Vegetable situation

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Material Information

Title:
Vegetable situation
Physical Description:
213 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, Commodity Economics Division
Place of Publication:
Washington
Frequency:
quarterly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Vegetables -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Vegetable trade -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Vegetable trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
TVS-6 (June 1937) - TVS-218 (Nov. 1980).
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-TVS-218, Nov. 1980.
Issuing Body:
Vols. for 1937-Nov. 1953 issued by Bureau of Agricultural Economics; 1954-Jan. 1961, by Agricultural Marketing Service; Apr. 1961- by Economic Research Service; Feb. 1978- by Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service; Nov. 1980 by Economics and Statistics Service, each a subdivision of the United States Department of Agriculture; Nov. 1980 approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board.
General Note:
MONTHLY CATALOG NUMBER: gp 81007565

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 026013012
oclc - 08029461
lccn - 78643830
issn - 0042-3084
Classification:
lcc - HD9220.U5 U57a
ddc - 380.1/41/50973
System ID:
AA00013012:00003

Related Items

Preceded by:
Vegetable situation
Succeeded by:
Vegetable situation
Succeeded by:
Vegetable outlook & situation


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Full Text
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VEGETABLE


SITUATION

TVS- 133
fA M S


J


-'


With smaller indicated production
for summer harvest than last year,
prices to potato growers during the
next 4 to 6 weeks are expectedto aver-
age well above those of last summer.
Prospective production of sweetpota-
toes is about the same as last year,
but a tenth below average.


Indicated production of dry Deans
is slightly below last year, while that
of dry peas is up sharply. Barring
poor harvests in Europe, export de-
mand in the season ahead and prices.
received by U. S. growers, for these
crops, are likely to be down substan-
tially from a year earlier.


Published quarterly by
AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Production Estimates
SUMMER POTATOES, SWEETPOTATOES,
DRY BEANS, AND PEAS
MIL. CWT.
0 10 20 30 40 50

SUMMER
POTATOES

SWEET-
POTATOES

DRY BEANS ..
"1949-57 av.
i-+1958
DRY PEAS ---------
DRY PEAS 1959 est.

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NEG. 7399-59 (7) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE


1 ~ i ii 1 11 H 1 1 11, 1 11111 iii 1 11ii 11 iii iiiii ii i. i. i n iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii11 iiiiii Xi ii


July 1959
FOR RELEASE
JULY 27, A.M.





JULY 1959


Table 1.--Vegetables and melons for fresh market: Reported commercial
of principal cruos, selected seasons, average 1949-57, 1958, and


acreage and production
indicated 1959


: Acreage Production
:: 1959 : 1959
Seasonal group : Average : : :: Average: :
SPer- Per-
and crop : 1949-57 : 1958 Indi- : Per- : 1949-57: 1958 : Indi- :cen e
: : : cated :of198 : cated :cent
:of 1958; j: :of 1958
:1,000 1,000 1,000
: Acres Acres Acres Pet. cwt. cwt. cwt. Pet.


Winter
Spring


263,990 211,100 234,210
695,yi7 697,120 650,090


summer:
Beans, lima
Beans, snap
Beets
Cabbage 2/
Cantaloups 3/
Carrots .
Cauliflower
Celery
Corn, sweet
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Escarole
Garlic
Honey dews
Lettuce
Onions 3/
Peas, green
Peppers, green 3/
Spinach
Tomatoes 2/
Watermelons
Total summer on which:
Acreage and produc-
tion have been
reported
Acreage has been
reported
All summer


Fall:
Cabbage
Early 24
Late 2/
Total fall on which:
Acreage has been
reported
Total on which 1959-
Acreage and produc-
tion have been
reported
Acreage has been
reported


12,300
40,530
1,920
31,310
75,310
11,150
4,710
7,860
145,380
13,570
1,470
690
2,060
8,780
38,500
7,380
14,220
8,750
1,210
47,570
313,470


9,100
37,300
1,700
27,850
87,400
10,600
4,300
6, ?20
145,050
12,050
1,300
900
2,900
8,000
44,650
11,210
2,500
9,100
1,600
51,250
353,850


8,850
36,850
1,600
26,500
79,600
10,250
3,850
6,860
145,400
12,950
1,300
1,000
3,200
5,900
45,000
12,350
1,250
8,650
1,800
49,450
306.600o


111
93

97
99
94
95
91
97
90
99
100
107
100
111
ll
110
74
101
110
50
95
112
96
87


31,074 27,998 28,921 103
49,212 52,289 49,344 94


312
1,494
327
5,510
6,771
2,550
719
2,681
7,836
1,051
140
101
158
1,239
7,375
1,301
129
294
55
4,154
21.400


246
1,449
274
5,400
8,361
2,566
791
2,649
8,889
1,012
162
153
203
1,090
7,972
2,473
89
293
80
5,014
25.926


203
1,481
256
4,968
8,444
2,472
670
2,701
9,263
975
143
150
272
948
9,285
2,728
42
317
81
5,027
22,054


_ 778,10 829 530 769,_2O 93 6, 5,597 75, 09 72,480 97

902.350 92.6,170 890,930 94 ---
: 02,350 946,170 --- ---- --- --- ---



: 42,760 37,360 34,630 93 "--..
: 4,290 3,700 3,500 95 -- -


: 47,050 41,060 38,130 93 --- ---


:1.737 .840 1.73,75Q0 1j65Q 5.0

.1,909,100 1,895,450 1,813,360


95 145,883 155,379 150,745 97,


J Group averages (including annual total) are simple averages of annual data.
/ Includes processing.
3/ No late summer production for cantaloups, onions, green peppers and tomatoes.
Vegetables-Fresh Market, USDA, AMS, issued monthly.


TVS-133


- 2 -


i





TVS-133 3 JULY 1959


THE VEGETABLE SITUATION


Approved by the Outlook and Situation Board, July 21, 1959



CONTENTS

: PaePage

: Summary .................... 3 Potatoes ...................... 12
: Commercial Vegetables for Sweetpotatoes .................. 13
SFresh Market ............... 4 Dry Edible Beans .............. 15
: Vegetables for Commercial Dry Field Peas ................. 16
: Processing ................. 8 List of Tables ................. 34 :

: Special Articles

: The Market for Vegetables, Potatoes, and
: Sweetpotatoes in Public Schools .................................... 17
: Trends in the Geographic Pattern of Production of Vegetables for
: Commercial Processing .............................................. 22


SUMMARY

Supplies of vegetables for fresh market sale, excluding melons, are
likely to be slightly larger this summer than last, and materially above the
1949-57 average. This is based on early July production estimates for crops
which make up about two-thirds of total summer tonnage. Among important fresh
items, moderately to substantially larger supplies than last summer are in
prospect for sweet corn, lettuce, and onions, and supplies of snap beans and
celery are expected to be slightly larger. Smaller output is expected for
lima beans, beets, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, and cucumbers. About the
same quantity of cantaloups, but substantially less watermelons are indicated.

A continued high level of disposable income during the next few months
is expected to sustain a good consumer demand for vegetables. If supplies are
about in line with July indications, prices received by growers for fresh
vegetables during August and September probably will average about the same as
a year earlier. Prices at retail may be a little higher.

Because of the prospect for a smaller pack than last year, overall
supplies of canned vegetables in the 1959-60 marketing season are expected to
be somewhat smaller than the heavy supplies of last season, though still above
average. Supplies of frozen vegetables are likely to be moderately larger
than last season and considerably above average.





JULY 1959


Production of potatoes for summer harvest is expected to be moderately
smaller than last year, but a little above the 1949-57 average. As harvesting
of late summer potatoes picks up, prices will decline sharply from mid-July
levels. During the next 4 to 6 weeks, however, both farm and retail prices
are likely to remain well above the low levels of a year earlier.

Acreage of sweetpotatoes for harvest is 3 percent larger than in 1958,
but yields are expected to be slightly lower. Prospective production is 1 per-
cent larger than last year, but a tenth below average. Should present produc-
tion prospects materialize, prices received by growers probably will average
near those of a year earlier, and prices to consumers may be slightly higher.

Early reports point to about the same supply of dry edible beans in
1959-60 as in the previous season. Barring an unexpectedly strong export
demand, such as occurred for 1958 crop beans, prices to growers in the 1959-60
season are likely to average materially below those of the previous season.

Prospects point to much larger supplies of dry field peas than the
relatively light supplies of the 1958-59 season. If production is near the
indicated 4 million hundredweight, supplies will be considerably larger than
needed for domestic use and normal export sales. Unless the reported general
drought in Northern Europe, or subsequent adverse weather seriously reduces
the European pea crop, prices received by U. S. growers in 1959-60 are expected
to average substantially below those of the previous season.


COMMERCIAL VEGETABLES FOR FRESH MARKET

Review of First
Half of 1959

Production of vegetables for fresh market sale, excluding melons, in
the first 6 months of the year was about in line with that of a year earlier,
and slightly below the 1949-57 average. But this year, especially in winter
and early spring, there was somewhat better balance in types of vegetables
available than in the first few months of 1958, when most tender crops from
Florida were in extremely short supply. Prices received by growers through
early spring averaged substantially below the high levels of a year earlier.
Prices in late spring were near those of a year ago. Production of late spring
watermelons was down sharply from the high level of 1958, but near the 1949-57
average. Output of spring cantaloups was substantially above last spring, but
about a tenth below average.

Slightly Larger Supplies Than in 1958,
About Same Prices As Year Ago
In Prospect This Summer

Early July production estimates for vegetables which make up about
two-thirds of the summer total, excluding melons, point to slightly larger
supplies of fresh market vegetables this summer than last, and materially


TVS-133







more than the 1949-57 average. Moderately to substantially larger tonnages
than either last year or average are in prospect for early summer green
peppers and onions, and for summer sweet corn and lettuce. Supplies of
snap beans and celery are expected to be slightly larger than last summer
but snap beans are fractionally below average. These increases compared
with a year earlier are partly offset by expected moderate to substantial
declines in production of cabbage, carrots, cucumbers, lima beans, beets,
cauliflower, and eggplant. Quantity of tomatoes for early summer harvest
promises to be about in line with a year ago, but a fifth above average.

Indicated production of summer watermelons is a seventh smaller than
last summer, but slightly above the 1949-57 average. Production of early
summer cantaloups is somewhat smaller than last year, but this is offset by
a slight increase in the important midsummer crop. Acreage for late summer
harvest is slightly larger than last year but a little below average.

The prospect of a continued high level of economic activity and dis-
posable income in the last half of 1959 is expected to sustain a good
consumer demand for both fresh and processed vegetables. If summer supplies
of fresh vegetables are about in line with early July indications, prices
received by growers in August and September are likely to average about the
same as those of a year earlier. Prices at retail may average slightly
higher.


Prospects for Major Summer Crops

Cabbage

Early July reports indicate that supplies of summer cabbage will be
materially smaller than either last summer or the 1949-57 average. The
indicated early summer production is 6 percent below last year and 4 percent
below average. Production for late summer harvest, which typically makes
up about three-fourths of total summer tonnage, promises to be 9 percent
smaller than 1958 and 12 percent less than average. The reduction in the
late summer crop from last year is because of a moderate cut in acreage and
slightly lower yields. These production estimates include the total summer
crop, some of which is used for the manufacture of sauerkraut. Stocks of
sauerkraut are somewhat larger than a year ago. With prices to growers
expected to be materially above the relatively low levels of last summer,
kraut packers may buy less open market cabbage than last summer.

Indications are that acreage of cabbage for early fall harvest is down
7 percent from last year, and for late fall down 5 percent. The early fall
crop makes up about 95 percent of the total fall tonnage, and furnishes most
of the storage supplies for the following winter. A substantial part of the
early fall production is also used for making kraut. Though it is now too
early to make a specific forecast of fall production, near average yields on
the indicated acreage would result in a total fall tonnage materially below


JULY 1959


TVS-133


- 5 -







both last year and the 1949-57 average. Such an output probably would result
in prices substantially above the relatively low levels of last fall.

Lettuce

Indications are that supplies of lettuce this summer will be materially
larger than last summer and much above average. Despite generally low prices
received for the 1958 crop of summer lettuce, growers this year planted
slightly more acreage than last year. California, which typically produces
about four-fifths of the summer tonnage, reports the same acreage as last
year, but in the Midwest acreage is a little larger. Weather has been
generally favorable for development of the summer crop, and prospective yield
is 15 percent above that of 1958.

