARE NOT AVAILABLE: GEORGIA, NORTH CAROLINA AND WEST VIRGINIA.


NEC. 7739-60(3) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE


rw
-'..... ........... .. ..

FLORIDA
............
) .......... :..... .: .. :....... :zv Y.:..Y..:Y: .: ""






VIRGINIA
SOUTH
CAROLI NA~
DELAWARE
"- ...' v......... ...... ..- .. ..
...:- :v ................. .................... ........ ...... FLO RIDA \
.-$ .................:



.


U. S. OEPARTMFNT OF AGRICULTURE


i








Table 7.--Tomatoes for processing: Trend in harvested acreage, yield and
production, selected States, South Atlantic Region, 1935-58 L


Acreage, South Atlantic Region


Delaware


: Maryland


: Virginia :South Caroline:


Florida :


Total


- 29 -


1,000 acres 1,000 acres 1,000 acres


12.4
10.1
11.2
5.6
4.4
4.1


59.1
53.6
51.1
32.5
19.3
11.7


23.1
24.4
34.0
18.4
15.1
11.8


1,000 acres acres 1,000 acres


1.4
1.5
2.5
2.0
1.4
1.5


4.2
3.8
2.9
3.1
7.6
8.2


100.2
93.4
101.7
61.6
47.8
37.3


Yield per


Maryland


Tons

3.5
4.9
4.1
5.9
7.0
6.8


acre, South Atlantic Region

: Virginia :South Carolina:


Tons

3.1
3.9
3.3
4.4
4.0
4.1


Tons

2.9
1.5
1.7
1.6
1.8
2.3


Florida : Average


Tons

3.0
2.9
3.1
4.3
4.8
5.6


Tons

3.4
4.5
3.8
5.3
5.6
5.6


: Production, South Atlantic Region

SDelaware : Maryland : Virginia :South Carolina: Florida : Total

S1,000 tons 1,000 tons 1,000 tons 1,000 tons 1,000 tons 1,000 tons

: 42.2 205.7 72.2 4.0 12.7 336.8
S 47.1 260.4 94.8 2.3 11.2 415.8
S 51.0 211.5 111.9 4.2 8.9 387.5
S 34.5 192.0 81.2 3.1 13.2 324.0
S 33.1 134.6 60.6 2.5 36.5 267.3
S 33.1 79.8 48.1 3.4 46.0 210.4

Production as percentage of South Atlantic Region

: Delaware : Maryland : Virginia :South Carolina: Florida : Total
: : :


: Percent

S 12.5
S 11.3
S 13.1
: 10.6
12.4
S 15.7


Percent


61.1
62.6
54.6
59.2
50.4
37.9


Percent


21.4
22.8
28.9
25.1
22.7
22.9


Percent


1.2
.6
1.1
1.0
.9
1.6


Percent Percent


3.8
2.7
2.3
4.1
13.6
21.9


100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0


Period


1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58


Delaware


1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58


Tons

3.4
4.7
4.6
6.2
7.5
8.1


1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58







1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58


/ Does not include minor amounts in the following States for which separate acreage
and production figures are not available: Georgia, North Carolina and West Virginia.
Vegetables-Processing, USDA, AMS, annual report.


