Vegetable situation

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Material Information

Title:
Vegetable situation
Physical Description:
213 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, Commodity Economics Division
Place of Publication:
Washington
Frequency:
quarterly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Vegetables -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Vegetable trade -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Vegetable trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
TVS-6 (June 1937) - TVS-218 (Nov. 1980).
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-TVS-218, Nov. 1980.
Issuing Body:
Vols. for 1937-Nov. 1953 issued by Bureau of Agricultural Economics; 1954-Jan. 1961, by Agricultural Marketing Service; Apr. 1961- by Economic Research Service; Feb. 1978- by Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service; Nov. 1980 by Economics and Statistics Service, each a subdivision of the United States Department of Agriculture; Nov. 1980 approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board.
General Note:
MONTHLY CATALOG NUMBER: gp 81007565

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 026013012
oclc - 08029461
lccn - 78643830
issn - 0042-3084
Classification:
lcc - HD9220.U5 U57a
ddc - 380.1/41/50973
System ID:
AA00013012:00005

Related Items

Preceded by:
Vegetable situation
Succeeded by:
Vegetable situation
Succeeded by:
Vegetable outlook & situation


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Full Text
A 13A5


VEGETABLE


SITUATION

TVS- 135


FROZEN VEGETABLE
January 1 Cold Storage


GREEN PEAS .............
LIMA BEANS .............
SNAP BEANS ............
SWEET CORN ............
BROCCOLI ..................
SPINACH .....................
BRUSSELS SPROUTS
CAULIFLOWER ..........
ALL OTHER*.............


50


STON
Holdings


100
MIL. LB.


150


*EXCLUDES POTATOES


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


NEG. 7659-60 (1) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE


Total stocks of frozen vegetables
on January 1 were about the same as
a year earlier, but almost a tenth
above the 1954-58 average. Supplies
of green peas and spinach were rela-
tively heavy, while holdings of lima
beans were light.


Consumption of frozen vegetables
in the first half of 1960 probably will
be a little larger than in the first half
of 1959. Retail prices of most items
during the next 4 to 6 months probably
will average a little above those of a
year earlier.


Published quarterly by
AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


7he


[7711 i. _.._.....


1954-58 Av.
1959
N1960


___________________________ 1. ___________________________


200


..../.....


1


January 1960
FOR RELEASE
FEB. 2, A. M.









Table 1.--Vegetables and melons for fresh market: Commercial acreage, yield per acre, and
production of principal crops, selected seasons, average 1949-58, 1959 and indicated 1960


Acreage


Average
1949-58


1959 :


Yield per acre


Production


Indi- : : : Indi- : : : Indi-
cated : Avera 1959 : cated : Average : 195 : cated
1/60 : 1960 : 19-58 : 1960
--- --m-- I-6o0- 1,000


Acres Acres


Cvt. Cwt.


Cwt. cwt.


Artichokes
Beans, lima
Beans, snap
Beets
Broccoli
Brussels
sprouts l/
Cabbage 27
Carrots
Cauliflower
Celery
Corn, sweet
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Escarole
Kale
Lettuce
Peas, green
Peppers,
green
Shallots
Spinach
Tomatoes

Total


* 8,350
S 640
: 24,620
: 5,700
: 6,o00

: 320

: 37,260
: 4,830
: lu,020
: 5,?10
: 1,710
700
: 4,520
: 2,760
: 63,650
: 1,3'0

4: 4,060
: 3,350
: 18,470
: 15,870


9,400
500
18,500
2,000
3,250

60
40,500
25,600
2,400
13,2450
8,000C
900
800
6,400
2,500
61,700


5,900
1,700
14,150
16,100


9,500 31 "0 240
450 26 20 16
19,000 30 28 32
2,000 76 80 85
3,200 45 47 53

60 c 4 35 40
47,800 160 146 158
34,100 135 149 156
2,950 96 76 83
11,500 433 15 I443
6,000 66 248 60
1,800 o6 50 70
900 128 115 125
6,200 123 120 125
2,000 72 70 75
66,900 136 141 1241
--- 18 ..

5,000 99 75 70
1, 400 26 21 28
13,000 43 51 52
11,300 100 115 125


:_2 b_7__ 236.810 245,060 _l 128 ___ 135


318
18
763
271
267

14
6,475
4,902
1061
4,337
412
129
94
,555
198
8,586
22


376
10
518
160
152

2
5,900
4,248
182
5,581
384
S45
92
768
175
8,690


380
7
608
170
171

2
7,560
5,312
245
5,094
360
126
112
775
150
9,439


401 40i2 350
88 36 39
747 724 672
1,713 1,852 1i,12


30.771


30.337 32. 984


SPR I NG


Asparagus -.' 3,:
Cabbage
Early :_ :
Onions
Early _.
Late 3
Watermelons
Late 3,'

Toudl Spring to
date

Winter and Spring:
to date


141,87C


16'.', 000 154,700


19,460 15,450 15,000 125


3 5,780
14,760

89,.680


S3,000 28,500
12,400 11,650

80,700 80,800


301,550 301,550 290,650


560,220


--- 3,317

--- 2,2414

--- 2,296
--- 2,042

--- 77,735


3,620

1,844

2,145
2,829

6,462


17,804 16,900


--- 575 47,237


538,360 535,710


1/ Short-time average.

2/ Includes processing.

3/ 1960 prospective acreage


Vegetables -- Fresh Market Report, USDA, AMS, issued monthly.


Crop and
seasonal
group


VEGETABLES


WINTER


Acres


cwt.


cwt.


T m I ... ..


JANUARY 1960


- 2 -


TVS-135





TVS-135 3 JANUARY 1960

THE VEGETABLE SITUATION


Approved by the Outlook and Situation Board, January 27, 1960



CONTENTS

Page Page

: Summary...................... 3 Potatoes...................... 12
: Commercial Vegetables for Sweetpotatoes................. 15
Fresh Market............... 4 Dry Edible Beans.............. 15
: Vegetables for Commercial Dry Field Peas............... 18
: Processing................. 9 Index of Special
Canned Vegetables............ 10 Features, 1959.............. 31
:Frozen Vegetables............ 11 List of Tables................ 32


SUMMARY

On January 1 aggregate production of 20 commercial fresh vegetables for
winter-season harvest was expected to be about 9 percent larger than last
winter, and 7 percent above the 1949-58 average. However, near freezing to
below freezing temperatures in Florida from January 20 to 25 resulted in
heavy damage and serious loss of tender vegetables, most of which are produced
in that State. Early reports indicate heavy loss of snap beans, sweet corn,
cucumbers, tomatoes and squash, and more moderate damage to green peppers.
The prospective supply situation is much more favorable for the more hardy
crops, a large portion of which is produced in California, Arizona and Texas.
Also Florida acreage of such crops apparently came through the freeze with
little damage. Among hardier crops, total U.S. tonnages of celery, kale
and spinach are expected to be down materially as a result of less acreage.
But materially larger tonnages are likely for cabbage, carrots, lettuce,
broccoli, and cauliflower, and a more moderate increase for beets.

Remaining supplies of canned vegetables appear to be a little smaller
than the heavy supplies of a year ago, but at least moderately above the
1949-58 average. Except for sauerkraut, all major canned items appear to be
in ample supply. January 1 stocks of frozen vegetables were about the same
as those of a year earlier.

Movement of frozen vegetables into consumption during the first half
of 1960 is expected to be moderately larger than in the first half of 1959,
and movement of canned items probably slightly larger. Stocks of both
canned and frozen items at the end of the current season are expected to be
at least moderately smaller than the heavy stocks at the beginning of the
season.





JANUARY 1960


Supplies of potatoes available for distribution into early spring will
be substantially smaller than the heavy supplies of a year earlier. January 1
stocks of fall-crop potatoes, at 97.5 million hundredweight, are down 10 per-
cent from the high level of a year ago. Estimated winter production is also
down substantially. The situation appears to be one of adequate, but not
burdensome supplies. Into early spring, prices of both storage potatoes and
new crop potatoes are expected to average materially above the low levels of a
year earlier.

Reports indicate that growers plan to plant moderately more acreage
this year than last to both early and late spring potatoes. Given near
average weather for the rest of the season, production for spring harvest is
likely to be moderately larger than last year. Prices in early spring prob-
ably will average substantially above those of early spring 1959. But the
sharp advance of last spring is not likely to be repeated, and prices.in late
spring probably will average below the high levels of a year earlier.

The 1959 crop of sweetpotatoes was up 8 percent from 1958. Remaining
supplies probably are at least moderately larger than a year ago. Prices
to growers are likely to remain substantially below those of last season.

Production of colored classes of dry edible beans was much smaller
in 1959 than in 1958. As a result, these classes are in tight supply, and
prices high. Supply of white beans as a group was considerably larger than
a year earlier. However, both domestic and export demand for white beans has
been strong, with exports in the early part of the season unusually heavy.
During the next 4 to 6 months prices to growers for colored beans are expected
to remain well above those of a year earlier. Prices of white classes are
expected to remain above support levels, though prices of pea beans, largest
of the white classes, are likely to average below those of last season.

Supplies of dry field peas are much larger than the relatively light
supplies of a year ago. Both export and domestic demand has been good so far
this season, with exports running well ahead of last season. Domestic use is
expected to exceed that of last season, but exports for the season as a whole
may be down from the high levels of last season. During the next 4 to 6 months
prices of green kinds probably will continue below those of a year earlier,
but white and wrinkled kinds may remain higher.


COILRCIAL VEGETABLES FOR FRESH 11ARKET
Production and Value of
Fresh Vegetables in 1959
Near That of 1958; Melon
Production Lower, Value Up

Acreage of vegetables harvested for fresh market sale in 1959, exclud-
ing melons, was 2 percent smaller than in 1958. Tonnage was about the same as
a year earlier, and slightly larger than the 1949-57 average. Among the
10 items with the largest volume, production of cabbage, carrots, cauliflower


- 4 -


TVS-135






JANUARY 1 -u


and cucumbers was substantially smaller than a year earlier, and snap beans
slightly smaller. But output of celery and dry onions was materially larger
than in 1;-8, tomatoes moderately larger, and lettuce and sweet corn slightly
larger. Acreage of both cantaloups and watermelons was down from a year
earlier. Production of cantaloups was fractionally larger, but production
of watermelons was down almost a fifth.