Indicated production of lettuce for summer harvest, of 9.3 million
hundredweight, is materially larger than last year and a fourth above the
1949-57 average. Most of the increased tonnage over 1958 is in California
where yield per acre is up a fifth. California growers and shippers of
summer lettuce and those in the San Luis Valley of Colorado are operating
under State marketing agreement and order programs, which will restrict
shipments from the large potential volume available. However, large supplies
in producing areas, and steady, ample arrivals in the market, are likely to
result in below average prices to growers.

Tomatoes

During the next 6 to 8 weeks supplies of tomatoes for the fresh market
will continue at or near their seasonal peak. Marketings are expected to
be about the same as in comparable weeks in 1958, but materially above the
1949-57 average. Prices are likely to average near those of a year earlier.

Production of tomatoes for early summer harvest is estimated at 5.0 mil-
lion hundredweight, the same as last year. Significant increases in
California, Ohio and New Jersey were about offset by declines in the Southeast
and South Central States. Acreage for late summer harvest is down moderately
from last year as a result of reductions in the Eastern and Western States.
Indicated acreage in the Midwest is about the same as last year, with a
sizeable increase in Ohio about offset by decreases in other States. First
production estimates for the late summer crop will be available August 11.

Dry Onions

Supplies of dry onions during late winter and early spring were
materially smaller than a year ago. Planting of much of the early spring crop
was late and maturity was further delayed and the size of the crop reduced by
cool, wet weather during the growing season. Marketing of new crop onions
through mid-April were very light and prices were much above both those of
a year earlier and the 1949-57 average. After mid-April, increased movement
from the delayed early spring harvest and the prospect of a large late spring


- 6 -


TVS-133


JULY 1959





JULY 1959


crop resulted in declining prices. During May, prices were still well above
those of a year earlier, but near average. With large supplies of late
spring onions, and in recent weeks increasing pressure from a large early
summer crop, prices continued to decline. For the week ending July 11, New
York wholesale price of New Jersey yellow onions, medium sizes averaged
$3.26 per hundredweight compared with $3.76 a year earlier.

Early July reports indicate that acreage of onions in the late summer
States is about a tenth larger than last year. Among the more important
producing States, acreage increases of 10 percent are reported in New York and
Colorado, 17 percent in Minnesota, 23 percent in Michigan, 6 percent in
Idaho, 4 percent in Oregon, and 15 percent in California. Smaller acreages
are reported in Indiana, Illinois, Nevada, and Washington. First production
estimates for late summer onions are available August 11.


Cantaloups

Production of cantaloups for spring harvest was 12 percent larger than
last year, and prices received by growers averaged substantially below those
of last spring. Indications are that supplies for the summer as a whole will
be about in line with those of last year, but substantially above the 1949-57
average. Production for early summer harvest is estimated at 1.2 million
hundredweight, 8 percent below last year. But prospective production of
midsummer cantaloups, which make up about three-fourths of the total summer
tonnage, is estimated at 7.3 million hundredweight, slightly larger than last
year. Virtually all of the increase is in California which produces about
three-fourths of the midsummer tonnage. California is operating under a
State marketing agreement and order program for cantaloups, under which the
industry can regulate quality and volume shipped.

If production prospects materialize for the midsummer crop, prices
received by growers for cantaloups during the next 4 to 6 weeks are likely
to average near those of a year earlier. Acreage for late summer harvest is
up slightly from last year.


Watermelons

Growers produced a surplus of watermelons in 1958, and prices both at
the farm and in retail stores were at low levels throughout the marketing
season. Producers in Florida cut acreage sharply this spring, yields were
lower, and production was down about a fourth from 1958 and only slightly
above the 1949-57 average. Except for the first few shipments, prices to
growers this season averaged much above the low levels of a year earlier,
and retail prices averaged materially higher. Prospects point to continued
smaller supplies of watermelons this summer than last, and substantially
higher prices to both growers and consumers. Early reports indicate
production of early summer melons was 16 percent smaller than last year


TVS-133


- 7 -







but about the same as the 1949-57 average. The decrease from last year is
due largely to the cut in acreage. Also, there is much less overlap of
supplies from the late spring crop, maturity of which was seriously delayed
last year. Prospective production of the relatively small late summer crop is
expected to be 7 percent smaller than last year, but considerably above
average.


VEGETABLES FOR COMMERCIAL PROCESSING

Carryover of Processed Vegetables
Larger Tan a Year Ago

Stocks of both canned and frozen vegetables at the beginning of the
1959 pack year were somewhat larger than a year earlier, and substantially
above average. Latest available data indicate that combined stocks of the
five major canned items were materially larger than either a year ago or the
1949-57 average. Among these items, combined canners' and distributors'
stocks of sweet corn were much smaller than the heavy carryover of a year
earlier. But holdings of tomatoes were much heavier than the light holdings
of a year earlier, holdings of green peas materially larger, and snap beans
and tomato juice at least moderately larger. Aggregate canners' stocks of
minor vegetables were also larger than last year.

Stocks of frozen vegetables at the beginning of the 1959 season were
moderately larger than a year earlier and the second highest of record. Total
holdings of frozen items on July 1 amounted to 588 million pounds, compared
with 550 million on July 1, 1958. Stocks of frozen lima beans, Brussels
sprouts, sweet corn, mixed vegetables and green peas were substantially
smaller than a year ago. But holdings of snap beans, broccoli, cauliflower,
mixed peas and carrots, spinach and french fried potatoes were materially
larger and asparagus moderately larger than a year earlier.

1959 Canned Pack
Expected to be Smaller
Than Last Year

Acreage and crop condition reports on July 1 point to an overall pack
of canned vegetables materially smaller than last year, but a little larger
than the 1949-57 average.

Production of winter and early spring spinach for processing was
substantially larger than a year ago, and indicated production of snap
beans is moderately larger. Acreage and condition reports also point to
a substantially larger pack of sweet corn. But these increases in canned
items are likely to be more than offset by smaller packs of other items.
Production of green peas for processing was down 7 percent, and indications
point to materially smaller tonnages of tomatoes and cucumbers for pickles.
The total frozen pack probably will be a little larger this year than last.


- 8 -


TVS-133


JULY 1959





JULY 1959


Supplies Continue Large Though
Smaller Than Last Season

If present production prospects are realized, supplies of canned
vegetables in the 1959-60 marketing season probably will be somewhat below
those of a year ago. However, supplies will remain somewhat above the 1949-57
average with most individual items in ample to heavy supply. Supplies of
frozen vegetables are likely to be moderately above last season and substan-
tially above average. Although some items will be in quite heavy supply,
fewer canned items are likely to be in really burdensome supply this year than
last. Because of less marketing pressure in some canned items, and higher
processing and handling costs wholesale and retail prices probably will
average a little higher this season than last.

Prospects for Principal Crops

Snap Beans

Prospects point to record supplies of processed snap beans available
for distribution in the 1959-60 marketing season. Carryover of canned snap
beans on July 1 was somewhat larger than a year earlier, and stocks of frozen
beans were substantially larger. Early July estimates point to a 7 percent
larger overall production of snap beans for processing than in 1958, and
materially more than the 1949-57 average. Larger production this year than
in 1958 is the result of a 2 percent increase in acreage for canning and a
14 percent increase for freezing. Acreage is up in all sections of the
country. Prospective production is larger than last year in all areas except
the Southeast. Among the more important States, estimated production is up
substantially in New York, Wisconsin, Texas, and California, and up moderately
in Washington and Oregon. Prospective production is down in Pennsylvania,
Maryland, Florida, Michigan, and Tennessee.

Production at the indicated level, together with carryover stocks at
the beginning of the season, would result in supplies of canned snap beans
moderately larger than those of last season and much above the 1949-57
average. Supplies of frozen beans would be substantially larger than both
a year earlier and average.

Green Peas

Early reports point to a supply of green peas in the 1959-60 marketing
season substantially smaller than the heavy supplies of last season, but
moderately larger than the 1949-57 average. June 1 holdings of frozen peas,
at 83 million pounds, were 34 million pounds less than a year earlier. Canner
and distributor stocks of canned peas on June 1 amounted to 12.0 million cases,
24 No. 2 equivalents, 1.1 million cases more than a year ago. But the increase
in stocks will be more than offset by a smaller canned pack.
Acreage of green peas for processing was cut 9 percent from 1958.
Yields are slightly higher than last year and estimated production is down
7 percent. Production in the important North Central area is down almost


TVS-133


- 9 -





JULY 1959


a fourth from last year-- except for Indiana, reductions are substantial in all
States in the area, and also in New York and Pennsylvania. Estimated produc-
tion is near that of last year in the Delaware-Maryland-Virginia area, and is
almost a fifth larger in the West.

Separate production estimates are not available for canning and freez-
ing. Reports from canners and freezers in mid-May, however, indicated 14 per-
cent more acreage for freezing than last year. Also, in the West where a
large part of the frozen pack is produced indicated yield is substantially
above that of 1958. Reported acreage for canning is down 17 percent and pro-
duction is expected to be materially smaller than last year. These early re-
ports point to a supply of canned peas about a tenth smaller than the burden-
some supply of last season, but slightly to moderately above the 1949-57 aver-
age. Supplies of frozen peas are expected to be about the same as those of
last season, and moderately above the latest 5-year average.

Sweet Corn

Supplies of processed sweet corn in the current season promise to be
moderately to substantially larger than either last season or the 1949-57
average. Indications are that carryover stocks of both canned and frozen corn
were materially smaller at the beginning of the current season than a year
earlier.

However, acreage of corn for processing is up in most of the important
producing States, and production is likely to be substantially larger than in
1958. Sharpest increases in acreage--17 and 12 percent--were reported in the
South Atlantic and Central areas. But acreage was up 10 percent in the Western
and 7 percent in the North Atlantic States. Total acreage for canning, which
accounts for about 85 percent of all acreage for processing, is up 12 percent,
and acreage for freezing up 11 percent.

Production estimates for sweet corn are not available until August 11.
Condition of the crop on July 1 was estimated at 96 percent, slightly better
than last July and moderately above average. Assuming average weather during
the rest of the growing season, production together with carryover stocks would
result in at least moderately more canned and frozen corn this season than
either last season or average.

Tomatoes

Because of the large 1958 pack, carryover stocks of tomatoes, tomato
juice and most tomato products at the beginning of the current season were
materially above both a year earlier and the 1949-57 average. Latest available
data indicate that holdings of canned tomatoes on July 1 were about 50 percent
larger than the light holdings of a year earlier. Stocks of tomato juice and
other tomato products also were relatively heavy.

However, the larger stocks at the beginning of the season are likely to
be more than offset by smaller production of tomatoes for processing. Acreage
for processing is down considerably in all parts of the country.


TVS-133


- 10 -







Condition of the crop on July 1 was 95 percent, compared with 90 percent a
year earlier and a 10-year average of 88 percent. Yields by States near the
1954-58 average would result in materially less production than last year.
Such production together with carryover stocks would result in materially
smaller overall supplies of tomatoes and tomato products than last season, but
substantially more than the 1949-57 average.


Cabbage for Sauerkraut

Supplies of sauerkraut in the 1959-60 season may be about the same as
the near average supplies of last season. Contract acreage and acreage con-
trolled by packers is up about 5 percent from last year, but yields may be a
little below the high levels of last season. Average condition of the crop on
July 1 was not quite as good as a year earlier. Packers buy large quantities
of cabbage on the open market in addition to production they control, but it
is too early now to estimate the quantity of such purchases. They may find
open market cabbage less plentiful and more expensive this year than last.
If the indicated smaller acreages of cabbage for late summer and early fall
harvest materialize, open market purchases by packers may not be as large as
a year earlier.

Green Lima Beans

Supplies of canned green lima beans may be slightly to moderately
larger this season than last. As consumption of this item has fallen off in
recent years, supplies this season are expected to be considerably below the
1949-57 average.

Carryover stocks of canned limas were materially smaller than a year
ago. But the decline in beginning stocks is expected to be more than offset
by an increase in the pack. Acreage for canning is up 6 percent, and yield
per acre may be higher than the below-average yield of 1958.

Supplies of frozen lima beans are expected to be at least moderately
smaller than last season. Cold storage holdings on July 1 were 54 million
pounds compared with 58 million in 1958. Also, acreage for freezing is down
6 percent from last year and yields may average below the high levels of 1958.