I Jll


I' -


TVS-136


APRIL 1960






TVS-136


- 30 -


APRIL 1960


LIST OF TABLES

Table Title Page

1 Vegetables and melons for fresh market: Reported commercial acreage and
production of principal crops, selected seasons, average 1949-58, 1959
and indicated 1960 ................. ................................... 2
2 Tomatoes for processing: Trend in harvested acreage, yield and production,
United States, by regions, 1935-58 ....................................... 19
3 Tomatoes for processing: Trend in harvested acreage, yield and production,
selected States, Western Region, 1935-58 .................................21
4 Tomatoes for processing: Trend in harvested acreage, yield and production,
selected States, North Central Region, 1935-58 ............................ 23
5 Tomatoes for processing: Trend in harvested acreage, yield and production,
selected States, South Central Region, 1935-38 ............................ 25
6 Tomatoes for processing: Trend in harvested acreage, yield and production,
selected States, North Atlantic Region, 1935-58 .........................27
7 Tomatoes for processing: Trend in harvested acreage, yield and production,
selected States, South Atlantic Region, 1935-58 ........................... 29
8 Truck crops, potatoes and sweetpotatoes: Unloads at 38 markets, indicated
periods 1959 and 1960 .......................................... .......... 31
9 Vegetables, fresh: Representative prices (l.c.1. sales) at New York and
Chicago for stock of generally good quality and condition (U. S. No. 1
when available), indicated periods, 1959 and 1960 .......................32
10 Vegetables, fresh: Average price per hundredweight received by farmers,
United States, indicated periods 1959 and 1960 ........................... 33
11 Vegetables for commercial processing: Prospective plantings, average
1949-58, annual 1959 and 1960 ............................................ 33
12 Vegetables, frozen: Cold-storage holdings, March 31, 1960 with comparisons ..34
13 Potatoes: Acreage and prospective plantings for 1960 season, with
comparisons ............................. ... ... .............. 34
14 Canned Vegetables: Commercial packs 1958 and 1959 and canners' and
wholesale distributors' stocks 1959 and 1960, by commodities,
United States ..... ............ ....... ... .. .... .................. 35
15 Potatoes, winter and spring: Acreage, yield per acre, average 1949-58,
1959 and indicated 1960 .......... ............................... 36
16 Sweetpotatoes: Plantings, average 1949-58, annual 1959 and indicated 1960 ..36
17 Potatoes: Price f.o.b. shipping points and wholesale price per
hundredweight at New York and Chicago, indicated periods 1959 and 1960 ....37
18 Sweetpotatoes: F. o. b. prices at Southern Louisiana points and
representative market prices (1. c. 1. sales) at New York and Chicago
for stock of generally good quality and condition (U. S. No. 1 when
available), indicated periods 1959 and 1960 ............................38
19 Average price per hundredweight received by farmers for potatoes,
sweetpotatoes, dry edible beans, and dry field peas, United States,
indicated periods, 1959 and 1960 ..........................................38
20 Peas, dry field: Prospective plantings for 1960 season, with comparisons ...39
21 Beans, dry edible: Prospective plantings for 1960 season, with
comparisons .......................................... ... .....o ....... 39






Table 8.--Truck crops, potatoes and sweetpotatoes: Unloads at 38 markets, indicated periods 1959 and 1960

(Expressed in carlot equivalents)_
February, 7'rY c i ..': ..Taiu-ry *.'-F-bruary -'6., 1 -.',: February *'7-'a. : *, I :C r.rarr: r.pril i '. \1<. *
Rail, : Rail, Rail, Rail,:
Commodity boat, boat, oat,boat,
boat" : bo, Truck TIm-otal
: Truck : Im- : and Truck m- : TotalTruck m- Total and uck m-
air / :ports: :ports: air :ports: : :ports
air :air air air

