Vegetable situation

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Title:
Vegetable situation
Physical Description:
213 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, Commodity Economics Division
Place of Publication:
Washington
Frequency:
quarterly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Vegetables -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Vegetable trade -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Vegetable trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
TVS-6 (June 1937) - TVS-218 (Nov. 1980).
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-TVS-218, Nov. 1980.
Issuing Body:
Vols. for 1937-Nov. 1953 issued by Bureau of Agricultural Economics; 1954-Jan. 1961, by Agricultural Marketing Service; Apr. 1961- by Economic Research Service; Feb. 1978- by Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service; Nov. 1980 by Economics and Statistics Service, each a subdivision of the United States Department of Agriculture; Nov. 1980 approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board.
General Note:
MONTHLY CATALOG NUMBER: gp 81007565

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 026013012
oclc - 08029461
lccn - 78643830
issn - 0042-3084
Classification:
lcc - HD9220.U5 U57a
ddc - 380.1/41/50973
System ID:
AA00013012:00004

Related Items

Preceded by:
Vegetable situation
Succeeded by:
Vegetable situation
Succeeded by:
Vegetable outlook & situation


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1960 OUTLOOK ISSUE
October 1959
FOR RELEASE
OCT. 30, P.M.


VEGETABLE

SITUATION


"ot


Supplies of fresh vegetables in
recent years have not kept pace with
population growth. Consumer demand
has been strong and prices of vege-
tables have been favorable relative
to all farm products. Prices in the
current year averaged about the same
as in 1958, but the seasonal pattern
ma~ different. Prices in winter and


early spring were materially below
the high levels of a year earlier,
when most tender vegetables were in
short supply as a result of adverse
weather in Florida. But supplies
in summer and fall were somewhat
lighter than a year ago, and prices
averaged significantly higher.


Published quarterly by
AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


76


TVS-134


PRICES FOR FRESH VEGETABLES
AND ALL FARM PRODUCTS
% OF 1910-14
300
Commercial vegetables & *
for fresh market* *\ os
200 -*-
All farm products*
100-- --*---------



1930 1940 1950 1960
*.INDEX NUMBERS OF PRICES RECEIVED BY FARMERS 1959 PARTLY ESTIMATED
U. S DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NEG. 3791-59 (10) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE


AMS




-2-


OCTOEIR 1959


LATE SUMMER AND FALL POTATOES


MIL. CWT.

300 ^

I/

2004




100
Production



0
1950 195
SSEPT.-MAR. U. S. AVERAGE PRICE
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


2 1954 1956


t PER CWT.


300



200

-t
#I -


100


IBER 15 PRICE
I I t 0
1958 1960


0 LATE SUMMER AND FALL CROPS COMBINED
NEG. 6471-59(9) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE


Potato growers typically receive considerably higher prices for moderate or small
crops of potatoes than for very large crops. Combined production of late summer and fall
potatoes was down 8 percent from last year.
Federal marketing agreements and orders, which restrict marketing of tablestock
potatoes to the better grades and preferred sizes, remain in effect in several major pro-
ducing areas. These orders assure consumers of better quality potatoes and increase
returns to growers. Prices into early spring are expected to continue substantially above
the low levels of a year earlier.


'.
,r
r
.me
p'


TVS-134


4





TVS-134 3 OCTOBER 1959


THE VEGETABLE SITUATION


Approved by the Outlook and Situation Board, October 26, 1959


CONTENTS

SPage Page :

SSummary .................... 3 Potatoes ..................... 15
: Commercial Vegetables for Sweetpotatoes ................ 17
: Fresh Market .............. 4 Dry Edible Beans ............. 19
: Vegetables for Commercial Dry Field Peas ............. 21
: Processing ............... 10 Cutlook for Vegetables
: Canned Vegetables .......... 10 At Retail ................ 23
: Frozen Vegetables .......... 14 List of Tables ............. 47
Special Article

: Longer Term Outlook Bright for United States Exports of Dry Beans
: and Peas .............. ........................... 25



SUMMARY

Supplies of vegetables available for fresh market sale this fall are
materially smaller than either last fall or the 1949-57 average. Among the
more important items, reductions from last fall are greatest for cabbage,
carrots and lettuce, but, except for cucumbers and eggplant, other items are
also down. During the next 6 to 8 weeks prices received by growers of fresh
market vegetables are expected to average materially above those of a year
earlier, and retail prices at least moderately higher. Larger available sup-
plies of dry onions probably will hold onion prices this fall below the
moderate levels of last fall, and winter prices much below the high levels of
a year earlier.

Continued large supplies of both canned and frozen vegetables are in
prospect into mid-1960. Prices of individual items compared with a year ago
will vary, depending largely on relative supply and quality. With ample to
heavy supplies of most items assured, however, wholesale prices in the first
half of 1960 are likely to average the same to slightly above those of a year
earlier, with retail prices slightly to moderately higher.

Supplies of potatoes available for fall and winter markets are somewhat
smaller than the burdensome supplies of a year ago. As in 1958, a large part
of the fall crop is again covered by marketing agreements and orders, which
restrict movement of tablestock potatoes to the better grades and preferred
sizes. Prices received by growers during the next 4 to 5 months are expected
to average materially above the low levels of a year earlier.





OCTOBER 1959


Total production of sweetpotatoes is slightly larger than last year,
and most of the increase is in States that have adequate storage facilities.
This means that supplies available for market during the winter and spring of
1960 probably will be a little larger than in the previous season. Prices to
growers are expected to average near the moderate levels of a year earlier.

Total supplies of dry edible beans remain large. The quantity of
colored beans is materially below a year ago, and appear to be in tight supply.
But total supplies of white beans are very heavy. Prices of colored beans may
average above those of last season. But with larger overall supplies of white
classes and lower support rates, prices to growers for white beans are expected
to average substantially lower this season than last.

Supplies of dry peas are about a third larger than the light supplies
of a year ago, and about a tenth above the 1949-57 average. Supplies are more
than ample to meet domestic and anticipated export demands. Prices received
by growers are likely to continue at fairly low levels, and substantially
below those of last season.

COMMERCIAL VEGETABLES FOR FRESH MARKET

Outlook for 1960

Consumer demand for vegetables in 1960 is expected to continue strong.
Thus, prices received by farmers for fresh market vegetables in 1960 compared
with 1959 will depend largely on the volume produced, and the seasonal pattern
of marketing. Assuming fairly normal weather in 1960, supplies of vegetables
in the first half of the year may be about in line with those of a year ear-
lier. But supplies in the fall may be larger.

Supplies of vegetables available for fresh market this fall are sub-
stantially smaller than either last fall or the 1949-57 average. October 1
estimates on crops that account for over 95 percent of total fall production
indicate an output about 12 percent smaller than last year and 8 percent below
average. Production prospects in Florida may have been further lowered by
heavy rains accompanying hurricane Judith. Based on the October 1 reports-for
important items, materially smaller crops are in prospect for early fall
tomatoes and fall snap beans, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce and sweet
corn. Supplies of celery promise to be about the same this fall as last, and
supplies of cucumbers somewhat larger, If supplies of fresh vegetables are
about in line with current indications, prices received by growers during the
next 6 to 8 weeks probably will average materially sbove those of a year
earlier. Prices at retail likely will be moderately to substantially above
those of last fall.


TVS-134





TVS-134 5 OCTOBER 1959

More dry onions are available for fall and winter markets this year than
either last year or than on the average in the 9 years 1949-57. The late summer
crop of 18.2 million hundredweight was about a tenth larger than last year.

Little information is available on acreage or probable production of
vegetables in 1960. Early reports point to slightly larger acreage of winter
artichokes, a substantially larger acreage of cabbage, substantially smaller
acreages of kale and shallots, and a slightly larger acreage of early spring
onions. The Department's acreage-marketing guide for winter vegetables,
released in August, recommended 3 percent less acreage and 2 percent larger
output of winter vegetables than in 1959. The guide for fresh spring vegetables
will be released in November.

Foreign Trade

Our annual exports of fresh vegetables are relatively small, typically
amounting to less than 4 percent of domestic production. However, exports
of a number of items are important to certain areas. Cabbage, carrots, celery,
lettuce, melons, onions and tomatoes are the main items exported, with the
bulk of exports going to Canada. U. S. exports of fresh vegetables and melons
in January-July 1959 amounted to 557 million pounds, 7 percent more than in the
corresponding months of 1958. Canadian demand is expected to continue strong
and exports to that country this winter and spring probably will be a little
larger than those of a year earlier. There has been a serious drought this
season in Northern Europe and several countries have liberalized trade restric-
tions or temporarily removed import duties on vegetables. However, because
of the distance and the transportation and distribution problems involved this
is likely to result in very little increase in U. S. exports of fresh vegetables.
It is likely to result in some increase in exports of canned and frozen
vegetables.

Imports of fresh vegetables are relatively light, typically amounting
to only 2 to 3 percent of annual supplies. However, for some items imports in
winter and spring account for a substantial portion of consumption. Cucumbers,
peppers,tomatoes, turnips and melons make up a large percentage of our imports,
most of which originate in Mexico and Cuba. Imports in the first 7 months of
1959 amounted to 553 million pounds. This was only slightly below the high
level of 1958 when domestic crops were severely damaged and delayed by cold,
wet weather.

Early reports indicated that production of winter vegetables in Mexico
may be about the same as last winter. There is an abundant supply of irriga-
tion water on the West Coast. Acreage of ground tomatoes probably will be
down. But an expected increase in acreage of staked tomatoes, which have
relatively high yields per acre, may result in a larger total production.
Prospects favor some increase in the relatively small acreages of green beans,
squash and cucumbers. Production of cantaloups and watermelons may show some
decline because of disease problems. Owing to continued political unrest in
Cuba, both production and exports of fresh vegetables are expected to be
below those of last season.





OCTOBER 1959


U. S. imports of fresh vegetables this winter and spring will depend
not only on the quantity and quality of export crops produced in Mexico and
Cuba, but also on domestic production and prices. Prospects are that less
cucumbers, most of which come from Cuba, will be available for import into the
U. S. Also, less melons may be available. But the total quantity of tomatoes
available for import may be the same as a year earlier, or even larger, and
miscellaneous items for shipment in mixed loads probably will be larger.

Outlook for Major
Fresh Vegetables

Cabbage. Supplies of cabbage available for fresh market are substantially
smaller this fall than last and much smaller than the 1949-57 average. Over-
all acreage of the important early fall crop was down moderately from 1958, and
yields in the East and Midwest were materially below the high levels of last
year. Estimated production, including production for processing, is down a
fourth from a year ago. Subtracting estimated tonnage on contract acreage for
kraut would leave about a third less cabbage than last fall for open market sale
to canners and fresh market buyers. Tonnage of late fall cabbage, which makes
up only about 5 percent of the total fall tonnage, is expected to be about a
tenth larger than last year.

Unlike the fall situation, supplies of cabbage this winter probably
will be significantly larger than either last winter or the recent 10-year
average. Carryover of fall crop cabbage for winter markets is expected to be
down sharply from a year earlier. But winter production, which furnishes the
great bulk of winter supplies, is likely to be quite heavy. Growers in early
September reported intentions to plant 16 percent more acreage to winter
cabbage than last year. Since yields in Florida were below average last winter,
production is likely to be up as much or moderately more than the increase in
acreage.

Cabbage marketing are expected to be relatively light during the next
few weeks, and both prices received by growers and retail prices are expected
to average materially above those of a year earlier. If the expected large
winter crop materializes, prices this winter probably will average below those
of last season.

Onions. Supply of dry onions available for fall and winter markets is materially
larger than either a year earlier or the 1949-57 average. Onions for fall and
winter consumption come from storage holdings of the late summer crop. Largely
as a result of increased acreage, indicated production of 18.2 million hundred-
weight is about a tenth larger than either 1958 or average. Early reports
indicate generally smaller sizes than last year in a number of areas. Among
the more important States, production is up substantially in New York, Michigan,
Idaho and California, and up moderately in Colorado.


TVS-134


- 6 -





OCTOBER 1959


These larger supplies are exerting pressure on markets. Prices received
by farmers during the first half of September averaged $1.90 per hundredweight
compared with $2.40 for the same weeks of 1958. The Idaho-East Oregon produc-
ing area is operating under a marketing agreement and order program that
requires all medium size onions moving to fresh market to be U. S. No. 1
quality. Because of larger overall supplies, prices into late winter are
expected to remain at moderate to low levels. Prices this fall are likely to
average significantly below those of last fall, with prices this winter much
below the high levels of last winter. A good deal of the price strength for
storage onions last winter resulted from the fact that supplies had to be
extended into the spring because of a seriously delayed and relatively small
early spring crop.

Intentions reports in early October indicated that growers in Texas
plan to plant about 33,500 acres of'onions for early spring harvest. This is
3 percent more acreage than was harvested from the early spring crop last year,
but 6 percent below the 1949-57 average. Much of the increase over last year
is in irrigated areas where yields are relatively high. Subsoil moisture in
nonirrigated Coastal Bend area is adequate.

First production estimate by the Crop Reporting Board is not available
until March 10. But, if growers plant close to the intended acreage and have
near normal weather, production will be considerably larger than last year.
Barring extremely adverse weather, volume movement of the crop is likely to
be several weeks ahead of last year, and prices into mid-spring much below the
high levels of a year earlier.

Carrots. Supplies of carrots for fall harvest are materially smaller than the
heavy supplies of last fall and moderately below the 1949-57 average. Output
for early fall harvest is estimated at 4.4 million hundredweight, 14 percent
less than last year. Large quantities of the early fall crop go to processors.
Prospective production for late fall harvest is down 2.0 million hundredweight
compared with 2.4 million a year ago.

The smaller supplies available in producing areas in recent weeks have
resulted in higher prices than a year earlier. F.o.b. prices in the Salinas-
Watsonville District of California in the week ended October 17 averaged
$2.90 per crate of 48 1-pound bags compared with $2.50 for the corresponding
week of last year. Since supplies in the next few weeks are expected to
remain relatively light, prices are likely to continue substantially above
the low levels of a year earlier.

Io information is available on the probable size of the winter crop.
The Department's acreage-marketing guide, released in August, recommended the
same acreage and production as last winter.

Celery. About the same quantity of celery probably will be available this
fall as last. Indicated production of 667,000 hundredweight for early fall
harvest is 14 percent less than last year. Yield prospects in Michigan, which


TVS-134


- 7 -





OCTOBER 1959


produces more than half the crop, were reduced substantially by adverse weather
during August and September. Estimated output of the California late fall crop
is 2.8 million hundredweight, slightly more than last year.

During late September-early October unloads of celery at the 38 cities
were somewhat lighter than a year earlier and prices averaged considerably
higher. However, with increased harvesting of late fall celery,. marketing and
prices during the next 4 to 6 weeks probably will average near those of a
year earlier.

Acreage and production estimates are not available on celery for winter
harvest. The 1959 crop waa record large. Prices received by growers were
extremely low, and about a fifth of the Florida crop was not marketed. The
Department's 1960 acreage-marketing guide suggests reductions of 20 percent in
winter acreage in.Florida, and 5 percent in Arizona and California. Since
Florida has the largest acreage this would mean an overall cut of 14 percent.
Reports of monthly plantings in Florida through September 30 indicated that
early season plantings in that State were running about a tenth below those
of last year. Typically about a third of the Florida acreage is in by the end
of September. Harvest of the Florida crop typically begins in mid-or late-
November, with January through March the most active period.

Lettuce. Supplies of lettuce available in early fall have been substantially
smaller than a year earlier and much below the 1949-57 average. Prices have
been relatively high, averaging much above those of a year earlier. Most of
the reduction in supply from 1958 was the result of a sharp acreage cut in
California which produces about four-fifths of the total crop. Also, quality
was generally poor in the Central Coast districts.

Output from the late fall crop in Arizona, now moving to market in volume,i
is near the large output of last year. Acreage is down 15 percent, but indicated
yield is above last year. Remaining supplies of fall crop lettuce appear to be
moderately smaller than those of a year ago. Prices during the next 4 to 6
weeks are likely to average moderately to substantially above those of a year
earlier.

No information is available on probable acreage and production of lettuce
for winter harvest. The Department's acreage-marketing guide recommends 25 per-
cent more acreage in Texas than in 1959, 10 percent less acreage in California
and no change in other States. This would give an overall acreage cut of 5 per-
cent, and with average yields about the same production as in 1959.

Tomatoes. Indicated production of early fall tomatoes in California is 3.1
million hundredweight, 8 percent less than last year, but 6 percent above the
1949-57 average. The reduction from 1958 is largely the result of lower yields.
During late September and early October, marketing appear to have been lighter
than those of a year earlier; prices have been higher.


TVS-134


- 8 -





OCTOBER 1959


Acreage for late fall harvest is 8 percent larger than last year, with
a substantial increase in Florida and a moderate increase in Texas. However,
production prospects in Florida are not too good. Weather was hot and humid
during the early part of the season, and more recently the crop has been
damaged by the heavy rains accompanying hurricane Judith. For the first time
in several years the Florida industry east and south of the Suwanee River is
operating without regulations under a marketing agreement and order program.
This will tend to relax quality and maturity standards somewhat, and will
increase the part of the crop that may move into inter-state trade.