Spinach

Supplies of canned spinach are expected to be moderately larger, and
frozen spinach substantially larger this year than last. Supplies of both
are above the 1949-57 average. Stocks of both canned and frozen spinach on
March 1 were materially smaller than on March 1, 1958. However, production of
spinach for winter and spring processing, which typically accounts for about
80 percent of the annual total, amounted to 134 thousand tons compared with
93 thousand last year.


- 11 -


JULY 1959


TVS-133





July 1959


Cucumbers for Pickles

Preliminary estimates indicate acreage of cucumbers for pickles
was cut 12 percent from 1958. Among the more important producing States,
California growers report a 7 percent larger planted acreage than last
year. But in all other States for which separate figures are available,
acreage is down.

Condition of the crop on July 1 was 82 percent, about the same as
that of last year but slightly below average. Should yields by States be
near the 1956-58 average, production on the indicated acreage would be
substantially below that of 1958, but near the 1949-57 average.

Beets for Canning

Early reports indicate less canned beets are in prospect this
season than last. Stocks probably are a little smaller than a year ago,
and the pack is likely to be down from 1958. Acreage of beets for pro-
cessing is a tenth smaller than last year. With yields near the 1956-58
average and with normal abandonment, the indicated acreage would produce
moderately to substantially less tonnage than both last year and the
1949-57 average.


POTATOES

Spring Production Smaller than
Year Earlier, Prices Higher

Production of early and late spring potatoes, combined, amounted
to about 26 million hundredweight. This was a tenth less than 1958
production and 7 percent below the 1949-57 average. Also, shipments of
old crop potatoes during the spring were somewhat smaller than a year ago.
With supplies smaller than last spring, prices moved up sharply from mid-
April to early June. Prices received by growers in June averaged $3.76
per hundredweight compared with the low level of $1.65 in June 1958.
Prices have declined somewhat in recent weeks as movement from the summer
crop has picked up, but the market is still well above year earlier levels.

Summer Prospects

Production of early and late summer potatoes, combined, is estimated
at 46.8 million hundredweight, compared with 49.0 million hundredweight
last summer, and the 1949-57 average of 45.3 million. Early summer
acreage is down moderately from last year, and expected yield is slightly
lower. Prospective production of 13.6 million hundredweight is 7 percent
smaller than last year but 11 percent above average. Acreage for late
summer harvest is down 2 percent from last year, and prospective yields
are a little below last year's record. Indicated production, at 33.2


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million hundredweight, is 3 percent less than last year but about in line
with the 1949-57 average. Harvest of the late summer crop is expected to
be on schedule except in the Pacific Northwest where cool spells in April
and May slowed development.

Marketings of potatoes during the early part of July were materially
smaller than a year ago. Distribution pipelines were not as well stocked
as in the early summer of 1958, demand was good, and prices averaged much
above those of a year earlier. F.O.B. shipping point prices of U. S.
No. 1 California long whites in the week ended July 11 averaged $3.00 per
hundredweight compared with $2.18 a year ago. During the next few weeks,
available supplies of potatoes will increase as harvesting of the late
summer crop picks up. Prices at both farm and retail levels are expected
to decline substantially from those of mid-July, but during the next 4 to
6 weeks they are likely to remain well above the low levels of a year
earlier.

Fall Acreage Only Slightly
Smaller Than Last Year

Indicated acreage of potatoes for fall harvest is 2 percent smaller
than in 1958. By far the most important of the seasonal potato crops,
the fall crop makes up about two-thirds of total annual production. In
addition to supplying fall markets, a large portion of the crop is stored
for marketing in winter and spring.

The slightly smaller overall acreage than that of last year is
largely the result of a 6 percent cut in the Eastern States. Acreage for
harvest is down only slightly in the Western States and is up fractionally
in the Central States. In the East, acreage is down slightly in Maine,
principal producing State in the area, down moderately in Pennsylvania and
substantially smaller in both Long Island and Upstate New York. Growers
in the 9 Central States reported a small increase in acreage. A 9 percent
increase in Minnesota more than offset a 5 percent decline in North Dakota.
Indicated acreage in the 9 Western States is about 1 percent less than in
1958. Growers in Idaho, which usually produces more than half of the
Western crop, reported 3 percent more acreage. This increase largely
offset declines in Colorado, Utah, Oregon and Wyoming.

Yield per acre and final production of fall potatoes will be
greatly influenced by weather conditions in important producing areas.
The first tentative estimate of production will be available August 11.

SWEETPOTATOES

Review of the 1958-59 Season

Acreage of sweetpotatoes harvested in 1958 was about 5 percent
smaller than the previous year, and a fourth below the 1949-56 average.


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July 1959


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The 1958 season was generally favorable for growing sweetpotatoes and
average yield was record high. Production, at 17.4 million hundredweight,
was 12 percent below the 8-year average, but about the same as in the
previous season.

Keeping quality of the 1958 Louisiana crop probably was better than
that of the previous crop. Throughout the 1958-59 season, total weekly
unloads in the 38 cities from which reports are received were generally
somewhat larger than those of a year earlier. Prices received by growers
in the fall averaged moderately below, and in winter and spring substan-
tially below those of a year earlier.

About Same Size Crop
Indicated or 1959

Acreage and condition of the sweetpotato crop on July 1 point to
about the same production this year as last. Acreage for harvest is 3
percent larger than in 1958, but yields are expected to average slightly
lower than the record yield of 1958. Prospective production, at 17.6
million hundredweight, is 1 percent more than last year, and a tenth
below the 1949-57 average.

Growers in Louisiana, leading State in production, report 5 percent
more acreage for harvest than last year, but about the same prospective
production. Heavy rains in the State in early June probably will result
in more late acreage than usual. Among other producing States, prospective
production is more than a fourth larger than a year ago in Texas and a
tenth larger in Virginia and Mississippi. But production is expected to
be moderately to substantially smaller than last year in most of the
remaining South Atlantic and South Central States. Indicated production
in New Jersey and California is the same as last season.

Price Prospects for
the 1959-o60 eason

The marketing season for 1959 crop sweetpotatoes is just getting
underway. Shipments are still relatively light and, as usual, prices
for these small early receipts are relatively high. For the week ended
July 14, New Puerto Rican type sweetpotatoes were bringing $5.50 per
hundredweight wholesale, New York City, about the same as a year earlier.
However, prices are already substantially below the mid-July level, and
will continue to decline into the fall as marketing increase seasonally.
Prices are likely to show some seasonal advance from fall into winter and
spring. If current production prospects materialize, retail prices may be
slightly higher than last season. Prices received by growers for the
1959 crop probably will average about the same as those of a year earlier.
But demand for sweetpotatoes has declined in recent years and, despite
another small crop, prices to growers probably will be below the 1949-56
average.


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July 1959





July 1959


DRY EDIBLE BEANS

Review of 1958-59 Season

Supply of dry beans in the 1958-59 season amounted to 19.7 million
hundredweight, 15 percent more than in the previous season. However,
both domestic and export sales have been larger than a year earlier, and
prices have held up well. Though prices to farmers have been moderately
to substantially below those of the previous season, they have averaged
significantly above the national support rate of $6.18 per hundredweight.
About 3.5 million bags of 1958 crop beans were placed under Government
loan and purchase agreement, but most of these were paid off before
maturity. Only about 600,000 bags of beans, mostly small reds, large
limas, and pinks were delivered to the Commodity Credit Corporation,
and there has been a good rate of outmovement from Government stocks.
In early July CCC uncommitted stocks were only 268,000 bags.

Supply in 1959-60 to be
NearThat of-a e-ar--Earlier

Early July reports indicate a 1959 dry bean crop of 18.4 million
hundredweight. This is 3 percent less than last year but a tenth above
the 1949-57 average. The 1959 decrease from 1958 is the result of a
moderately smaller acreage. Prospective yield is up slightly. The
smaller production will be about offset by more normal carryover stocks
at the end of the current season than last season when carryover was
unusually light. Thus, prospects point to total supplies for the 1959-60
season about in line with those of the current season.

Prospective Production by Areas

Though production estimates by class of beans, are not yet avail-
able, the prospective crop by areas gives some indication of production
by classes. Estimated production of all beans in California is 3.9
million 100-pound bags, 4 percent less than last year. Total output of
lima beans is expected to be slightly smaller than in 1958, with a 7
percent decline in the more important large limas more than offsetting
an 11 percent increase in baby limas. Production of "other beans" in
California, principally blackeye, pink and small white, is moderately
smaller than last year.

Growers in the Southwest expect to harvest about 8 percent less
acreage this year than last, and yields are expected to be moderately
lower. Prospective production of 1.7 million bags is 14 percent below
that of 1958. Practically all of the acreage in the Southwest is in
pintos -- the area typically produces about half the total crop. Most of
the remaining pintos and virtually all of the great northern are pro-
duced in the Northwest. Total production in the Northwest is estimated
at 6.2 million bags, slightly less than last year. Among important pinto


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July 1959


producing States, prospective output is down substantially in Washington,
about the same as last year in Idaho and Wyoming and up substantially in
Nebraska. There is some indication that growers in Idaho, Wyoming and
Nebraska planted a larger acreage of great northern and a smaller acreage
of pintos. It thus appears likely that 1959 production of pintos will be
substantially smaller than the 1958 crop of 4.8 million bags. In Washing-
ton, which accounts for about two-thirds of the total output of small
reds, indicated production of 1.1 million bags is about a fifth smaller
than last year, though much above average. There is some indication that
small reds may be down more from 1958 than indicated in the overall State
figures.

Production in the Northeast is estimated at 6.6 million bags, about
the same as in 1958 but materially above average. A substantial cutback of
production in New York State, largely because of a smaller acreage, may
result in a somewhat smaller total crop of red kidney beans. New York
typically produces about four-fifths of the total supply of this type.
Production in Michigan, mostly pea beans, is expected to be slightly above
the large crop of last year.

Price Prospects for 1959 Crop Beans

Early indications are that total supply of dry beans in the 1959-60
marketing season will be about the same as that of the previous season.
Domestic consumption in the season ahead may be a little larger than that
in 1958-59, but barring another poor crop in Europe like the one in 1958,
export demand for 1959 U. S. production is likely to be down substantially.
Supply of lima beans is expected to be about in balance with demand. It
appears that substantial surpluses of pea beans and great northern are in
prospect. Any other surpluses probably will be moderate. The national
average support price for 1959 crop beans has been set at $5.35 per hundred
pounds compared with a support rate of $6.18 for the 1958 crop. Actual
prices of beans will vary in response to the supply-demand situation for
each class; however, barring another season of strong export demand, prices
received by growers in 1959-60 are expected to average substantially below
those of the 1958-59 season.

DRY FIELD PEAS

Review of 1958-59 Season

Supplies of dry field peas in the 1958-59 season were about a fifth
smaller than last season and 15 percent less than the 1949-56 average.
Domestic demand for dry peas has been good all season. Export demand was
particularly strong owing to a short crop in Europe. Despite much smaller
overall supplies, U. S. exports were larger than a year earlier and far
above the 1949-56 average. Strong demand for the small supplies resulted
in relatively high prices for the 1958 crop. Monthly prices received by
growers in the period September through June averaged about $5.65 per hun-
dredweight compared with the low level of $3.00 a year earlier.


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JULY 1959


Larger Crop and Supplies
In Prospect for 1959

Relatively high prices for the 1958 crop, and the prospect of light
carryover stocks at the end of the current marketing season encouraged farmers
to plant a much larger acreage to dry peas this year than last.

Early July reports indicate 289,000 acres for harvest, 42 percent more
than last year. In Idaho and Washington, which together produce 85 to 90 per-
cent of the total crop, acreages for harvest are up 55 and 39 percent.

First production estimates indicate a 1959 crop of 4.0 million hundred-
weight. This is an increase of 63 percent over the small crop of last year,
and a fourth above the 1949-57 average. Carryover stocks at the beginning of
the season are much lighter than a year ago. Nevertheless, if production
prospects materialize, total supplies in the 1959-60 season will be almost a
fourth larger than in the 1958-59 season, and slightly above the 1949-57 aver-
age.

Prices for 1959 Dry Peas
Likely to Average Lower
Than for 1958 Crop

Total domestic use of dry peas is expected co be somewhat larger in the
1959-60 marketing season than in the previous season. Also, since about mid-
spring there has been a general drought in the Netherlands and other pea pro-
ducing areas of Northern Europe. As yet we have no estimate of possible dam-
age to peas. However, barring another very poor crop year in Europe, exports
of peas are expected to be smaller than the heavy exports of the 1958-59 sea-
son. As prospective supplies are larger than needed to furnish anticipated
markets,prices received by farmers for 1959 crop peas are likely to average
substantially below those of the previous season.