Asparagus : 315 391 --- 706 2 32 --- 34 214 --- 671 25 -- 1,096
Beans, lima, snap,
and fava 111 573 85 769 70 265 38 373 46 373 22 441 135 483 68 686
Beets : 3 53 -- 56 2 40 --- 42 1 46 --- 47 12 46 -- 58
Broccoli : 267 125 --- 392 196 131 --- 327 194 110 --- 304 214 81 ---
Cabbage : 872 2,388 34 3,294 921 2,190 37 3,148 915 2,331 17 3,263 739 1,536 3 2,278
Cantaloups and
other melons --- --- 431 431 --- --- 270 270 2 5 617 624 1 2 586 589
Carrots 663 1,332 --- 1,995 854 899 --- 1,753 814 874 --- 1,688 657 597 --- 1,254
Cauliflower : 335 484 --- 819 299 488 --- 787 257 491 --- 748 270 345 --- 615
Celery : 1,400 1,929 --- 3,329 1,184 1,356 --- 2,540 1,177 1,522 --- 2,699 1,006 1,178 --- 2,184
Corn : 49 292 5 346 10 71 14 95 50 105 6 161 46 216 1 263
Cucumbers : 9 490 118 617 36 116 239 391 27 140 155 322 12 186 98 296
Escarole and endive: 41 187 --- 228 81 276 5 362 80 265 2 347 57 191 5 253
Lettuce and romaine: 3,277 2,621 --- 5,898 3,100 2,859 --- 5,959 3,148 2,727 --- 5,875 2,768 2,334 --- 5,102
Onions 3/ 595 1,910 555 3,060 564 1,414 127 2,105 452 1,516 192 2,160 6 1,041 117 1,627
Peas, green 60 74 33 167 --- 8 107 115 5 37 104 146 19 20 --- 39
Peppers : 72 35 289 716 56 294 215 565 124 404 149 677 101 344 106 551
Spinach : 282 191 --- 473 238 172 --- 410 247 195 --- 442 140 157 --- 297
Tomatoes : 199 1,641 2,315 4,155 258 933 1,555 2,746 100 821 1,765 2,686 270 770 1,135 2,175
Turnips arundtabagas: 1 377 208 586 2 304 177 483 3 249 151 403 5 166 101 272
Watermelons --- 2 82 84 --- --- 96 96 --- 1 151 152 --- 8 267 275
Other Vegetables
includingg mixed) : 1,538 154 --- 1,692 1514 112 1 1,627 1.631 125 1 1,757 1,171 104 --- 1,275
Total :10,069 15,569 4,155 29,813 9.387 11,960 2,881 24.228 9,487 12.715 3.332 25.534 8.763 10J230 2,487 21.480

Potatoes : 7,541 7,049 22 14,612 6,848 5,588 12 12,448 8,335 5,353 8 13,696 6,364 3,418 2 9,784
Sweetpotatoes : 8 1,728 --- 1,736 5 1,185 --- 1,190 8 1,123 --- 1,131 6 865 --- 871

Grand total :17,638 24,346 4,177 46,161 16,240 18,733 2,893 37,866 17,830 19,191 3,340 40,361 15,133 14,513 2,489 32,135


1 Revised to reflect heavier truck loading-reference special notice
2 Except watermelons. 3/ Includes shallots, chives, cipolinas, leeks,


in January 18, 1960, Weekly Shipments-Unloads
scallions, and green onions.


Markets include: Albany, Atlanta, Baltimore, Birmingham, Boston, Buffalo, Chicago, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbia, Dallas, Denver,
Detroit, Houston, Indianapolis, Kansas City, Los Angeles, Louisville, Memphis, Miami, Milwaukee, Minneapolis, Nashville, Newark, New
Orleans, New York, Oakland, Philadelphia, Pittsburg, Portland (Ore.), Providence, St. Louis, St. Paul, Salt Lake City, San Antonio,
San Francisco, Washington, and Wichita.
Truck unloads are not 100 percent complete but represent highest percentage obtainable under local conditions in markets covered.
Market News: Weekly reports, USDA, ANS.


Summary, AMS.









Table .--Vegetables, fresh: Representative prices (l.c.l. sales) at New fork
and Chic-to for stock of generally good quality and condition (U. S. No. 1
when available), indicated periods, 1 .5- and 1960


Tuesday nearest mid-month


Market :State 1 i5' 16 i
and of Unit
commodity origin

SMar. : Apr. : Jan. : Feb. : Mar. : Apr.
17 : 14 : 12 : 16 : 15 : 12


: Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol.


New York:

Beans, snap,
green, Valentine
Beets, bunched
Broccoli, bunched
Cabbage:
Domestic,
Round type
Carrots:
Bunched
Topped, washed

Topped, washed

Cauliflower
Celery
Pascal
Pascal
Escarole
Lettuce, Big Boston
Onions:
Western section,
Yellow, medium
Yellow, large
Peppers, green
Spinach, Savoy

Chicago:
Beans, snap, green
Beets, bunched
Broccoli
Cabbage:
Domestic,
Round type
Carrots:
Topped, washed
Topped, washed
Celery:
Pascal
Pascal
Lettuce, Iceberg,
dry pack
Onions:
Yellow, Spanish
Yellow, medium
Peppers, green
Spinach, flat type


Florida
Texas
:California


Florida

:California
:California

Texas

:California

Florida
:California
Florida
Florida


New York
Idaho
Florida
Texas


Florida
Texas
:California


Texas

:California
Texas

Florida
:California


Bu. bskt.
42's
: 14's, small crt.