Estimates are not yet available on total acreage and probable produc-
tion of the Florida winter crop, but given average weather, it appears likely
they will be somewhat above 1958. The Department's acreage-marketing guide
suggests about a sixth more acreage and production than last year. Although
political unrest in Cuba may result in less tomatoes available for import
from that country, ample quantities again are expected to be available from
the West Coast of Mexico. The level of U. S. prices and the timing of harvest
in Mexico will have an important bearing on quantities imported.

The Longer Outlook

Rate of population growth and real income are the two main measurable
factors expected to influence the aggregate demand for vegetables in the next
few years. Calculations for the longer outlook are based on assumed rates of
population growth made by the Bureau of the Census. These would result in a
population of 195 million to 197 million by 1965. Real income per person is
also likely to continue an uptrend, and in the mid-1960's is expected to be
moderately to substantially above current levels. Rising income probably will
not result in any increase in total vegetable consumption per person. But it
will influence the relative demand and rate of consumption for individual
items, and for vegetables in different forms. Technological developments,
nutritional findings and education, and changes in modes of living--factors
that do not lend themselves to precise statatistical measurement--will also
influence demand.

Since about 1950 the use of vegetables per person (fresh equivalent)
has remained fairly stable at about 200 pounds. This total is not expected
to change much by the mid-1960's. During the past decade, however, the
importance of processed items has increased and that of fresh items has
declined. This trend is likely to continue, but perhaps at a slower rate.
Although a further moderate decline in use of fresh vegetables per person is
in prospect in the years ahead, total requirements will continue to increase
because of the growth in population. Total production of vegetables for
fresh market in the mid-1960's is likely to be at least moderately above
1957-59 levels.


TVS-134


- 9 -





OCTOBER 1959


VEGETABLES FOR COMMERCIAL PROCESSING

Outlook for 1960

Processed vegetables are again in heavy supply. Overall quantity of
canned vegetables available for distribution in mid-1960 is near the heavy
supply of a year earlier, and materially above the 1949-57 average. The pack
probably was moderately smaller in 1959 than 1958. But the reduction in pack
was about offset by larger beginning stocks. Supplies of frozen vegetables
are near record levels. Prices of individual canned and frozen items compar-
ed with a year earlier will vary, depending largely on relative supply. With
ample to heavy supplies of most items available, wholesale prices in winter
and spring are expected to average the same to slightly above those of a year
earlier, and retail prices slightly to moderately higher.

During the past 3 years, aggregate supplies of processed vegetables
have been generally heavy, and carryover stocks large at the end of each sea-
son. These larger-than-needed supplies have kept pressure on markets, and
many canners have been caught in a serious cost-price squeeze. Assuming near
normal yields, a moderate cut in acreage probably will be needed in 1960 to
bring supplies into balance with anticipated trade needs. Department acreage-
marketing guides for processed vegetables will be issued in early 1960.


1959 Production for Processing
Moderately Below That of 1958

Total tonnage of vegetables for processing promises to be moderately
smaller than last year, though somewhat above the 1949-57 average. Acreage
of 8 important vegetables for processing was down only slightly. But the
16 percent cut in acreage of tomatoes, a crop with relatively high yield per
acre, probably will reduce overall average yield. Production estimates are
not yet available for asparagus, cucumbers, fall spinach or open market pur-
chases of cabbage for sauerkraut. The expected reduction in tonnage compared
with last year is largely the result of 5 percent less green peas and 17 per-
cent less tomatoes.


Canned Vegetables

Outlook for 1960. Total supplies of canned vegetables available in the
1959-60 marketing season are expected to be close to the large supplies of
last season. The pack of canned vegetables promises to be down moderately
from last year, but this is about offset by materially larger stocks at the
beginning of the current season. Mid-year packer and distributor stocks of
6 important canned vegetables--snap beans, sweet corn, green peas, tomatoes,
tomato juice and sauerkraut--amounted to 52 million cases, 24/2 equivalents.
This was 12 percent larger than in mid-1958 and about 40 percent more than


TVS-134


- 10 -





OCTOBER 1959


the 1949-57 average. Limited data also indicate that mid-year stocks of all
other vegetables as a group were larger than a year earlier. Carryover stocks
at the beginning of the season, together with prospective production for pro-
cessing, probably mean slightly to moderately more snap beans this season
than last, and substantially more sweet corn. Supplies of green peas are
down moderately. Total supplies of tomatoes, tomato juice and tomato products
will be somewhat below the high levels of last season, but most of the reduc-
tion may be in tomato products.

Distributor demand for canned vegetables was slow during the early
part of the 1959-60 season, with prices generally weak. Some items have firm-
ed up in recent weeks as early season "special offers" have been withdrawn.
Prices of a large number of items are expected to advance moderately into
winter and spring, as distributor demand becomes more active. F.o.b. prices
in the first half of 1960 are expected to average the same to slightly higher
than those of a year earlier. Retail prices are likely to average slightly
to moderately above those of last winter and spring.

Canned Snap Beans. Supplies of canned snap beans in the current season
promise to be record high. Combined canner and distributor stocks on July 1
were substantially above those of a year earlier. Also, total production for
processing, about three fourths of which is canned, is up 6 percent. Produc-
tion is down moderately in the South Atlantic States, but is substantially
larger in the Midwest and South Central States, and slightly to moderately
larger in the Northeast and the West. Production estimates, together with
earlier acreage intentions of canners and freezers, suggest a moderately large-
er canned pack than last year.

Thus, another season of heavy snap bean supplies seems assured. Large
supplies of most other canned and frozen vegetables will continue to offer
stiff competition for the consumers' dollar. Early season cannery prices of
most grades and styles of snap beans in the East and Midwest have been moder-
ately below those of a year ago. However, some recent low prices have been
withdrawn, and prospects are for some firming up of this market. Both f.o.b.
and retail prices in the first half of 1960 probably will average close to
those of last season. A broad market and continued heavy promotional effort
this season are likely to result in record or near-record disappearance.

Sweet Corn. Combined canner and distributor stocks of sweet corn at the
beginning of the current season were much smaller than those of a year earlier
and most other recent years. But both acreage of corn for processing and
indicated yield were up materially from 1958. Estimated production, 80 to
85 percent of which typically goes into canning, is about a fourth larger
than last year. Production is down moderately in the Northeast and down
slightly in Delaware-Maryland, but is up a third in the important Midwest
area and up almost a fifth in the West. Earlier acreage intentions of canners
and freezers suggest an increase in the canned pack about in line with the


- 11 -


TVS-134





OCTOBER 1959


overall increase in tonnage. Despite smaller beginning stocks, a pack of
this size would result in supplies about an eighth larger than last season,
and at least moderately above average.

Trade reports indicate relatively light supplies of fancy corn in the
Midwest with extremely heavy holdings of lower grades. Early season cannery
prices of whole kernel corn in the East and Midwest have been moderately to
substantially below those of a year earlier, while cream style has been
about the same as in the early part of last season. Disappearance of canned
corn in the current season may be a little larger than in 1958-59. Prices
received by canners for the 1959 pack, particularly for the lower grades, are
expected to average somewhat lower than those of a year earlier. Prices at
retail also may average a little lower.

Green Peas. Supplies of canned green peas in the current season are moder-
ately below the near record supplies of the previous two seasons, but about
8 percent above the 1949-57 average. June 1 carryover stocks at 12.0 million
cases, 24/2 equivalents, were about a million cases more than a year earlier.
But this years' pack, at 25.7 million cases, 24/2 equivalents, was almost
4 million cases smaller than last year. The pack was down sharply in the East
and Midwest, but about a tenth larger in the West. The total pack of early
June and sweets were both about an eighth smaller than last year. Overall
quality of the pack was somewhat lower than last season. The pack of fancy
grade peas, at roughly 14 million cases, 24/2 equivalents, was down 18 percent
from 1958 while the combined pack of extra standard and standard grades was
down only 7 percent.

Partly as a result of the heavy carryover that many canners worked to
move ahead of volume shipments of new pack, price concessions in the early
part of the season were widespread. F.o.b. prices have been at very low levels,
averaging moderately below those of a year earlier. However, prices probably
have seen their low for the season--most grades and sizes are expected to show
moderate to substantial advances. During the remainder of the season, both
f.o.b. and retail prices of higher grade peas are likely to average moderately
above the low levels of a year earlier. Nevertheless, consumers will still
find general shelf prices of peas attractive, and rate of disappearance
probably will be near that of last season.

Tomatoes. Indications are that tomatoes, tomato juice and most tomato products
will remain in heavy supply into mid-1960. Production of tomatoes for process-
ing in 1959 was down 17 percent from 1958, and the pack of each tomato item
probably will be moderately to substantially smaller than last year. But
combined stocks of tomatoes, tomato juice and tomato products on July 1, 1959
amounted to 42 million cases, 24/2 equivalents, 10 million cases more than a
year earlier. These substantially larger stocks at the beginning of the season
offset most of the expected reduction in pack. Thus, supplies of some items,
particularly tomatoes and tomato juice, are likely to be near the high levels
of last season. Although probable supplies of most other tomato products
are less than supplies of a year earlier, they are above most other recent years.


TVS-134


- 12 -







Disappearance of tomatoes and tomato products remained at a high level
in the 1958-59 season, with tomato juice, and catsup and chili sauce showing
record movement. With heavy supplies again available, movement of tomatoes
and tomato products into consumption is expected to continue at a high level.
The large carryover stocks of tomatoes and most tomato products, together
with cull distributor demand, has depressed markets. During the early part
of the season, f.o.b. prices for tomatoes, tomato juice, catsup, and paste
averaged moderately below those of a year earlier. However, the seasonal
price lows probably are past, and for most items moderate advances appear
likely. F.o.b. prices of tomatoes, and most tomato products in the first
half of 1960 are expected to average the same to slightly above those of a
year earlier. Retail prices are likely to be slightly to moderately above
those of last season.

Sauerkraut. Production of cabbage for kraut on acreage owned or controlled
by packers was estimated, on October 1, at 116,600 tons, 7 percent less than
last year. Hot, dry weather during September materially lowered prospects.
Acreage for harvest is larger than last year. Substantial declines in tonnage
from 1958 in Ohio, Indiana, and Wisconsin more than offset a moderate increase
in New York and a substantial increase in other States as a group.

These estimates do not include open market purchases of cabbage for
kraut, which typically make up 40 to 50 percent of total packer requirements
and come largely from the early fall crop. Indicated production of cabbage
for open market sale this fall appears to be substantially smaller than last
year, and prices are expected to be materially higher. Under these conditions
packers may take less open market cabbage for kraut than last season. The
supply of sauerkraut available into mid-1960 may be moderately smaller than
last season. Heavy pork supplies this fall and winter are likely to stimulate
the demand for kraut. F.o.b. and retail prices for the season probably will
average at least moderately above those of last season.

Cucumbers for Pickles. The Crop Reporting Board's first estimate of produc-
tion of cucumbers for pickles is not available until November 10. However,
trade reports indicate that tonnage is likely to be at least as large as last
year. Total acreage planted was down 12 percent from 1958, with cuts in all
important States except California, which reported a 7 percent increase. But
yields in the Midwest may be substantially above those of last year according
to present indications.

Other Canned Vegetables. Supplies of canned green lima beans probably are
moderately larger than last season, though substantially below the 1949-57 av-
erage. As consumption of this item has declined in recent years, indicated
supplies are fully ample. Larger supplies are expected this season than last,
because of a larger estimated pack, as beginning stocks were smaller. Produc-
tion of limas for processing is only slightly larger than last year. But the
substantial increase in production in Michigan and Wisconsin, States in which
most of the crop is canned, together with the slower-than-year-earlier build-
up of frozen stocks, suggests a larger canned pack.


OCTOBER 1959


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OCTOBER 1959


Supplies of canned spinach promises to be somewhat larger than a year
earlier, and substantially above the 1949-57 average. Stocks at the begin-
ning of the current season were materially smaller than a year earlier, but
production of winter and spring spinach for processing was up sharply. These
crops make up about three-fourths of total annual tonnage. Estimates of fall
acreage and production for processing will be available November 10.

Reports in early October indicate slightly to moderately smaller
supplies of canned beets this season than last. Canned supplies in each of
the last 3 seasons have been around 12 million cases, 24/2 equivalents, 10 to
15 percent above the 1949-57 average.
Frozen Vegetables
Supplies of frozen vegetables are near record levels, continuing the
growth of recent years. Total stocks of frozen items at the beginning of the
current season were somewhat larger than those of a year earlier, and the
1959 pack probably was up.

Although total pack figures are not available for 1959, there are in-
dications that the pack will be slightly to moderately larger than last year.
The 1959 pack of frozen asparagus amounted to 32.6 million pounds, about
8 million pounds more than that of last year. The spring pack of spinach was
much larger than that of a year earlier, almost 95 million pounds compared
with 61 million pounds for the previous spring. Pack of frozen green peas,
at 305 million pounds, was almost 53 million pounds larger than the 1958 pack.
More potato products likely will be frozen this year, continuing the marked
growth of these items.

Stocks of frozen vegetables on October 1 amounted to 915 million pounds,
98 million pounds above the 1954-58 average, and 54 million pounds more than
last year. Most of the pack occurs before October, so peak supplies for the
season also will likely show a gain over last year.

Consumer demand for frozen vegetables remains strong, and disappearance
per person continues at or near record levels. Most items are in ample to
heavy supply, and continue to compete with the large supply of canned vege-
tables. Overall retail prices of frozen items during the remainder of the
season are likely to average the same to a little above those of a yearearlier.
The Longer Outlook
During the last decade use of commercially processed vegetables per
person has increased substantially. The increase about offset a decline in
use of fresh and home-processed vegetables. With advancing processing
technology and increased emphasis on easy-to-prepare and ready-prepared foods,
processing is expected to continue to gain in importance. Into the mid-1960's,
production of vegetables for processing probably will grow at a little faster
rate than population. Fastest rate of growth is expected to occur in the
frozen component, with most items showing moderate to substantial gains.
Canned items too, are likely to show a slight increase in rate of consumption
compared with the 1957-59 average.


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POTATOES

Supply Down Somewhat
From Last Year, Smaller
Acreage Intended For Winter Crop

The outlook for potato prices during the next several months is con-
siderably better, from the standpoint of growers, than the vary unfavorable
situation of a year earlier. Acreages in both the late summer and fall States
were down slightly from 1958. Also, weather in the fall States was a little
less favorable and yields averaged moderately below last year's record. As a
result, combined production of late summer and fall potatoes amounted to 200
million hundredweight, 8 percent less than the large crop of 1958. But
production is moderately above both the 1949-57 average and the Department's
acreage-marketing guide recommendation.

Early indications also point to less winter crop potatoes. Growers in
Florida and California, in early September, reported intentions to plant a
sixth less acreage than last year. Intended acreage was down 20 percent in
Florida and 13 percent in California. Yields in both California and Florida
may be above last winter when crops suffered more than the usual weather damage.
If farmers plant close to the intended acreage, yields near the average of recent
years would result in production at least moderately below last year and sub-
stantially below average. Winter production, of course, is relatively small
compared with consumption in that season.

Geographic Distribution
of Fall Crop About
Same as Last Year

Indicated total production of fall potatoes is down about 9 percent from
1958. Production is down in all areas. The proportion of total production in
each of the major regions remained close to that of last year, but reflected
substantial shifts from a few years ago. About 35 percent of the 1959
production is in the 8 Eastern States compared with an average of 41 percent in
the 1949-57 period. The 9 Central States produced 25 percent of the 1959 crop,
about in line with the 9-year average. But production in the West reflected
the growing importance of this area during the last few years. The 9 Western
States accounted for 40 percent of the fall crop in 1959, the same as last year,
but well above the average of 34 percent.

Indicated production of fall crop potatoes in the Eastern States of 59.1
million hundredweight is 10 percent below last year. In Maine, which accounts
for about 60 percent of the Eastern total, acreage was down only slightly, and
production down moderately. But acreage was down 12 percent in New York and 6
percent in Pennsylvania. Yields were also lower in both States--in New York
production was down more than a fifth, in Pennsylvania almost a tenth.


- 15 -


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OCTOBER 1959





OCTOBER 1959


Production in the Central States, at 41.5 million hundredweight, is 5
percent less than last year. Most of the reduction resulted from a smaller
acreage and lower yields in North Dakota. Yield and production were down
moderately in Michigan.

Indicated production of 66.5 million hundredweight in the Western States
is 9 percent less than last year. Although down moderately from last year,
production in Idaho again exceeded that in any other State. Among the other
States in the West, Washington had a little larger production than last year,
Montana slightly less, and California, Colorado, Oregon, Nevada, Utah and
Wyoming materially less.