THE MARKET FOR VEGETABLES, POTATOES, AND
SWEETPOTATOES IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS

By William S. Hoofnagle and Kenneth E. Anderson,
Marketing Research Division, AMS

Approximately 60,000 of the 106,000 public elementary and secondary
schools in the United States provide a noonday food service. They range all
the way from a complete plate lunch to a la carte service. About 54,000 of
the 60,000 public schools with a food service participated in the National
School Lunch Program. Daily estimated attendance in schools providing a food
service averaged somewhat over 21,000,000 children during the survey period,
about 91 percent in schools under the National School Lunch Program.


- 17 -


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- 18 -


According to a national probability sample of the 60,000 schools, the
total monetary value of all food delivered to the schools, including both
purchases and donations, during the survey period amounted to $597 million, or
about $28 per child. Vegetables accounted for nearly a tenth of the total.

About $505 million worth of all foods, or 85 percent of the total was
acquired from local sources. The remainder, or 15 percent of the total dollar
value, comprised commodities donated directly by the Government from purchases
made especially for the school lunch program or from food acquired under price
stabilization or surplus removal programs.

The school market is primarily local and, for most commodities, the
role of Government in supplying the school outlet is relatively small. Through
the National School Lunch Program, however, children learn of new foods, or
familiar foods in new form, and this may enhance the size of the market for
certain commodities.

The National School Lunch Program is jointly administered by the U. S.
Department of Agriculture and State educational agencies. It provides assist-
ance to schools that operate a nonprofit food service for children. Schools
in the program receive assistance in cash and commodity donations to help them
serve well-balanced, low-cost noonday lunches. The primary aim is to serve the
school children a nutritious, appetizing meal each school day and to encourage
the consumption of nutritious agricultural commodities and other foods. The
improved eating habits for many of the Nation's children will probably carry
over into adult years and result in increased consumption of some farm products.

Each year the Department receives an appropriation of funds to carry
out its part of the program. Most of the appropriation is allocated among the
States for the purchase of food at the local level by participating schools.
About $15 million is spent annually by the Department in purchasing certain
foods that are donated directly to participating schools. Commodities acquired
from time to time under price support or surplus removal programs are distrib-
uted to schools that operate a nonprofit food service, and to other eligible
recipients.



Vegetables

Included in the $597 million worth of all foods delivered to the
60,000 public elementary and secondary schools during the period July 1957-
June 1958, were nearly $55 million worth of vegetable juices and fresh, frozen,
canned, and dried vegetables except potatoes and sweetpotatoes. Thus, vegetable
juices and vegetables (except potatoes and sweetpotatoes). accounted for 9.2
cents of the school food dollar, of which canned vegetables made up 6.1 cents.
Based on average daily attendance of somewhat over 21,000,000 pupils in schools
which had some form of food service, total value of deliveries averaged $2.55
per child. Vegetables and vegetable juices were purchased primarily through
commercial channels in nearby markets. However, direct donations of vegetables


JULY 1959


TVS-133





JULY 1959


and vegetable juices by the U. S. Department of Agriculture from funds appro-
priated under the National School Lunch Program accounted for about 9 percent
of.the total value of these items used by schools.

Canned items accounted for 66 percent of the $55 million total. Deli-
veries of vegetable juices were relatively light--about $400,000, practically
all tomato juice. Fresh vegetables made up 26 percent of the value of total
deliveries, followed by dried and frozen vegetables.

During the year, $13.7 million worth of potatoes and sweetpotatoes--an
average of 64 cents per child attending a school having a lunch service--were
purchased by public schools below the college level. Potatoes and sweetpotatoes
in all forms accounted for 2.3 cents of the school food dollar of which fresh
white potatoes made up 1.4 cents. All potatoes and sweetpotatoes were ac-
quired through commercial channels in nearby markets.

Elementary schools received a larger per capital value of canned,
fresh, dried, and frozen vegetables and vegetables juices than high schools.
The per capital value of potato chips and sticks was larger in high schools
than in elementary schools. All other forms of potatoes and sweetpotatoes
were used to a greater extent in the elementary schools. With the exception of
frozen items, the per capital value of vegetable, potato, and sweetpotato pro-
ducts delivered to schools in rural areas was higher than in schools in urban
areas with populations of 2,500 or over. Frozen vegetables were used in
greater quantities in urban than in rural areas.

The popularity of the four leading vegetable items in the school market
was reflected in the quantity, both purchased and donated, that moved into the
outlet--green beans, 65 million pounds; green peas, 52 million pounds; tomatoes,
57 million pounds; and corn slightly over 38 million pounds. Practically all
of the green beans, peas, tomatoes, and corn deliveries to schools were canned.
Between 4 and 8 percent of the 1957-58 total canned pack of these four vege-
tables moved into the schools.

Green beans, green peas, tomatoes, and corn in all forms delivered to
public elementary and secondary schools during the period July 1957- June 1958
amounted to $28.7 million, slightly over half of the nearly $55 million value
of all deliveries of vegetables. Green bean deliveries totaled $9.5 million,
tomatoes $7.0 million, green peas $6.6 million, and corn $5.6 million. These
four vegetable items were acquired primarily from local merchants; Government
donations accounted for only 14 percent of total value. The donated tomatoes,
peas, and beans went only to schools that participated in the National School
Lunch Program, as funds used in acquiring these items had been especially
appropriated for this purpose.

Other canned vegetables of economic importance, though less in volume,
included baked beans, beets, spinach, and carrots. Canned vegetables not in-
dividually identified in the survey accounted for almost 31 million pounds.


- 19 -


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JULY 1959


Significant quantities of fresh vegetables bought by schools included
21.8 million pounds of lettuce valued at $3.4 million; 51.6 million pounds
of cabbage, valued at $2.8 million; 17.6 million pounds of carrots, valued
at $1.7 million; and 10.4 million pounds of tomatoes valued at $1.5 million.
Other fresh vegetables not individually identified in the survey accounted
for 30 million pounds and were valued at $3.6 million.

Compared with canned and fresh items, dried vegetable deliveries were
of minor importance. Slightly over 28 million pounds of dried vegetables
valued at $2.6 million were delivered to school outlets. Donations of dried
beans by the Government accounted for more than two-fifths of the total value
of all dried vegetable deliveries.

Relatively small quantities of frozen vegetables, including peas, corn,
and lima beans, moved into the school market during the year--6.6 million
pounds, valued at $1.3 million. All frozen vegetables were purchased locally.


Vegetable Juices

Compared with vegetables, the value of juices delivered was relatively
minor--about $400,000. Tomato juice accounted for practically all vegetable
juice deliveries. All were purchased through commercial channels in nearby
markets.

A small quantity of powdered fruit and vegetable juices, about 400,000
pounds, was purchased by the schools, but the proportion attributable to
vegetable items alone was not learned.


Potatoes and Sweetpotatoes

The 60,000 schools purchased $13.7 million worth of potatoes and sweet-
potatoes during the survey period. Fresh, frozen, and canned white potato
purchases amounted to $9 million, 93 percent in fresh form. Potato chips and
sticks, next in importance, were valued at $3.2 million. Sweetpotato acquisi-
tions, primarily canned product, totaled $1.3 million. Dehydrated potatoes
accounted for the remainder.

Approximately 205 million pounds of potatoes and sweetpotatoes in all
forms, 9.6 pounds per child, moved into the schools. More than 6 million
pounds of potato chips and sticks and some 12 million pounds of sweetpotatoes
entered the school market in the survey period. Canned and frozen sweet-
potatoes made up three-fifths, fresh form the remainder. Purchases of a
relatively small quantity of dehydrated potatoes amounted to only about
700,000 pounds. All potatoes and sweetpotatoes used were acquired from local
merchants.


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JULY 1959


The Market Potential

Further expansion of the school food market is likely to occur as
school enrollments continue to rise and as new schools are constructed with
modern cooking and cafeteria facilities. During the 1958-59 school year,
enrollments in schools with and without a lunch service totaled 34.7 million
pupils. The United States Department of Health, Education and Welfare esti-
mates that public school enrollments in the United States will reach 41.5 mil-
lion pupils by 1965. By 1970 such enrollments are expected to climb to
44.5 million pupils, approximately 25 percent more than current enrollments.


Increased pupil participation in schools that have lunch programs will
continue to be an influence on the future market for food in schools. From
this study, it was found that in schools under the National School Lunch
Program the daily average number of lunches sold was equal to 52 percent of
total average daily attendance. The remaining 48 percent of the enrollment re-
presents a current latent demand, part of which probably constitutes a
potential demand for school lunches and thereby, perhaps increased quantities
of farm products.


Still another possibility for increasing the consumption of food is
in schools that are now without a food service. Our 1957 study indicated
there were more than 26,000 public schools in this category, and an additional
19,352 schools served milk only. l/ It appears reasonable to expect that some
of these schools will have a lunch service in the years ahead and thus will
provide an additional means of increasing the use of vegetables, potatoes,
and sweetpotatoes in this segment of the away-from-home eating market.



I/ "Participation of Schools and Pupils in School Lunch programs in Elemen-
tary and Secondary Schools of the United States," Marketing Research Report
No.262, Agr. Mktg. Serv., U. S. Department of Agriculture, August 1958 and
"Milk Consumption in the Nation's Schools', Marketing Research Report No.284,
Agr. Mktg. Serv., U. S. Department of Agriculture, November 1958.


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TRENDS IN THE GEOGRAPHIC PATTERN
OF PRODUCTION OF VEGETABLES FOR COMMERCIAL PROCESSING*

During the last two decades the processed vegetable industry has been
characterized by a substantial increase in acreage, sharply higher yields,
rapid expansion in production, and important shifts in the geographic pattern
of production. Without attempting to evaluate the many complex forces contrib-
uting to the changes, the following discussion is a resume of important regional
and ultra-regional shifts.
Total production of vegetables for processing doubled in the years be-
tween 1935-38 and 1955-58. Acreage was up only 20 percent, but yields increased
almost 70 percent. Although all regions except the South Atlantic showed some
gain in acreage, 90 percent of the total increase resulted from a doubling of
acreage in the Western Region. This region also showed the highest average
yield per acre, and experienced the sharpest increase in yield.
These changes caused a significant shift in the regional pattern of pro-
duction. Between 1935-38 and 1955-58 tonnage increased in all regions except
the South Atlantic, but the increase in the West was phenomenal. There, output
increased more than four-fold and accounted largely for the overall expansion of
the industry. The Western Region has consistently increased in relative impor-
tance, from 20 percent of the U. S. total in the earlier period to 46 percent in
1955-58. Despite a big increase in tonnage the North Central Region has declined
in relative importance--from 42 to about 32 percent of the total. The North
Atlantic, South Atlantic, and South Central regions have also shown large
declines in relative importance.


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JULY 1959





- 23 -


Table 2.-- Vegetables for processing: Trend in acreage, yield and
production, United States, by regions,1935-58


: Acreage,by regions
Period : : orth : South South North
: Western Total
SCentral Central : Atlantic Atlantic
: 1,000 acres 1,000 acres 1,000 acres 1,000 acres 1,000 acres 1,000 acres


1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58


230
264
391
378
434
488


704
706
860
761
788
719


78
107
149
111
90
92


218
222
262
199
209
186


198
233
290
256
268
231


1,428
1,532
1,952
1,705
1,789
1,716


Yield per acre, by regions
North South South North
Western central :Central Atlantic Atlantic : Average

Tons Tons Tons Tons Tons Tons


1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58


3.1
3.8
4.1
4.6
5.9
6.8


2.1
2.6
2.4
2.5
2.9
3.2


1.8
1.9
1.8
1.9
1.9
2.3


2.4
2.8
2.4
2.8
2.5
2.6


3.4
3.7
3.2
3.7
4.0
4.0


2.5
3.0
2.8
3.2
3.7
4.2


Production, by regions


Western


1,000 tons


North
Central
1,000 tons


South
Central


1,000 tons


South
Atlantic
1,000 tons


North
Atlantic
1,000 tons


Total


1,000 tons


708
1,015
1,600
1,751
2,563
3,306


1,479
1,857
2,028
1,931
2,255
2,288


139
201
269
206
170
215


517
616
621
551
530
475


668
859
935
955
1,083
923


3,511
4,548
5,453
5,394
6,601
7,207


: Production as a percentage of U.S. total
SoW n rth South South North
* Western tal
SCentral Central Atlantic Atlantic
Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent


20.2
22.3
29.3
32.5
38.8
45.9


42.1
40.8
37.2
35.8
34.2
31.7


4.9
3.8
2.6
3.0


14.7
13.6
11.4
10.2
8.0
6.6


19.0
18.9
17.2
17.7
16.4
12.8


100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0


*ByT Will M. Srmnons, analytical Statistician, Divislon-' if -a.i.ultural Econcnics,/AM;.