Demand for fresh vegetables remained strong in 1,.9. Among the 10 lead-
ing vegetables from the standpoint of volume, prices averaged significantly
lower for only two items -- celery and dry onions. Prices received by growers
in 1959 were close to those of a year earlier for cauliflower and lettuce,and
moderately to substantially higher for snap beans, cabbage, carrots, cucumbers,
sweet corn and tomatoes. Aggregate value of commercial vegetables, excluding
melons, for fresh market in principal producing States, amounted to about
$681 million in 1957, compared with about $675 million in 1958.

Prices of cantaloups were materially above those of 1958, and water-
melons were much above the low levels of a year earlier. Aggregate value of
melons amounted to about $111 million in 1959, well over the $87 million of
1958.

Low Temperatures
in Florida Hit
Winter Vegetables

January 1 estimates of the Crop Reporting Board indicated a production
of winter vegetables about 9 percent larger than last winter and 7 percent
above the 1949-58 average. However, tender crops, grown largely in Florida,
suffered heavy damage and serious loss as a result of near freezing to below
freezing temperatures from January 20 to 25. Early reports indicate heavy
loss of snap beans, sweet corn, cucumbers, tomatoes and squash, and more
moderate damage to green peppers. Hardy crops, a large portion of which is
grown in California, Arizona and Texas, are in a more favorable supply situa-
tion. Also, acreages of such crops in Florida came through the freeze with
only light damage. Among the more important crops, production of sweet corn,
tomatoes and green peppers is expected to be much smaller than last winter,
and production of celery and spinach at least moderately smaller. But output
of winter-season cabbage, carrots, cauliflower and lettuce is expected to be
substantially larger than last winter. Among other vegetables, smaller sup-
plies are in prospect for kale, and larger supplies for beets and broccoli.

Domestic production of tender winter vegetables, particularly
tomatoes, cucumbers and peppers, will as usual be supplemented by imports
from Mexico and Cuba. Early reports indicated that production of winter
vegetables in Mexico would be larger than last winter. But recent heavy
rains and floods have caused considerable damage and loss. However, with
tight domestic supplies of tender vegetables, imports from Mexico may be as
large as a year earlier. Production and imports from Cuba are expected to
be below last winter.


TVS-135


- 5 -






JANUARY 1960


Prospects For Leading Crops

Cabbage. Supplies of cabbage available this winter are likely to be materially
larger than both last winter and the 1949-58 average. January 1 stocks of fall-
crop cabbage were relatively light, but production for winter harvest is expected
to be substantially above both last winter and average.

Growers of early fall cabbage, who received low prices for the 1958 crop,
cut acreage moderately in 1959. Hot, dry weather, particularly in the East, was
less favorable than a year earlier, and yield per acre was much lower. Total
early fall production, for fresh market and processing, was down a fourth from
1958. Acreage in Upstate New York was moderately smaller than in 1958, and
yield per acre was down sharply. As a result, harvested tonnage of Danish
cabbage was a fourth smaller in 1959. Much of the crop was not of suitable
quality for storage. Also, small overall supplies of cabbage and high prices
this fall encouraged sales. This left January 1 stocks in producing areas of
only 195,000 hundredweight, compared with 712,000 a year earlier and the 9-year
average of 530,000. With only light supplies remaining, prices of storage
cabbage are likely to continue relatively high. Most of the small late crop
production in Virginia, .orth Carolina, and South Carolina moved to market
before January 1.

However, the great bulk of cabbage available in the first quarter of the
year will come from winter production. January 1 reports indicate that output
of cabbage for winter-season harvest is expected to be about a fourth larger
than last winter. Acreage is up in all States except Arizona, which reports no
change, and prospective yields are also higher in Texas and may be higher in
Florida. Indicated production is up sharply in Texas and California. Produc-
tion in Florida is also expected to be larger than a year ago, though low
temperatures from January 20 to 25 retarded the crop and lowered quality.
Arizona, of minor importance in the total picture, reports a smaller crop.

During the rest of the season, cabbage is expected to benefit from
curtailed supplies of several other fresh vegetables. Despite the substantially
larger supplies in prospect, prices to growers during the next 6 to 8 weeks may
average close to those of a year earlier.

Early December reports indicate a slight reduction from 1959 in prospec-
tive acreage of cabbage for early spring harvest. But near normal yields might
result in a little larger production than last year, when yields in most States
were below average.

Celery. Supplies of celery are materially smaller this winter than last, but
almost a sixth above the 1949-58 average. Acreage in all States is smaller
than last winter. Most of the reduction in expected output is in Florida where
acreage was down 17 percent and yield prospects have been cut by low tempera-
tures. Prospective output in California is close to that of last winter, while
the less important Arizona crop is down substantially.

Marketings of celery in early January were somewhat smaller than for
the comparable weeks of 1959 and f.o.b. prices averaged higher. Supplies


- 6 -


TVS-135






TVS-135 7 JAIJUARY 196')

available during the rest of the season are expected to remain materially below
those of last winter. Prices to growers in the next 6 to 8 weeks are expected
to average substantially above the low levels of a year earlier.

Lettuce. Production of lettuce for winter-season harvest promises to be
mater-ialily larger than both last year and the 1949-58 average. Acreage was up
in all States except Florida which reported no change, and yield per acre is
up in Florida and Texas. Total prospective production is almost a tenth larger
than both last winter and average. About three-fourths of the total winter
production is in California, mostly in the Imperial Valley. Supplies are
heavy, but growers and shippers in the Valley are operating under a State
marketing agreement and order program, similar to the one in effect last winter.
Purpose of the order in California is to limit shipments to the more desirable
grades and sizes, promote orderly marketing and increase returns to growers.
Also, lettuce is expected to benefit considerably from the tight supply
situation for a number of other salad items. Rains in late December caused
some lowering of quality, and low temperatures and heavy frosts on January 1-3
reduced head sizes and slowed maturity.

Onions. Supplies of onions available for distribution during the next 6 to 8
weeks are more than a fourth larger than a year earlier and a sixth larger than
the 1950-58 average. The late summer crop, a large part of which goes into
storage, was more than a tenth larger than both 1958 and the 10-year average.
Disappearance of onions to January 1 was considerably larger than a year ago
and the largest in the past decade. Reported losses to January 1 were heavier
than last year in the important States of New York, Minnesota, Idaho-Eastern
Oregon, Colorado and 'Uestern Oregon. Nevertheless, remaining supplies of sound
onions held by growers and dealers on January 1 amounted to 5.7 million hundred-
weight, compared with 4.4 million a year earlier and the 9-year average of
4.8 million. Cold storage stocks were down in 1959, but holdings in common
storage, more than 90 percent of the total, were up sharply. Biggest increase
over January 1, 1959 was in the Eastern States, where total holdings were up
54 percent. Stocks were up 26 percent over 1959 in the Western States and
17 percent in the Central States. However, holdings in the Central States were
slightly below average.

Production estimates are not yet available for the early spring crop in
Texas. Early estimates indicate 28,500 acres for harvest in 1960, 14 percent
less than last year. But most of the reduction this year is in dry land areas
where yields are relatively low. Also, early plantings have made better
progress and overall yield prospects are better than last year when the crop
was seriously delayed and yields lowered by adverse weather. Early acreage is
expected to furnish light shipments starting about mid-February, several weeks
ahead of last year.

Larger January 1 supplies of storage onions, and the prospect of
earlier volume movement from the early spring crop indicate large market
supplies of onions during the next few weeks compared with the light supplies






JANUARY 1960


of a year earlier. Both prices to growers and retail prices of onions during the
next 6 to 8 weeks are expected to average much below the high levels of a year
earlier.

Intentions reports indicate that growers plan to plant 6 percent less
acreage of onions for late spring harvest than last year, and a fifth less than
the 1949-58 average. In California, which accounts for almost two-thirds of
the production, acreage is up 19 percent over 1959. But substantial reductions
are in prospect in Arizona, Texas, North Carolina and Georgia. However, because
of the larger acreage in California, where yield is relatively high, overall
yield for the late spring crop may be moderately higher than last year. Yields
near the 1956-59 average, by States, on the indicated acreage would result in a
1960 production near that of last year and much above the 10-year average.
Production at this level probably would result in some marketing difficulties
and below average prices.

Carrots. Early estimates indicate a production of carrots for winter harvest of
5.3 million hundredweight. This is about a fourth larger than last year and
8 percent above the 1949-58 average. Acreage and prospective production are up
substantially in Texas, California and Arizona. Hot weather in Texas in Septem-
ber and early October and heavy rains in mid-October damaged early plantings and
resulted in considerable replanting.

Weekly unloads of carrots in the 38 reporting cities during December were
larger than a year ago, with the bulk of shipments from California and Texas.
However, prices to growers averaged materially above the low levels of a year
earlier. Unloads in the early weeks of January were substantially larger than
those in comparable weeks of 1959, and f.o.b. prices averaged materially lower.
Indications are that the harvest pattern in Texas may be more nearly normal than
last year, when harvest was seriously delayed, with heavy marketing late in the
season. However, with larger overall supplies available, prices for the remain-
der of the winter season probably will remain relatively low.

Tomatoes. The Florida crop of tomatoes for winter-season harvest is expected to
be much smaller than both last year and the 1949-58 average. Acreage was down
30 percent from 1959, and the crop suffered heavy losses from low temperatures
on January 20 to 25. Also, fewer tomatoes than last season are available for
import from Cuba. Early reports indicated that more than last year might be
available for import from the West Coast of Mexico. Heavy rains and floods in
early January caused considerable damage. Nevertheless, with a larger acreage
of staked tomatoes, which have a higher yield, tonnage available for export
may be as large as a year earlier. In any event, total supplies for U. S.
consumption are expected to be materially smaller this winter than. last.


: The next issue of the Vegetable :
: Situation is scheduled for release on :
: April 29, 1960.


TVS-135


- 8 -






JANUARY i960(


Watermelons. Early reports indicate that growers plan to have about the same
acreage of watermelons for late spring harvest this year as last. Prospective
1960 acreage in Florida is the same as in 1959, and in California 1-percent
larger. Some early plantings in South Florida were destroyed by low tempera-
tures in late January, and considerable replanting will be necessary. Yields
near the 1955-59 average, by States, would result in production in Florida
substantially larger than last spring, but at least moderately below the
1949-58 average; production in California would be smaller than last year, but
probably above average. If output reaches these levels, prices to growers in
California probably would average at least as high as the near average prices
of last season; but prices to Florida growers probably would average materially
below last season.