Foreign Trade

This country's foreign trade in potatoes, conducted mostly kith Canada,
is quite small compared with domestic production. Exports are typically
considerably larger than imports. Our foreign trade generally has little
overall effect on domestic markets, but it is important to certain areas.
In the period July 1958 through June 1959 exports and shipments amounted to
about 4.0 million hundredweight, compared with 2.9 million the previous season.
There were substantial increases in exports to Canada, and in shipments to
Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Heavy supplies and low prices throughout
most of the period discouraged U. S. imports. Total U. S. imports for both
seed and tablestock for the crop year ended June 30 amounted to less than 1
million hundredweight.

Although materially below those of a year ago, potatoes in this country
are in fairly heavy supply. Also, prospective production in Canada at 34.5
million hundredweight, is down 14 percent from last year and 12 percent below
the 1949-57 average. Canada extended the tariff period recently and this may
tend to discourage somewhat our exports to that country. Effective April 11,
1958 the Canadian Government eliminated the January 1 to June 14 duty-free
entry period previously in effect for new potatoes. The duty of 372 cent per
hundredweight that previously was in effect for old crop potatoes from
January 1 to June 14, and for all potatoes from June 15 to December 31, was
extended to cover imports of all potatoes throughout the year. Nevertheless,
with substantially smaller Canadian supplies, U. S. exports in the current
season probably will be larger than in 1958-59. Imports into the U. S. are
expected to remain relatively light.

Marketing Orders Cover
Large Part of Fall Production

This season, as during the past several seasons, marketing agreements
and orders are in effect in a number of the major producing areas. The orders
impose certain size, quality, and maturity restrictions relating to the market-
ing of potatoes produced in areas covered. The orders generally promote more
orderly marketing of better quality potatoes, and increase returns to the
growers. Federal marketing orders for potatoes are now in operation in Maine,
the Red River Valley of Minnesota and N6rth Dakota, Colorado, Idaho, Washington,
Oregon, and the counties of Modoc and Siskiyou in Northern California.


TVS-134





OCTOBER 1959


Based on the indicated size and distribution of the 1959 fall crop, about 70
percent of production is in areas covered by Federal marketing agreements and
orders. A few additional areas operate under State marketing agreements and
orders.

Prices This Fall and Winter
Likely To Be Above A
Year Earlier

Production of late summer and fall potatoes was down 8 percent from last
year when burdensome supplies resulted in seriously depressed markets. However,
supplies are still above the 1949-57 average, and somewhat larger than suggested
in the Department's acreage-marketing guide. As last season, grade and size
regulations in effect in many important producing areas will tend to reduce the
supply of potatoes available for food. The lighter winter crop in prospect and
on expected active export demand will also help to ease the pressure on markets.
Thus, prices for fall and winter potatoes probably will average materially
above the low levels of a year earlier.

The Longer Outlook

Introduction and improvement of processed items, together with increased
merchandising effort, in recent years has slowed and may have halted, at least
for a while, the long-time downtrend in per capital consumption of potatoes.
However, with the prospect of higher consumer incomes and less emphasis on
cheaper foods, increased competition from other foods, and some tendency of
consumers to move away from most starchy-type foods, potatoes will be hard put
to maintain their current position. Because of a larger population, total
consumption of food in 1965 is expected to be at least moderately above current
levels. Since potato supplies have been larger than needed in most recent
years, little or no increase in production from the 1957-59 level would be
required to meet the larger anticipated total demand.

SWEETPOTATOES

1959 Crop Slightly
Larger Than Last Year

Production of 1959 crop sweetpotatoes was estimated, on October 1, at
18.0 million hundredweight. This is 3 percent more than last year, but 8 per-
cent below the 1949-57 average. Acreage was up slightly from 1958 and yield,
also up slightly, was record high.

Acreage was a little higher than last season in all producing sections
except the Lower Atlantic States--North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and
Florida--which showed a moderate decline. Production was also larger than last


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OCTOBER 1959


year except in the Lower Atlantic area, which was down moderately, and in
California where output was about the same as in 1958. Among the more important
individual States, production was materially smaller than last year in Maryland,
Georgia and Alabama, and moderately smaller in South Carolina. But aggregate
production was larger than last year in States with adequate storage facilities.
Combined production in New Jersey, Virginia, North Carolina, Louisiana, Texas
and California was moderately larger than last year, with material increases in
Virginia and Texas and a moderate increase in Louisiana. These six States
furnish the bulk of shipment in the last half of the season. Thus, supplies
:f sweetpotatoes in Northern markets this winter and spring.probably will be a
little larger than those of a year earlier.

Prices Likely to Average
Close to a Year Earlier

Demand for sweetpotatoes in the current marketing season is expected to
be about the same as last season. During the early weeks of the season unloads
in 38 cities were larger than those of a year earlier, and prices to growers
were somewhat lower. During September, however, unloads were about in line
with those of a year ago, and prices to growers averaged $2.68 per hundred-
weight, compared with $2.74 in September 1958. Price quotations in producing
areas indicate that the market in mid-October was a little below that of a
year ago. In the week ended October 17, f.o.b. prices of U. S. No. 1 Puerto
Rican type sweetpotatoes, uncured, at Southwest Louisiana shipping points
averaged $2.18 per 50-pound crate compared with $2.30 in the corresponding
week of 1958. Prices are expected to rise seasonally this winter and into
spring, and for the season are likely to average close to those of last season.

The demand for sweetpotatoes has declined sharply in the last decade.
This is reflected in the fact that despite a substantial cut in production,
prices received by growers in recent years have generally been no higher, and
have sometimes been lower, than those of the immediate postwar years. This
together with higher costs of production goods and higher living expenses have
resulted in smaller acreages. Recent experience suggests that acreage planted
to sweetpotatoes in 1960 is likely to be about the same as in 1959.

The Longer Outlook

Sweetpotato production has declined rapidly in the postwar period.
The decline appears to have been associated with both a decline in demand, and
a number of production and marketing problems such as high labor requirements,
lack of sufficient satisfactory storage in some areas, and disease and insects.
Some of these factors may have reached their maximum influence. Because of a
larger population total production of sweetpotatoes in the mid-1960's probably
will be moderately above the 1957-59 average.


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OCTOBER 1959


DRY EDIBLE BEANS

Total Supply Slightly Larger
Than Last Season

Indicated total supply of dry beans in the current season is over 20
million hundredweight, slightly larger than last season but slightly below the
1949-57 average. However, in most of the years since 1949 beans have been in
heavy supply, and in some years considerable quantities were delivered to the
Commodity Credit Corporation under the Government purchase agreement and loan
programs.

Supplies available this season appear to be somewhat larger than
anticipated domestic and export sales. The slightly larger supply this season
than last results from more normal carryover stocks at the beginning of the
current season than the unusually light carryover of a year earlier, and from
a slight increase in production.

Less Colored, More White Beans
Available Than Last Season

Production by classes is not reported until December, but an examination
of the crop by areas sheds considerable light on the probable production and
supply of a number of important classes. Such an examination indicates that
supplies of all colored types combined is substantially smaller than that of
last season--perhaps as much as a million bags smaller. Also, supplies appear
to be at least moderately below the 1953-57 average. Supplies of pintos, pink,
and small reds are expected to be substantially smaller than last season, and
supply of red kidney beans probably will be moderately smaller.

In contrast to colored types, total production and supply of white
beans is up sharply. Supplies of white types in the current season appear to
be up more than a million bags from last season and about two million bags
above the recent 5-year average. A big increase in pea beans, most important
of the white types, accounts for the bulk of the increase over last season.
But the great northern, small whites and yelloweye also appear to be in sub-
stantially larger supply.

Supplies of both large limas and baby limas are somewhat smaller than
last season, and about in line with anticipated domestic needs.

More Quality Problems
Than Last Season

Unfavorable weather in a number of areas prior to and during harvest
has resulted in serious quality problems. Hardest hit was the Northwest
where adverse weather in September seriously hampered harvest. Dry, hot
weather in early September slowed harvesting in Nebraska and Wyoming, and
caused an unusual amount of shattering and splitting of beans. Later in the
month, harvesting in these States was again stopped because of wet weather.


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OCTOBER 1959


In both Idaho and Washington less than a fourth of the crops had been harvested
when heavy rains started. The amount of damage is uncertain, but quality
appears to have been lowered considerably.

These reports indicate serious quality problems for small reds, and
probably for great northern and pintos.

Lower Price Support

The national average support price for 1959 crop dry edible beans is
$5.35 a hundred pounds. This is 60 percent of the 1959 February parity price
and, except for baby lima beans, 74 cents below the average support rates for
the 1958 crop. The support price for 1959 crop beans is $5.68 to $6.18 a
hundred pounds for pea and medium white beans, depending on area; great northern
$5.33 to $5.83; small white and flat small white $6.06; pink $5.86; small red
$5.91 to $6.01; pinto $4.63 to $5.23; red kidney $7.24; large limas $8.81; and
baby limas $4.21 a hundred pounds. There are also quality premiums ranging up
to 25 cents, and a 25 cent discount for No. 2 beans. Equity payments, previously
made when the market price on the day of takeover by CCC was above the support
price plus charges, are no longer available. Producers can obtain any equity
they may have by repaying the loan before maturity, and regaining full ownership
of the beans.

The Demand for Beans

Total supply of dry bears for the 1959-60 season is estimated at over 20
million 100-pound bags, slightly more than last season. Total domestic use of
dry beans in most recent years have ranged from 14.5 to slightly over 15 million
bags. About 1.2 million bags of this typically goes for seed--the remainder is
used for food. Domestic use in the current season may be a 'little above that
of 1958-59, but there is little prospect for any very sizeable increase.

United States exports of dry beans, greatly influenced by production in
Europe, vary sharply from year to year. During the last 5 seasons exports
have ranged from 1.8 million bags in 1954-55 to about 4 million bags in 1958-59.
However, there has been a substantial increase in export demand over the years,
and a further increase seems likely in the years ahead. The large exports last
season were due partly to a poor crop in Europe. Indications are that the 1959
crop in Central and Northern Europe suffered considerable damage from extended
drought. This together with our heavy supplies of white beans, preferred in
many European markets, suggests heavy U. S. exports in the current season.
Export demand in the early part of the season has been very strong. Neverthe-
less, it seems unlikely that total exports will be as large as those of last
season, since export availabilities of colored beans are lower.


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- 20 -





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- 21 -


OCTOBEi 1959


On balance, it appears that domestic plus foreign sales in the current
season are not likely to be any larger than those of last season, and they may
be a little smaller. If this situation should materialize, a substantial
buildup of stocks would be carried over into the 1960 crop year.

Prices Likely to Average
Lower Than Last Season

Prices received by growers for the various classes of beans will depend
largely on the supply demand situation for a particular class. Supplies of
small and large limas appear to be about in balance with anticipated demand,
while the important colored classes--pintos, red kidneys, and small reds--
appear to be in tight supply. Prices of large limas and colored beans may
average above those of last season. But pea beans, great northern and small
whites are all in heavy supply. These larger overall supplies of white types,
and lower support rates will exert considerable pressure on these markets.
Prices received by growers for white classes in the current season are expected
to average substantially below those of last season. To avoid continued bur-
densome supplies and low prices, growers of white classes of beans should plant
at least moderately less acreage in 1960.

The Longer Outlook

During the last decade the domestic use of dry ediblebeans per person
has declined slightly. The decline appears to be associated with higher in-
comes and the general trend in this country toward easy to prepare foods.
During the next few years the domestic consumption of beans per person may
show some further decline. However, there may be a significant increase in
foreign demand. Thus, total requirements in the mid-1960's are expected to
be somewhat above current levels. Since dry beans have been in heavy supply
in a number of recent years, only a small increase in production would be
necessary to meet the expected larger requirements.


DRY FIELD PEAS

Supplies Much Larger
Than Last Season, and
Above Average


Supplies of dry field peas available for distribution in the 1959-60
season are relatively heavy. Stocks at the beginning of the current season
were materially smaller than those of a year earlier, but production was up
sharply. Total supplies appear to be about a third larger than the light
supplies of last season and about a tenth above the 1949-57 average.





OCTOBER 1959


Production of 1959 crop peas is estimated at 4.2 million 100-pound bags.
This compares with a 1949-57 average of 3.2 million bags, and with last year's
small crop of 2.5 million bags. The increase in production in 1959 over 1958
was due to a 42 percent larger acreage and record high yields. The light
supplies and relatively high prices for the 1958 crop were largely responsible
for the sharp increase in acreage. Indicated total production is up about
70 percent, with most of the increase in Washington and Idaho--these States
combined account for about four-fifths of the total crop. Production in
Washington, at 2.1 million bags is about double that of last year, and Idaho
at 1.7 million is up more than 50 percent.


Prices Likely To
Average Substantially
Below Last Season

Domestic use of dry peas in the current season is likely to be 2.6 to
2.7 million bags--materially above that pf last season. Export demand has
been good 'in most recent years and probably will be fairly good this season.
However, there are indications that Europe is not as short of peas this year
as last, and U. S. exports are likely to be moderately to materially below
the 1.5 million bags exported last season. Thus, supplies available appear
more than ample to furnish domestic and anticipated export demand.

During the early part of the 1959-60 season, prices have been con-
siderably below the levels of both a year earlier and average. Price received
by growers in mid-September averaged $3.48 per hundredweight, compared with
$4.85 a year earlier. Large supplies of peas available are expected to keep
markets under pressure. Prices to growers this season are expected to continue
substantially below those of last season, and somewhat below the 1949-57
average. A substantial cut in acreage, from that of 1959, is needed if
growers are to avoid the likelihood of a continued surplus of peas in the
1960-61 season.

The Longer Outlook

Over the last decade domestic consumption of dry peas per person has
fluctuated sharply from year to year, but has shown no definite trend. Non-
food use, mostly for seed, has varied from 1.2 million hundredweight to
1.7 million. Quantity used for fodd also fluctuated widely, but has averaged
a little more than half a pound per person. The domestic rate of consumption
is expected to remain near this level during the next few years, with total
requirements about keeping pace with population growth. Exports in the mid-
1960's probably will be at or above the relatively high levels of the last
three seasons. A 1965 crop the same to moderately smaller than the large
crop of 1959 would be sufficient to meet anticipated needs.


TVS-134


- 22 -





TVS-134


- 23 -


OCTOBER 1959


OUTLOOK FOR VEGETABLES AT RETAIL

Producers of vegetables for fresh market are intensely aware of the
sharp seasonal and intra-seasonal variations in prices he receives for vege-
tables and also of the frequent and substantial variations in year-to-year
prices for particular items. These changes in price are associated with
characteristics of the commodity--seasonal nature of production, high degree
of perishability and in some instances the pattern of demand. Housewives
too are aware of sudden and sometimes sharp movements in retail prices. How-
ever, many of these movements are intra-seasonal, short-term, and local in
nature. Thus, on a national basis there probably is less seasonal variation
in retail prices of major fresh vegetables than might be supposed, or than
might be indicated by seasonal production and farm prices. A large part of
the explanation lies in the fact that the retail price covers not only the
price at the farm level, but also the marketing margin--all charges made by
the marketing agencies for assembling, processing, transporting and dis-
tributing the product. These changes make up 65 to 75 percent of the retail
price of most fresh vegetables. They make up an even larger share of the
retail price of most processed vegetables. These heavy marketing charges
are relatively stable in the short-run, so that with a change in the supply
or demand for a particular item, prices at the retail level fluctuate much
less percentagewise than prices at the farm level.

Retail prices of potatoes this summer were well above those of the
previous summer. Potato supplies available this fall and winter are mate-
rially smaller than the large supplies of a year ago. Although supplies are
fully adequate to maintain civilian consumption at year earlier levels,
retail prices during the next 4 to 5 months are likely to average materially
above the low levels of a year earlier. Sweetpotato prices are expected to
average about the same this fall and winter as last. More dry onions are
available than a year ago. Also, barring severe weather in Texas, which
damaged and seriously delayed the 1959 early spring crop, it will not be
necessary to hold any substantial portion for early spring markets. Retail
prices this fall probably will average moderately below, and this winter
substantially below those of a year earlier.

Supplies of fresh vegetables at retail will be materially smaller this
fall than last. Among major items, prospective supplies of celery are about
the same as last fall and retail prices probably will average near those of a
year ago. But supplies of most items are below those of a year ago. Moder-
ately to substantially higher retail prices than last fall are expected for
cabbage, lettuce, snap beans, carrots and sweet corn.

During the next 6 to 8 months consumers can expect continued heavy
supplies of processed vegetables, and attractive shelf prices. Among major
canned items, quantities of snap beans and corn probably are larger than those
of a year ago, and tomatoes and tomato juice may be about as large as last
season. Supply of green peas is down at least moderately from the burden-
some level of a year ago, with fancy grades down substantially. Supplies of
a number of tomato products also are down from the high levels of last season.