1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58







1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58


JULY 1959


TVS-133






The Western Region experienced a teriffic expansion in production of
vegetables for commercial processing, from 708,000 tons in 1935-38 to 3,300,000
tons in 1955-58. Three States in the region--California, Oregon and Washington-
-in 1955-58, accounted for 88 percent of the acreage and 93 percent of the pro-
duction. Both acreage and yield increased sharply in each of the three States
as well as in other States as a group. California had the highest yield per
acre throughout the period, partly as a result of its large acreage of toma-
toes, a crop with relatively high yields. California also registered the
sharpest increase in yield.

California improved its position as the dominant producing State within
the region. The State in 1935-38 accounted for 69 percent of the total ton-
nage, and sharp increases in average yields, particularly after 1950, boosted
California's share to 78 percent of the total. Oregon and Washington each have
generally contributed 6 to 8 percent of total production in the region. Both
States showed some increase in relative importance in the early part of the
period, but in recent years have lost.a part of the increase.
In terms of tonnage, production in other States as a group increased by
80 percent during the period. Among States in this group, tonnage was smaller
in New Mexico, and in Montana it was down a third; but production increased
several-fold in Idaho, more than doubled in Wyoming, and was up sharply in
Colorado and Utah. Because of more rapid expansion in California, however,
production in these other States as a group declined from 19 to less than
8 percent of the total for the region.


VEGETABLES FOR PROCESSING
Trend in Production, by States, Western Region


THOUS. TONS


3,000



2,000



1,000


Total


OTHER ....

WASHINGTON-

- O REGO N ..............
IOREGON



r A iFORNIA


r -


1943-46 1947-50


1951-54 1955-58


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NEG. 7381-59 (7) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE


1935-38


1939-42


- 24 -


TVS-133


JULY 1959


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


NEG. 7387-59 (7) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE





JULY 1959


Table 3.--Vegetables for processing: Trend in acreage, yield and
production, selected States, Western Region, 1935-58


: Acreage, Western Region
Period California : Oregon : Washington : Other 1/ : Total
*
: : :


- 25 -


1,000 acres

137.1
148.9
196.5
175.8
202.9
238.5


1,000 acres


23.8
31.o
62.9
69.7
79.1
89.0


1,000 acres


26.6
39.6
73.5
73.9
92.4
103.4


1,000 acres


42.0
44.4
57.7
58.7
60.0
57.3


1,000 acres


229.5
263.9
390.6
378.1
434.4
488.2


: Yield per acre, Western Region

SCalifornia : Oregon : Washington : Other 1/ : Average

: Tons Tons Tons Tons Tons

S 3.6 1.8 1.6 3.2 3.1
4.8 2.3 1.9 3.6 3.8
5.8 2.1 1.8 3.4 4.1
7.0 2.3 1.8 3.8 4.6
9.4 2.7 2.1 4.2 5.9
: 10.9 2.9 2.1 4.3 6.8

: Production, Western Region

:California : Oregon : Washington : Other l/ Total

: 1,000 tons 1,000 tons 1,000 tons 1,000 tons 1,000 tons

488.5 42.6 42.1 134.7 707.9
S 711.4 72.5 73.3 157.7 ,o014.9
1,139.1 134.4 131.5 195.6 1,600.6
1,237.2 162.0 130.7 221.2 1,751.1
: 1,905.2 209.8 194.7 253.5 2,563.2
S 2589.6 256.2 214.6 245.9 3,306.3

Production as a percentage of Western Region

: California : Oregon : Washington : Other I : Total
: : *


Percent


1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58







1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58







1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
.1955-58


Percent


6.0
7.2
8.4
9.2
8.2
7.8


Percent


6.0
7.2
8.2
7.5
7.6
6.5


Percent

19.0
15.5
12.2
12.6
9.9
7.4


Percent


100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0


l/ Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming.


1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58


69.0
70.1
71.2
20.7
74.3
78.3


TVS-133





JULY 1959


Production of vegetables for commercial processing in the North Central
Region increased more than 50 percent from 1935-38 to 1955-58. Practically
all of the increase was due to higher yield per acre, as total acreage was
only slightly larger. Among the more important producing States in the
region, acreage was up sharply in Wisconsin and Minnesota, up more moderately
in Michigan, and showed no definite trend in Illinois. But in Ohio acreage was
cut almost in half and in Indiana and in other States as a group was cut about
two-thirds. Among these other States, only South Dakota showed an increase.

These trends in acreage within the region resulted in a significant
shift in the regional pattern of production. In terms of tonnage, production
was up sharply in Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan, Illinois and Ohio, but down
sharply in Indiana and in other States as a group. Among these other States
only South Dakota registered an increase. Wisconsin gained sharply in impor-
tance, from 14 percent of the total for the region in 1935-38 to 29 percent
in 1955-58. There was also a marked increase in the relative importance of
Minnesota and some increase for Michigan and Illinois. Production in Indiana
declined sharply in relative importance, from 31 percent of the total in the
earlier period to 14 percent in the most recent period. Ohio showed some
decline in relative importance, but still accounted for about 11 percent of
the total. Production in other States as a group declined from more than 9 to
less than 4 percent of the total for the region.



VEGETABLES FOR PROCESSING
Trend in Production, by States, North Central Region
THOUS. TONS



3,000

Total

2,000 OTHER
INDIANA -55
:OHIOx
1,000 **I
.19-3 9 MICHIGAN

WISCONSIN
0
1935-38 1939-42 1943-46 1947-50 1951-54 1955-58


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NEG. 7386-59(7) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE


- 26 -


TVS-133


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


NEG. 7386-59 (7)


AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE





27 -
Table 4.--Vegetables for processing: Trend in acreage, yield and
production, selected States, North Central Region, 1935-58


JULY 1959


: Acreage, North Central Region

Period isconsin:Minnesota: Michigan:Illinois : Ohio :Indiana :Other V1: Total
*
r *


:1,000
: acres


159.5
186.5
280.5
261.3
288.2
279.3


1,000
acres

90.2
91.6
126.2
124.6
149.6
151.7


1,000
acres

62.1
56.4
65.8
71.2
74.0
67.0


1,000 1,000 1,000
acres acres acres


109.8
92.8
111.0
103.8
116.7
108.2


57.2
64.0
64.0
50.4
38.6
31.5


152.4
149.4
136.2
103.7
881.5
55.6


1,000
acres

73.2
65.0
76.6
46.2
38.8
26.1


1,000
acres

704.4
705.7
860.3
761.2
787.4
719.4


Yield per acre, North Central Region

:Wisconsin:Minnesota: Michigan: Illinois: Ohio : Indiana:Other ij: Average

Tons Tons Tons Tons Tons Tons Tons Tons

1.3 1.9 1.7 2.0 3.2 3.0 1.9 2.1
1.6 2.6 2.0 2.5 4.1 3.6 2.5 2.6
:1.8 1.9 1.8 2.4 4.0 3.3 2.4 2.4
2.0 2.1 2.0 2.6 4.8 3.8 2.2 2.5
:2.2 2.3 2.4 3.1 6.5 4.8 2.7 2.9
: 2.3 2.7 3.1 3.5 7.8 5.7 3.2 3.2

Production, North Central Region

:Wisconsin:Minnesota: Michigan: Illinois: Ohio :Indiana :Other I/: Total

1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
tons tons tons tons tons tons tons tons

204.5 173.2 102.9 223.1 180.4 455.7 139.2 1,479.0
307.3 236.0 115.4 233.4 262.7 538.4 164.1 1,857.3
506.0 238.1 121.0 262.8 258.9 454.5 186.8 2,028.1
511.3 266.8 143.4 274.3 240.8 394.3 100.4 1,931.3
: 625.4 346.7 180.3 357.0 252.8 389.1 103.2 2,254.5
: 653.0 403.6 209.0 374.4 246.5 318.6 82.6 2,287.7

Production as a percentageot' pjorti Cent-ral RPegon

:Wisconsin:Minnesota: Michigr.n: Illinois: Ohio : Indiana:Other l/: Total
*


1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58








1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58







1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58


13.8
16.6
24.9
26.5
27.7
28.6


11.7
12.7
11.7
13.8
15.4
17.6


7.0
6.2
6.0
7.4
8.0
9.1


15.1
12.6
13.0
14.2
15.8
16.4


Percent Percent Percent Percent


12.2
14.1
12.8
12.5
11.2
10.8


30.8
29.0
22.4
20.4
17.3
13.9


9.4
8.8
9.2
5.2
4.6
3.6


100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0


IJ Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska and South Dakota.


TVS-133


1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58


: Percent Percent Percent Percent





JULY 1959


Production of vegetables for commercial processing in the South Central
Region is small relative to production in other sections of the country.
However, the output in the region has grown from 139,000 tons in 1935-38 to
215,000 tons in 1955-58. About two-fifths of the increase was due to a
larger acreage and three-fifths to higher average yield. Acreage about
doubled in Texas, the most important State in the region, and in Oklahoma,
but declined in Tennessee, Arkansas, and other States as a group. Among
these other States a big increase in Alabama was more than offset by big re-
ductions in Kentucky, Louisiana and Mississippi.
Changes in acreage together with different rates of increase in yield
have resulted in a significant shift in the pattern of production. Tonnage
in Texas and Oklahoma was much larger in 1955-58 than in the earlier period,
but it was somewhat smaller in Tennessee and Arkansas. As a result, produc-
tion in Texas gained in relative importance from about a fourth of the total
for the region in 1935-38 to almost half the total in recent years. Oklahoma
also increased sharply in relative importance, and in the most recent period
accounted for 9 percent of the total. Production in Tennessee and Arkansas
both declined from more than 20 to less than 15 percent of the total for the
region. Other States as a group showed about the same decline in importance.


VEGETABLES FOR PROCESSING
Trend in Production, by States, South Central Region


- 28 -


THOUS. TONS


300




200




100




1935-38
1935-38


1939-42 1943-46 1947-50 1951-54


1955-58


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NEG. 7390-59 (7) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE


TVS-133


AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE


NEG. 7390-59 (7)


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE






Table 5.--Vegetables for processing: Trend in acreage, yield and
production, selected States, South Central Region, 1935-58
: Acreage, South Central Region

Peri 1 : Texas : Oklahoma : Tennessee : Arkansas : Other 1/ : Total

: 1,000 acres 1,000 acres 1,000 acres 1,00 000 acres 1000 acres 1,000 acres


1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58


20.8
28.9
47.2
39.2
37.4
40.2


4.5
11.4
23.7
14.9
10.1
9.6


16.7
16.4
16.4
12.8
13.1
14.1


17.4
31.2
44.2
29.0
16.1
14.2


18.5
19.5
17.3
15.5
13.2
14.4


77.9
107.4
148.8
111.4
89.9
92.5


Yield per acre, South Central Region

Texas : Oklahoma : Tennessee : Arkansas : Other 1/ : Average


: Tons Tons Tons Tons Tons Tons

S 1.7 1.7 2.2 1.8 1.6 1.8
1.9 1.7 2.0 2.0 1.7 1.9
S 2.3 1.4 1.7 1.7 1.5 1.8
S 2.0 1.4 2.4 1.6 1.8 1.9
2.0 1.6 1.9 1.7 2.0 1.9
S 2.6 2.1 2.1 2.0 2.3 2.3

: Production, South Central Region

: Texas : Oklahoma : Tennessee : Arkansas : Other 1/ : Total

:1,000 tons 1,000 tons 1,000 tons 1,000 tons 1,000 tons 1,000 tons

35.9 7.5 36.1 30.5 29.2 139.2
55.2 19.1 33.1 61.3 32.4 201.1
: 108.2 33.4 27.5 74.0 26.0 269.1
80.3 21.4 30.4 46.5 27.8 206.4
76.1 16.2 24.4 27.0 26.2 169.9
103.6 20.1 30.1 28.6 32.5 214.9

: Production as a percentage of South Central Region

: Texas : Oklahoma : Tennessee : Arkansas : Other i/ : Total
: : :


1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58







1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58







1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58


25.8
27.4
40.2
38.9
44.8
48.2


Percent


5.4
9.5
12.4
10.4
9.5
9.4


Percent


25.9
16.5
10.2
14.7
14.4
14.0


Percent


21.9
30.5
27.5
22.5
15.9
13.3


Percent


21.0
16.1
9.7
13.5
15.4
15.1


Percent


100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0


1/ Alabama, Kentucky, LInuisiana and Mississippi.