1-3/4 bu. crt.

: 4 doz. pony crt.
:48-1 lb. film bag
crt.
:48-1 lb. film bag
crt.
:Ctns.film wrpd.12 t

16-in. crt.
: 16-in. crt.
: 1-1/9 bu. crt.
:2 doz. crt.


:50-lb. sack
50-lb. sack
SBu. bskt.
: Bu. bskt.


Bu. bskt.
4 2's
:14's, small crt.


:1-3/4 bu. crt.

:48-1 lb. film bag
:48-1 lb. film bag

S16-in. crt.
: 16-in. crt.


:California : 2 doz. head crtn.:


Idaho
:Midwestern
Florida
Texas


50-lb. sack
50-lb. sack
Bu. bskt.
Bu. bskt.


6.25
3.40
2.75


2.50

3.80

4.25


--- 3
3.25 3


2.25
4.50
2.00



6.75

4.50
2.00


6.00
3.25
2.50


3.50
3.75
3.75


3.50
3.50


5.00
3.90
3.75


4.25
3.50
3.10


2.75 2.20 2.15 2.25

--- 3.10 4.65 4.85


3.75

.15 2.68
.85 ---


2.90
5.65
1.90
3.25


1.33
2.50
5.25
2.20


6.50
3.35
3.70


2.75
5.00
1.45
3.75


1.50
2.50
7.50
1.90


4.25
3.65
3.50


4.25 3.50

--- 2.75
4.25 3.25


3.00
5.25
1.65
1.50


1.30
2.45
4.oo
2.25


6.25
3.55
3.15


2.75
4.25
1.65
1.50


1.50
2.75
4.00
2.00


4.75

2.75


4.00
4.00
2.75


2.50

4.12

4.12

3.50


2.10
3.75
1.62



4.50
5.00
8.50
1.90


4.75
3.35
2.85


2.35

4.15


2.35
3.25

2.85

4.75
4.35
7.00
2.25


1.85


5.50
5.75
1.85


4.75 3.25 3.00


2.20
1.30
8.50
2.15


2.15
1.15
6.00
1.90


2.25
1.25
6.25
1.75


1.00
6.00


Weekly summary of terminal market prices, USDA, AMS, Market News Reports.


- --


TVS-136


- 32 -


APRIL 1960


2.50 3.00 2.25 2.15 2.80

4.25 3.75 3.75 --- 3.25
--- 3.15 2.60 2.45 2.45

2.65 3.15 2.80 2.85 2.85
3.75 4.25 4.50 4.85 3.75


:






APRIL 1960


Table 10.--Vegetables, fresh: Average price per hundredweight received
United States, indicated periods, 1959 and 1960


by farmers,


1959 : 1960
Commodity Feb. 15 :Mar. 15 Jan. 15 : Feb. 15 Mar. 15

Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol.

Beans, snap 13.30 9.90 9.70 14.70 14.00
Broccoli 9.70 8.40 12.20 10.70 10.30
Cabbage : 1.85 1.55 2.80 2.05 1.35
Carrots : 2.10 2.25 2.10 2.10 1.95
Cauliflower 3.75 3.35 5.30 3.65 3.65
Celery 2.55 2.40 3.50 3.60 3.40
Corn, sweet 6.50 7.40 8.00 7.30 6.80
Cucumbers : 13.50 18.80 7.70 10.40 13.30
Lettuce : 5.40 3.80 6.30 5.20 5.10
Onions : 4.10 8.10 1.55 1.40 1.35
Peppers, green 16.00 21.60 22.90 19.60 13.60
Spinach 7.20 7.00 6.60 8.00 8.10
Tomatoes 10.10 11.30 12.50 11.40 13.20

Agricultural Prices, USDA, AMS, issued monthly.