OCTOBER 1959


Table 1. --Average retail price of specified fresh and canned
items, by months, 1957 to date


Item : : : : : : : : :
and Jan. :Feb. :Mar. Apr. :May :June :July :Aug. :Sept. Oct. : Nov. Dec.
year
__________________* _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ ______


FRESH
Potatoes
(10 pounds)
1957
1958
1959

Sweetpotatoes
(Pound)
1957
1958
1959

Onions (Pound)
1957
1958
1959

Cabbage (Pound)
1957
1958
1959

Celery (Pound )
1957
1958
1959

Lettuce (Head)
1957
1958
1959

CANNED
Corn (No. 303 can)
1957
1958
1959

Peas (No. 303 can)
1957
1958
1959

Tomatoes (No. 303
can)
1957
1958
1959

Catsup (14-oz.
bottle)
1957
1958
1959


:Cents




56.4
59.6
54.3


13.2
15.0
13.9


7.7
8.6
10.8


8.3
10.4
10.2


17.0
14.7
15.1


18.5
16.9
16.7



17.2
17.5
18.6


21.4
21.3
21.0



14.9
15.6
15.9



23.2
22.3
22.6


Cents Cents Cents


56.2
61.3
54.5



13.6
15.5
14.0


8.7
9.0
11.7


8.7
11.4
9.9


16.7
15.6
13.8


16.8
16.2
19.5



17.2
17.5
18.9


21.4
21.2
20.8



14.8
15.8
15.8



23.3
22.1
22.6


55.0
73.2
52.8



13.7
16.5
14.2


8.4
11.0
15.7


9.6
12.0
9.4


15.6
15.8
12.9


13.6
20.2
16.7



17.2
17.5
19.1


21.4
21.2
20.8



14.9
16.6
15.8



23.3
21.8
22.7


55.8
82.5
55.8



14.4
17.1
14.1


9.9
13.6
16.9


10.6
11.1
8.9


14.7
19.0
12.3


15.6
19.4
15.5



17.1
17.5
19.4


21.4
21.0
20.8



14.8
17.6
15.6



23.3
21.9
22.7


Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents


57.3
76.3
63.1



16.1
17.7
14.2


12.3
11.3
14.2


9.1
10.5
9.1


15.5
21.1
13.1


15.4
20.9
14.6



17.1
17.5
19.5


21.5
20.9
20.7



14.8
18.0
15.7



23.3
21.8
22.6


59.0
68.1
89.6



17.4
17.9
14.9


13.0
10.5
11.0


60.3
67.4
81.2



18.7
18.6
15.2


11.5
10.1
10.2


58.6
59.1
67.6



17.5
18.8
15.8


56.1
52.2
58.5



13.3
13.8
12.9


9.3 8.2
9.4 9.0
9.9 9.2


8.7 8.6 8.4 8.4
8.7 7.6 7.0 7.0
8.5 8.7 8.3 8.4


16.2
18.3
14.5


18.0
15.3
15.8



17.1
17.5
19.6


21.6
20.9
20.5



14.9
18.5
15.5



22.2
21.9
22.4


16.9
17.1
14.5


18.7
16.0
16.3



17.1
17.6
19.7


21.7
21.0
20.4



15.0
18.3
15.5



22.0
22.0
22.5


14.2
14.3
13.4


21.9
14.8
17.4



17.1
17.7
19.6


21.6
21.1
20.4



15.0
17.6
15.4



21.8
22.1
22.3


14.4
14.2
14.5


18.3
15.9
22.7



17.1
17.8
19.3


21.5
21.1
20.0



15.1
16.7
15.2



21.7
22.2
22.4


Cents Cents Cents




55.9 56.5 57.7
49.4 50.4 51.6


12.7 12.3 13.5
12.6 12.9 13.4



8.1 8.2 8.4
8.9 9.1 9.4



7.9 7.9 8.3
7.0 6.8 7.7



13.5 13.3 13.6
13.2 14.5 15.1



19.1 18.4 15.0
18.1 16.3 18.1




17.3 17.3 17.3
18.0 18.2 18.4



21.4 21.4 21.2
21.1 21.1 21.0




15.2 15.3 15.4
16.5 16.2 16.1




21.8 22.0 22.1
22.4 22.4 22.5


Retail prices, Bureau of Labor Statistics, U. S. Department of Commerce.


TVS-134


- 2b -




OCTOBER 1959


But supplies of peas and tomato products appear fully ample to maintain or
even increase the rate of consumption over that of last season. Supplies of
frozen vegetables are the second largest of record, with all important items
in adequate supply.

Prices of individual items compared with last season will vary,
depending on relative supply, demand, and quality of the product. However,
it seems likely that overall retail prices of processed vegetables will aver-
age slightly to moderately above those of a year earlier. Canned corn during
the next several months probably will sell a little lower than last season;
snap beans about the same; peas the same to slightly higher; and sauerkraut
and a number of tomato products moderately higher.



LONGER TERM OUTLOOK BRIGHT FOR UNITED STATES EXPORTS
OF DRY BEANS AND PEAS


By
Orval E. Goodsell j

During the last three seasons, farmers in the United States have
produced 16 to 19 million hundredweight dry edible beans, and 2.5 to 4.2 mil-
lion hundredweight of dry field peas. Foreign markets constitute an important
outlet for dry beans and peas produced in this country. During the last three
or four seasons annual exports of dry beans have amounted to 13 to 21 percent
of total production. Exports of peas in the 1955-57 season amounted to 17 to
34 percent of annual production.

U. S. exports of both beans and peas vary significantly from year to
year, depending in part on crop conditions in importing countries and in other
exporting countries. Over the past decade, however, there has been a notable
upward trend in exports of both beans and peas. Dry bean exports in 1956-58
averaged 3.1 million 100-pound bags per season, about three-fourths larger
than in 1947-49. Exports of dry peas in 1956-58 averaged 1.3 million
100-pound bags, almost three times as much as in 1947-49. While exports in
the immediate future or for any one year may fall below recent levels,
prospects are excellent for a continued long term uptrend in exports of both
beans and peas.

In the last decade, international bean trade had jumped 62 percent, and
pea trade 167 percent. The United States has been a major supplier, and there
is every indication that it will not only retain, but will improve its posi-
tion in-the international bean and pea market.


I/ Marketing Specialist (Beans and Peas), Grain and Feed Division, FAS.


- 25 -


~


TVS-134





OCTOBER 1959


Population in all major consuming markets is increasing--very rapidly
in some of them. At the same time, economic conditions are improving. With
a rise in personal income, people in many foreign countries are eating more
beans; per capital consumption of beans is increasing in several important
markets; bean production is declining in some areas, and in others it is not
keeping pace with population growth.

BEAN MARKETS

Reasons for declining bean production in some countries and the failure
of production to increase as rapidly as demand in others are many and varied.
But, generally speaking, Latin American production still is a primitive hand
operation on very small acreages.

With industrialization, people are moving to the cities where they no
longer depend on the family or country garden, but rather on the growing city
markets. These markets must have an ever increasing supply from farms geared
to produce in commercial quantities, and served by an adequate transportation
system. Much of Latin America lacks these. Major attention is given to
industrialization, and agriculturally to the production of exportable cash
crops such as cotton, sugar, and coffee. Much bean acreage has been displaced
by these crops.

Much of warm, humid Latin America is ill adapted climatically to bean
production. Bean diseases are wide-spread and storage is inadequate and
difficult. Interplanting of beans with corn is becoming less common, due to
increased use of hybrid corn, which requires a longer growing season. Thus,
where hybrid corn is increasing, bean acreage is decreasing.

In Europe most of the big importing countries do not produce beans. In
others beans are giving away to other crops which apparently are more
profitable.

Latin America

U. S. bean exports to Latin America have jumped over 500 percent since
the 1940's. Cuba is the largest single foreign market for U. S. beans. Since
the mid-1940's this trade has almost tripled, from an average of 350,000 bags
annually in 1935-45 to over 1 million bags this year.

Recent political changes in Cuba have aroused fears among some U. S.
exporters, especially of colored beans, that Cuban imports of beans might
drop. However, during the 1958-59 marketing season, U. S. exports to Cuba
were the second highest ever recorded--1,146,000 bags.

Cuba's population is increasing at the rate of about 100,000 per year,
and each Cuban uses about 24 pounds of beans annually. This means that to main-
tain current consumption ratio Cuba must increase its supplies by 24,000 bags
each year. Despite this growing need for supplies, local production has
dropped 50 percent since the early 1950's, from a 1-million bag average


- 26 -


TVS-134







between 1948 and 1952, to 500,000 bags in 1958. The growing population and
the drop in production has resulted in a sharp uptrend in U. S. exports of
dry beans to Cuba. Mexico in the last 6 years has become our second best
Latin American bean market. Mexico took more than a million bags in the
marketing year ended last August 31, and nearly 800,000 bags the year before.
Developments in Mexico have been phenomrenal--population has almost doubled
since the 1930's. Per capital bean consumption has doubled, production has
almost tripled, and bean imports have jumped from almost nothing before 1952
to a million bags annually in 4 of the past 8 years.

Mexico's population is increasing almost 1 million per year. Per
capital bean consumption is now nearly 30 pounds. To maintain this consump-
tion level, supplies must be increased each year by approximately 300,000 bags.
To meet these larger requirements further expansion is expected in both
domestic production and imports.

Other Latin American countries have made sizeable purchases of U. S.
beans over the years, and several have begun since 1950. These latter include
Peru, Nicaragua, El Salvador, Costa Rica, Guatemala, and recently Brazil. In
the last 8 years, purchases of Latin American countries excluding Cuba and
Mexico have ranged from 70,000 to 300,000 bags annually. This indicates that
these countries are facing problems similar to those in Cuba and Mexico.

Brazil's population for example, is growing at the rate of 1,500,000 a
year. Per capital consumption of beans has risen 10 pounds in the last 20 years.
To provide the new population with the current rate of 52 pounds of beans per
person will require almost 800,000 bags additional supply each year. As in
Mexico, unless the rising consumption trend is reversed, these additional
beans must be produced domestically or imported.

Europe

U. S. bean exports to Europe have jumped from a prewar annual average
of 35,000 bags to over 1 million bags in recent years.

The European market is growing even faster in some ways than the mar-
kets in Latin America. The outstanding feature of trade with Europe is the
growing demand for canning beans. More than 50,000 tons of beans went into
cans in England alone during each of 3 most recent years, and 3,000 tons were
canned in France--2- times the volume of 10 years ago.

It is largely because of canning that per capital bean consumption has
almost tripled in the United Kingdom since prewar days. Bean canning is also
growing in popularity in Italy, West Germany, the Netherlands, and other
countries.

The principal bean importing countries of Europe do not produce many
beans and their already small production is rapidly declining. About 75 per-
cent of the West European bean crop is grown in 3 countries--Italy 4 million
bags; Spain 2 million bags; and France 2& million bags. While acreage in


- 27 -


TVS-134


OCTOBER 1959





OCTOBER 1959 .


these countries has been about constant in the last 4 years, it is 30 percent
below prewar and 10 percent below the 1950-54 average. In West Germany,
Belgium, and the Netherlands, bean acreage--always small--has declined 50 per-
cent below prewar.

Total population is increasing in West Europe at the rate of 1.6 mil-
lion persons per year. Per capital consumption of beans is 3-5 pounds, and
this rate is rising in some of the countries. Unless the downtrend of bean
acreage or the uptrend of consumption is reversed, imports will continue to
rise.

Marketing Trends

In both Europe and Latin America, the growing popularity of the super-
market is stimulating the sale of beans, especially in cellophane packages.
The marketing potential offered by the supermarket as an outlet is tremendous.
Supermarkets and canners both need a more steady and dependable supply of
good-quality beans of uniform variety, for processing into standardized
canned and prepackaged products.

To meet these specialized needs, the United States has a unique advan-
tage in that it produces large quantities of several specific classes of good
quality beans. U. S. production of pea beans alone is greater than the total
bean output of any other major bean-exporting country; so is U. S. production
of pinto beans. Production of several other classes also is greater than the
total exportable supply of most countries. In 1958, U. S. bean output was
divided as follows:


1,000
Type 100-lb. bags

Pea beans .................... 5,110
Pinto ........................ 4,791
Great Northern ............... 1,909
Small Red .................... 1,463
Lima ......................... .1,449
Other ........................ 4,259
Total 18,981



So long as the trend toward packaging and canning more beans continue,
the need for a product designed to meet specific requirements will continue
to increase. The major canneries, for example, want a small white bean of
uniform size and cooking characteristics like the Michigan pea bean or the
California small white. The large Cuban import market wants principally
red beans. Mexicans import pinto beans.


WS-134


- 28 -





OCTOBER 1959


Competition

Latin America has been largely dependent on the United States and
Chile for its bean imports. But Chile exports mainly white beans, and Latin
Americans use very few of this type. They prefer colored beans. Thus, the
Latin American market is largely the domain of U. S. exporters.

Competition in Europe is different. U. S. beans, principally white
compete with those from Chile, the Balkans, and Africa. Chilean exports
have held quite steady for many years except once or twice recently when
the government curtailed exports to avoid shortages in the domestic market.

Exports from Africa to Europe have declined for the last 3 years, but
those from the Balkans have increased sharply since 1955. Turkey, a competi-
tor of a few years ago, has now turned importer because of its expanding
domestic consumption. In coming years, ample supplies of specialized type
beans should make the United States a stronger competitor in the world's
specializing markets.


PEA MARKETS

Prospects for U. S. pea exports also appear good. As with beans,
canning of dry peas is important and growing. Canned dry whole peas, often
called "soakers" abroad, are used much as canned fresh peas are in the
United States.

The United Kingdom has one large canning plant and several smaller
ones that handle these legumes. This industry has sprung up also in the
Philippine Republic, principally since the end of World War II; there are
at least four small canning plants in Manila alone.

In addition to canning, there is a fast growing export market for dry
peas, to be used whole or split. U. S. exports to Latin America have in-
creased 6 fold since prewar--from 60,000 bags average in 1935-39 to
375,000 bags in 1955-58. Exports to Europe have jumped from nothing in
1935-39 to 450,000 bag. average in 1955-58. Exports were even larger during
the late 1940's, but much of the volume was government programs. Recent
exports have been entirely commercial. From 1952 when export data by
classes first became available, to the 1956-59 period commercial exports of
Alaska peas about tripled and those of yellow peas about doubled.


TVS-134


- 29 -





Table 2.--Commercially produced vegetables: Civilian per capital consumption, 1937-58


Fresh equivalent As percentage of annual total
Total : : Processed : : Processed
Year: fresh: : : : :
and :Fresh 1/ Total Canned : Frozen Fresh Total Canned Frozen
Processed : : :
Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds Percent Percent Percent Percent
1937 : 164.3 111.0 53.3 52.3 1.0 67.6 32.4 31.B 0.6
1938 :170.1 114.5 55.6 54.6 1.0 67.3 32.7 32.1 .6
1939 : 174.6 116.6 58.0 56.8 1.2 66.8 33.2 32.5 .7
1940 179.9 116.9 63.0 61.6 1.4 65.0 35.0 34.2 .8
1941 :180.5 113.5 67.0 65.4 1.6 62.9 37.1 36.2 .9
1942 :192.7 118.3 74.4 71.8 2.6 61.4 38.6 37.3 1.3
1943 :186.6 116.4 70.2 68.5 1.7 62.4 37.6 36.7 .9
1944 :195.2 123.5 71.7 67.9 3.8 63.3 36.7 34.8 1.9
1945 : 221.6 133.8 87.8 83.4 4.4 60.4 39.6 37.6 2.0
1946 :223.8 129.9 93.9 89.2 4.7 58.0 42.0 39.9 2.1
1947 : 206.0 122.4 83.6 77.5 6.1 59.4 40.6 37.6 3.0
1948 :199.5 123.0 76.5 69.5 7.0 61.7 38.3 34.8 3.5
1949 : 193.3 115.8 77.5 70.7 6.8 59.9 40.1 36.6 3.5
1950 :198.8 114.6 84.2 76.8 7.4 57.6 42.4 38.7 3.7
1951 : 200.6 111.6 89.0 79.7 9.3 55.6 44.4 39.8 4.6
1952 : 199.2 111.0 88.2 76.9 11.3 55.7 44.3 38.6 5.7
1953 : 199.7 108.3 91.4 79.6 11.8 54.2 45.8 39.9 5.9
1954 : 196.6 107.3 89.3 76.8 12.5 54.6 45.4 39.1 6.3
1955 : 198.6 104.6 94.0 80.5 13.5 52.7 47.3 40.5 6.8
1956 :202.5 106.9 95.6 81.5 14.1 52.8 47.2 40.2 7.0
1957 : 200.5 104.6 95.9 81,4 14.5 52.2 47.8 40.6 7.2
1958 3/: 199.3 101.1 98.2 82.8 15.4 50.7 49.3 41.6 7.7
**


E/ Excluding melons.
2/ Data include pickles and


sauerkraut in bulk; exclude canned and frozen potatoes, canned sweet-


potatoes, canned baby foods and canned soups.
3/ Preliminary.