VEGETABLES FOR COMMERCIAL PROCESSING

1959 Acreage, Production,
and Value of Vegetables
for Processing Down From
A Year Earlier

Harvested acreage of 10 crops for commercial processing was about
4 percent smaller in 1959 than in 1958, and about a tenth below the 1948-57
average. The 1959 growing season was generally favorable and, except for snap
beans and cabbage, yields approached or exceeded the high levels of the
previous season. However, because of acreage reductions in a number of crops,
and the sharp cut in tomato acreage, a crop with relatively high yields per
acre, overall production was down 8 percent from the high level of 1958. In
addition to a much smaller production of tomatoes, tonnages of lima beans,
beets, green peas, and cucumbers for pickles were down as a result of acreage
cuts. Also, output of cabbage for kraut was down sharply as a result of
13 percent less acreage and a much lower yield. Sweet corn and spinach were
the only important crops to show substantial increases in tonnage. Production
of asparagus was up moderately, and snap beans up slightly.

Prices for cabbage for kraut, in 1959 were substantially higher than
in 1958, for asparagus, beets and sweet corn a little higher, and for tomatoes
the same as in 1958. Higher prices for some items were about offset by
slightly to moderately lower prices for lima beans, snap beans, green peas,
spinach and cucumbers for pickles. Total value of 10 important processing
crops in 1959 amounted to a little more than $259 million, about 7 percent
less than the value of the 1958 crops.

Prospects for 1960

Supplies of canned vegetables appear to be a little smaller than
the heavy supplies of a year ago, but materially larger than the 1949-58
average. Holdings of frozen vegetables are about in line with a year ago.
Stocks of both canned and frozen items at the end of the current season prob-
ably will be at least moderately smaller than the relatively heavy stocks of a
year earlier.


TVS-135


- 9 -






JANUARY 1960


The movement and market tone of processed vegetables during the next
2 or 3 months will have some influence on processor operations in 1960. But
overall supplies of processed vegetables in the last 3 seasons have been
generally heavy, and prices paid to both canners and freezers for a number of
major items have been low relative to their raw product, labor and material
costs. To avoid the likelihood of burdensome supplies and low prices, proces-
sors should keep the 1960 pack in line with anticipated market requirements.
The Departments 1960 acreage-marketing guide for commercial vegetables for
processing, which gives detailed recommendations for individual items, is
being prepared for release in early February. Copies may be obtained from the
Agricultural Marketing Service.


CANNED VEGETABLES

Production of vegetables for commercial processing and incomplete pack
data indicate that the total pack of canned vegetables in 1959 was somewhat
larger than the 1949-57 average, but moderately to substantially smaller than
the 1958 pack. Among the more important items, the pack of sweet corn was
much larger than the light pack of a year earlier. But the packs of green
peas, tomatoes, and tomato juice were materially smaller than the heavy packs
of 1958, and the pack of sauerkraut was down sharply. Among other items on
which information is available, the pack of green lima beans was materially
larger than a year earlier and pumpkin and squash moderately larger. But packs
of asparagus and cucumber pickles were down moderately, and packs of tomato
catsup, paste, sauce, and pulp and puree were down substantially from the large
packs of 1958.

Remaining Supplies a
Little Smaller Than a
Year Ago, Above Average

The smaller overall pack of canned vegetables in 1959, compared with
1958, was largely offset by substantially larger carryover stocks at the
beginning of the current season. Thus, total supplies available for the
current marketing year, ending in mid-1960, were near the heavy supplies of
the previous season. Overall movement of canned vegetables in the first part
of the season appears to have been moderately larger than in the corresponding
months of last season. This, together with incomplete stocks data, indicates
that remaining supplies of canned vegetables probably are a little smaller
than a year ago, but at least moderately above the 1949-58 average. Among
items on which recent stocks data are available, canner stocks of sweet corn
were materially above the relatively low levels of a year ago. But canners'
stocks of green peas were almost a fifth smaller than the heavy holdings of a
year earlier, sauerkraut almost a third smaller and asparagus about a tenth
smaller. Although recent stocks data are not available, remaining supplies of
green lima beans, and spinach probably are larger than a year ago. Because of
reduced 1959 packs, however, supplies of cucumbers for pickles probably are
moderately smaller than a year ago, and supplies of tomatoes, tomato juice,
and most tomato products substantially smaller. Most of these items were in
very heavy supply a year ago. Except for sauerkraut, all major items appear to
be in ample supply.


TVS-135


- 10 -






JANUARY 1960


Movement of canned vegetables into consumption channels during the
remainder of the current season is likely to be slightly larger than a year
earlier. Overall stocks at the end of the current year are expected to be at
least moderately smaller than the large stocks at the beginning of the season.

During the first part of the current season distributor demand was
generally dull compared with canner offerings, and f.o.b. prices relatively
low. In recent weeks prices of a large number of items have advanced slightly,
but except for sauerkraut, pumpkin, spinach, and some tomato items, f.o.b. prices
are generally below those of a year ago. Some further moderate price advances
are expected into the spring. During the remainder of the season, f.o.b.
prices are likely to average the same to slightly above those of last season.
Retail prices are likely to average a little higher than a year earlier.


FROZEN VEGETABLES

1959 Pack Probably
Near That of 1958

Pack figures for 1959 are not yet available for most frozen items, but
there are indications that the total commercial pack of frozen vegetables was
about the same or slightly larger than the 1,428 million pounds frozen in
1958. The 1959 pack of frozen green peas amounted to 305 million pounds,
53 million more than in 1958. The pack of cut corn at 117 million pounds was
up 8 million pounds from a year earlier, and frozen asparagus at almost 33 mil-
lion pounds was also up 8 million pounds. The 1959 pack of spinach probably
was up substantially from a year earlier owing to the sharp increase in the
important spring pack. These and other increases will be at least partly
offset by expected decreases for broccoli, cauliflower, and a number of miscel-
laneous and mixed items.

Remaining Supplies About
The Same as a Year Ago

Indications are that the overall rate of movement of frozen vegetables
was moderately larger in the first half of the current season than a year
earlier. Net outmovement in December amounted to almost 63 million pounds,
9 million more than in December 1958. Remaining supplies of 845 million
pounds are 2 million less than a year ago, but substantially above the 1954-58
average. January 1 cold storage holdings of green peas, spinach and Brussels
sprouts were materially larger than those of January 1, 1959 and sweet corn
and frozen french fried potatoes slightly larger. But these increases were
offset by substantially smaller stocks of asparagus, lima beans, broccoli,
cauliflower, mixed peas and carrots, and mixed and "other" vegetables. Hold-
ings of snap beans were slightly smaller than a year ago.

Prospect Next Few Months

Demand for frozen vegetables is likely to continue strong, and movement
in the first half of 1960 is likely to be moderately larger than in the first
half of 1959. Stocks at the end of the current season are likely to be at


- 11 -


TVS-135






JANUARY 1960


least moderately below the relatively heavy holdings at the beginning of the
season. Retail prices of frozen vegetables are expected to remain at
moderate levels during the next 4 to 6 months, but prices of most items prob-
ably will average slightly to moderately above those of a year earlier.
During the next two months, movement of frozen vegetables is likely to be
stimulated by short supplies of a number of fresh items.


POTATOES


Review of 1959

Potato supplies were heavy during the winter of 1958-59, owing to
large stocks of potatoes from the previous fall crop, and prices were gener-
ally low. By early spring, however, movement into food channels and heavy
diversions to starch and livestock feed had reduced holdings of potatoes to
moderate levels. Also, combined production of early and late spring potatoes
in 1959 amounted to 26.7 million hundredweight, moderately less than either
1958 or the 1949-57 average. With these smaller supplies, prices to growers
moved up sharply from $1.04 in March to $3.76 in June. As marketing from
the summer crop picked up, prices declined rapidly from the high June level,
but remained well above the depressed levels of a year earlier. Production
of fall crop potatoes was materially below that of a year ago. Disappearance
too has been somewhat smaller than in the fall of 1958. Disappearance of
the 1959 fall crop to January 1 was about 68 million hundredweight, compared
with almost 75 million from the larger 1958 crop. Movement to fresh market
outlets probably was close to that of last fall, and movement to potato
chippers and other food processors a little larger. But movement to starch
factories and livestock feed was materially below 1958. Prices continue
to average well above the low levels of last fall. Prices received by
gro'.;ers in December averaged $1.89 per hundredweight, compared with iPl.17 in
December 195'.


Much of Fall Crop Again
Under Marketing Orders

Marketing agreement and order programs, similar to those in effect
during the past several seasons, are again in effect this season in a number
of major fall-producing areas. The orders impose certain size, quality,
and maturity restrictions on marketing of tablestock potatoes. The regula-
tions generally encourage more orderly marketing of better quality potatoes,
and increase returns to growers. Federal marketing orders for potatoes
are now in operation in Maine, the Red River Valley of Minnesota and North
Dakota, Colorado, Idaho, Washington, Oregon, and the counties of Modoc and


- 12 -


TVS-135






JANUARY i10


Siskiyou in Northern California. About 70 percent of the 1)5y fall crop
production was in areas covered by Federal marketing orders. Except for
Maine, the size and/or quality restrictions under the Fe,.veral orders are some-
what lo.:er this season than last. Some additional areas operate under State
marketing agreements and orders.


Smaller Supplies, Higher Prices
In Prospect Into Early Spring

Total supplies of potatoes available for distribution into early
spring are somewhat smaller than the relatively heavy supplies of a year
earlier. Stocks of potatoes on hand are smaller than a year ago, and
estimated production for winter harvest also is do'..n.

Total storage stocks of potatoes held by growers and dealers in
26 fall-producing States on January 1, 1960 amounted to 97.5 million hundred-
weight. These stocks according to the USDA Crop Reporting Board were
moderately above the 10-year average but almost 11 million hundredweight
below those of January 1, 1959. Production of potatoes for 1960 winter harvest
in Florida and California was estimated on January 1 at 3.5 million hundred-
weight, compared with 4.0 million last winter. Also, the Florida crop was
damaged and yield prospects lowered by low temperatures from January 20 to 25.
The winter crop of course makes up only a small part of the market requirements
for the season; the bulk of winter supplies come from storage stocks.

The picture into early spring looks like one of ample but not
burdensome overall supplies of potatoes. However, supplies of new
crop winter potatoes are expected to be the smallest since 1952. Prices
of both storage and new crop potatoes into early spring are expected
to average materially above the low levels of a year earlier.