Percent


-- 29 -


JULY 1959


TVS-133





JULY 1959


Production of vegetables for commercial processing in the North Atlantic
Region was 38 percent larger in 1955-58 than in 1935-38. All of the expan-
sion occurred in the 1940's and earlier 1950's, with some contraction since
the mid-1950's. The larger 1955-58 production compared with earlier years
was due about equally to higher yield per acre and a larger total acreage.
In New York State acreage was about the same as in the earlier period, but
acreages were up sharply in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Acreage was down
substantially in other States as a group, with only Massachusetts showing any
increase.
Actual quantity of processing vegetables was much larger in 1955-58
than in 1935-38 in New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Production de-
creased in other States as a group, as declines in Connecticut, Maine and
Vermont more than offset a sizeable increase in Massachusetts and a small in-
crease in New Hampshire. During the 20 year period, production in New York
declined in relative importance from 46 to 41 percent of the total for the
region. Pennsylvania registered a sharp gain, and in the most recent period
made up 25 percent of the total. New Jersey showed a slight increase in re-
lative importance, accounting for more than a fourth of the total. Other
States as a group declined in relative importance from 11 to less than 5 per-
cent of the total for the region.


TVS-133


- 30 -





TVS-133


Table 6.--Vegetables for processing: Trend in acreage,
production, selected States, North Atlantic Region,


yield and
1935-58


: Acreage, North Atlantic Region
Period : New York : New Jersey : Pennsylvania : Other 1/ : Total

: : *


1,000 acres

95.5
102.8
119.5
11.2
11.5
94.7


1,000 acres


47.8
61.4
73.6
66.2
74.4
68.0


1,000 acres

32.0
49.9
72.9
55.7
60.2
52.6


1,000 acres

23.0
18.4
24.1
22.4
21.6
15.3


1,000 acres


198.3
232.5
290.1
255.5
267.7
230.6


: Yield per acre, North Atlantic Region

: New York : New Jersey : Pennsylvania : Other l/ : Average

S Tons Tons Tons Tons Tons

3.2 3.8 3.3 3.3 3.4
S 3.7 4.0 3.7 2.8 3.7
3.4 3.5 2.9 2.5 3.2
3.6 4.2 4.0 2.2 3.7
S 4.1 4.3 4.2 2.3 4.0
4.0 4.0 4.4 2.7 4.0

: Production, North Atlantic Region

: New York : New Jersey : Pennsylvania : Other 1/ : Total
: : :


1,000 tons

305.1
375.3
407.0
403.2
462.5
380.5


1,000 tons


182.0
248.5
254.7
277.5
317.7
271.6


1,000 tons


105.2
183.3
212.8
225.0
253.6
229.1


1,000 tons


75.1
51.7
60.1
49.3
49.2
42.0


1,000 tons


667.4
858.8
934.6
955.0
l,n83.0
923.2


: Production as a percentage of North Atlantic Region

: New York : New Jersey : Pennsylvania : Other I/ : Total


Percent

45.7
43.7
43.5
42.2
42.7
41.2


Percent

27.3
28.9
27.3
29.0
29.3
29.4


Percent

15.8
21.4
22.8
23.6
23.4
24.8


Percent


11.2
6.0
6.4
5.2
4.6
4.C


Percent


100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0


51 Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Vermont.


1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58


1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58







1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58


1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58


- 31 -


JULY 1959





TVS-133


- 32 -


JULY 1959


Production of vegetables for commercial processing in the South Atlantic
Region tended to increase into the early 1940's. Since that time production
has trended downward, and in 1955-58 it was 8 percent below that of 1935-38.
Average yield per acre was only moderately higher than in the earlier period,
and acreage was down 15 percent. Sharp reductions in acreages in the important
State of Maryland and in Virginia more than offset increases in Delaware,
Florida and other States as a group. Among these other States big increases in
Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina more than offset a decrease in West
Virginia.
Maryland, biggest producing State in the region, has lost much ground
both in terms of tonnage produced, and in relative importance. Production in
Maryland has declined more than a third, and in 1955-58 made up a little more
than 40 percent of the total for the region; this compared with more than
60 percent in the earlier period. Virginia too has declined in importance.
But production has increased rather sharply in Delaware, Florida and other
States as a group. Among these other States, production in Georgia, North
Carolina and South Carolina showed big increases, while West Virginia showed a
big decline. Production in Delaware showed some gain in relative importance in
the region and in the most recent period accounted for 16 percent of the total.
Florida, and other States as a group have gained rapidly. During 1955-58
Florida produced about 14 percent of the total for the region, and other States
13 percent.


VEGETABLES FOR PROCESSING
Trend in Production, by States, South Atlantic Region
THOUS. TONS
Total

6 0 0 ....................... O TH ER --
600 OTHER



400 VIRGINIA




200 MARYLAND



0
1935-38 1939-42 1943-46 1947-50 1951-54 1955-58


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NEG. 7389-59 (7) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


NEG. 7389-59 (7)


AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE





JULY 1959


Table 7.--Vegetables for processing: Trend in acreage, yield and
production, selected States, South Atlantic Region, 1935-58


: Acreage, South Atlantic Region
Period : :
Period : Maryland : Virginia : Delaware : Florida : Other / : Total

: 1,000 acres 1,000 acres 1,000 acres 1,000 acres 1,000 acres 1,000 acres


1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58







1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58







1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58







1935-38
1939-42
1943-46
1947-50
1951-54
1955-58


130.4
122.6
130.1
98.0
84.3
67.8


41.2
43.5
50.1
34.9
34.3
26.3


30.1
31.0
35.3
33.8
38.6
40.6


4.7
8.9
18.4
11.3
21.8
19.9


11.5
16.4
28.1
21.3
30.4
31.0


217.9
222.4
262.0
199.3
209.4
185.6


* _Yield per acre, South Atlantic Region

SMaryland : Virginia : Delaware : Florida : Other 1/ : Average

S Tons Tons Tons Tons Tons Tons

2.5 2.2 2.0 2.9 2.0 2.4
3.1 2.7 2.1 2.3 1.8 2.8
2.6 2.6 2.1 1.8 1.5 2.4
S 3.2 3.0 1.9 2.2 1.8 2.8
3.0 2.6 1.9 2.9 1.7 2.5
S 2.9 2.8 1.9 3.4 2.0 2.6

: Production, South Atlantic Region

SMaryland : Virginia : Delaware : Florida : Other I/ : Total

: 1,000 tons 1,000 tons 1,000 tons 1,000 tons 1,000 tons 1,000 tons

S 327.3 92.6 61.3 13.5 22.5 517.2
382.7 118.2 65.2 20.4 28.9 615.4
337.5 132.6 75.4 32.5 42.8 620.8
317.9 104.0 65.3 25.0 38.3 550.5
: 255.7 88.1 71.9 62.5 52.1 530.3
197.3 72.7 76.1 67.4 61.4 474.9

: Production as a percentage of South Atlrantic 'Neion

: Maryland : Virginia : Dklaware : Florida : Other L/ : Total
: : *


Percent


63.3
62.2
54.4
57.7
48.2
41.6


Percent


17.9
19.2
21.4
18.9
16.6
15.3


Percent


11.9
10.6
12.1
11.9
13.6
16.0


Percent


2.6
3.3
5.2
4.5
11.8
14.2


Percent


4.3
4.7
6.9
7.0
9.8
12.9


Percent


100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0


- 33 -


I_ Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina and West Virginia.


TVS-133





TVS-133 34 JULY 1959

LIST OF TABLES


Table Title Page


1 Vegetables and melons for fresh market: Reported commercial
acreage and production of principal crops, selected seasons,
average 1949-57, annual 1958, and indicated 1959 ............. 2

2 Vegetables for processing: Trend in acreage, yield and produc-
tion, United States, by regions, 1935-58 ..................... 23

3 Vegetables for processing: Trend in acreage, yield and produc-
tion, selected States, Western region, 1935-58 ............... 25

4 Vegetables for processing: Trend in acreage, yield and produc-
tion, selected States, North Central region, 1935-58 ......... 27

5 Vegetables for processing: Trend in acreage, yield and produc-
tion, selected Sates, South Central region, 1935-58 ......... 29

6 Vegetables for processing: Trend in acreage, yield and produc-
tion, selected States, North Atlantic region, 1935-58 ........ 31

7 Vegetables for processing: Trend in acreage, yield and produc-
tion, selected States, South Atlantic region, 1935-58 ........ 33

8 Truck Crops, Potatoes and Sweetpotatoes: Unloads at 38 markets,
indicated periods 1958 and 1959 ............................. 36

9 Vegetables, Fresh: Representative prices (1.c.l. sales) for
stock of generally good quality and condition (U. S. No. 1
when available), New York and Chicago, indicated periods,
1958 and 1959 ...................................... ........... 37

10 Vegetables, Commercial for Fresh Market: Index numbers (unad-
justed) of prices received by farmers, as of 15th of the month,
United States, by months, average 1935-39, average 1947-49,
and 1950 to date ......................... .................... 38

11 Truck Crops for Processing: Planted acreage and estimated
production, average 1948-57, annual 1958 and indicated 1959 .. 38

12 Canned Vegetables: Commercial packs 1957 and 1958 and canners'
and wholesale distributors' stocks 1958 and 1959, by commo-
dities, United States ........................................ 39

13 Vegetables, Frozen: United States commercial packs 1957 and
1958, and cold storage holdings, July 1, 1959, with
comparisons .................................................. 40





TVS-133 35 JULY 1959

LIST OF TABLES continued


Table Title Page


14 Potatoes, Irish: Acreage, yield per acre,and production,
average 1949-57, annual 1958 and indicated 1959 ............ 41

15 Sweetpotatoes: Acreage, yield per acre, and production,
average 1949-57, annual 1958 and indicated 1959 ............ 41

16 Potatoes: Price f.o.b. shipping points and wholesale price
at New York and Chicago, indicated periods 1958 and 1959 .... 42

17 Sweetpotatoes: Representative wholesale price per bushel
(l.c.l. sales) at New York and Chicago for stock of generally
good merchantable quality and condition (U. S. No. 1 when
available) indicated periods, 1958 and 1959 ................. 42

18 Beans, Dry Edible: Acreage, yield per acre, and production,
average 1948-57, annual 1958 and indicated 1959 ............. 43

19 Peas, Dry Field: Acreage, yield per acre, and production,
average 1948-57, annual 1958 and indicated 1959 ............ 43









: THE VEGETABLE SITUATION IS ISSUED 4 TIMES A YEAR,

: IN JANUARY, APRIL, JULY, AND OCTOBER



: THE NEXT ISSUE IS SCHEDULED FOR RELEASE ON

OCTOBER 30, 1959
8 ______________________








Table 8.-Truck crops, potatoes and sweetpotatoes: Unloads at 38 markets, indicated periods 1958 and 1959


(Expressed in carlot equivalents)
1958 1959
June 6-28 April 3-24 May 1-29 June 5-26 July 3-17
Como1dity : : : : :: : : : :
: Rail : : : : Ral : :Rail:Rail
: and : Truck p Total and Truck : : Total :and : Truck: : Total: and : Truck : : Total: and : Truckpo Total
Sboat : : boat: : : boat port : boat: :boat : r