Table 3.--Civilian per capital consumption of selected commercially produced fresh and processed vegetables 1/, United States, calendar years 1937-58

Fresh equivalent basis
Commodity ---
1937 :1938 1939 : 1940 : 1941 1942 : 1943 :1944 : 1945 :1946 :1947 : 1948 : 1949 : 1950 :1951 :1952 :1953 :1954 : 1955 :1956 : 1957: 1958
Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb.
Asparagus
Fresh :1.2 1.1 1.3 1.5 1. 5 1.3 1.2 12 1.1 1.1 1.1 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.7 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.8
Canned : .70 .61 .77 .82 .82 .92 .83 .85 .48 1.31 .77 .94 .86 .88 .94 .87 1.03 .99 .88 1.00 1.02 1.03
Frozen .06 .11 .06 .10 .11 .08 .12 .21 .28 .25 .23 .29 .25 .25 .26 .30 .32 .33 .31 .33 .32 .30


Beans, lima 2/
Fresh
Canned
Frozen

Beans, snap
Fresh
Canned
Frozen

Broccoli
Fresh
Frozen

Cabbage
Fresh
Canned 3/

Corn 4/
Fresh
Canned
Frozen

Cucumbers
Fresh
Canned 5~

Peas, green 2/
Fresh
Canned
Frozen

Spinach
Fresh
Canned
Frozen

Tomatoes
Fresh
Canned 6/


.7 .8 .9 .8 .8 .7 .6 .6 .6 .7 .6 .6 .6 .5 .5 .4 .4 .4 .3 .3 .3 .3
.48 .48 .55 .72 .78 .80 .60 .33 .47 .49 .48 .53 .52 .83 .70 .66 .66 .70 .72 .73 .71 .64
.24 .20 .25 .30 .24 .54 .32 .38 .37 .60 .83 .84 1.09 1.14 1.22 1.59 1.62 1.47 1.59 1.66 1.61 1.61


: 4.0 4.8 5.0 5.0 4.6 4.9 5.3 4.7 4.8 4.7 4.0 4.1 4.1 3.9 3.8 3.4 3.5 3.3 3.4 2.8 2.9 2.6
1.29 1.50 1.55 1.70 1.68 1.93 1.94 2.12 2.44 2.39 2.01 2.09 2.16 2.49 2.36 2.51 2.58 2.67 2.94 3.02 2.87 3.10
:.06 ..06 .05 .05 .09 .13 .07 .20 .25 .25 .33 .37 .36 .45 .57 .67 .72 .81 .84 .91 .92 .99


: .7 .7 .8 .6 .7 .6 .7 1.0 .9 1.0 1.0 .9 .9 1.0 .7 .8 .7 .6 .5 .5 .5 .4
:.02 .02 .02 .01 .04 .05 .04 .04 .12 .17 .16 .23 .29 .29 .41 .58 .58 .63 .72 .72 .67 .74


:17.8 19.8 16.4 18.5 16.2 18.9 17.0 19.8 20.5 17.7 17.0 16.6 14.7 14.3 13.3 12.8 12.7 12.6 11.2 12.2 11.4 11.5
1.83 2.43 2.62 2.68 2.95 2.77 2.39 .85 1.36 3.01 3.14 1.48 2.56 2.43 2.98 2.55 2.50 2.53 2.44 2.57 2.11 2.31


:5.1 5.2 5.1 5.6 6.2 6.7 6.3 6.7 7.9 7.7 7.7 8.7 7.6 7.7 7.6 7.8 7.8 8.5 8.3 8.2 7.8 8.4
:9.85 10.21 10.85 11.31 12.05 14.09 13.57 12.71 14.13 15.83 14.80 12.60 12.36 13.20 12.37 12.27 13.12 13.22 13.48 13.49 13.61 13.61
.13 .09 .16 .20 .17 .28 .10 .46 .54 .63 1.03 .97 .94 .88 1.28 1.63 1.86 1.79 2.13 2.76 2.48 2.88


:2.1 2.4 2.4 2.3 2.3 2.2 1.7 1.8 2.5 2.9 2.5 2.7 2.5 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.6 2.8 2.8 2.6 2.8 2.6
2.01 2.24 2.21 2.11 2.47 2.79 2.45 2.19 2.26 2.86 3.19 3.35 3.18 3.28 3.06 3.62 3.86 3.87 3.83 3.70 3.88 4.06


2.3 2.1 2.3 2.1 2.1 1.7 1.6 1.7 1.6 1.4 1.1 .9 .8 .7 .6 .5 .4 .4 .4 .3 .3 .3
7.76 8.18 8.39 9.26 10.38 10.73 9.86 8.89 12.06 12.82 9.84 9.78 8.96 9.16 9.00 8.63 8.33 8.26 8.07 8.17 8.05 7.92
.41 .42 .62 .58 .89 1.16 .75 1.59 1.76 1.69 2.29 2.55 2.10 2.43 2.85 3.35 3.52 3.92 3.78 4.21 4.45 4.62


:2.6 2.5 2.9 2.7 2.6 2.5 2.3 2.2 2.3 2.0 1.9 1.7 2.0 1.7 1.6 1.5 1.4 1.1 1.0 1.1 1.0 1.1
.88 .81 .81 .98 .81 1.14 .76 1.25 .99 1.45 1.01 .91 1.01 .84 1.08 .93 .91 .68 .83 .95 .83 .89
.03 .04 .02 .07 .02 .23 .20 .32 .48 .36 .40 .56 .52 .68 .91 .90 .94 .94 1.04 1.01 .97 1.01


:12.8 13.8 14.1 13.3 13.1 14.0 14.1 14.4 16.1 15.4 13.9 13.9 13.5 12.9 13.3 13.1 12.8 12.9 12.8 12.0 12.2 11.5
:25.35 26.09 26.35 28.71 30.42 33.12 31.95 34.42 43.98 43.43 37.07 32.59 34.05 37.62 40.98 38.65 40.24 38.16 41.26 42.14 42.56 43.55


1/ Data for processed vegetables include pickles and sauerkraut in bulk, and exclude quantities consumed in commercially produced soups, baby foods, and vegetable mix-
tures such as peas and carrots, and succotash. 2/ "In-pod" basis. V/ Sauerkraut, canned and bulk. 4/ "Cut" basis. / Pickles, canned and bulk. 6/ Including canned
whole tomatoes and tomato products other than soup.

Data for the processed vegetables were converted to a fresh equivalent basis using factors presented in Conversion Factors and Weights and Measures for Agricultural
Commodities and Their Products (May 1952 edition), with the following exception : frozen broccoli, 1.33 beginning 19 ~ -







Table 4 .- Canned vegetables: Per capital consumption 1909-58 i/

(Net canned weight)
Leafy, green, and yellow vegetables / : Tomato products 2/ Other vegetables 2/
: : : Pumpkin : l : Catsup aste Pulp : TSmato : Other
Year Asparagus a Carrots: Peas and Spinach: o and chili and : a other: Beets Cor Pickle Sa rautotat
: beans means : squash : t oatoes sauce : sauce uree :e table:


S: : : :es / : : :


S Lb.
1909 : --
1910 --
1911 : --
1912 --
1913 -
1914 : --
1915 : --
1916 ---
1917 : --
1918
1919 -
1920 : 0.4
1921 : .3
1922 : .3
1923 : .4
1924 : .4
1925 : .4
1926 : .4
1927 : .4
1928 : .5
1929 : .5
1930 : .4
1931 : .4
1932 .4
1933 : .5
1934 : .5
1935 : .4
1936 : .5
1937 : .5
1938 .5
1939 .6
1940 : .6
1941 : .6
192 : .7
1943 : .6
1944 : .6
1945 .4
1946 : 1.0
1947 ; .6
1948 : .7
1949 : .6
1950 .7
1951 .7
1952 : .7
1953 : .8
1954 : .8
1955 : .7
1956 .8
1957 : .8
1958 2/ : .8


"'


Lb. Lb.









-- 0.9
.8
-- .5
0.1 .6
.1 .7
.1 .9
.2 1.3
.2 1.3
.1 1.0
.1 1.3
.2 1.7
.2 2.0
.3 1.7
.2 1.3
.2 1.1
.2 1.3
.3 1.4
.3 1.5
.3 1.8
.3 2.0
.4 2.1
.5 2.3
.6 2.3
.6 2.6
.4 2.6
.2 2.9
.3 3.3
.4 3.3
.3 2.7
.4 2.8
.4 3.0
.6 3.4
.5 3.2
.5 3.4
.5 3.5
.5 3.6
.5 4.0
.5 4.1
.5 3.9
.4 4.2


Lb. Lb.
--- 1.8
-- 1.5
1.4
-- 1.9
- 2.5
--- 2.7
2.7
--- 2.4
2.4
3.0
2.8
-- 3.0

2.8
--- 2.8
2.9
3.6
--- 4.3
--- 4.6
-- 4.3
4.2
-- 4.1
--- 4.4
-- 4.6
4.1
0.1 3.2
.1 3.2
.2 3.6
.2 4.0
.2 4.3
.2 4.6
.2 4.9
.2 5.0
.3 5.5
.4 6.2
.3 6.4
.2 5.9
.3 5.3
.4 7.2
.6 7.6
.4 5.9
.4 5.8
.3 5.3
.4 5.4
.3 5.4
.4 5.1
.4 5.0
.4 4.9
.4 4.8
.4 4.9
.4 4.8
.5 4.7


1/ Excludes soups and baby food. In years 1909-42 calendar-year data are derived from pack-year data by combining proportional parts of each pack year involved. Civilian con-
sumption, beginning 1941. 2/ Minor vegetables and, In earlier years, items not shown separately are included In "other". 3/ Based on information available for 1944-46, tomato
Juice comprises approximately 85 percent of the total, combination vegetable Juices 13 percent, and other vegetable Juices 2 percent. Combination vegetable Juice contains
approximately 70 percent or more tomato Juice. / Computed as a residual; includes miscellaneous greens, pimlentoo potatoes, mixed vegetables, and all items, especially in
earlier years, for which no separate data are available. V/ Preliminary.


Lb. Lb. Lb.
-- 6.0
- -- 5.4
-- 4.9
-- 5.9
- 7.1
-- 7.2
-- 6.0
-- 5.0
- 6.6
-- 7.2
- -- 6.4
0.2 0.4 5.0
.2 .3 4.4
.2 .6 4.5
.3 .8 5.8
.4 .5 6.1
.4 .6 7.0
.4 .5 6.8
.4 .7 5.4
.5 1.0 5.5
.8 1.3 5.9
.6 .8 6.6
.4 .6 5.8
.4 .5 5.2
.5 .6 5.4
.5 .8 5.4
.3 .8 5.7
.4 .9 5.8
.5 1.0 5.6
.4 .9 5.9
.6 .9 5.8
.7 1.1 5.9
.6 .9 6.0
.6 1.2 6.2
.6 .8 5.6
.5 1.4 4.9
.4 1.1 4.1
.6 1.6 4.0
.6 1.1 3.9
.6 1.0 4.4
.5 1.1 4.7
.6 .9 5.1
.6 1.2 4.9
.7 1.0 4.1
.6 1.0 4.5
.7 .7 4.6
.7 .9 4.5
.7 1.0 4.6
.7 .9 4.6
.6 1.0 4.6


Ib. Ib. Lb.














0.2 0.6 --
.4 .7 -
.4 .7 --
.3 .6 -
.3 .6 ---
.3 .6 ---
.4 1.0 0.2
.2 .8 .6
.2 .5 1.1
.4 .6 1.1
.4 .7 1.1
.5 .8 1.6
.5 .8 2.4
.5 .8 3.0
.7 .7 2.8
.7 .6 2.7
.8 .7 3.0
.9 .6 3.7
1.1 .8 4.4
1.5 1.2 4.1
2.0 1.5 2.9
2.7 2.1 7.0
3.1 2.1 5.2
2.7 1.6 3.9
2.3 .5 4.2
2.2 .6 4.5
2.5 .7 5.0
3.4 .8 4.7
e.7 .9 5.1
2.9 .8 5.4
2.7 .5 5.1
3.3 .7 4.9
3.3 .9 4.6
3.4 .7 4.8


Ib. Lb. b. Ib.
--- 2.1 -.
--- 25 --
-- 3.8 --
4.3
-- 3.3 -
--- 2.5
-- 3.0 --
-- 2.8 -.- .
2.8
--- 2.8 --- ---
-- 3.2 -
-- 3.6 1.6 1.4
0.3 4.0 1.2 .8
.2 3.8 1.2 .9
.2 3.2 1.8 1.2
.2 3.4 1.2 2.2
.3 3.4 1.3 2.1
.5 3.8 1.5 1.5
.4 4.4 2.5 1.3
.3 3.9 1.4 1.6
.3 3.7 1.2 2.0
.4 3.9 1.8 2.0
.6 4.2 1.8 2.3
.6 3.8 1.8 2.4
.3 3.4 1.6 1.7
.3 3.1 1.6 1.7
.4 2.9 1.7 1.5
.5 3.5 1.8 2.4
.5 4.1 2.0 1.4
.6 3.9 2.1 1.4
.6 4.0 2.3 1.9
.7 4.3 2.2 2.0
.8 4.5 2.2 2.1
.9 4.8 2.5 2.3
1.2 5.6 2.8 2.1
1.1 5.4 2.5 1.8
1.0 5.0 2.2 .7
1.4 5.6 2.3 1.0
1.4 6.3 2.9 2.3
1.2 5.8 3.3 2.4
1.2 5.0 3.4 1.1
1.0 4.9 3.4 2.0
1.2 5.2 3.4 1.9
1.6 4.9 3.2 2.3
1.4 4.8 3.7 2.0
1.4 5.2 3.9 1.9
1.4 5.2 4.0 2.0
1.3 5.3 3.9 1.9
1.5 5.3 3.8 2.0
1.4 5'4 3.9 1.6
1.5 5.4 4.1 1.8


Ib. Lb. Lb.
- 5T 15.3
5.1 14.5
5.5 15.6
6.6 18.7
--- 6.9 19.8
--- 6.8 19.2
6.3 18.0
- 5.9 16.1
--- 7.1 18.9
- 8.9 22.3
--- 4.6 21.3
0.3 2.1 18.5
.3 2.0 16.9
.3 1.2 17.1
.3 2.5 21.5
.3 2.1 23.0
.3 2.5 25.7
.2 -- 25.9
.2 -- 22.3
.2 -- 23.0
.2 .1 25.9
.1 .8 28.4
.1 -- 25.3
.1 .3 22.1
.1 -- 22.0
.1 .5 23.3
.1 .3 26.2
.1 .4 27.7
.1 .8 29.4
.1 1.1 31.1
.1 .8 31.8
.2 .7 34.4
.3 .8 36.9
.2 .5 39.7
.3 .7 37.0
.3 .7 34.4
.3 1.2 43.2
.7 .8 46.8
.5 .9 40.5
.3 1.6 37.9
.5 1.6 39.1
.7 1.7 42.1
.4 1.6 42.2
.8 2.0 42.0
.7 2.1 43.3
.6 1.5 42.0
.8 1.9 43.5
.8 1.6 43.9
.8 1.7 43.9
1.1 1.7 LL.8





Table 5.-- Vegetables, frozen: Per capital consumption, 1937-58 i/


Leafy, green, and yellow vegetables


Other vegetables :


S:Potato
Year : : : : : : :Rhubarb: pro- Total
:Aspara-: Snap: Lima :Car-: : Peas Pumpkingro-:Brussels Spin-:Other:Cauli-:Corn:Succo: : ducts : /
gus : beans: beans:rots:Peas : and and colii: sprouts: ach : / :flower: cut: tash
Carrots. squash. .basis.
_.. : :.. :. : : : : : : : :


Lb.

1937 : 0.03
1938 : .05
1939 : .03
1940 : .05
1941 : .05
1942 : .04
1943 : .06
1944 : .11

1945 : .14
1946 : .13
1947 : .11
1948 : .14
1949 : .13

1950 : .12
1951 : .13
1952 : .15
1953 : .16
1954 : .17

1955 : .16
1956 : .17
1957 : .16
1958 6 .15


Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb.

0.05 0.11 0.15
.05 .09 .15
.04 .11 .22 0.01

.04 .13 / .21
.07 .11 0.01 .32 /
.10 .24 .01 .41 .01
.05 .14 Y/ .27 .01
.16 .17 .03 .56 .02

.20 .17 .02 .62 .02
.20 .27 .04 .60 .04
.26 .38 .07 .81 .04
.29 .38 .05 .91 .07
.28 .49 .10 .75 .04

.35 .51 .08 .86 .06
.45 .55 .09 1.02 .08
.53 .71 .11 1.16 .10
.57 .73 .13 1.25 .09
.64 .66 .17 1.40 .11

.66 .72 .21 1.34 .10
.72 .75 .15 1.50 .08
.73 .73 .27 1.58 .12
.79 .72 .24 1.64 .11


Lb. b. Lb L Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb.


k_/ 0.01
0.01 .02
.01 .02


S 0.02 4/
J .021 0.01
.0O 0.01


/ 0.03
.02
.04


.01 .01 0.01 .04 .01 0.01 .05
.01 .03 .01 .01 .01 / .04
.02 .03 .02 .13 .01 .01 .07
.03 .03 .02 .11 / .02
.07 .03 .05 .18 .6 .04 .11


2/ 2/
2/ 2/
2/ 2/

2/ 2/
2/
5/
_/ 0.o4


Lb. Lb.