Spring Production Likely
To be Moderately Larger;
No Sharp Price Increase

Although no production estimates are available for the spring crops,
production probably will be somewhat larger than the relatively light output
of 1959. Intentions reports indicate that acreage for early spring harvest,
partically all of which is in Florida, will likely be about 8 percent
larger than last year. Also, yields may be above last spring, when much
of the Florida crop ran to small sizes. Yields near the average of recent
years on intended acreage would result in early spring production materially
larger than the 1959 crop of 3.1 million hundredweight.


TVS-135


- 13 -






- 14 -


Intentions reports indicate that potato growers plan to plant about
6 percent more acreage for late spring harvest this year than last. On such
an acreage, yields near the average of recent years would result in a produc-
tion a little larger than in 1959, and probably close to the 1949-58 average.
Acreage in California, which grows about 60 percent of the late spring crop,
is up 13 percent from last year. However, yields may be at least moderately
below the high level of 1959. Acreage is up 4 percent in Texas, but down
10 percent in Arizona. In large producing areas in the East, acreage is up
11 percent in Alabama, and up slightly in North Carolina.

If growing and harvesting conditions for the spring crop are near the
average of recent years, prices to growers in early spring will likely average
substantially above the early weeks of the 1959 spring season. But prices
are not likely to show sharp advances similar to those of last spring. Prices
of potatoes in late spring probably will average materially below the levels
of a year earlier.


Foreign Trade

On an annual basis United State's foreign trade in potatoes, conducted
mostly with Canada, is small relative to domestic production. Exports typi-
cally amount to less than 2 percent of production, and imports less than 1 per-
cent. Nevertheless, to certain areas and at certain times our foreign trade
is important. United States exports of potatoes from July 1958 through June
1959 amounted to about 4 million hundredweight, and imports less than 1 million
hundredweight.

United States exports of potatoes in the early part of the current
season were below the corresponding period of last season. But with Canadian
supplies materially smaller than a year ago, U. S. exports in the first half
of 1960 are expected to be substantially larger than those of a year earlier.
Imports into the U. S. into mid-1960 are likely to be relatively light, and
to consist mainly of seed stock.


Prospects Beyond Spring

It is too early to attempt to assess the probable supply and price
prospects for potatoes into summer and fall. But it is not too early for
producers to begin shaping up plans for these crops. In laying their plans
producers should remember that people like to eat about the same quantity of
potatoes from one year to the next, regardless of price. Any substantial
overproduction results in seriously depressed prices. To avoid the likelihood
of burdensome supplies and low prices, producers should make at least moderate
cuts in acreage of both summer and fall crop potatoes.

The U. S. Department of Agriculture Acreage-Marketing Guide for the
early summer, late summer and fall crops will be released in February. Through
these recommendations, an attempt is made to guide growers in adjusting produc-
tion to anticipated market needs. Copies of the guides may be obtained from
the Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA, Washington 25, D. C.


TVS-135


JANUARY 1960






TVS-135 15 JANUARY 1960

SWEETPOTATOES

1960 Crop Materially Larger
Than Last Year

Sweetpotato production in 1959, at 18.7 million hundredweight, was
moderately below the 1948-57 average, but about 8 percent above that of 1958.
Acreage harvested was slightly larger than in 1958, with increases in Virginia,
North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Texas, and California.
These increases more than offset declines in Maryland, Florida, Alabama, Arkan-
sas, and Oklahoma. No change in acreage from last year was reported for New
Jersey, Missouri, Kansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, and Louisiana. The season
was generally favorable for sweetpotatoes and U. S. average yield of 68 hundred-
weight per acre was record high.

Combined production in lew Jersey, Virginia, North Carolina, Louisiana,
Texas and California, which furnish the bulk of shipments in the last half of
the season, was 7 percent larger than last year. Unloads data indicate that
so far this season marketing from these States have been a little larger than
in the comparable period last season. This indicates that remaining supplies
are at least moderately, and perhaps materially, larger than a year ago.


Prices Next Few Months
Likely to Continue
Below a Year Earlier

Demand for sweetpotatoes this season is about the same as it was last
season, but this season's larger crop has kept prices under pressure. During
the first half of the season total unloads in the 38 cities reporting were
slightly above those of a year earlier and prices to growers averaged about
50 cents lower. Peak marketing occurred in the fall, with a seasonal low
price of $2.54 per hundredweight to the grower in October. Prices to growers
in December averaged $3.43 per hundredweight, but were still more than a dollar
below those of mid-December 1958. The 8 percent larger crop in .1959 than in
1958, together with unloads data in the 38 cities, indicate that current hold-
ings of sweetpotatoes are somewhat larger than holdings a year ago. Prices
during the next 2 to 3 months are likely to average substantially below those
of a year earlier.

DRY EDIBLE BEANS

Total Supplies Little
Below Last Season; Less
Colored More White

Total production of dry edible beans in 1959 was 18.2 million hundred-
weight, compared with 19.2 million in 1958. Stocks at the beginning of the
current season were somewhat larger than a year earlier. Thus, total supplies
available for distribution in the 1959-60 season were only slightly less than
last season and slightly more than the 1953-57 average. Although total supplies
were close to those of a year ago, distribution by classes was quite different.






- 16 -


Total supplies of colored beans available in the current season
amounted to a little less than 7 million hundredweight, almost a fifth less
than last season, and materially below average. Production of Pintos, at
4.3 million hundredweight, was about 600,000 hundredweight less than last
year. As beginning stocks of this class probably were smaller than they
were last season, supply was likely down more than 600,000 bags, and
substantially below average. Among other important colored classes,
production of both red kidney and small reds was much smaller in the 1959
season than in 1958. As a result, supply of red kidney beans is about 30
percent smaller than both last season and the recent 5-year average. Supply
of small red beans in the current season was down a third from last season,
and moderately below the 1953-57 average. Among the less important classes,
pink beans are also in substantially smaller supply than a year ago, but
supplies of cranberry beans are larger. All colored beans together make up
about 36 percent of the total supplies compared with 43 percent last season
and the 1953-57 average of 42 percent.

In contrast to the light supply of colored beans, total supply of
white beans at the beginning of the season amounted to more than 9 million
hundredweight. This was about an eighth larger than in the previous season,
and a fourth above the 1953-57 average. Because of sharply higher yields in
Michigan, production of pea beans, at 5.8 million hundredweight, was
considerably above the 5.1 million produced in 1958. Production of great
northern and small white beans was also up, and supplies of each of these
were substantially larger than both last season and average. Total supply
of lima beans was materially smaller than a year ago and much below average.
Supplies of baby limas were about the same as last season, but because of
reduced production, supplies of large limas were about an eighth smaller.
Supply of blackeye beans appeared to be about the same as last season, and a
tenth above average.

Disappearance Probably
Will be Smaller
Than Last Season

Domestic use of dry beans in the current season may be slightly above
the 14.9 million hundredweight used last season. Since domestic demand for
dry beans is quite inelastic, however, there is little prospect for any
very sizeable increase.

Exports of dry beans from this country, greatly influenced by
production in Europe, vary considerably from year to year. But in recent
years there has been a growing demand for export. This trend toward
increased exports is expected to continue in the years ahead. However, the
very heavy exports -- 4.0 million hundredweight -- last season was due in
part to a poor crop in Europe. With the 1959 crop in Central and Northern
Europe reported to be hard hit by prolonged drought, and with heavy U. S.
supplies of white beans, large exports in the first part of the current
season resulted. Total exports of dry beans in the period September-November
amounted to 1.2 million hundredweight compared with 704,000 hundredweight a


TVS-135


JANUARY 1960






JANUARY 1960


year earlier. All of the increase was in white types, as export movement of
colored types was smaller than a year earlier. Exports of white beans for
the season as a whole probably will be very large. However, because of tight
supplies and high prices of colored beans, it seems unlikely that total
exports of beans will be as large this season as last.

Price Prospects

Domestic demand for both white and colored beans was good and export
movement of white classes in the early part of the season was unusually
large. Colored classes are in generally tight supply and prices for the
season to date have averaged materially above those of a year earlier.
For example, according to the Bean Market News, Colorado shipping point
prices of Pintos, largest of the colored classes, was $8.60 to $8.75 per
hundredweight for the week ended January 14, compared with about $6.80 a
year earlier. Red kidneys and small reds are also in light supply and prices
are substantially above those of a year ago. During the next few months
prices of all major colored classes are expected to remain well above those
of last season.

Prices of both large and baby limas are above a year earlier.
Supplies of Great Northern are significantly larger than a year ago. But
demand has been strong and in recent weeks prices of northern have moved
above year earlier levels. Heavy supplies of pea beans, largest of the
white classes, continue to weigh on markets. Prices for this class are
expected to remain below those of a year earlier, but above support levels.

Pricing Policy for any
1959-Crop Dry Beans
Taken Over Under Support

The U. S. Department of Agriculture announced that the Commodity
Credit Corporation had no inventory of dry beans as of January 21, but
outlined a pricing policy for any beans that might be taken over in coming
weeks under the price support program.

Through December 31, 1959, a total of 1,822,066 hundredweight of 1959-
crop dry beans had been put under price-support loans and purchase agreements.
This is somewhat smaller than the 2,789,586 hundredweight of 1958-crop dry
beans put under support through December 31,1958. Market prices have been
above support prices and producers should find it profitable to redeem
their beans under price-support loan prior to the maturity dates of
February 29 in New York, Michigan, and Pennsylvania and April 30 in all
other States.

Any 1959-crop dry beans taken over by the Commodity Credit Corporation
will be sold at the higher of the domestic market price or the statutory
minimum price, which is 105 percent of the 1959 support rates plus reasonable
carrying charges. This pricing will apply to both domestic and export sales.
Any 1959-crop beans acquired under price support and which are not sold


- 17 -


TVS-135






JANUARY 1960


through commercial channels under this pricing policy will be made
available, prior to the 1960 harvest, to noncommercial outlets such as
domestic and foreign donation.

The pricing policy is designed to encourage maximum movement of dry
beans into commercial market channels. It removes any uncertainty regarding
CCC pricing of dry beans and should make commercial holding of the dry bean
inventory possible.