Asparagus : 2 657 --- 659 608 571 --- 1,179 99 1,261 --- 1,360 4 552 --- 556 --- 31 -- 31
Beans, lima, snap and :
fava 65 1,849 1,914 77 489 50 616 195 1,524 31 1,750 39 1,884 1,923 --- 1,042 --- 1,O42
Beets 10 195 --- 205 14 51 65 9 121 130 3 212 215 1 161 --- 162
Broccoli 19 66 -- 85 259 94 -- 353 153 93 --- 246 22 83 --- 105 7 56 --- 63
Cabbage : 212 2,894 24 3,130 888 2,315 14 3,217 580 3,300 2 3,882 105 2,637 41 2,783 4 1,740 28 1,772
Cantaloupe and
other melons 3,957 2,610 198 6,76 --- 1 773 774 86 514 1,404 2,004 4,657 3,080 136 7,873 3,469 2,100 --- 5,569
Carrots : 825 893 --- 1,78 716 1,120 -- 1,836 1,034 1,285 2,319 705 819 1 1,525 523 546 --- 1,069
Cauliflower : 18 429 6 453 253 406 -- 659 84 518 --- 602 57 452 5 514 35 294 --- 329
Celery 1,564 1,630 3,194 1,287 1,712 --- 2,999 1,619 2,328 -- 3,9 1,330 1,306 -- 2,636 922 897 1,AI
Corn : 1,228 2,254 3,482 462 970 31 1,463 1,185 2,229 13 3,427 1,408 2,494 --- 3,902 465 3,378 --- 3,843
Cucumbers 200 1,914 --- 2,114 148 840 22 1,010 122 1,325 11 1,658 84 2,039 --- 2,123 16 1,351 17 1,384
Escarole and endive : 34 134 -- 168 49 131 --- 180 65 126 --- 191 21 160 --- 181 2 127 --- 129
Lettuce and romaine : 3,155 4,132 17 7,304 3,655 2,729 -- 6,384 4,813 3,840 6 8,679 3,036 3,818 23 6,877 2,263 2,634 5 4,902
Onions : 1,622 1,291 66 2,979 333 1,616 1,167 3,116 2, 3j3 2,023 98 4,504 1,612 1,141 102 2,855 882 1,104 15 2,001
Peas, green 90 77 --- 167 99 74 173 154 110 264 104 91 --- 195 36 56 --- 92
Peppers 429 826 7 1,262 114 415 263 792 109 776 98 983 321 730 8 1,o59 70 886 1 957
Spinach : 2 352 354 111 302 413 13 493 506 3 294 --- 297 3 160 --- 163
Tomatoes : 2,118 4,351 5 6,474 358 1,625 1,928 3,911 1,628 5,120 604 7,352 1,765 4,891 10 6,666 658 4,519 11 5,188
Turnips and rutabagas : 122 2 124 1 306 129 436 2 247 74 323 2 138 25 165 3 88 1 92
Watermelons : 2,885 7,460 118 10,463 3 61 411 475 597 2,350 776 3,723 1,394 7,230 27 8,651 1,767 10,719 1 12,487 a
Other vegetables
(including miaed) : 341 94 -- 435 1,339 154 3 1,496 1,186 200 1 1.,87 349 102 --- 41 224 49 --- 273
Total above 18,776 34,230 443 53,449 10,774 15,982 4,791 31,547 16,136 29,783 3,118 49,037 17,01 34,153 378 51,552 11,350 31,938 79 L3,367

Potatoes 9.348 7,605 68 17,021 7,997 6,123 13 14,133 10,865 8,174 40 19,079 8,224 6,884 38 15,146 4,947 5,711 6 1.,.(7
Sweetpotatoes --- 330 --- 330 4 1,081 -- 1,085 3 1,026 --- 1,029 --- 479 --- 47 --- 253 -- 253

Grand total : 28,124 42,165 511 70,800 18,775 23,186 4,804 46,765 27,004 38,983 3,158 69,145 25,245 41,516 416 67,177 1,2j 7 37,905 85 54,287



I/ Except watermelons.

Markets: Albany, Atlanta, Baltimore, Birmingham, Boston, Buffalo, Chicago, Cinainnati, Cleveland, Columbia, Dallas, Denver, Detroit,
Houston, Indianapolis, Kansas City, Los Angeles, Louisville, Memphis, Miami, Milwaukee, Minneapolis, Nashville, Newark, New Orleans,
New York, Oakland, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Portland (Ore.), Providence, St. Louis, St. Paul, Salt Lake City, San Antonio,
San Francisco, Washington, and Wichita.

Truck unloads are not 100 percent complete but rreesent highest percentage obtainable under local conditions in markets covered.


Market News: Weekly reports, USDA, AMS.






TVS-13?


- 37 -


JULY 1959


Table 9 .-Vegetables, fresh: Representative prices (l.e.1. sales) for stock of generally ood quality
and condition (U. S. No. 1 when available), New York and Chicago, indicated periods, 1958 and 1959

:Tuesday nearest mid-month
Market State
and : of : Unit 1958 1959
commodity origin :
SMay June July May June July
IS 17 15 12 16 14
::..


New York:
Asparagus
Beans, snap, green
Valentine
Broccoli, bunched
Cabbage


:New Jersey-large, 12 bchs. crt.

:New Jersey:Bu. hamper
:Penn. :12's 4/5 bu. crt.


Domestic, round type .Long Islandl-3/5 bu. crt.
Domestic, round type :New Jersey:l-3/5 bu. bx.
Cantaloula :California:36's jumbo ert.
Co-rota, topped, washed :California:48-1 lb. film bag
: crt.
Cauliflower, catskill type.New York. 12's crt.
Celery
Pascal : New York :2-1/2-3 dos.
Pascal :California:2-1/2 doz.
Cucumbers : Maryland :Bu. bskt.
Eggplant :Florida :Bu. bskt.
Escarole :New Jersey:1-1/9 bi. crt.
Honeydews :California: 9-12's std. crt.
Lettuce, Iceberg :California:2 doz. cart.
Onions
Yellow, flat type, med. :New Jersey:50 lb. sack
Yellow, Grano, large :Texas :50 lb. sack
Peppers, green, med.-lge.N. Carolina:Bu. bskt.
Spinach, Savoy :New Jersey: Bu. bskt.
Tomatoes :Virginia :6X6 60-lb. ert.


Chicago:
Asparagus, bunched, fancy: llinois :12 1-lb. bchs.


Beans, snap, green,
various varieties
Broccoli
Cabbage, Domestic,
r~urd type
Cantaloupe
Carrots, topped, washed
Cauliflower
Celery
Pascal
Pascal
Cucumbers
EgEglant
Honeydews
Lettuce,Iceberg,dry pack
Onions
Yellow, Grano, large
Yellow, medium
Peppers, green
Spinach, flat type
Tomatoes, 2 layer
Watermelons


:Illinois :Bu. bskt.
:California:14's 1/2 crt.


:Illinois :1-3/5 bu. crt.
:California:36-45's jumbo crt.
:California:4E-1 lb. film bag eart
:California:WGA crt. 18's

:California:2-3 doz.
:Michigan :2,-4 doz.
-Illinois :Bu. bskt.
:Florida :Bu. bakt.
:California:9-12's std. flat crt.:
:California:2 doz. heads, cart.

Texas :50 lb. sack
:California:50 lb. sack
:N.Carolina:Bu. bskt.
:Illinois :Bu. bskt.
:California:6x6 20 lb. flat
:Texas :28-32 lb. av.


Dol.


3.52








4.55-



:1/11.00

4.37


5.00


Dol. Dol.


Dol. Dol. Dol.


3.75 4.25


2.63 2.00
3.00 2.75


S.25 .63
--- 7.00

4.75 5.37
--- 2.75


6.25

4.75
1.13

1/3.50


3.50
5.90
2.75
4.uo
1.25
3.75
3.00


--- 1.88
2.90 2.63 ---
: --- 1.63
.88 .88 1.13
: .. --- 6.20



1/2.35 1/3.00 -

: --- 2.25
S3.75 1/3.50 -


3.85
6.00


7.85
4.25


.75
6.25
5.00


10.00 5.75 5.25
--- 3.35
-- --- 2.50
4.50 13.25 2.25

3.50 2.75 2.d5

2.25 2.40 --
--- 2.15
--- 2.15
2.00 1.00 1.15
--- .3.15
3.35 2.15


-- 2.00 2.25
3.00 2.75
1.88
--- 1.00 1.75
--- 6.00 7.25

4.25 4.63 4.38
.-- 2.62

1.88
4.15 5.h0 3.65
2.75
3.40 4.00 4.75
-- 1.13 1.38
-- 4.50
2.65 2.50 4.oc


4.50

.88


2.13

.95


1.63
2.20
1.85

3.50


2.62 1.35

--- 3-75
3.35 --- 3.00


3.85
5.25

4.00


3.50
2.40

3.75


1.85


5.75
4.35


4.85


3.50
2.35

2.00
2.00

1.25


1.25
7.65
3.85
2/3.75

3.15
2.25
5.00

4.00
3.85

1.50
2.25
2.85
2.50
4.00
3.00


Weekly of Term et prices, USA, AS, market News Reports.d
Weekly Summary of Terminal Market Prices, USDA, AMS, Market News Reports.







Table 10.--Vegetables, commercial for fresh market: Index numbers (unadjusted)
of prices received by farmers, as of 15th of the month, United States,
by months, average 1935-39,average 1947-49, and 1950 to date

(1910-1914 100)

Period Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr.: May : June July : Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. De. Av.


1935-39 : 114 121 133 130 125 98 87 82 81 90 103 115 107
1947-49 : 288 305 310 308 277 215 207 196 193 204 241 246 249

Year
1950 : 257 213 195 276 231 211 200 170 156 165 214 249 211
1951 : 338 346 288 333 276 215 203 197 190 211 290 343 269
1952 /: 301 249 294 341 311 294 289 240 203 227 272 285 276
1953 1./: 267 273 254 252 251 285 246 209 191 206 226 241 242
1954 /: 254 239 236 265 255 204 222 192 176 202 240 223 226

1955 l: 251 273 260 272 254 220 206 210 226 219 245 230 239
1956 E_: 246 276 271 246 262 291 264 202 184 215 281 267 250
1957 1/: 241 237 238 271 285 281 269 233 200 213 217 246 244
1958 L: 310 356 401 342 280 218 197 173 183 214 256 236 264
1959 2/: 302 304 298 294 285 227
l Revised. In addition to the vegetables included in the series published prior to January
1954, the following have been added; broccoli, sweet corn, cucumbers, and watermelons.
2/ Preliminary.
Agriculture Prices, USDA, AMS, issued monthly.

Table 11.--Truck crops for processing: Planted acreage and estimated
production, average 1948-57, annual 1958 and indicated 1959

Planted acreage Production

S: : 1959 as :
Crop : Average : 1958 :Indicated: per- : Average : 1958 :Indicated
: 1948-57 : :1959 : centage : 1948-57 : 1959
: :: of 1958 :

:Acres Acres Acres Percent Tons Tons Tons

Beans, green, lima / : 106,600 89,150 87,640 98 93,300 88,800 ---
Beans, snap :138,100 159,700 167,100 105 290,700 360,700 386,100
Beets for canning : 18,800 16,660 15,110 91 153,300 152,100 ---
Cabbage for kraut:
Contract only : 9,300 7,760 8,110 105 106,800 125,300

Corn, sweet 2/ 468,600 403,040 451,020 112 1,376,400 1,2,600 ---
Cucumbers for pickles :142,400 126,180 111,590 88 293,500 356,800 ---
Peas, green : 455,900 396,250 359,430 91 449,800 485,500 450,300
Spinach:
Winter and spring 3/ : 29,900 26,880 29, 50 111 99,100 92,300 134,100

Tomatoes : 347,500 360,700 2)2,000 81 3,298,300 4,287,300

Total acreage to date :1,717,100 1,586,320 1,521,950 96 6,161,200 7,273,JO

4 Production reported on shelled basis.
SIn husk.
S1949-57 average.
NOTE: All data subject to addition and revision in later monthly reports.
Vegetables-Processing-USDA, AMS, issued monthly.


- 38 -


TVS-133


JULY 1959







Table 12.--Canned vegetables: Commercial packs 1957 and 1958 and canners' and
wholesale distributors' stocks 1958 and 1959, by commodities, United States

Pack Stocks

C o: : Canners / Wholesale distributors /
Commodity
: 1957 : 1958
: Date : 1958 : 1959 : Date : 1958 : 1959
::::: :


Major commodities
Beans, snap
Corn, sweet
Peas, green
Tomatoes
Tomato juice 2/

Total

Minor commodities
Asparagus
Beans, lima
Beets
Blackeye peas
Carrots
Okra
Pickles
Pimientos
Pumpkin and squash
Sauerkraut
Potatoes
Sweetpotatoes
Spinacrh
Other greens
Tomato products:
Catsup and
chili sauce
Paste
Pulp and puree
Sauce
Vegetables, mixed

Total, comparable
minor items

Grand total,
comparable items


1,000
cases
24/2's


26,174
31,533
33,857
21,686
32,590


1,000
cases
24/2's


26,432
27,075
29,549
30,465
37,467


June
June
June
Apr.
Apr.


1,000
cases
24/2's


5,602
8,412
7,661
4,995
17,032


1,000
cases
24/2's


6,198
5,118
8,840
10,673
19,606


June
June
June
Apr.
Apr.