5/ 0.40
2/ .41
2/ .50

2/ .57
2/ .67
2/ 1.10
/ .74
2/ 1.63


.08 .08 .05 .26 .04 .04 .13 0.01 .04 5/ 1.90 }
.03 .12 .07 .20 .06 .07 .15 .01 .05 2/ 2.04
.06 .11 .04 .22 .09 .04 .25 .01 .08 0.01 2.58
.05 .17 .07 .31 .10 .09 .23 .05 .02 .05 2.98
.03 .21 .12 .29 .11 .10 .22 .05 .02 .07 3.01


.06 .22 .09 .38 .15 .09 .21 .05 .03
.06 .31 .13 .50 .22 .13 .31 .06 .04
.06 .44 .14 .50 .33 .18 .39 .08 .04
.07 .43 .18 .51 .30 .16 .45 .06 .03
.09 .47 .16 .51 .36 .17 .43 .07 .05


.12 3.38
.23 4.31
.36 5.28
.31 5.43
.44 5.90


.09 .54 .17 .57 .54 .19 .51 .06 .04 .74 6.64
.10 .54 .20 .56 .39 .19 .66 .03 .02 1.20 7.26
.13 .50 .19 .53 .48 .15 .59 .07 .04 1.22 7.49
.09 .56 .17 .55 .66 .17 .70 .06 .03 1.44 8.08


/ Civilian consumption only, beginning 1941.
SIncluded with leafy, green, and yellow because most items included are considered to be greens.
/Computed from unrounded data.
SLess than 0.005 pound.
Included with "other."
Preliminary.






Table 6.--Fresh vegetables and melons, commercial: Per capital consumption, farm weight, 1919-58 I/

Vegetables
: :Leafy, green, and yellow
Year Tomatoes Art- Aspar Lima : Snap Brusse : : :Lettuce : Green :
chokes agu :beans(un-: beans:Broccoli: sprouts:Cabbage:Carrots: Kale: and :peas(un-:Peppers:Spinach:Minor: Total
: : -: shelled): : : : : p :escarole:shelled):
: Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb.


1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958


10.8
S11.1
S9.9
11.7
11.6
11.9
12.6
: 10.6
:12.3
:12.0
: 13.5
: 12.9
:12.4
:13.5
: 12.5
: 13.5
: 14.0
:12.6
: 12.8
13.8
S14.1
S13.3
13.1
14.0
: 14.1
:14.4
:16.1
: 15.4
:13.9
: 13.9
: 13.5
S12.9
:13.3
:13.1
: 12.8
: 12.9
:12.8
: 12.0
12.2
/: 11.5


0.5
.6
.5
.5
.6
.7
.8
1.0
1.0
1.1
1.0
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.3
1.4
1.2
1.4
1.2
1.1
1.3
1.5
1.5
1.3
1.2
1.2
1.1
1.1
1.1
.9
.9
.9
.8
.8
.8
.7
.7
.8
.8
.8


3.0
3.0
3.1
3.1
3.4
3.6
3.6
3.5
3.7
3.8
4.5
4.5
4.8
4.5
5.1
5.1
4.9
4.4
4.0
4.8
5.0
5.0
4.6
4.9
5.3
4.7
4.8
4.7
4.0
4.1
4.1
3.9
3.8
3.4
3.5
3.3
3.4
2.8
2.9
2.6


0.1
.2
.3
.3
.4
.5
.6
.6
.7
.7
.8
.6
.7
.6
.7
1.0
.9
1.0
1.0
.9
.9
1.0
.7
.8
.7
.6
.5
.5
41


17.3
27.3
18.5
23.0
19.5
24.0
22.0
22.2
23.1
19.8
21.0
18.4
19.4
19.2
17.1
22.6
19.6
17.9
17.8
19.8
16.4
18.5
16.2
18.9
17.0
19.8
20.5
17.7
17.0
16.6
14.7
14.3
13.3
12.8
12.7
12.6
11.2
12.2
11.
11.5


2.2
2.4
2.5
2.8
3.0
3.1
3.0
3.4
4.1
4.0
5.9
6.1
5.4
5.4
5.3
6.0
5.9
6.2
6.4
7.0
7.4
7.7
7.6
8.0
11.1
9.9
11.7
9.6
8.7
9.3
8.5
8.8
8.0
7.9
7.8
7.6
7.2
7.5
6.8
6.4


5.2
7.4
7.0
8.0
8.4
9.6
10.1
10.7
11.6
12.4
13.2
12.8
12.3
11.2
11.0
11.9
11.9
12.5
12.6
11.5
13.4
13.2
13.7
13.6
14.5
16.4
17.4
19.3
19.4
18.7
17.9
18.6
18.5
19.8
19.6
19.5
19.9
20.4
19.6
19.0


0.3
.4
.6
.7
.9
1.1
1.2
1.4
2.0
2.2
2.3
2.6
2.3
2.5
2.7
2.3
2.5
2.5
2.3
2.1
2.3
2.1
2.1
1.7
1.6
1.7
1.6
1.4
1.1
.9
.8
.7
.6
.5
.4
.4
.4
.3
.3
.3


1.2
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.4
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.5
1.6
1.4
1.7
1.4
1.5
1.7
1.8
1.9
2.1
1.9
1.8
1.8
1.4
1.8
2.1
2.2
1.9
2.2
2.3
2.2
2.1
2.1
2.0
2.1
2.0
1.9
2.0
1.7


0.9
1.0
1.3
1.5
1.7
2.0
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.3
2.6
2.4
2.8
2.6
2.3
2.5
2.3
2.7
2.6
2.5
2.9
2.7
2.6
2.5
2.3
2.2
2.3
2.0
1.9
1.7
2.0
1.7
1.6
1.5
1.4
1.1
1.0
1.1
1.0
1.1


4.0
5.1
4.7
5.2
4.8
5.4
5.2
5.3
5.5
4.8
4.9
5.5
5.9
5.6
4.7
5.8
6.2
5.5
5.7
6.2
5.3
5.4
5.1
5.9
5.8
5.3
6.1
4.7
6.5
6.7
5.5
5.3
4.4
3.9
4.4
4.9
4.1
5.6
5.8
5.3


Continued -


35.1
49.0
40.0
46.7
44.4
51.6
50.2
52.0
55.6
52.5
57.7
56.2
57.1
55.4
52.7
60.6
57.8
56.9
56.4
59.1
58.7
60.1
57.4
60.6
62.2
65.4
69.8
65.1
64.0
63.2
58.8
58.5
55.0
54.5
54.3
53.7
51.2
53.9
51.9
49.9





Table 6.--Fresh vegetables and melons, commercial: Per capital consumption, farm weight, 1919-58 1/ -continued
:Vegtables Melons : Total
ear: Other : Total : :vegetables
Beets : Cauli- : Celery: Corn Cueum-: Egg- : Garlic: Onions and : Minor Total : vege- : Water- :Canta- :Total and
: flower : b : bersa plant : :shallots 2/ : : tables : melons :loups :melons: melons
Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb.
1919 :0.8 1.1 5.2 2.9 2.7 0.3 4/ 11.7 6.0 30.7 76.6 15.7 9.1 24.8 101.4
1920 : .8 1.2 5.5 2.7 2.5 .4 0.1 14.3 7.4 34.9 95.0 22.6 9.2 31.8 126.8
1921 .8 1.2 5.6 2.5 2.6 .5 .1 12.2 6.8 32.3 82.2 25.5 9.4 34.9 117.1
1922 : .8 1.3 5.5 2.4 3.1 .4 .1 13.0 7.8 34.4 92.8 27.5 9.8 37.3 130.1
1923 .8 1.5 5.8 2.3 2.8 .4 .1 13.2 7.2 34.1 90.1 20.1 9.0 29.1 119.2
1924 :1.1 1.3 6.2 2.8 3.2 .4 .1 13.8 8.5 37.4 100.9 25.7 10.0 35.7 136.6
1925 :1.1 1.5 6.6 3.1 3.4 .4 .2 13.7 8.5 38.5 101.3 24.2 10.2 34.4 135.7
1926 : .9 2.4 6.1 3.1 3.1 .3 .2 13.4 8.5 38.0 100.6 26.5 9.9 36.4 137.0
1927 :1.2 1.8 6.2 3.1 3.2 .4 .1 13.5 8.6 38.1 106.0 20.7 10.1 30.8 136.8
1928 :1.4 2.0 7.4 3.4 3.2 .3 .1 13.4 8.5 39.7 104.2 20.1 10.5 30.6 134.8
1929 : 1.7 2.5 8.5 3.4 3.0 .4 .1 12.5 9.3 41.4 112.6 21.4 10.7 32.1 144.7
1930 : 1.7 2.3 8.6 4.1 3.1 .4 .2 13.0 9.4 42.8 111.9 23.2 9.8 33.0 144.9
1931 1.7 2.7 7.6 4.4 2.8 .4 .1 10.1 9.0 38.8 108.3 22.2 10.6 32.8 141.1
1932 :1.5 2.6 7.6 5.2 2.3 .4 .2 11.0 9.1 39.9 108.8 18.2 8.9 27.1 135.9
1933 : 1.5 2.5 7.4 5.4 2.2 .4 .1 11.4 8.4 39.3 104.5 17.6 7.7 25.3 129.8
1934 :1.8 2.4 7.5 5.8 2.3 .4 .1 11.4 9.4 41.1 115.2 17.8 7.8 25.6 140.8
1935 : 1.5 2.4 6.6 5.7 2.5 .4 .1 11.0 9.2 39.4 111.2 18.7 8.5 27.2 138.4
1936 : 1.6 2.7 7.3 5.8 2.2 .5 .2 13.3 9.4 43.0 112.5 17.6 8.8 26.4 138.9 ,
1937 : 1.7 3.1 7.8 5.1 2.1 .4 .2 12.0 9.4 41.8 111.0 18.8 10.0 28.8 139.8 o
1938 : 1.8 2.9 8.0 5.2 2.4 .5 .1 10.9 9.8 41.6 114.5 17.7 9.5 27.2 141.7
1939 : 1.7 3.3 8.3 5.1 2.4 .5 .2 12.6 9.7 43.8 116.6 15.8 9.6 25.4 142.0
1940 : 1.7 3.5 8.2 5.6 2.3 .4 .1 11.7 10.0 43.5 116.9 17.4 9.1 26.5 143.4
1941 :1.6 2.6 8.8 6.2 2.3 .5 .2 11.0 9.8 43.0 113.5 15.1 9.4 24.5 138.0
1942 : 1.4 2.7 7.9 6.7 2.2 .4 .2 12.3 9.9 43.7 118.3 14.5 8.0 22.5 140.8
1943 : 1.3 2.6 7.0 6.3 1.7 .4 .1 10.9 9.8 40.1 116.4 13.8 7.9 21.7 138.1
1944 : 1.2 3.1 7.4 6.7 1.8 .5 .2 12.7 10.1 43.7 123.5 18.4 9.6 28.0 151.5
1945 : 1.1 3.5 8.2 7.9 2.5 .6 .2 13.4 10.5 47.9 133.8 19.5 10.2 29.7 163.5
1946 :1.5 3.6 9.1 7.7 2.9 .6 .3 13.4 10.3 49.4 129.9 19.4 11.2 30.6 160.5
1947 : 1.3 3.3 7.9 7.7 2.5 .4 .2 12.6 8.6 44.5 122.4 18.1 9.9 28.0 150.4
1948 :1.3 3.4 8.5 8.7 2.7 .5 .2 11.8 8.8 45.9 123.0 17.5 9.8 27.3 150.3
1949 : 1.2 3.1 8.2 7.6 2.5 .4 .2 11.3 9.0 43.5 115.8 17.9 8.9 26.8 142.6
1950 : 1.1 3.0 8.4 7.7 2.4 .4 .2 11.3 8.7 43.2 114.6 15.8 9.1 24.9 139.5
1951 : .9 2.8 8.8 7.6 2.5 .4 .2 11.4 8.7 43.3 111.6 17.2 8.9 26.1 137.7
1952 1.0 2.6 8.6 7.8 2.6 .5 .2 11.3 8.8 43.4 111.0 17.1 8.6 25.7 13o.7
1953 : .9 2.4 8.6 7.8 2.6 .4 .2 10.9 7.4 41.2 108.3 19.0 9.2 28.2 1'6.5
1954 .8 2.2 8.7 8.5 2.8 .4 .2 10.7 6.4 40.7 107.3 19.3 9.6 28.9 1- 2
1955 : .8 2.2 8.6 8.3 2.8 .4 .3 10.4 6.8 40.6 104.6 20.0 9.2 29.2 133.8
1956 : .8 2.3 8.5 8.2 2.6 .4 .2 10.7 7.3 41.0 106.9 18.9 8.9 27.8 134.7
1957 : .7 2.5 8.1 7.8 2.8 .4 .2 10.8 7.2 40.5 104.6 17.9 7.8 25.7 130.3
1958 / : .6 2.2 7.6 8.4 2.6 .4 .2 10.9 6.8 39.7 101.1 18.7 8.2 26.9 128.0
i Excludes quantities produced in home gardens. Minor vegetables on basis of carlot shipment data estimated to be 43 percent "leafy,
green and yellow" 1919-49, then based on production of known items in each group, increasing each year to 55 percent in 1955; subsequentlyH
minor distributed each year on basis production of known items. Civilian consumption only, 1941 to date. 2/ Includes 0.1 pounds of \
shallots in each year beginning 1929. In earlier years shallots are included in minor vegetables. Includes onions used in dehydration. "o
3/ Included in minor vegetables. 4/ Less than 0.05 pounds. ~ Preliminary.





TV~s.1


OCTOBER 1959


36 -
Potatoes, sweetpotatoes, dry edible beans, and dry field peas:
consumption, primary distribution weight, 1909-58 /


Year Potatoes : Sweetpotatoes :Dry edible beans : Dry field peas
*2 2/ 3/ 4

S Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds

1909 : 187 26.2 6.8
1910 : 198 26.2 6.5
1911 : 157 24.0 6.3
1912 : 179 24.0 6.8
1913 : 189 23.6 6.15
1914 157 22.1 6.4
1915 : 185 25.3 5.8
1916 143 24.5 5.1
1917 146 27.9 7.5
1918 :174 26.7 7.4
1919 : 152 29.3 5.4
1920 : 140 29.1 5.7
1921 : 156 27.2 4.8
1922 : 143 28.9 5.1
1923 174 24.8 5.9
1924 154 17.6 7.8
1925 : 157 17.7 7.35/
1926 128 21.1 7.6
1927 141 25.0 8.7
1928 147 20.7 8.6 0.5
1929 : 159 22.4 7.8 .4
1930 : 132 18.3 9.5 .5
1931 : 136 20.6 8.8 .7
1932 : 134 27.7 7.4 .6
1933 : 132 24.0 7.1 .9
1934 :135 24.4 9.1 .8
1935 : 142 25.6 8.4 .5
1936 :130 19.8 9.0 .6
1937 : 126 21.5 7.8 .6
1938 :129 21.3 9.6 .6
1939 : 122 19.7 9.3 .7
1940 : 123 16.2 8.4 .7
1941 : 128 18.4 8.8 .5
1942 : 127 20.4 11.1 .6
1943 :125 21.4 8.9 .8
1944 : 136 19.7 8.1 .8
1945 : 122 18.3 7.8 .8
1946 :123 17.2 8.7 .7
1947 :127 14.5 6.5 .5
1948 : 105 11.5 6.8 .8
1949 : 110 11.7 6.9 .4
1950 : 106 12.1 8.6 .8
1951 : 113 8.1 8.1 .7
1952 : 101 7.3 8.1 .5
1953 : 106 8.0 7.6 .6
1954 : 106 8.o 8.2 .6
1955 : 106 8.2 7.3 .4
1956 : '; 7.6 8.0 .7
1957 : 100 7.2 7.5 .6
1958 6/ : 100 6.7 7.6 .2
1/ Civilian consumption only, beginning 1941. 2/ Farm weight basis, calendar years. Includes
farm garden produce but not nonfarm. Excludes canned sweetpotatoes and canned and frozen pota-
toes; includes potatoes used in manufacture of potato chips. 3/ Cleaned basis, calendar years.
4/ Cleaned basis, crop years beginning approximately September of year indicated. 2/ Basic data
inadequate. 6/ Preliminary.


Per capital


Table -. -







Table 8.--Vegetables and melons for fresh market: Reported commercial acreage and production of
principal crops, selected seasons, average 1949-57, 1958 and indicated 1959

Acreage Production

1959 1:5
Seasonal group : Average Average
and crop : 199-57 1958 Per- 1949-57 1958 : Per-
S _/ Indicated centage / Indicated centage
: of 1958 of 1958
: Acres Acres Acres Pet. 1000 cwt. 1,000 cwt. 1000 cwt. Pet.