DRY FIELD PEAS

Supplies Much Larger
Than Light Supplies
Of Last Season

Supplies of dry field peas are much larger than the relatively light
supplies of a year ago, and probably moderately above the 1949-57 average.
Stocks of dry peas at the beginning of the season, September 1, 1959, were
very light and far below the relatively heavy stocks of a year earlier. But
1959 production of 4.4 million hundredweight was the second largest since
1947 and about 75 percent larger than the small 1958 crop. Biggest increase
in 1959 production over 1958, occurred in Alaskas and other smooth green
kinds, which were up about 90 percent. But production of white Canada and
other yellow and white kinds was about two-thirds larger than in 1958, and
output of "other peas," mostly wrinkled kinds, was up about 50 percent.
Total production in Washington, at 2.2 million hundredweight, was double
that of last season, and production in Idaho, at 1.8 million hundredweight,
was up 64 percent. The larger overall crops was the result of 47 percent
more harvested acreage in 1959, and record high yields.

Demand Strong,
Prices Firm to Strong

Domestic use of dry field peas in the current season is likely to be
materially larger than last season. Dry peas were in tight supply last
season, prices were relatively high and domestic use for food was
drastically curtailed. Export demand in the early part of the season has
also been unusually strong. In the period September-November exports of
green kinds amounted to 433,000 hundredweight compared with 329,000 a year
earlier, and exports of white and yellow kinds combined amounted to 336,000
hundredweight compared with 158,000 a year earlier. Although exports for
the season as a whole may be down somewhat from the high level of last
season, they are expected to compare favorably with most other recent years.
So far this season f.o.b. prices of smooth green and wrinkled kinds have
averaged below those of a year earlier, but prices of white and yellow kinds
have averaged higher. With prospects for a good rate of movement into both
domestic and foreign channels, prices in the next 4 to 6 months are expected
to remain firm to strong.


- 18 -


TVS-135






JANUARY 1960


Smaller Crop Needed
in 1960

Indications are that a smaller crop will be needed in 1960. Carry-
over stocks of dry peas at the beginning of next season are likely to be
substantially above the very light carryover at the beginning of the
current season. This together with a crop as large as in 1959 -- 4.4
million hundredweight -- probably would result in burdensome supplies in the
1960-61 season. Domestic use of dry peas for food in 1960-61 probably
will be somewhere around one million hundredweight. Based on experience
of recent years, another 1.5 to 1.6 million hundredweight will go into
domestic nonfood uses -- feed, seed for dry and green crops, and loss.
Total domestic use typically amounts to 2.5 to 2.7 million hundredweight.
Thus, in years of big crops the export market assumes increased importance.
Exports in the last 3 or 4 seasons have averaged much above those of earlier
years, reaching 1.5 million hundredweight in the 1958-59 season. Exports
are expected to remain relatively high. But unless production is cut in
1960, and barring serious crop failure in Europe, foreign markets in
1960-61 probably would not take enough peas to keep prices to growers from
falling to very low levels. To forestall the likelihood of surplus supplies
and low pr-ces next season, growers in 1960 should plant substantially less
acreage than in 1959.


- 19 -


TVS-135







TVS-135


Table 2 .--Vegetables and melons for fresh market:


and season


Commercial acreage, production,


average price per hundredweight received by farmers
crops, average 1949-57, annual 1958 and 1959


for principal


Acreage Production Price per hundredweight

Crop
Average : 958 1959 Average : 1958 19 Average: 19
19199-58 19 15 15 1959
1949-57 : .: 1949-57 1949-57:


Artichokes
Asparagus
Beans, lima
Beans, snap


Beets
Broccoli :
Brussels
sprouts / :
Cabbage f_
Cantaloups 2:


Carrots 1/3/:
Cauli-
flower l/:
Celery 1 :


Corn, sweet
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Escarole


Garlic j/ 3/:
Honey balls
Honey dews
Kale


Lettuce
Onions l/ 3_/:
Peas, green
Peppers,
green


Shallots
Spinach 4/
Tomatoes
Watermelons


Acres

8,230
42,640
18,540o
160,310


6,740
39,880

5,750
133,260
128,320


Acres

9,400
50,650
12,850
128,050


4,850
39,930

5,050
119,460
134,800


80,640o 69,940

30,830 30,250
35,930 35,780


204,550
49,770
4,820
5,110


2,310
290
10,830
2,790

214,930
119,280
16,430


211,350
50,650
4,600
6,400


2,900

11,170
2,500


224,110
106,250
8,400


41,810 39,950


5,810
39,900
230,500
401,700


Total : 2,041,900


4,000
30,950
222,650
457,150

2,024,040


Acres

9,400
48,800
12,100
127,350

4,200
40,750

5,710
119,060
125,900


1,000 1,000 1,000
cwt. cwt. cwt.


317
1,132
472
5,301


329
1,314
328
4,449


376
1,254
276
4,387


Dollars Dollars Dollars


9.12
13.47
8.27
8.42


10.22
12.84
8.38
8.05


9.09
13.66
10.03
9.03


707 530 470 2.67 2.59 2.52
1,983 2,192 2,260 8.23 7.73 7.72


556
22,007
11,814


570
21,166
12,601


590
19,043
12,733


65,650 14,920 15,215 13,615


9.30
1.75
4.12


8.82
1.71
3.95


9.09
2.18
4.38


3.07 2.78 3.02


27,200 4,616 4,646 4,120 3.37 3.58 3.46
38,130 14,367 14,o69 15,227 3.74 4.46 3.24


213,150
48,900
5,100
7,500


3,200

8,260
2,500


218,980
113,430
7,150


11,532
3,777
476
650


162
26
1,449
202


30,597
22,242
529


13,169
4,047
422
758


218

1,285
162


32,697
23,742
237


13,307
3,658
498
938


272

1,239
175


33,011
25,561
273


3.60
5.05
4.79
4.47


11.40
6.11
4.68
3.75


4.17
2.68
7.92


3.40
4.65
5.56
5.53

10.41

4.68
5.80


4.03
3.39
8.12


3.66
5.71
6.03
4.28


9.47

5.58
4.00


3.95
2.41
10.24


43,450 2,583 2,412 2,578 8.38 10.13 10.25


3,300
29,790
200,120
388,900


155
1,998
19,015
28,841


86
1,654
18,824
36,306


62
1,564
19,609
29,437


7.39
5.70
6.87
1.40


5.87
6.57
6.35
1.05


6.34
6.51
7.30
1.65


1,917,980 202,426 213,428 206,533


I Includes some quantities used for processing.
2/ Includes Casabas, Persians, and other muskmelons.
3/ Includes production used for dehydration.
Includes production for processing in those States for which separate estimates of fresh market
and processing production are not prepared.


Annual summary, Vegetables Fresh Market, USDA, AMS, December 16, 1959.


JANUARY 1960


- 20 -





Table 3.--Truck crops, potatoes and sweetpotatoes: Unloads at 38 markets, indicated periods 1959 and 1960
(Expressed in carlot equivalents)
Oct. 31 Nov. 27. 1959 : Dec. 5 31. 1959 Jan. 3 16. 1959 Jan. 1 15. 1960 ,
Rail, : Rail, R: ail, Rail, :
Commodity boat, Trc Ima- boat Im- : boat Irm- boat, Im-
Commodity oat Truck I Total boat Truck Im: Total boat Truck Im Total : Track Total
and 1/ sports and / ports and ports and :ports.
air : air l_/ :. air air


Asparagus
Beans, lima, snap,
and fava
Beets
Broccoli
Cabbage
Cantaloups and
other melons 2/
Carrots
Cauliflower
Celery
Corn
Cucumbers
Escarole and endive
Lettuce and romaine
Onions 3/
Peas, green
Peppers
Spinach
Tomatoes
Turnips amdrutabagas
Watermelons
Other Vegetables
(including mixed)
Total

Potatoes
Sweetpotatoes
Grand total


601
74
126
2,569

148
1,216
1,247
1,575
542
1,064
187
2,468
2,689
8
559
329
3,012
286
3


685
75
288
2,750

165
1,857
1,351
3,212
695
1,106
195
5,660
3,297
60
997
357
4,041
622


72
1
189
561


611
169
1,452
14
7
23
3,152
577
28
107
195
253
---


357
33
94
1,783

1
1,085
492
1,651
139
306
232
2,343
2,236
15
255
157
11,301
237


543
34
283
2,406

12
1,701
661
3,103
156
428
255
5,499
2,826
50
490
352
12,188
456


40

116
316


283
144
669
44
11
30
1,675
415
2
93
135
193
3


194
12
57
1,243


505
249
799
105
133
56
1,172
1,094
3
257
82
1,013
182


293
12
173
1,559

* 20
790
393
1,468
149
225
86
2,847
1,509
26
375
217
1,461
326


99

94
538


414
144
664
5
28
40
1,777
326

6
123
114
1


240
18
66
1,086


478
210
669
30
145
114
1,308
834
1
176
69
545
166


370
18
160
1,649

19
892
354
1,333
40
283
156
3,086
1,176 *
16 o
312 ,
192
1,285
274


: 802 62 --- 864 1,442 61 --- 1,523 742 60 --- ...2 959 *, --- 1,009
:_9L070 18j_ 7 45 82_ ,292 8,853 22,798 1,314 32,966 _4911 7,216 604 12,731 5,332 6,205 1,07 12,624

: 5,755 8,275 14 14,044 5,884 7,630 16 13,530 3,581 3,840 2 7,423 3,925 3,553 3 y, 4i
: 18 2,852 --- 2,870 20 2,108 --- 2,128 8 628 --- 636 5 597 1 603


14,843 29,904 459 45,206 14,757


32,536 1,330 46,624 8,500


11,684


606 20,790


9,262 10,355 1,091 20,,..,


1 Revised to reflect heavier truck loading--reference
2 Except watermelons. 3/ Includes shallots, chives, ci


special notice in January 18, 1960 Weekly Sripients-Unloads Summary, AMS.
polinas leeks, scallions, and green onions.


Markets include: Albany, Atlanta, Baltimore, Birmingham, Boston, Buffalo, Chicago, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbia, Dallas, Denver,
Detroit, Houston, Indianapolis, Kansas City, Los Angeles, Louisville, Memphis, Miami, Milwaukee, Minneapolis, Nashville, uewark, New
Orleans, New York, Oakland, Philadelphia, Pittsburg, Portland (Ore.), Providence, St. Louis, St. Paul, Salt Lake City, San Antonio,
San Francisco, Washington, and Wichita.
Truck unloads are not 100 percent complete but represent highest percentage obtainable under local conditions in markets covered.


Market News: Weekly reports, USDA, AMS.