1,000
cases
24/2's


2,613
3,074
3,269
3,492
2,791


1,000
cases
24/2's


2,660
3,128
3,183
3,221
2,961


145,840 150,988 43,702 50,435 15,239 15,153



S5,887 6,183 Mar. 1 1,445 1,329 Apr. 1 614 556
S 2,518 2,464 May 1 1,137 916 Jan. 1 495 473
S8,335 8,030 May 1 4,166 3,958 Jan. 1 993 954
S 1,418 1,951
S 2,517 3,186 May 1 1,641 1,607 Jan. 1 421 434
S 560 852
:3/25,146 3/24,262
S 357 493
S 3,327 3,535 Apr. 1 1,203 960 Jan. 1 552 550
:/9,202 /11,119 June 1 4/3,476 4/3,763 June 1 671 688
S 3,243 3,383
S 5,345 7,017
S6,346 5,240 Mar. 1 1,806 1,104 Apr. 1 604 583
S2,103 2,318


S18,180 21,075 Apr. 1 9,697 11,421 Apr. 1 1,826 1,783
S/8,741 5/11,477 Apr. 1 63,190 6A4,231 Jan. 1 642 745
S4,527 4,320 Apr. 1 6/1,789 .6,833 Jan. 1 650 619
: 7,969 12,158 Apr. 1 E/3,690 ?_, 595 Jan. 1 748 625
S 3,454 3,463


:119,175 132,526 33,240 36,717 8,216 8,010


: 265,015 283,514


76,942 87,152


23,455 23,163


i/ Converted from actual cases to standard cases of 24 No. 2 cans.
2/ Includes combination vegetable juices containing at least 70 percent tomato juice.
/ Crop for processing converted to a canned basis by applying an overall conversion factor
(pickles 68 and sauerkraut 54 cases equivalent to 1 ton fresh).
R/ reported in barrels; converted to 24/2's by using 14 cases to the barrel.
Estimated, basis California pack.
/ California only.

Canners' stock and pack data from National Canners Association, unless otherwise noted.
Wholesale distributors' stocks from United States Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census.


TVS-133


- 39 -


JULY 1959





- 40 -


JULY 1959


Table 13.--Vegetables, frozen: United States commercial packs
1957 and 1958, and cold-storage holdings,
July 1, 1959, with comparisons


Packs


Cold-storage holdings


Commodity


1957 :
:


1,000
pounds


1958 :
:*


1,000
pounds


Asparagus
Beans, green
and wax
Beans, lima
Broccoli
Brussels sprouts
Carrots
Cauliflower
Corn, cut
Corn-on-cob
Mixed vegetables
Peas
Peas and carrots
Pumpkin and
squash
Rhubarb
Spinach
Succotash
Kale
Okra
Peas, blackeye
Potato products
Turnip greens
Miscellaneous
vegetables


Total


31,201

134,361
131,379
80,452
33,354
34,237
22,690
112,917
13,699
41,547
295,823
21,017

13,151
S 4,704
102,130
10,037
S 4,106
17,071
11,624
:219,860
10,873

20,332

:1,366,565


24,365

156,006
125,910
109,679
30,424
53,713
33,251
111,039
10,370
37,297
251,934
21,467

18,007
4,448
97,472
8,937
3,579
15,767
13,012
269,462
11,041

26,064

1,433,244


29,382

28,464
44,890
32,090
14,262
2
12 63
_/30,422
I/
12(,963
2/


52 37
55,537



2/



132,797

510,270


30,437

24,592
48,495
28,159
12,814

9,284
27,087

1q901
170,954
9,009



46,975
2

L2
66,279


59,092

550,078


31,832

30,935
41,393
41,857
11,565
13,958
10,965
3/21,182

13,535
140,233
10,792



74,257

2/

2/
86,839


59,045

588,388


1 Preliminary.
2 Included in miscellaneous vegetables.
SSweet corn.
Corn-on-cob included with sweet corn.


Pack data from National Association of Frozen Food Packers.


TVS-133


July 1
average
1954-58


1,000
pounds


July 1
1958


1,000
pounds


July 1,
1959 1


1,000
pounds


--







Table 14.--Potatoes, Irish: Acreage, yield per acre, and production, average 1949-57,
annual 1958 and indicated 1959

Acreage Yield per acre Production
H arrested
Seasonal : : For e 1958 : Indi-: Ave 1958 : Indi-
group : Average : 1958 harvest : cated : cated
:199-57 : : 1959 19495-57 : 1959 11949-57 1/ : 1959

: 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
: acres acres acres Cwt. Cwt. Cwt. cwt. cwt. cwt.

Winter 26.3 34.5 26.3 156.2 144.1 147.3 4,103 4,971 3,874

Spring
Early : 24.8 31.2 25.8 134.8 150.7 128.3 3,355 2/4,70o 3,311
Late : 185.4 166.2 137.9 133.6 145.3 163.5 24,540 24,152 22,553

Summer
Early : 128.6 117.3 110.7 95.7 125.0 123.0 12,217 2/14,65) 13,614
Late 210.7 183.8 180. 158.5 186.7 193.6 33,052 2/34,308 33,206

Total to date : 575.8 533.0 481.6 134.2 155.3 159.0 77,267 82,793 76,558

Fall
8 Eastern : 2.. 288.5 270.5 206.8 228.0 --- 61,884 65,788 ---
9 Central 327.9 308.3 309.9 117.6 142.0 --- 38,408 43,785 ---
9 Western 277.4 337.2 334.7 188.0 217.6 --- 52,269 73,363--
Total : 05.2 934.0 .915.1 168.9 195.9 --- 152,261 182,936 --

United States :1,481.1 1,467.0 1, u:,.7 155.8 181.1 --_ 229,829 265,729 _

SRevised.
2 Production includes the following quantities not harvested or not marketed because of low prices
(thousand hundredweight): Early Spring 395, Early Summer 136, Late Summer 403.
Crop Production, USDA, AMS, issued monthly.


Table 15.--Sweetpotatoes: Acreage, yield per acre, and production, average 1949-57,
annual 1958 and indicated 1959

: Acreage : Yield per acre Production
: Harvested
Group and : : : For : : : Indi- : : Indi-
State : Average : : harvest Average 1958 : cated Average 1958 : cated
: 1949-57 : 1959 1949-57 : 1959 1949-57 : : 1959

:1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
:acres acres acres Cwt. Cwt. Cwt. cwt. cwt. cwt.

Central
Atlantic 38.1 39.9 42.8 85 96 91 3,224 3,812 3,886
Lower
Atlantic 2/ 102.5 56.6 54.5 52 64 61 5,365 3,614 3,: 6
South
Central 3/ 194.8 154.3 160.1 50 57 57 9,778 8,750 9,115
North
Central / : 3.5 3.2 3.3 55 74 75 172 238 247
California : 11.7 12.0 13.0 70 85 78 817 1,020 1,014


Total :352.9 266.0 273.7 55.5 65.5 64.3 19,516 17,434 17,598

1' New Jersey, Maryland, and Virginia.
2 North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida.
Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Texas.
Missouri and Fansas.
Crop Production, USDA, AMS, iss-'ed monthly.


- 41 -


TVS-133


JI.LY 1959








Table 16.--Potatoes: Price f.o.b. shipping points and wholesale price at
New York and Chicago, indicated periods 1958 and 1959

Week ended
S: 1958 : 1959
Item : State : Unit :
: May June July May June July
: 17 14 12 16 13 : 11
: Dol. Dol. Doi. Dol. Dol. Dol.
F.o.b. shipping points
Kern District-
Bakersfield, Long : 100-lb. sack :
White, washed California U. S. No. 1 : 2.88 1.76 2.18 2.75 4.25 3.00

Phoenix -Round Reds : Arizona 100-lb. sack
: S. No. 1: 3.02 2.00 --- 3.00 4.85 ---

Washington- : North 100-1b. sack
Cobbler, washed : Carolina :U. S. No. 1 --- --- 1.70 --- 3.36

Onley -Eastern
Shore points : 100-1b. sack
Cobbler, unwashed : Virginia :U. S. No. 1 : --- --- 1.78 --- --- 3.15

: : Tuesday nearest mid-month
S: 1955 : 1959
May June July May : June: July
13 17 : 15 12 16 14
Dol. Dol. Doi. Dol. Dol. Dol.
Terminal markets
New York
Long White, washed : California : 50-lb. sack : 3.50 2.43 2.70 2.70 3.60 2.91
Cobblers, unwashed : Virginia : 50-lb. sack : --- -- 1.14 --- --- 1.90

Chicago : 100-lb. sack
Round Reds : California :U. S. No. :
Size A : --- 3.45 --- --- 6.60 4.30

Long Whites : California : 100-lb. sack
U. S. No. 1
Size A :5-15 3.60 4.10 4.75 6.25 4.60


F.o.b. prices are the simple averages of the mid-point of the range daily prices and are compiled from
Market News Reports of AMS. Market prices are submitted Tuesday of each week by Market News repre-
sentatives.

Table 17.--Saeetpotatoes: Representative wholesale price per bushel (i.c.1. sales)
at New York and Chicago for stock of generally good merchantable quality and
condition (U. S. No. 1, when available) indicated periods, 1958 and 1959

Tuesday nearest mid-month
195 : 1959
Item : State : Unit : : : : : :
SMay June July May June July
S13 17 : 15 12 16 : 14
SDol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol.
New York : North
Puerto Rican : Carolina Bu. bskt. 5.65 5.40 5.63 4.25 3.85 3.70

Chicago
Puerto Rican,
cured : Louisiana : 50-1b. crt. : 5.50 5.50 5.85 3.50 3.15 2.50



Prices submitted for Tuesday of each week by the Market News representative at New York and Chicago.


- 42 -


TVS-133


JULY 1959







Table 18.--Beans, dry, edible: Acreage, yield per acre, and production,
average 1948-57, annual 1958 and indicated 1959 J/

SAcreage Yield per acre Production 2/
States .
and Harvested For Indi- Indi-
and1_____8:Average: a8 :Average : 1958
classes 9Avaharvest 1956 cated 5 1958 cated
Average:. 1958 1959 :198-5 :95 :1948-57 : : 1959
:1948-57: : : :
: 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
acres acres acres Pounds Pounds Pounds bags bags bags

Maine, New York, Michigan : 586 653 641 952 1,001 1,024 5,570 6,537 6,561
Nebraska, Montana, Idaho,
Wyoming, Washington :301 371 361 1,597 1,708 1,719 4,796 6,335 6,205
Colorado, New Mexico,
Arizona, and Utah :319 278 255 708 726 684 2,170 2,018 1,743
California
Large lima 72 66 60 1,640 1,656 1,700 1,171 1,093 1,020
Baby lima : 46 22 22 1,624 1,618 1,800 724 356 396
Other 197 210 193 1,201 1,258 1,300 2,375 2,642 2,509

Total California : 315 298 275 1,358 1,373 1,427 4,270 4,091 3,925

United States :1,521 1,600 1,532 1,113 1,186 1,203 16,804 18,981 18,434


I Includes beans grown for seed.
2/ Bags of 100 pounds (cleaned).

Crop Production, USDA, AMS, issued monthly.


Table 19.--Peas, dry, field: Acreage, yield per acre,and production,
average 1948-57, annual 1958 and indicated 1959 1/

Acreage Yield per acre Production 2/

State Harvested :For Indi- Indi-
Avegharvest. Averag 1958 cated :Average 1958 cated
:Average: :194-57: 1948-57 :
:194 7: : 959: : :9 : :1959
: 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
: acres acres acres Pounds Pounds Pounds bags bags bags

Minnesota : 4 3 4 1,001 1,100 1,300 41 33 52
North Dakota : 4 2 4 934 1,300 1,200 34 26
Montana : .--- --- --- ---
Idaho : 93 77 119 1,197 1,450 1,450 1,119 1,116 1,726
Wyoming : --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
Colorado 10 12 10 878 1,000 900 90 120 90
Washington 140 101 140 1,148 1,060 1,400 1,588 1,071 1,960
Oregon 11 7 10 934 1,400 1,400 103 98 140
California : 8 1 2 1,163 1,100 1,450 93 11 29

United States :281 203 289 1,145 1,219 1,400 3,193 2,475 4,045


1/ In principal commercial producing States. Includes peas grown for seed and peas harvested
dry.
2/ Bags of 100 pounds (cleaned).


Crop Production, USDA, AMS, issued monthly.


- 43 -


TVS-133


JULY 1959




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