Winter 2/
Spring /
Summer 2


Fall:
Beans, snap
Early
Late
Total

Broccoli
Brussels sprouts
Cabbage 2/
Early
Late
Total

Carrots
Early
Late
Total

Cauliflower
Early
Late
Total

Celery
Early
Late
Total

Corn
Cucumbers
Early
Late
Total

Eggplant
Lettuce
Early
Late
Total


Peas, green
Peppers, green
Spinach
Tomatoes
Early
Late
Total


: 263,9
: 695,7:
: 902,3


LO
10
50


: 18,050
: 17,900
: 35.950


211,100
695,320
946,170



14,600
15,800
30.400


237,310
653,130
890,980



13,700
14,500
28.200


31,074
49,212
88,301



712
518
1.230


27,998
52,247
97,353



595
580
1.175


29,882
49,299
94,566



516
487
1. 00


22,020 23,950 23,700 99 1,006 1,161 1,111 96
S 5,590 4,900 5,500 112 549 564 553 98

42,760 37,510 35,310 94 9,800 10,215 7,668 75
4 ,290 3,150 3,600 114 472 402 444 110
S 47,050 40,660 38,910 96 10,272 10,617 8,112 76


: 18,530 21,640 16,750 77 4,496 5,117 4,407 86
: 9,770 10,000 8,100 81 2,393 2,400 2,025 84
: 28,300 31,640 24,850 79 6,889 7,517 6,432 86


: 8,250 7,900 7,250 92 1,364 1,282 1,087 85
: 5,660 5,900 6,500 110 860 1,062 1,040 98
: 13,910 13,800 13,750 100 2,224 2,344 2,127 91


: 3,640 2,660 2,510 94 965 776 667 86
: 7,980 7,400 7,100 96 2,891 2,738 2,840 104
: 11,620 10,060 9,610 96 3,856 3,514 3,507 100

: 5,180 13,000 10,100 78 323 780 622 80

: 4,620 5,700 5,900 104 401 508 499 98
: 4,530 5,100 6,200 122 470 586 682 116
: 9,150 10,800 12,100 112 871 1,094 1,181 108

: 1,420 1,600 1,850 116 96 126 146 116

: 43,940 35,250 29,850 85 5,874 4,691 4,110 88
: 13,840 26,600 22,500 85 1,805 3,192 3,150 99
: 57,780 61,850 52,350 85 7,679 7,883 7,260 92


2,480
7,370
6,730

18,730
16,500
35,230


1,900
5,200
5,730

20,800
10,900
31,700


1,600
5,600
5,650

20,500
11,800
32,300


88
326
423

2,902


44
325
319

3,328


56
321
286

3,075


Total fall to date : 289,7
Total acreage and
production reported:
to date for 1959 : 2,151,830


287,190 266,070


2,139,780 2,047,490


93 38,734


40,791 35,792


96 207,321 218,389 209,539


SFor group and annual totals, averages of the yearly totals.
Includes cabbage used for sauerkraut.
Includes asparagus used for processing and cabbage for sauerkraut.

Vegetables-Fresh Market, USDA, AMS, issued monthly.


TVS-134


- 37 -


OCTOBER 1959








Table 9,--Truck crops, potatoes and sweetpotatoes: Unloads at 38 markets, indicated periods 1958 and 1959


(Expressed in carlot equivalents)
1958 1959

September 5-26 July 3-31 August 7-28 September 4-25 October 2-1i
Commodity :
Rail : : Rail ail : Rail : : :Ral Rail : : :
and : Truck : : Total : and : Truck : : Total :and : Truck : : Total and : Truck : Total : and : Truck : : Total
boat ports boat : ports : boat : ports : boat : ports : : boat: ports
: : : boat


Asparagus
Beans, lima, snap, and:
fava 1
Beets ---
Broccoli 47
Cabbage : 12
Cantaloups and
other melons 1 : 2,715
Carrots 508
Cauliflower : 50
Celery : 649
Corn 43
Cucumbers 19
Escarole and endive
Lettuce and romaine : 3,054
Onions 587
Peas, green 68
Peppers 68
Spinach 29
Tomatoes 199
iLurnip and rutabagas -
Watermelons 22
Other vegetables


(including mixed)
Total


Potatoes
Sweetpotatoes

Grand total


--- --- 31 ---


1,256 ---
188 ---
92 ---
2,580 -

1,723
985 16
1,257 ---
1,572 -
3,374 ---
1,068 ---
175 ---
2,753 12
2,184 7
30 ---
1,112 ---
227 -
4,321 2
191 207
2,384 ---


1,257
188
139
2,592


--- 1,777 --
1 259 --
14 77 --
10 2,979 28


4,438 5,116 3,473 --
1,509 845 986 1
1,307 45 525 --
2,221 1,313 1,606 ---
3,417 478 6,089 11
1,087 16 2,150 20
175 2 213 --
5,819 3,695 4,320 31
2,778 1,395 1,940 36
98 76 70 --
1,180 78 1,524 1
256 9 232 ---
4,522 1,028 7,130 36
398 3 158 12
2,406 2,111 16,964 11


1,777
260
91
3,017


-- 1,405 --
--- 169 --
12 47 --
7 2,376 --


8,589 3,282 2,820 ---
1,832 469 798 7
570 72 448 --
2,919 532 1,466 ---
6,578 25 4,134 42
2,186 2 1,286 ---
215 --- 170 ---
8,046 3,505 2,782 14
3,371 643 1,939 65
146 46 23 --
1,603 3 1,201 --
241 26 121 ---
8,194 454 4,468 16
173 --- 106 38
19,086 212 7,671 ---


1,405
169
59
2,383


-- 1,168 --
--- 175 --
17 74 --
40 2,686 -


6,102 2,809 1,499 ---
1,274 447 1,005 32
520 76 576 ---
1,998 594 1,515 --
4,201 30 2,790 ---
1,288 --- 1,078 --
170 1 185 ---
6,301 3,142 2,634 ---
2,647 571 2,198 29
69 38 10 --
1,204 47 1,104 ---
147 58 143 ---
4,938 363 3,706 1
144 2 161 136
7,883 18 2,134 --


2 --- 2

1,168 4 966 --- 970
175 --- 110 --- 110
91 43 127 --- 170
2,726 139 2,052 2,082

4,308 721 390 --- 1,111
1,484 417 772 31 1,220
652 17 871 --- 888
2,109 572 982 --- 1,554
2,820 54 438 --- 492
1,078 19 876 --- 895
186 1 151 --- 152
5,776 2,408 2,324 --- 4,732
2,798 380 1,518 --- 1,8
48 21 6 --- 27
1,151 193 563 --- 756
201 27 177 --. 204
4,070 818 2,028 --- 2,846
299 --- 232 203 435
2,152 --- 146 --- 146


S 405 23 --- 428 378 71 --- 449 338 48 --- 386 496 22 --- 518 469 32 --- 501
: 8,476 27,495 244 36,215 16,613 52,574 187 69,374 9,628 33,478 182 43,288 8,749 24,863 198 33,810 6,194 14,763 234 21,1l'

:4,643 10,215 1 14,859 7,765 1,20 6 18,061 4,359 8,426 --- 12,785 4,210 9,644 2 1,35'. 3,8 6,120 8 10,020
_ 5 1,418 --- 1,423 --- --- 464 2 801 --- 803 5 1,434 --- 1,439 8 1,226 --- 1,23L


: 13,124 39,128 245


52,497 24,378 63,328 193


87,899 13,989 42,705 182


56,876 12,964 35,941 200


49,105 10,094 22,109 242 32,445


1/ Except watermelons.


Markets: Albany, Atlanta, Baltimore, Birmingham, Boston, Buffalo, Chicago, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbia, Dallas, Denver, Detroit,

Houston, Indianapolis, Kansas City, Los Angeles, Louisville, Memphis, Miami, Milwaukee, Minneapolis, Nashville, Newark, New Orleans,

New York, Oakland, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Portland (Ore.), Providence, St. Louis, St. Paul, Salt Lake City, San Antonio,

San Francisco, Washington, and Wichita.


Truck unloads are not 100 percent complete but represent. nighest percentage obtainable under local conditions in markets covered.


Market Iews: Weekly reports, USDA, Al-NS.








Table lO.--Vegetables, fresh: Representative prices (l.c.l. sales) at New York and Chicago
for stock of generally good quality and condition (U.S. No. 1 when available)
indicated periods, 1958 and 19ly

Tuesday nearest mid-month
Market State 1958 : 1959
and of Unit
Commodity Origin Sept. Oct. Sept. Oct.
16 14 15 13
:Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars


New York


Beans, snap, green,
Valentine
Broccoli
Cabbage, domestic round type
Cantaloups
Carrots, bunched
Carrots, topped, washed
Cauliflower, -a tskill
Celery, Pascal
Celery, Pascal
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Escarole
Honey Dews
Lettuce, Iceberg type
Onions, yellow, medium size
Onions, yellow, large size
Peas, green
Peppers, green, medium large
Tomatoes


New York
California
New Jersey
California
California
California
New York
New York
California
Florida
New Jersey
New Jersey
California
California
New York
Idaho
California
New Jersey
California


Bu. bskt.
14's small crt.-bunches
1 3/5 bu. box
Jumbo crt. 36's
4 doz. 2/3 W. G. A. crt.
48-ib. film bag crt.
Crt. 12's
2-3 doz. 16" crt.
2 doz. 16" crt.
Bu. bskt.
Bu. bskt.
1 1/9 bu. crt.
8's jumbo crt.
2-doz. crtn.
50 lb. sack
50 Ib. sack
Bu. bskt.
Bu. bskt.
6 x 6 lug boxes


Chicago


Beans, snap, green,
Valt ent tie
Beets, bunched
Broccoli
Cabbage, domestic round type
Cantaloups
Carrots, topped, washed
Cauliflower

Celery, Pascal type
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Escarole
Honey Dews
Lettuce, Iceberg type,
dry pack
Onions, Spanish
Peas, green
Peppers, green
Tomatoes, green, ripe
and turning


Mississippi:
Illinois
California
Illinois
California
California
California

California
Florida
Illinois
California
California

California
Colorado
California
Illinois

California


Bu. basket
18's-1 3/5 bu. crt.
14's -crt.
1 3/5 bu. crt.
36's jumbo crt.
48-lb. film bag crt.
Crtn. 2-layer filmwrod.
12's
2-3 doz. 16" crt.
Bu. bskt.
Bu. bskt.
Crates, 24's
9-12's std. crt,

2 doz. heads, crtn.
3" and lgr.-50 lb. sack
Bu. bskt.
Bu. bskt.

6 x 6 and Igr. Lug. box,
20 lb. flat 2 layers


2.13
3.35
1.05
7.25
6.00
4.63
2.20

5.30

1.63
1.00
: 4.18
3.25
1.50
2.60
5.00
2.25







3.15
1.10
6.75
4.35

3.50
4.35
: i_-
1.65

3.85

2.75
2.25

2.25


3.42
.88
7.40
5. '8
4.48
1.75
3.25
4.10
6.25
2.75
1.13
3.76
4.75
1.62
2.80
6.00
1.88
4.40




3.25
1.60
3.15
.90

4.15

3.50
3.50
5.75
1.75

3.65

3.50
2.35
5.00
1.75


2.50


3.50
5.00
2.38
8.25
5.25
4.82
2.75
3.80
6.45
-7-
1.88
2.13
4.25
6.35
1.17
2.89

2.75
5.00





1.50
4.00
1.35
7.00
4.25

4.15
5.50

1.35

4.50

5.25
2.65

2.15


3.25
2.13
6.50
4.65
4.75
2.50
4.00
5.75
4.00
3.25
1 38
4.25
5.75
1.07
2.75
6.25
1/1.75
3.60




3.00
1.25
3.25
1.75

4.50

3.50
5.35
4.35
1.35
3.35
4.00

4.25
2.50
6.25


1/ Small-Medium


Weekly Summary of Terminal Market Prices, USDA, AMS, Market News Reports.


3.65 4.00


TVS-134


- 39 -


OCTIEII 1959






TVS-1 34


Table 11.-- Vegetables, commercial for fresh market:


OCTOBER 1959

Index numbers (unadjusted) of


prices received by farmers, as of 15th of the month, United States by
months, average 1935-39; average 1947-49, and 1950 to date l1/


(1910-1914=100)

Period Jan.. Feb. Mar. Apr. : May : June : July : Aug. : Sept.: Oct. Nov. : Dec. :Average


1935-39 : 114 121 133 130 125 98 87 82 81 90 103 115 107
1947-49 : 285 305 310 308 277 215 207 196 193 204 241 246 249

Year
1950 : 257 213 1'5 276 231 211 200 170 156 165 214 249 211
1951 : 338 346 288 333 276 215 203 197 190 211 290 343 269
1952 : 301 249 294 341 311 294 289 240 203 227 272 285 276
1953 : 267 273 254 252 251 285 246 209 191 206 226 241 242
1954 : 254 239 236 265 255 204 222 192 176 202 240 223 226

1955 : 251 273 260 272 254 220 206 210 226 219 245 230 239
1956 :246 276 271 246 262 291 264 202 184 215 281 267 250
1957 : 241 237 238 271 285 281 269 233 200 213 217 246 244
1958 : 310 356 o01 342 280 218 197 173 183 214 256 236 264
1959 / : 302 304 298 294 285 227 229 228 229

I/ Revised. In addition to the vegetables included in the series published prior to January 1954, the
following have been added; broccoli, sweet corn, cucumbers, and watermelons.
2/ Preliminary.
Agricultural Prices, USDA, Al-IS, issued monthly.

Table 12 .--Vegetables, for commercial processing: Harvested acreage and estimated
production, average 1948-57, annual 1958, and indicated 1959

Harvested acreage :Production

: Prelim- Indi- : 1959 as
Commodity Average 1958 : inar Average 158 cated : percent-
: 1946-5 1959 :1948-57 : : 1959 : age of
S: 1958

:Acres Acres Acres Tons Tons Tons Percent

Beans, lima : 101,600 81,680 83,750 93,300 88,800 90,400 102
Beans, snap :131,800 51,160 163,200 290,700 360,700 382,800 106
Beets : 17,600 16,060 14,500 153,300 152,100 148,200 97
Cabbage for kraut
(contract) 8,700 7,490 8,060 106,800 125,300 116,600 93
Corn, sweet : 442,600 386,410 431,300 1,376,400 1,324,600 1,654,600 125
Peas, green : 427,900 378,200 344,100 449,o00 485,500 461,800 95
Spinach
Winter and spring ]/ 26,820 22,300 28,030 99,100 92,300 134,100 145
Tomatoes 340,300 345,850 289,100 3,298,300 4,287,300 3,565,000 83

Total to date :1,497,320 1,389,150 1,362,040 5,867,700 6,916,600 6,553,500 95

Asparagus 95,200 107,230 --- 105,830 111,200 -
Cabbage for kraut
(open market) : 7,200 4,460 --- 93,900 77,700 -
Cucumbers : 131,800 119,650 --- 293,500 356,800 -
Spinach (fall) / : 6,480 7,570 --- 25,600 31,500 -

Acreage and
production :4,737,500 1,628,060 --- 6,381,200 7,493,800


ij 1949-57 averages.
Vegetables-Processing, USDA, AMS,


issued monthly.


- 40 -





- 41 -


Table 13.--Canned vegetables: Commercial packs 1957 and 1958 and canners' and
wholesale distributors' stocks 1958 and 1959, by commodities, United States


OCTOBER 1959


Pack Stocks
Commodity :
Common y Canners / Wholesale distributors 1/
197 : 1958 Date 1958 1959 Date 1958 1959
: : : : :


1,000
cases
24/2's


Major commodities
Beans, snap
Corn, sweet
Peas, green
Tomatoes
Tomato juice 2,


:26,174
: 31,533
:33,857
: 21,686
: 32,590


1,000
cases
24/2's


26,432
27,075
29,549
30,465
37,467


July
Aug.
June
July
July


1,000
cases
24/2's


4,909
4,461
7,661
2,715
9,400


1,000
cases
24/2's


5,592
2,342
8,840
6,512
10,747


1,000 1,000
cases cases
24/2's 24/2's


July
July
June
July
July


2,484
2,953
3,269
2,652
2,349


2,571
2,825
3,183
2,901
2,742


Total


: 145,040


Minor commodities
Asparagus
Beans, lima
Beets
Blackeye peas
Carrots
Okra 3/
Pickles
Pimientos
Pumpkin and squash
Sauerkraut
Potatoes
Sweetpotatoes
Spinach
Other greens
Tomato products:
Catsup and
chilli sauce
Paste
Pulp and puree
Sauce
Vegetables mixed,


5,887
2,518
8,335
1,418
2,517
560
4/25,146
357
3,327
/ 9,202
3,243
5,345
6,346
2,103


18,180
6/ 8,741
4,527
7,969
3,454


Total comparable :
minor items : 119,175


Grand total
comparable items


:265,015


jI.U, oo


6,183
2,464
8,030
1,951
3,186
853
/ 24,262
493
3,535
/ 10,962
3,383
7,017
5,240
2,318


21,075
6/ 11,477
4,320
12,158
3,463


132,370


29,140 34,033


Mar.. 1,445
Aug. 1 581
July 1 2,998

July 1 1,284



July 1 1,047
Aug. 1 5/3,209


1,329
471
2,651

1,266



865
5/3,404


Mar. 1 1,806 1,104


July 1
July 1
July 1
July 1


5,835
7/1,632
1/1,070
I/1,458


7,043
7/2,899
1/1,067
1/3,764


22,365 2.5,863


51,511 59,896


283,358


13,7U 14,222


Apr.
July
July


July 1



July 1
July 1


Apr. 1



July 1
July 1
July 1
July 1


614
477
1,043

418



388
601


604



1,559
642
645
858


556
422
1,107

408



405
620


583



1,400
658
558
672


7,849 7,389


21,556 21,611


Converted from actual cases to standard cases of 24 No. 2 cans.
Includes combination vegetable juices containing at least 70 percent tomato juice.
Okra, okra and tomatoes, and okra, corn and tomatoes.
Crop for processing converted to a canned basis by applying an overall conversion factor (pickles 68
and sauerkraut 54 cases equivalent to 1 ton fresh).
SReported in barrels; converted to 24/2's by using 14 cases to the barrel.
Estimated, basis California pack.
California only.