65
1
162
181

17
619
104
1,637
153
42
8
3,187
606
52
433
28
972
1


--- 12 --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---







JANUARY 1960


Table 4.--Vegetables fresh: Representative wholesale prices (1.c.l. sales) at
New York and Chicago for stock of generally good quality and condition (U. S.
No. 1 when available) indicated periods, 1958, 195) and 1iO60


: Tuesday nearest mid-month
Market : State _____:________
and of : Unit 1958-59 : 195-60
Commodity : Origin _____
Nov.: Dec.: Jan.: Nov.: Dec. Jan.
: 11 : 16 : 13 : 10 : 15 12
Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol.


New York
Beans, snap, green, Valentine :Florida
Broccoli, bunched :California
Cabbage, domestic round type :Florida
Cabbage, Danish type :New York
Carrots, bunched :California
Carrots, topped, washed :California
Cauliflower :Texas
Celery, Golden Heart : Florida
Celery, Pascal :California
Corn, green :Florida
Cucumbers :Florida
Eggplant :Florida
Escarole :Florida
Lettuce, Iceberg type :California
Onions, yellow, large size :Idaho
Onions, yellow, medium size :IJew York
Peppers, green, California Wonder:Florida
Spinach, Savoy type :Texas
Tomatoes, green ripe, unwrapped :Florida


Chicago
Beans, snap, green, Valentine
Broccoli
Cabbage, domestic round type
Carrots, topped, washed
Cauliflower
Celery, Pascal type
Corn, green
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Escarole
Lettuce, Iceberg type, dry pack
Onions, Spanish, yellow
Onions, Yellow Globe
Peppers, green, California
Wonder type
Spinach, flat type
Tomatoes, green ripe and turning


Florida
:California
:Texas
:California
:California
:California
:Florida
:Florida
:Florida
:Florida
:Arizona
:Colorado
:tidwestern

:Florida
:Texas
:Florida


Bu. hamper
:l's small crt.
:1-3, 4 bu. crt.
:50 lb. sack
:4 doz. pony crt.
.48-1-lb. film bag crt:
:Long Island crt. 12's:
:2'-4 doz. 16 in. crt.:
:24 doz. 16 in. crt.
:5 doz. crt., yellow
:Bu. bskt.
:Bu. bskt.
:1-1/9 bu. crt.
:2 doz. crtn.
:50 lb. sack
:50 lb. sacr:
:Bu. bskt.
:Bu. bskt.
:L/ox6 60-lb. crt.



Bu. hamper
:1i 's crt.
:1-3 4 bu. crt.
:hd-l-llb film baa crt:
:Film wrapped 12's
:2-3 doz. 16 in. crt.
:5 doz. crt., yellow
:Bu. bskt.
:Bu. bskt.
:1-1,9 bu. crt.
:2 doz. heads, crtn.
:3" & Lgr. 50 lb. sack:
:50 lb. sack, medium

:Bu. bskt.
:Bu. bskt.
:2. 8 lb. cartons


1/ 1i bu. crate.


2/ With or without stems.


Weekly summary of terminal market prices, USDA, AMS, Market News Reports.


3.15


5.38
4.20


4.89
3.06
3.95
3.40
1.70
3.07
3.10
1.80


12.30



2.85
2.75

3.75

4.35
2.75
3.75
2.75
1.88
2.50
2.65
2.00


4.25
3.20
4.50
1.63
5.50
4.50
L.38
2.40
5.21
3.75
4.32
3.10
1.79
3.28
3.01
2.05
3.61
1.89
9.17



3.75
2.75
1.00
4.25

)4. 4 5
3.50
4.25
2.75
2.25
2.50
2.50
2.40


6.50
3.68
3.50
1.23
4.25
5.92
3.75
3.42
5.30
4.13

4.13
1.52
2.95
4.25
2.88
4. L0O
2.15
6.1iJ



7.00
3.15
2.85
5.65

L.75
4 00
9.00
3.75
1.75
2.50
3.75
3.00


5.50
2.90

3.35
4.25
4.35


5.00
2.50
4.50
4.25
4. 00
3.00
2.60
1.20


0.70



5.25
3.50

4.15

4.75
2.35
4.75
4.50
2.50
2.50
2.15
1.50


6.50
4.00

3.38
5.75
5.50

4.00
4.65
5.00

6.00
4.50
4.50
2.40
1.25
8.00
2.15
11.10


7.00
3.50
5.00
4.50
4.. 50
4.50

11.00
5.00
4.00
3.75

1.50

8.00


3.50
3.75
2.75
.1.75


3.75
".00
5.00
h. 00
5.50
3.50
1.45
4.75
2.50
1.05
7.50
1.90
8.60


7.25
3.50
3.00
3.75
3.35
4.25
5.25
5.25
3.25
1.65
4.75
2.20
1.30

8.50
2.15
2.65


--- 14.25

--- 1.75


. 50 ---
3.00 ---
2.00 ---


TVS-135


- 22 -







TVS-135


- 23 -


JANUARY 1960


Table 5.--Vegetables, fresh: Average price received by farmers, per hundredweight,
United States, indicated periods, 1)5. and 1959

Avera e first half of month

Commodity 1958 1959
Slovember December : October November December
Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars

Beans, snap 8.80 7.50 7.90 11.50 15.80
Broccoli 7.90 8.90 9.50 9.10 11.50
Cabbage : 1.40 1.95 3.05 3.15 3.70
Carrots : 2.95 2.80 3.25 3.25 3.40
Cauliflower : 3.75 4.55 4.60 4.40 4.50
Celery : 4.20 3.05 4.80 4.20 3.50
Corn, sweet 3.40 3.80 4.45 4.00 6.60
Cucumbers 5.10 4.60 5.00 7.90 14.40
Lettuce 3.25 3.35 6.50 4.40 4.85
Onions : 2.60 3.05 1.90 1.75 1.60
Peppers, green 12.50 10.70 7.60 9.70 18.00
Spinach 5.40 6.50 6.90 7.00 9.60
Tomatoes : 10.60 7.70 8.40 8.50 10.50


Agricultural Prices, USDA, AMS, issued monthly.


Table 6.--Vegetables, commercial for fresh market: Index numbers (unadjusted)
of prices received by farmers, as of 15th of the month, Uniced States
by months, average 1935-39, average 1947-49, and 1950 to date _/

(1910-1914 = 100)


Period : Jan. : Feb. : Mar. : Apr. : May : June: July : Aug.: Sept.: Oct.: Nov. : Dec. : Av.


1)35-39 : 114 121 133 130 125 98 b7
1947-49 : 28b 305 310 308 277 215 207


Year
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

1955
195o
1957
1958
1959 g2/


213
346
249
273
239

273
276
237
356
304


195
288
294
254
236

260
271
238
401
298


231
276
311
251
255

254
262
285
280
285


200
203
289
246
222

206
264
269
197
229


02 bl 90 103 115 107
196 193 204 241 24b 249


170
197
24o
209
192

210
202
233
173
228


165
211
227
206
202

219
215
213
214
266


214
290
272
226
240

245
281
217
256
248


211
269
276
242
226

239
250
244
264
267


1/ In addition


to the vegetables included in the series published prior to January 1954, the


following have been added; broccoli, sweet


corn, cucumbers, and watermelons.


2/ Preliminary.


Agricultural Prices, USDA, AMS, issued monthly.







T'.'3-135


- 24 -


JANUARY 1960


Table I. --Vegetables for commercial processing: Acreage, production, and season average
price? per tun received by farmers, average 19145-57, annual 195-3 and 1959

H i-rvested acreage : Pro.'lu:tion : Frice per ton
C-,mmodi ty Average : 193 : 1959 Average 195 195 Average : 1959
S14L'3-57 199-57 1948-57 .

: Acres Acres Acres Tons Tons Tons Dol. Dol. Dol.

Asparagus : '5,20' 1'7,310' 111,200 105,830 111,3C0 11'1,300 200.50 193 50 197.8C
Beans
lima 1/ : l11 ,6k', 77,760 ,3*i'. c6 ,.t'.' 32,70rC'' 1l47. .' 1J'".'.9' 133 .40
3eans,
snap : 151,.'. 15'., 160 164,670 290C,74 0 36L,,50C 3&5,70". 117.00 110.5:' 107.30
Teets : 17,60X il',i16, 1., 153,3'' 153,20X .1.-2,000 20.7"' 17.70 18.10
Cabbage
for kraut : 15,9'.0' 11, 0 1 I"', 370 2 '.*, 7'7". 203,00". 1 1,000 13. "'' 1.6.' 14.30
Corn,
sweet 2/ : l2,6' 3 '..,00 1-3,00 1 376.,i400 1,329,90'0 1,57','-800 21.20 1 ..u 19.10
Cucumbers
for pickles : 131 ,.00 115',350 100,5 C'.0 293,5.- 356,800 335,2,00 60.50 53.30 51.40
Feas,
green 1/ : 427,'.' 376 ,1400 345,1,O L9, 30 i5,..0 71,200 39.?. 33.330 7.90
Spinach 3/ 33,310 30,520 34,20,0 1214,700, 121,7,0 151,0'L, 1.50 41.20 37.90
Tomatoes : 31'-,3C C0 345,750 2-37,730 3,29.--,300 4,2.37,4 ) 3,53,300 26.50 25.40 24.110

Total :1,737,500 1,c32,310 1,563,72 6,3.?l.],2..'C' 7,502,40,l, 6,928,000

1' Production and price o.n a "shelled" basis.
2' Corn in the husk.
3/ Averages are 19.)',-57.

Annual Summary, Vegetables Processing, USDA, A-lS, Decemberr 16, 1959.