Table ll.--Vegetables for commercial processing: Prospective
plantings, average 1949 -58, annual 1959 and 1960

Planted acreage : 196 as
Crop : percentage of-
Crop Average : 1959 : Intended : Average 1959
: 1949-58 : 1960 : 1949-58
:Acres Acres Acres Percent Percent

Asparagus : 98,410 111,200 -- -- --
Beans, green lima : 106,500 84,870 97,290 91 115
Beans, snap :143,200 174,000 184,650 129 106
Beets for canning 19,000 13,760 14,770 78 107
Cabbage for kraut
Contract : 9,100 7,880 8,990 99 114
Open market : 6,600 2,750 -- -- --
Total for cabbage : 15,700 10,630 -- -- --

Corn, sweet : 459,700 450,000 438,370 95 97
Cucumbers for pickles 141,100 106,770 103,100 73 97
Peas, green :453,900 359,700 376,500 83 105
Spinach: 1/
Winter and early spring : 8,770 10,700 9,900 113 93
Late spring and fall : 30,510 29,700 -- -- --
Total for spinach : 39,280 40,400 --- -

Tomatoes :343,400 296,030 293,250 85 99

Total, 10 crops :1,820,100 1,647,360 -

1/ Winter 1957-58 average. Previous years not available.
Vegetables-Processing, USDA, AMS, issued monthly.


TVS-136


- 33 -








Table 12.--Ve6etables, frozen: Cold-storage holdings, March 31, 10O, with comparisons



S March 1959 1960
Commodity average
S1955-59 : March 31 : January 31 : February 29 : March 31 1/

: il. lb. MiU. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. lb.

Asparagus 10.8 10.5 14.7 11.4 9.4
Beans, lima, Fordhook : n.a. n.a. 37.4 32.7 28.7
baby :n.a. n.a. 35.9 27.9 23.7
Total 2/ 73.4 73.5 73.3 60.6 52.4
Beans snap, regular cut :n.a. n.a. 47.8 38.7 29.0
French style: n.a. n.a. 28.5 23.4 17.7
Total 2/: 49.4 57. 5 76.3 62.1 46.7
Broccoli 41.2 52.8 37.2 37.4 42.6
Brussels sprouts 20.1 18.3 23.8 20.0 16.4
Carrots n.a. 24.1 35.9 30.3 25.2
Cauliflower 17.3 16.2 14.9 11.8 10.4
Corn, sweet 52.0 49.5 70.7 57.4 45.4
Peas and carrots n.a. 13.7 13.2 12.2 11.5
Peas, green 104.5 114.7 174.9 147.6 117.2
Potatoes, french fried :n.a. 97.1 81.4 96.8 106.7
Spinach 26.4 28.6 32.3 28.1 37.7
Mixed vegetables : n.a. 21.9 21.1 20.3 20.8
Other vegetables 173.3 69.5 85.1 74.4 70.4

Total 568.4 647.9 754.8 670.4 612.8'

_/ Preliminary. 2/ Not reported separately prior to January 31, 1960.
n.a. not available.

Cold Storage Report, USDA, AMS, issued monthly.

Table 13.--Potatoes: Acreage and prospective plant in._s for 1960 season with comparisons


SYield per : Acreage
.Acreage harvested acre' 1960 as
Seasonal group 1949-58 1955-59 : 1959 1960 percentage
average average of 1959
1,000 acres Cwt. 1,000 acres 1,000 acres Percent

Acreage harvested:
Winter : 27.1 155.2 26.3 20.6 78.3
Early spring : 25.5 143.1 25.6 28.6 111.7
Late spring : 183.5 156.0 138.1 153.0 110.8
Total : 236.1 --- 190.0 202.2 106.4

Prospective plantings:
Early summer j 129.2 2/114.0 115.2 117.1 101.6
Late summer and fall 3/ :1,137.7 2/179.0 1,109.7 1,125.4 104.4
Total : 1,266.9 --- 1,224.9 1,242.5 101.


J Intended aucrage for 1960 as of February 1.
2 Yield per planted acre.
3 Intended 'a:,ear e for 1960 as of March 1.


Crop Production, USDA, ANS, issued monthly.