Canners' stock and pack data from National Canners Association, unless otherwise noted.
distributors' stocks from United States Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census.


Wholesale


TVS-134


,1, nl, __ _^_





- 42 -


OCTOBER 1959


Table 14-Vegetables, frozen: United States commercial packs 1957 and 1958 and
cold-storage holdings, October 1, 1959 with comparisons

:Packs Cold-storage holdings

Commodity October 1 :October 1, : October 1,
1957 1958 average 1958 1959
: :1954-58


Asparagus
Beans, green
and wax
Beans, lima
Broccoli
Brussels sprouts
Carrots
Cauliflower
Corn, cut
Corn-on-cob
Mixed vegetables
Peas
Peas and carrots
Pumpkin and
squash
Rhubarb
Spinach
Succotash
Kale
Okra
Peas, Blackeye
Potato products
Turnip greens
Miscellaneous
vegetables


1,000
pounds


31,201

134,361
S 131,380
80,452
: 33,354
34,237
22,690
112,917
13,699
4 1,547
295,823
21,017

S 13,151
4,704
102,130
10,037
4,106
17,070
11,624
: 219,860
10,873

S 20,332


1,366,565


1,000
pounds


24,365

156,006
125,910
109,679
30,424
53,713
33,251
111,039
10,370
37,297
251,934
21,467

18,007
4,448
97,472
8,937
3,579
15,767
13,012
269,462
11,041

26,064

1,433,244


1,000
pounds

26,025

112,182
117,416
31,339
11,369
2'
11,739
3,'103,705
4.
2,
253,104
2

2.
2,
35,941
2

2

2.
2.

114,148

316,972


1,000
pounds


28,592

123,830
126,439
28,014
8,443
2'
8,4uo
./110,512
4
13,473
268,424
7,318

2
2
29,522
2
2'
2

32,592
2

75,113

860,752


1,000
pounds

27,387

136,339
109,185
39,989
11,530
9,481
11,190
,. 98,735
4
11,102
280,808
7,200


2.'
2


2

46,530


73,698

914,673


1/ Preliminary. 2. Included in miscellaneous vegetables Sweet corn. 4-' Corn-on-cob
included with sweet corn.

Pack data from TNational Association of Frozen Food Packers.


Table 15.--United States average prices received by farmers per cwt. for important
field crops, September 15, 1959, with comprrlsons

S Average 1958 1959

August January
Commodity 1909- 1947- September July August September
SJuly December 15 15 15 15
1914 1949
Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars


Potatoes
Sweetpotatoes
Beans, dry edible
Peas, dry field


1.14
1.60
3.37


2.46
4.28
9.92
4.60


1.22
2.74
6.49
4.85


2.70
6.10
6.79
4.17


1.82
2.94
6.77
3.70


1.62
2.68
5.90
3.48


Agricultural Prices, USDA, AMS, issued monthly.


TVS-134


Total





OCTOBER 1959


Table 16.--Vegetables, fresh: Average price received by farmers,
September 15, 1959 with comparisons


per cwt. United States,


1958 : 1959
Commodity : : :
August September July : August September
Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars

Beans, snap 6.20 7.80 7.90 7.20 9.00
Broccoli 8.10 8.60 7.50 9.00 10.10
Cabbage 1.55 1.55 2.80 2.55 2.50
Cantaloups 3.05 3.45 4.25 4.45 3.75
Carrots 4.05 3.35 4.50 3.55 3.15
Cauliflower 4.15 4.15 3.50 4.60 3.80
Celery 2.55 3.50 3.45 3.45 4.45
Corn, sweet 3.05 2.30 3.80 3.05 2.65

Cucumbers : 3.40 3.95 4.50 4.05 4.70
Lettuce 2.20 3.50 3.80 4.15 6.10
Onions 2.05 2.40 2.50 3.05 1.90
Peppers, green : 7.80 6.00 7.70 6.60 5.20
Spinach 5.80 6.20 5.80 6.80 7.10
Tomatoes 6.30 4.40 7.00 7.40 5.20
Watermelons .95 .95 1.20 1.30 1.40


Agricultural Prices, USDA-AMS, issued monthly.


Table 17.--Potatoes: Acreage, yield per acre, and production, average 1949-57,
annual 1958 and indicated 1959

Acreage Yield per acre Production
: Harvested : : :
Seasonal : : For : : Indi- : Indi-
Group : Average: harvest: Average. 1958 : cated Average 1958 : cated
: 1949-57: 1958 : 1959 1949-57: : 1959 1949-57: : 1959

: 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
:acres acres acres Cwt. Cwt. Cwt. cwt. cwt. cwt.

Winter : 26.3 34.5 26.3 156.2 144.1 147.3 4,103 4,971 3,874

Spring
Early : 24.8 31.2 25.8 134.8 150.7 128.3 3,355 1/4,703 3,311
Late : 185.4 166.2 137.9 133.6 145.3 163.5 24,540 24,152 22,553

Summer
Early : 128.6 117.3 110.7 95.7 125.0 124.7 12,217 1/14,659 13,806
Late : 210.7 183.8 177.4 158.5 186.7 184.7 33,052 1/34,308 32,774

Fall
8 Eastern 299.9 288.5 271.5 206.8 228.0 217.9 61,884 65,788 59,168
9 Central : 327.9 308.3 311.9 117.6 142.0 133.2 38,408 43,785 41,543
9 Western 277.4 337.2 335.2 188.0 217.6 198.4 52,269 73,363 66,514
Total : 905.2 934.0 918.6 168.9 195.9 182.0 152,561 182,936 167,225

United States : 1,481.1 1,467.0 ,396.7 155.8 181.1 174.4 229,829 265,729 243,543

l/ Production includes the following quantities not harvested or not marketed because of low
prices (thousand hundredweight): Earl Spring 395; Early Summer 136; Late Summer 403.


Crop Production, USDA, AMS, issued monthly.


TVS-134


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TVS-134


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OCTOBER 1959


Table.18.--Potatoes: Price f.o.b. shipping points and wholesale price
at New York and Chicago, indicated periods 1958 and 1959

Week ended

1958 1959
Variety State Unit
Sept. : Oct. : Sept. Oct.
S20 8 19 : 17

: : Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol.
F.o.b. shipping
points


Various varieties,
mostly Katahdin


: Rochester,
: New York


Various varieties,
mostly Katahdin, :Benton Harbor,
unwashed Michigan
Chippewas and :South and Con-
Katahdin, unwashed: tral New
:Jersey Points


Terminal Markets


U. S. No. 1
50 Ib. sack

U. S. No. 1
50 lb. sack


.76


'./.73


.70 1.06


.77


1.16


.95


U. S. No. 1 :
100 Ib. sack: 1.31 1.25 2/1.68 -/1.88
Tuesday nearest mid-month

1958 1959

Sept. Oct. Sept. Oct.
16 14 15 13
: ol. Dol. Dol. Dol.


New York


Chippewas and
Katahdin, unwashed: Long Island

Russets, washed : Idaho-Oregon
2 inch minimum


Chicago

Russets
Rnound Reds


: Washington
LVinnesota-


: 50 Ib. sack : .84

S50 lb. sack : 2.38




: 100 lb. sack: 3.30


.83 1.18

2.20 2.50




3.15 4.05


SNorth Dakota : 100 lb. sack; 1.65 2.20 2.40 2.65
I/ West Michigan points. 2/ 50 pound price doubled.
F.o.b. prices are simple averages of the range of daily prices, compiled
from Market News Service reports. The market prices are representative prices
for Tuesday of each week and are submitted by the Market News Service repre-
sentative at each market.


1.25

2.50




3.65








Table 19.--Sweetpotatoes: Acreage, yield per acre and production,
average 1949-57, annual 1958 and indicated 1959

Acreage Yield per acre Production
Group H :
and : Har d For : Indi- : : Indi-
State : : harvest : average 1958 : cated : Average 1958 : cated
S1949- 1958 1959 199-57 : 1959 1949-57 : 1959
-1::95:: : 1959

:1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
:acres acres acres Cwt. Cwt. Cwt. cwt. cwt. cwt.
Central
Atlantic 38.1 39.9 42.8 85 96 92 3,224 3,812 3,924
Lower
Atlantic 2/ 102.5 56.6 54.5 52 64 63 5,365 3,614 3,424
South
Central 3/ 194.8 154.3 160.1 50 57 59 9,778 8,750 9,424
North
Central 4/ : 3.5 3.2 3.3 55 74 76 192 238 250

California : 11.7 12.0 13.0 70 85 78 817 1,020 1,014
United States 352.9 266.0 273.7 55.5 65.5 65.9 19,516 17,434 18,036

l New Jersey, Maryland, and Virginia. 2/ North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida.
/ Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Texas. / Missouri
and Kansas.




Table 20.--Sweetpotatoes: Price f.o.b. shipping points and wholesale price
(l.c.l. sales) at New York and Chicago, indicated periods, 1958 and 1959

Week ended

: 1958 :
Item : State Unit 19 1959

: : Sept. 20 : Oct. 18 : Sept. 19 : Oct. 17


: Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol.
F.o.b. shipping points
Puerto Rican :Southern Louisiana
: points : 50 Ib. crt. : 2.56 2.30 2.38 2.18
lNerimaola : Eastern Shore,
: Virginia : Bu. bskt. : 1.55 1.86 1.60 ---

Tuesday nearest mid-month
Terminal markets 1958 19

:Sept. 16 :Oct. 14 Sept. 15 :Oct. 13
:Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol.
New York
Golden : Virginia : Bu. bskt. 1.70 2.17 1.90 1.87

Chicago
Puerto Rican : Louisiana : 50 lb. crt. : 3.15 3.15 3.15 2.90


F.o.b. prices are simple averages of the range of daily prices, compiled from Market News Service
reports. The market prices are representative prices for Tuesday of each week and are submitted by the
Market News Service representative at each market.


TVS-134


- 45 -


OCTOBER 1959







Table 21.--Beans, dry, edible: Acreage, yield per acre, and production,
average 1948-57, annual 1958 and indicated 1959 j

Acreage Yield per acre Production
States
and Harvested : For Average: Indi- Indi-
classes :Average: harvest :. 1958 .cated :Average : 1958 .cated
1948i-57: 1958 1959 1948-57 1959 :1948-57 1959
: 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
Acres acres acres Pounds Pounds Pounds bags bags bags


Maine, New York, Michigan :586 653 641 952 1,001 1,196 5,570 6,537 7,667
Nebraska, Montana, Idaho,
Wyoming, Washington : 301 371 361 1,597 1,708 1,666 4,796 6,335 6,014
Colorado, New Mexico,
Arizona, and Utah :319 278 255 708 726 678 2,170 2,018 1,728
California
Large lima 72 66 60 1,640 1,656 1,600 1,171 1,093 960
Baby lima 46 22 22 1,624 1,618 1,700 724 356 374
Other 197 210 193 1,201 1,258 1,325 2,375 2,642 2,557

Total California 315 298 275 1,358 1,373 1,415 4,270 4,091 3,891

United States :1,521 1,600 1,.22 1,113 1,186 1,260 16,804 18,981 19,300


Includes beans grown for seed.
SBags of 100 pounds (cleaned).

Crop Production, USDA. AMS, issued monthly.


Table 22.--Peas, dry, field: Acreage, yield per acre, and production,
average 1948-57, annual 1958 and indicated 1959 1/

Acreage Yield per acre Production

State Harvested For AverageInd- Average Indi-
"'harvest Ave rag 1958 1:A9age
:Average: 1958 :1948-57: 8 cated 194-57 : 1958 cated
:1948-57: 1959 1959 1959
: 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
: acres acres acres Pounds Pounds Pounds bags bags bags

Minnesota 4 3 4 1,001 1,100 1,300 41 33 52
North Dakota 4 2 4 934 1,300 1,100 34 26 44
Idaho : 93 77 119 1,197 1,450 1,450 1,119 1,116 1,726

Colorado : 0 12 10 87d 1,000 900 90 120 90
Washingtcn 140 101 140 1,148 1,060 1,500 1,588 1,071 2,100
Oregon 11 7 10 934 1,400 1,500 103 98 150
California 8 1 2. 1,163 1,100 1,450 93 11 29

United States : 21 203 289 1,145 1,219 1,150 3,193 2,475 4,191



i/ In principal commercial producing States. Includes peas grown for seed and peas harvested
dry.
2/ Bags of 100 pounds (cleaned).


Crop Production, USDA, AMS, issued monthly.


-46 -


TVS-134


OCTOBER 1959







LIST OF TABLES
Table Title Page
1 Average retail price of specified fresh and canned items, by months, 1957 to date .. 24
2 Commercially produced vegetables: Civilian per capital consumption, United States,
1937-58 .................................... ......... ...... .... .. 30

3 Civilian per capital consumption of selected commercially produced fresh and processed
vegetables, United States, calendar years 1937-58 .................................... 31

4 Canned vegetables: Per capital consumption 1909-58 ................................. 32

5 Vegetables, frozen: Per capital consumption, 1937-58 ................................ 33

6 Fresh vegetables and melons, commercial: Per capital consumption, farm weight,
1919-58 ........................................................................... 34

7 Potatoes, sweetpotatoes, dry edible beans, and dry field peas: Per capital consump-
tiogprimary distribution weight, 1909-58 .......................................... 36

8 Vegetables and melons for fresh market: Reported commercial acreage and production
of principal crops, selected seasons, average 1949-57, 1958, and indicated 1959 .... 37

9 Truck crops, potatoes and sweetpotatoes: Unloads at 38 markets, indicated periods,
1958 and 1959 ........ ... .................................................. 38

10 Vegetables, fresh: Representative prices (l.c.l. sales) at New York and Chicago for
stock of generally good quality and condition (U. S. No. 1 when available) indicated
periods, 1958 and 1959 ............................................................ 39
11 Vegetables, commercial for fresh market: Index numbers (unadjusted) of prices receiv-
ed by farmers, as of 15th of the month, United States by months, average 1935-39;
average 1947-49, and 1950 to date .................................................. 40
12 Vegetables, for commercial processing: Harvested acreage and estimated production,
average 1948-57, annual 1958, and indicated 1959 ................................... 40

13 Canned vegetables: Commercial packs 1957 and 1958 and canners' and wholesale distri-
butors' stocks 1958 and 1959, by commodities, United States ........................ 41
14 Vegetables, frozen: United States commercial packs 1957 and 1958 and cold-storage
holdings, October 1, 1959 with comparisons ........................................ 42
15 United States average prices received by farmers per cwt. for important field crops,
September 15, 1959, with comparisons .............................................. 42
16 Vegetables, fresh: Average price received by farmers, per cwt. United States,
September 15, 1959 with comparisons .............................................. 43
17 Potatoes: Acreage, yield per acre, and production, average 1949-57, annual 1958,
and indicated 1959 ................................................................. 43
18 Potatoes: Price f.o.b. shipping points and wholesale price at New York and Chicago,
indicated periods 1958 and 1959 ..................................................... 44

19 Sweetpotatoes: Acreage, yield per acre and production, average 1949-57, annual 1958
and indicated 1959 .................................................................. 45
20 Sweetpotatoes: Price f.o.b. shipping points and wholesale price (1.c.l. sales) at
New York and Chicago, indicated periods, 1958 and 1959 .............................. 45
21 Beans, dry, edible: Acreage, yield per acre, and production, average 1948-57, annual
1958 and indicated 1959 .................................................... 46
22 Peas, dry, field: Acreage, yield per acre, and production, average 1948-57, annual
1958 and indicated 1959 ................................................... ........ 46


TVS-134


- 47 -


OCTOBER 1959




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3II I 1262 I 09060 7135IIIIII IIIl lIll
3 1262 09060 7135


U. S. Department of Agriculture
Washington 25, D. C.

OFFICIAL BUSINESS



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