Table 8.--Frozen vegetables: Cold-storage holdings, December 31, 1959, with comparisonss

: 1958 : 1959
Dec ?.
C. dity average : Dec. 31 : Aug. 31 : Sept. 30 : Oct. 31 : oy. 30 : Dec. 31 I/
i -5a-58 : : : : : :
: 1,00 1,000 1,000' 1 00 1,000 1,000' 1,000
pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds

Asparagus : 1.,652 20,275 29,693 26,841 22,649 19,762 16,994
Beans, lima : 105,173 1,J3,258 71,570 107,891 105,932 93,269 81,846
Beans, snap : 35,508 94,802 130,318 133,639 123,379 109,580 93,303
Broccoli : 40,634 47,872 36,386 36,781 42,828 42,126 40,528
Brussels sprouts : 27,112 25,368 8,394 i4,161 21,460 27,256 30,893
Carrots : 2' 2/ 9,894 '9,192 24,946 39,110 37,994
Cauliflower : 21, 1 23,,02'?6 11,055 10,290 14,244 17,396 18,449
Corn, sweet : P2,585 30,398 60,123 102,106 102,186 95,000 82,184
Mixed vegetables : 2 24,826 12,149 11,9 1 12,934 17,206 20,172
Peas, green : 173,7r5 192,562 312,360 292,661 260,119 235,018 205,676
Peas and carro-.ts,
mixed : 2! 18,284 8,221 7,154 11,105 11,768 13,398
Potatoes, french :
fried : 2" 63,22.5 50,343 45,695 50,911 59,412 71,490
Spinach : 33,223 33,981 58,115 51,189 50,232 -7,338 41,209

All other
vegetables : 179,173 113,451 72,613 75,446 87,737 92,679 91,074

Total : 771,975 546,353 571,747 925,030 930,662 906,970 845,210

i/ Preliminary. 2/. Data not available.
Cold Storage report, USDA, AMS, issued monthly.








Table 9.--Canned vegetables: Commercial packs 1i6S and 1959 and canners' and wholesale
distributors' stocks 1958 and 1959, by commodities, United States

Pack : Stocks
Commodity : 158 Canners 1/ : ,iles3ie dlstrut.:rs
1 Date 1958 1959 Date 1958 1959


- 25 -


Major commodities
Beans, snap
Corn, sweet
Peas, green
Tomatoes
Tomato juice 2/

Total

Minor commodities
Asparagus
Beans, lima
Beets
Blackeye peas
Carrots
Okra 3/
Pickles
Pimientos
Pumpkin and squash
Sauerkraut
Potatoes
Sweetpotatoes
Spinach
Other greens
Tomato products:
Catsup and
chili sauce
Paste
Pulp and puree
Sauce
Vegetables, mixed

Total comparable
minor items

Grand total
comparable items


1,000
cases
24/2's

26,432
27,075
29,549
30,465
37,467


: 150,988


: 6,183
2,464
: 8,030
1,951
3,186
853
&:/24,262
493
: 3,535
:4/10,962
3,383
7,017
: 5,240
: 2,318


. 21,075
6/ll,,477
4,320
: 12,158
: 3. 463


1,000
cases
24/2's


25,338
33,810
25,674
24,126
31.116


140,064


5,811
2,692
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
4/22,794
n.a.
3,666
4/7,614
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.


19,258
6/8,520
3,525
9,448
n.a.


July
Dec.
Dec.
July
July


1,000
cases
24/2's

4,909
20,703
23,377
2,715
9.400


1,000
cases
24/2's

5,592
23,780
19,242
6,512
10.747


1,000
cases
24/2' s


July
Nov.
Nov.
July
July


16 106 65,873


Oct.
Aug.
July


3,558
581
2,,*3


July 1 1,284



July 1 1,047
Dec. 1 2/7,514


Mar. 1 1,806


July
July
July
July


5,835
7/1,632
7/1,070
7/1,458


3,698
471
2,651

1,266



865
_/5,169


1,104



7,043
1/2,899
7/1,067
71/3,764


2,484
3,509
3,226
2,652
2,349


1,000
cases
24/2's


2,571
3,207
3,547
2,901
2,742


14.220 14. 968


Apt. 1 614
July 1 477
July 1 1,043

July 1 418



July 1 388
Nov. 1 723


Apr. I 604


July
July
July
July


1,559
642
645
858


556
422
1,107

408



405
774


583



1,400
658
558
672


: 132,370 83,328 28,783 29.97 7971 7,54


: 283,358


223,392


89,887 95,870


22,191 22,511


/J Converted from actual cases to standard cases of 24 No. 2 cans.
2/ Includes combination vegetable juices containing at least 70 percent tomato juice.
/ Okra, okra and tomatoes, and okra, corn and tomatoes.
Crop for processing converted to a canned basis by applying an overall conversion factor (pickles 68
and sauerkraut 54 cases equivalent to 1 ton fresh).
/ Reported in barrels; converted to 24/2's by using 14 cases to the barrel.
S/ Estimated, basis California pack.
7/ California only.


n.a. not available.



Canners' stock and pack data from National Canners Association, unless otherwise noted. Wholesale
distributors' stock from United States Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census.


6 5L87


TVS-135


JANUARY 1960






TVS-135


- 26 -


JANUARY 1960


Table la--Potatoes: Acreage, yield per acre, and production, average 1949-57,
annual 1958 and 1959


Acreage Yield per acre Production
Seasonal Harvested
Group :__ Average: : Average:
: :- 1949-57 1 1958 1959 -1/ 19/4957. 1958 1959 I/
1: 9age: 1958 : 1959 :

: 1,000 1, 000 1,000 1,0CC 1,000 1,000
: acres acres acres Cwt. Cwt. Cwt. c'.t. cwt. cwt.

Winter : 26.3 34.5 2o.3 156.2 144.1 152.3 4,103 4,971 L.,005

Spring
Early : 24.8 31.2 2:.6 134.8 150.7 122.8 3,3'5 4,703 3,1,L
Late : 185. 16c..2 138.1 133.6 145.3 170.6 24,540 24,152 23,558

Summer
Early : 128.6 117.3 11.8 95.7 125.0 123.8 12,217 14,659 14,215
Late : 210.7 183.8 178. 158.5 186.7 184.3 33,052 34,308 32,916

Fall
8 Eastern 299. ') 288.5 271.0 206.8 228.0 215.7 61,884 65,788 58,453
9 Central : 327.9 303.3 C4 .b 117.6 142.0 132.5 38,408 43,785 40,34?
9 Western : 277.4 337.2 333.2 188.0 217.6 199.2 52,269 73,363 66,358
Total : 905.2 9.34.0 '8..B 168.Ci 15.9 181.7 152,561 182,9j6 16,160

United States :1,481.1 1,467.0 1,3'92.2 155.8 181.1 17L.5 229,829 265,729 242, }8

I/ Preliminary.


Table 11.--Sweetpotatoes: Acreage, yield per acre, and production,
average 1949-57, annual 1958 and 1959

Acreage Yield per acre Pr oduction
Region : :~ : : : :
Harvested
SAverage : 1 : Average 58 1959 1
A-a .1 : 1958 : 1959 : 19495: 58 1959
Average 1956. :1159- :-:): :-:

:1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
acres acres acres Ct. C. Ct. Cwt. cut. cwt. cwt.

Central
Atlantic 2/ : 38.1 39.7 -2.7 85 '95 3,224 3,761 3,822
Lower
Atlantic 3/ 102.5 56.6 60.5 5 64 66 5,365 3,614 L,002
South
Central _/ : 194.8 154.3 155.7 50 57 62 9,778 8,750 9,615
North
Central / : 3.5 3-2 3.2 55 74 78 192 238 250
California 11.7 12.0 13.0 70 85 78 817 1,020 1,01I

United States 352.9 2t,5.b 275.1 55.5 65.4 68.0 19,516 17,383 18,703

i/ Preliminary.


New Jersey, Maryland,


and Virginia.


North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida.
Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Texas.
Missouri and Kansas.


Annual summary, Crop Production, USDA, Aj"S, December 16, 1959.






- 27 -


JANUARY 1960


Table 12.--Potatoes: Price f.o.b. shipping points and wholesale price at New York
and Chicago, indicated periods, 1958, 1.,5 and 1960

Week ended

Variety State Unit 1 58-59 1959-60

Nov. 15:Dec. 13:Jan. 17:Nov. 14: Dec. 12:Jan. 16
Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol.
7.o.b.shppn


F. o. b. shipping
points

Katahdin, unwashed

Various varieties I/



Katahdin i/

Katahdin, unwashed

Russet Burbank 2/



Red McClure,
washed 3/
Katahdin, unwashed


:South Dearfield,:
:Massachusetts
:Rochester, New :
:York, (Western :
:and Central
:points)
:Presque Isle
:Maine, Aroostock:
:Pennsylvania
(Eastern points):
:Idaho Falls
:Upper Valley
:Twin Falls
:District
:San Luis Valley,:
:Colorado
:Benton Harbor,
:Michigan


U. S. No. 1 :
100 lb. sack :


S. No. 1 :
lb. sack
S. No. 1 :
lb. sack
S. No. 1
lb. sack


U. S. No. :
100 lb. sack
U. S. No. 1
100 lb. sack
U. S. No. 1
50 lb. sack


--- 1.35 1.35



.81 .82 .81 1


.66 .59

.85 .80



2.16 2.09

1.76 1.63

.81 .84


.56

.80 1



2.27 3

1.62 2

.81 1


--- 2.16 2.49



.39 1.36 1.42

.97 .96 1.14

.19 1.15 1.30



.15 3.39 4.26

.45 2.45 2.75

.27 1.27 1.32


Terminal Markets

New York

Katahdin, unwashed


Russets, washed


Tuesday nearest mid-month

1958-59 1959-60

Nov. 11 Dec. 16:Jan.13:Nov. 10 Dec. 15 Jan. 12
Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol.


4/:Long Island

:Idaho


Katahdin, unwashed 5_/:Maine

Chicago


Russets


:Idaho


S. No. 1
lb. sack
S. No. 1
lb. sack
S. No. 1
lb. sack


U. S. No. 1
100 lb. sack


1.00

2.26

1.08



3.55


.96 .95 1.40 1.38 1.53

2.24 2.25 2.60 2.75 3.20

1.12 1.12 1.50 1.53 1.63



3.35 3.60 4.50 5.00 5.60


1/ Mostly Katahdin.
/ 20-30 percent, 10 ounces and larger.
2 3/4 inch minimum.
5 Some Chippewas.
S2 inch minimum.



Weekly Summary of f.o.b. and terminal market prices, USDA, AMS, Market News reports. F.o.b. prices
are simple averages of the range of daily prices.


TVS-135







- 28 -


JANUARY Y 160


Table 13--Sweetpotatoes: Price f.o.b. shipping points and wholesale (l.c.l. sales) at
New York and Chicago, indicated periods, 1.:5,3, 155', and 1o60


Week ended


Item


F.o.b. shipping
points
Puerto Rican,
cured
Puerto Rican,
cured












Terminal markets
New Yori
Puerto Rican
Chicago
Puerto Rican,
cured


State : Unit

S[lo. 1

: Dol.