- 34 -


TVS-13'-


APRIL 1960








Table 14.--Canned vegetables: Commercial packs 1958 and 1959 and canners' and wholesale
distributors' stocks 1959 and 1960, by commodities, United States

:Pack :Stocks
Commodity Canners / : Wholesale distributors 1
S 1958 : 1959 : Date 1959 1960 Date : 1959 1960



Major commodities
Beans, snap
Corn, sweet
Peas, green
Tomatoes
Tomato juice 2/

Total

Minor commodities
Asparagus
Beans, lima
Beets
Blackeye peas
Carrots
Okra 3/
Pickles
Pimientos
Pumpkin and squash
Sauerkraut
Potatoes
Sweetpotatoes
Spinach
Other greens
Tomato products:
Catsup and
chili sauce
Paste
Pulp and puree
Sauce
Vegetables, mixed

Total comparable
minor items

Grand total
comparable items


:1,000 1,000
cases cases
24/2's 24/2's

26,432 25,338
27,075 33,810
29,549 25,674
30,465 24,126
37,467 31,116


1,000
cases
24/2's


Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.


9,505
9,342
13,300
10,673
29.417


1,000
cases
24/2's

7,099
10,657
9,018
7,001
24,852


Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.


1,000
cases
24/2's

2,596
3,332
2,911
3,308
2.452


1,000
cases
24/2's

2;697
3,147
3,113
3,289
2,461


:15983 140,064 72,237 58.627 14,599 14,707


6,183 5,811 Mar. 1 1,329 1,061 Jan. 1 544 592
2,464 2,692 Feb. 1 1,508 1,341 Jan. I 473 493
8,030 7,741 Mar. 1 4,929 4,238 Jan. 1 954 1,030
1,951 1,727
3,186 2,425 Mar. 1 1,869 1,687 Jan. 1 434 470
853 627
S4/24,262 4/22,794
493 638
3,535 3,666 Apr. 1 960 945 Jan. 1 550 516
: /10,962 4/7,614 Apr. 1 5/4,643 5/2,719 Jan. 1 712 876
3,383 n.a.
7,017 n.a.
5,240 7,135 Mar. 1 1,104 1,898 Jan. 1 575 623
2,521 1,791


: 21,075 19,258 Apr. 1 11,421 9,171 Jan. 1 1,429 1,529
6/11,477 6/8,520 Apr. 1 7 4,231 7/2,636 Jan. 1 745 863
4,320 3,525 Apr. 1 /1,833 7 764 Jan. 1 619 623
12,158 9,448 Apr. 1 7/5,551 4,479 Jan. 1 625 754
: 3,463 3,560


S122,173 108.972 3390378 30,939 7,660 8,369


273,161 249,036


111,615 89,566


22,259


23,076


SConverted from actual cases to standard cases of 24 No. 2 cans.
SIncludes combination vegetable juices containing at least 70 percent tomato juice.
/ Okra, okra and tomatoes, and okra, corn and tomatoes.
/Crop for processing converted to a canned basis by applying an overall conversion factor (pickles
68 and sauerkraut 54 cases equivalent to 1 ton fresh.)
5 Reported in barrels; converted to 24/2's by using 14 cases to the barrel.
SEstimated, basis California pack.
SCalifornia only.


n. a, not available.



Canners' stock and pack data from the National Canners Association, unless otherwise noted.
Wholesale distributors' stock from United States Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census.


TVS-136


APRIL 1960


- 35 -






Table 15.--Potatoes, winter and spring: Acreage, yield per acre,
average 1949-58, 1959 and indicated 1960 i/


Harvested acreage : Yield per acre : Production
Seasonal : Average : :Indi- : Average : : Indi- : Average : :-Indi-
group : 1949-58 : 1959 : cated : 1949-58 : 1959 : cated : 1949-58 : 1959 : cated
___ :_ : 1960 : / :1960 ::/ 1960
1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
acres acres acres Cwt. Cwt. Cwt. cwt. cwt. cwt.

Winter 27.1 26.3 20,6 155.0 152.3 146.3 4,190 4,005 3,014
Early spring 25.5 25.6 28.6 136.4 122.8 120.0 3,490 3,144 3,432
Late spring : 183.5 138.1 153.0 134.8 170.6 -- 24,501 23,558

/ This acreage and production is later included in reports of total potatoes. 2/ Simple averages
of annual data for the season.

Table 16.--Sweetpotatoes: Plantings, average 1949-58, annual 1959 and indicated 1960

Acreage
Area Average : 1959 : Indicated : 1960 as percentage
: 1949-58 : 1960 1/ : of 1959
: 1,000 acres 1,000 acres 1,000 acres Percent

Central Atlantic / : 38.2 42.7 37.8 89
Lower Atlantic 3 100.1 62.5 53.3 85
South Central : 196.8 164.9 135.9 82
!iorth Central 5 : 3.7 3.3 2.8 85
California :11.7 13.0 12.0 92

United States 352.5 286.4 6/241.8 84.4


l_ Indications as of March 1, 1960. 2/ New Jersey, Maryland, and Virginia. / North Carolina,
South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. 4 Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas,
Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas. 5/ Missouri and Kansas. 6/ Assuming 1955-59, average yield by States,
production from this prospective acreage would amount to 15.1 million hundredweight in 1960,
compared with 18.7 million hundredweight in 1959- H

Crop Production, USDA, AMS, issued monthly. 0






- 37 -


APRIL 1960


Table 17.--Potatoes: Price f.o.b. shipping points and wholesale price per hundredweight at
New York and Chicago, indicated periods 1959 and 1960

'Week ended
1959 : 1960
Item
:Feb. : Mar. Apr. :Jan. : Feb. :Mar. : Apr.
S14 14 18 : 16 : 13 : 12 :16


Dol. Dol.


Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol.


F.o.b. shipping points:
New stock
Dade County, Florida,
U. S. No. 1, Size A,
Round Red 1/
Old stock
San Luis Valley, Colorado,
Red McClure 2/
Idaho Falls, Idaho
Russet Buibank
Arrostook County, Maine,
U. S. No. 1, Size A,
Katahdin 1//
Hartford, Connecticut-Rockville area,
Katahdin
Rochester, West and
Central New York Katahdin /
East Grand Forks, Minnesota
Round Reds mostly Pontiacs, washed


2.84


1.74

2.16


2.36 3.60


--- 5.00


1.40 2.49 2.75 2.75


1.98


--- 4.26 4.00


.98 1.04 1.26 2.28 2.18


1.25

1.38

1.26


1.22


--- 2.60 2.49


1.30 1.36 2.84 3.04


1.19


--- 2.18 1.98


5.00 6.00


3.12 3.58

4.47 ---


2.68 3.28

3.18 ---

3.36 3.92

2.26 3.32


Tuesday nearest mid-month
1959 : 160

Feb. Mar. :Apr. :Jan. :Feb. Mar. : Apr.
17 17 14 : 12 16 : 15 : 12
*


Dol.


Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol.


Terminal Markets:
New York:
New stock
Florida, Round Reds / 5/
Old stock
Long Island, Katahdin 1/ 4/ /
Maine, Katahdin / / j
Idaho, Russet Burbank 2/ /
Chicago:
New stock
Florida, Round Reds / j 6/
Old stock
Idaho, Russet Burbank _/ 7/


4.80

1.74
2.06
4.50


4.00


4.00 5.76


1.70
2.14
4.50


1.70
2.16
2.60


3.06
3.26
6.40


--- 7.00


3.10
3.40
6.50


3.40 5.00 6.50 6.80


3.45 3.25 3.95 5.60 5.50


6.90 8.24


3.76
3.80
6.90


4.40
7.36


6.50 7.40

6.20 6.40


50 pound price doubled.
2 3/4 minimum.
2 1/4 minimum.
Some chippewas.
SU. S. no. 1, size A.
Street sales.
SCarlot sales.


F. o. b. prices are the simple averages of the mid-point of the range of daily prices.
prices are for Tuesday of each week and are submitted by Market News representatives to
Vegetable Division of AMS.


Terminal market
the Fruit and


TVS-136






TVS-136


- 38 -


APRIL 1960


Table 18.--Sweetpotatoes: F.o.b. prices at Southern Louisiana points and
representative market prices (l.c.l. sales) at New York and Chicago for
stock of generally good quality and condition (U.S. No. 1, when
available), indicated periods 1959 and 1960

: Week ended
S1959 : 1960
Location and Unit :: : : :
: J An
variety Feb. : M. Ap. Ja lFeb. Ap&.

: Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol.
F.o.b. shipping points
S.W. Louisiana points
Puerto Rican, U.S. :50 pound:
No.l, cured :crate :3.25 3.14 3.12 2.88 2.80 2.80 3.12

: Tuesday nearest mid-month
: 1959 : 1960
Feb. Mr. Apr. Jan. Feb.. Mar. Apr.
17 17 14 12 16 15 12
Terminal markets
New York
New Jersey, orange : Bushel:
Jersey type : basket : 3.13 3.13 3.05 2.38 2.25 2.13 2.25
North Carolina, : Bushel:
Puerto Rican type : basket : 4.40 4.35 4.10 3.50 3.25 3.50 3.40
Chicago
Louisiana, :50 pound:
Puerto Rican, cured :crate : 4.00 3.75 3.65 3.65 3.50 3.50 3.65


F. o. b. prices are simple averages of the mid-point of the range of daily prices.
Market prices are for Tuesday of each week and are submitted by Market News
representatives to the Fruit and Vegetable Division of AMS.


Table 19.--Average price per hundredweight received by farmers for potatoes,
sweetpotatoes, dry edible beans, and dry field peas,
United States, indicated periods, 1959 and 1960

S1959 : 1960
Commodity Feb. Mar. Jan. Feb. Mar.
: 15 : 15 : 15 : 15 : 15
S Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol.
Field crops
Potatoes 1 1.10 1.04 2.10 2.13 2.65
Sweetpotatoes 4.25 3.96 3.51 3.35 3.46
Beans, dry edible 6.86 6.79 7.50 7.43 7.41
Peas, dry field 6.22 6.22 3.92 3.75 3.66


1/ Monthly average price.


Agricultural Prices, USDA, AMS, issued monthly.







Table 20.--Peas, dry field: Prospective plantings for
1960 season, with comparisons l/

S:r Yield per': Acreage!planted
Acreage planted
tae plplanted Indicated 1960 as
state planted acre
t1949-58 : acr : 1959 1960 percentage
:average 1955-59 : 12/ 0 of 1959
:: average :
1,000 1,000 1,000
acres Pounds acres acres Percent

Minnesota : 5 850 5 6 120
North Dakota : 4 865 6 6 100
Idaho : 98 1,254 130 117 90
Colorado : 18 484 13 16 120
Washington : 144 1,150 150 158 105
Oregon 10 1,250 12 13 108
California : 7 1,358 2 ..

Total United States :295 1,141 318 3/316 99.4

SIn principal commercial producing States.
2/ Indication as of March 1, 1960.
/ Assuming planted yield per acre, by States, equals the 1955-59 average,
production from the prospective acreage would be 3.6 million 100-pound bags (cleaned
basis), compared with 4.4 million bags produced in 1959.

Crop Production, USDA, AMS, issued monthly.

Table 21.--Beans, dry edible: Prospective plantings for
1960 season, with comparisons 1/

: : Yield per : Acreage planted
Acreage
: planted planted : Indicated: 1960 as
Group of States : 1949-58 acre 1959 1960 : percentage
:average 1955-59 2/ of 1959
: average
1,000 1,000 1,000
:acres Pounds acres acres Percent

Maine, New York, Michigan : 621 932 659 672 102.0
Nebraska, Montana, Idaho,
Wyoming, Washington : 313 1,647 371 341 91.9
Colorado, New Mexico,
Arizona, and Utah : 324 697 260 264 101.5
California : 309 1,363 267 259 97.0

Total United States : 1,567 1,122 1,557 3/1,536 98.7

I/ Includes beans grown for seed.


2/ Indications as of March 1, 1960.
_/ Assuming 1955-59 average yields per planted acre,
prospective acreage would amount to about 17.3 million
compared with 18.2 million bags produced in 1959.


by States, production from this
100-pound bags (cleaned basis),


Crop Production, USDA, AMS, issued monthly.


TVS-136


APRIL 1960


- 39 -





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