: :U.S. No. 1
:S.W. Louisiana:50 lb. crt..: 4.12
? :U.S. No. 2
:9.T. Louisiana:501b.crt. --








SDol.




:Ilorth Caro.lina:pu. bskt. : .14


:Louisiana :50 lb. crt.: ---


1;50-59 1: 959-00

5 :Dec. 13:Jan. 17 Ilov. ii :Dec. 12:Jan. 16

Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol.


3.74 3.55

2.05 1.92


3.08 2.88


--- 1.62 1.65


Tuesday nearest mid-month

1.-.:.^. i)5 -60

i Dec. 1,1 .Jan. 13. Nov. 1i .Dec. 15: Jan. 12
Dol. Do.], Dol. Dol. Dol.


4.77 .75 3.15


4.50 4.25


3.25 3.50


3.75 3.65


Weekly Suivmary of f.o.b. and termTinal prices, USDA, AISL, iart:et Niews reports. F.o.b. prices are
simple av.eraes cof the ranr;:e of' daily .rices.






Table 11--United States a'er:-e prices i'eceived by farmers per hundred-
..'eiht for important fili cr-ops, indicated periods, 1583 aid 1.'5.


Common ity


Potatoes
Sweetpotatoes
Beans, dry edible :
Peas, dry field :


Average 1.,'5, I <5'

A.ug. 1-C, JaL. 1,147-
ly. : Dec. 15 : Oct. 15 : 11ov. 15 : Dec. 15
July 14 Decol. 1ol. ol. ol. ol.
Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dal.


1.1-

3.37
:5.:i


2. 6


4. o6


1.17
.5)
6.70
5.80


1. 5;1
2.54
6.61
3.63


1.32
2. ol
7.21
3.-90


1.89
3.43
7.41
)1.23


Agricultural Prices, USDA, AMS, issued monthly.


TVS-135






JAnilIAPY 1~60


Table 15--Beans, dry, edible: Acreage, yield per acre, and production,
average 1 `'.-57, annual 1 *,; and 1 j


States
and classes


: Har'.'este.. acrea-ge
: Aver,'ge : : n :
- .. : :


Yield per acre


Average :
1 4 :


Production 2/


S..'e .C :
1 I -' .


: 1,000 1,0u' 1,000
: acres acres acres Pounds


Pounds Pounds


1,(. 1,000 1,000
La- .3 I s I'. s


Maine, Ilew York
and ".ichigan
Nebras'-a, Montana:
Idaho, Wyoming:
and Washington:
Colorado, New
Mexico,Arizona
and Utah
California:
Large lima
Baby lima
Other


301


319

72
46
1 )7


653


379


281

66
22
210


952 1,OC5 1,120 5,570 6,564


360 1,57T


241

60
24
183


1,640
1,624
1,201


1,7C3 1,653


735 715


1,b56
1,618
1.258


1,527
1,717
1,306


4,796 0,456


2,170 2,o64


1,171
72ti
2,375


1,612

2, u.2


Total California :


:67 i, L~l 1,yJ5


United States


: 1,521


1,611 1,477 1,113


1,i 1,233 16,804 19,175


Includes beans grown for seed.
Pas of 100 pounds, cleaned basis.


Table 16.--Beans, dry, edible: Production in selected
types, United States, annual 1958 and 1959


areas, by major


Michigan Idaho and Colorad ad New York California Total
Type -:
1958 : 1959 1958 159 1958 : 1959 1 : 1-59 1: 1- 1 159 i' 195

l,("' 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
bags -/ bags 3/ t.-s J/ bags 3/ ba s 3/ bags _/

Pea (Navy) :4,949 5,612 61 107 --- --- A 59 -- --- 5,101 5,778
Great
J.cretiern :-- --r 1,972 2,120 --- 10 -- -- --- --- 1, 2,130
Pinto : 13 13 2,801 2,531 2,062 1,712 -- 8 3 ,_. 4,259
Red Kidney : 106 121 23 31 1 --- 1,045 (23 204 179 1,379 951
Standard
lima --- --- ------ --- --- 1,093 916 1,C 916
Baby lima : --- --- --- --- -- --- --- -- 12 35r 412

varieties : 158 223 1,599 1,162 28 10 175 155 2,)i 2, 4,3' 3,763

Total :5,226 5, 9(J 6,456 5,951 2,C,.i 1,7-' 1,311 837 4,091 3,718 l), 1' 18,212


1 Includes Montana, Wyoming, Nebraska, and Washington.
2 Includes Maine, New Mexico, Arizona, and Utah.
Bags of 100 pounds, cleaned basis.



Crop Production annual summary, USDA, AMS, December 16, 1959.


6,32,


5,951


1,723

916
412
2,390


:,. .


18,212


.


TVS-135


- 29 -


,'. 11









Table 17.--Peas, dry field: Acreage, yield per acre, and production,
average 1948-57, annual 1958 and 1959 1_/


Harvested acreage


State


Minnesota

North Dakota

Montana

Idaho

Wyoming

Colorado

Washington

Oregon

California

United States


Average
1948-57

1,000
acres

4

4

6

93

5

10

140

11

8

281


: 1958
1,0


1,000
acres

3

3


Yield per acre


1959 Average
: 1948-57
1,000


1,000
acres

3

4


77 126


I---

12

101

7

1

204


7

146

12

2

300


Pounds

1,001

934

1,115

1,197

1,348

878

1,148

934

1,163

1,145


* 1958
*
*


Pounds

1,100

1,400



1,450



1,000

1,060

1,400

1,100

1,221


1959


Pounas

1,130

1,250



1,450



930

1,500

1,450

1,750

1,458


Production 2/

Average : 1958 : 1959
1948-57 :

1,000 1,000 1,000
bags bags bags

41 33 34

34 42 50


60

1,119

64

90

1,588

103

93

3,193


1,116



120

1,071

98

11

2,491


1,827



65

2,190

174

35

4,375


l/ In principal commercial producing States.
harvested dry.
2/ Bags of 100 pounds, cleaned basis.


Includes peas grownm for seed and cannery peas


Annual summary, Crop Production, USDA, AMS, December 16, 1959.


---





JANUARY 1960


Index of Special Features,
The Vegetable Situation, 1959


Issue
number r/


Feature


Trend to Smaller Retail, Larger Institutional
and Bulk Containers for Frozen Vegetables
(Discussion and Table) . . .

January 1 Frozen Vegetable Stocks (Chart) . .

United States-Canadian Fruit and
Vegetable Tariff Negotiations
(Discussion and Tables). . . .


Seasonal Variation in Supply of Fresh
Vegetables and Potatoes
(Discussion and Tables). . .

Potatoes: March 1 Intentions Compared
with Plantings, Late Summer and Fall
Crops (Chart) . .

The Market for Vegetables, Potatoes and
Sweetpotatoes in Public Schools (Discussion)

Trends in the Geographic Pattern of Production
of Vegetables for Commercial Processing
(Discussion, Tables and Charts) .

Production Estimates: Summer Potatoes,
Sweetpotatoes, Dry Beans, and Peas (Chart) .

Longer Term Outlook Bright for United States
Exports of Dry Beans and Peas (Discussion) .


131

131



132


132


132


133



133


133


134



134


134


Per Capita Consumptioan Series for Commercially
Produced Fresh and Processed Vegetables, Potatoes,
Sweetpotatoes, Dry Beans and Dry Peas (Tables) .

Index of Prices for Fresh Vegetables and
All Farm Products (Chart) . .


j/ Issues for 1959: 131 January; 132 April; 133 July; 134 October.


- 31 -


TVS-135


. .





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
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Washington 25, D. C. U 3 1262 09060 6962

OFFICIAL BUSINESS



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TVS-135 32 JANUARY 1960

LIST OF TABLES

Table Title Page

1 Vegetables and melons for fresh market: Commercial acreage, yield per acre, and production
of principal crops, selected seasons, average 1949-58, 1959 and indicated 1960 .................. 2
2 Vegetables and melons for fresh market: Commercial acreage, production, and season
average price per hundredweight received by farmers for principal crops, average 1949-57,
annual 1958 and 1959 ... ..................................................................................... 20
3 Truck Crops, potatoes and sweetpotatoes: Unloads at 38 markets, indicated periods
1959 and 1960 with comparisons ............................................ ........... 21
4 Vegetables, fresh: Representative wholesale prices (l.cl. sales) at New York and Chicago for
stock of generally good quality and condition (U. S; No. I when available) indicated periods,
1958, 1959 and 1960 ................................................................................................. 22
5 Vegetables, fresh: Average price received by farmers, per hundredweight, United States,
indicated periods, 1958 and 1959 .............................................................................. 23
6 Vegetables, commercial for fresh market: Index numbers (unadjusted) of prices received by
farmers, as of 15th of the month, United States by months, average 1935-39. average 1947-49,
and 1950 to date ........... o .................................................................................... 23
7 Vegetables for commercial processing: Acreage, production, and season average price per ton
received by farmers, average 1948-57, annual 1958 and 1959 ............................................... 24
8 Frozen vegetables: Cold-storage holdings, December 31, 1959, with comparisons ...................... 24
9 Canned vegetables: Commercial packs 1958 and 1959 and canners' and wholesale distributors'
stocks 1958 and 1959, by commodities, United States .......................................................... 25
10 Potatoes: Acreage, yield per acre, and production, average 1949-57, annual 1958 and 1959 .., ....... 26
11 Sweetpotatoes: Acreage, yield per acre and production, average 1949-57, annual 1958 and 1959 ..... 26
12 Potatoes: Price f.o.b. shipping points and wholesale price at New York and Chicago, indicated
periods, 1958, 1959 and 1960 ........................................... ........................ .................... 27
13 Sweetpotatoes: Price f.o.b. shipping points and wholesale (l.c.l. sales) at New York and Chicago,
indicated periods, 1958, 1959 and 1960 ......................................................................... 28
14 United States average prices received by farmers per hundredweight for important field crops,
indicated periods, 1958 and 1959 ..................................................................................... 28
15 Beans, dry, edible: Acreage, yield per acre, and production, average 1948-57,
annual, 1958 and 1959 ............................................................................................ ........... ..... 29
16 Beans, dry, edible: Production in selected areas, by major types, United States,
annual 1958 and 1959 ............... ..... ........................................................................ 29
17 Peas, dry field: Acreage, yield per acre, and production, average 1948-57, annual
1958 and 1959 .............................................................................................................. 30




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