Vegetable situation

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Material Information

Title:
Vegetable situation
Physical Description:
213 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, Commodity Economics Division
Place of Publication:
Washington
Frequency:
quarterly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Vegetables -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Vegetable trade -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Vegetable trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
TVS-6 (June 1937) - TVS-218 (Nov. 1980).
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-TVS-218, Nov. 1980.
Issuing Body:
Vols. for 1937-Nov. 1953 issued by Bureau of Agricultural Economics; 1954-Jan. 1961, by Agricultural Marketing Service; Apr. 1961- by Economic Research Service; Feb. 1978- by Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service; Nov. 1980 by Economics and Statistics Service, each a subdivision of the United States Department of Agriculture; Nov. 1980 approved by the World Food and Agricultural Outlook and Situation Board.
General Note:
MONTHLY CATALOG NUMBER: gp 81007565

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 026013012
oclc - 08029461
lccn - 78643830
issn - 0042-3084
Classification:
lcc - HD9220.U5 U57a
ddc - 380.1/41/50973
System ID:
AA00013012:00001

Related Items

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Vegetable situation
Succeeded by:
Vegetable situation
Succeeded by:
Vegetable outlook & situation


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VEGETABLE


SITUATION

TVS- 126


11958 OUTLOOK ISSUE


October 1957
FOR RELEASE
OCT. 30, A. M.


0 1.1 A I I I I I I 1
1930 1935 19A
*INDICATIONS AS OF OCTOBER 3


Production of fall potatoes is down
9 percent from a year earlier, and in-
dications are that winter production
will be smaller. Federal Marketing
agreements and orders, restricting
marketing of tablestock potatoes to
the better qualities, are in effect in
areas which account for about 70 per-
cent of fall production. A diversion
program for 1957 fall crop potatoes,


945 1950 1955 1960
SEASON AVERAGE PRICE WEIGHTED BY PRODUCTION
NEG. 414-57(10) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE


similar to the one for the 1956 crop,
is also in operation to encourage order-
ly marketing of good quality potatoes
and to increase returns to growers.
With supplies of potatoes at more
manageable levels, prices received
by growers into the Spring are expected
to average substantially above the
low levels of a year earlier.


Published quarterly by
AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE







Table 1.--Vegetables for fresh market: Reported commercial acreage and
production, average 1949-55, annual 1956, and indicated 1957

Acreage Production
Seasonal group 6 year : : Indicated 1957 : 6 year Indicated 1957
and crop average :1956 : : Per- : average : 1956 : Per-
1949-55 I/: : Amount: centage: 1949-55 I : Amount : centage
: : of 1956: : of 1956
Acres Acres Acres Percent 1,000 cwt. 1,000 cwt. 1.000 cwt. Percent


Winter 2/
Spring 3/
Summer 2
Fall 4/
Beans, lima
Beans, snap
Early
Late
Total

Broccoli
Brussels sprouts
Cabbage 2/
Early
Late
Total
Carrots
Early
Late
Total
Cauliflower
Early
Late
Total
Celery
Early
Late
Total

Corn
Cucumbers
Early
Late
Total

Eggplant
Lettuce
Early
Late
Total

Peas, green
Peppers, green
Spinach
Tomatoes
Early
Late
Total

Total fall to date
Total fall
Total acreage and
production reported
to date for 1957
Total, all


265,290
696,500
908,540

560

18,860
18,340
37.200


268,090
710,040
869,700

350

14,850
16,000
10.850


250,360
683,920
897,800



15,500
17,600
31.100


30,746
48,437
87,468

16

729
520
1.249


34,097
55,132
90,291


615
508
1.123


29,578
51,274
88,058



707
513
1.220


21,460 27,400 21,500 78 987 1,197 969 81
5,460 6,200 5,800 94 513 745 558 75

43,810 41,300 35,490 86 9,692 11,557 8,317 72
4,480 3,100 3,900 126 --- --- -
48,290 44,400 39,390 89 -

18,440 18,140 19,710 109 4,462 4,792 4,479 93
9,760 10,500 9,000 86 2,349 2,730 2,160 79
28.200 28,640 28,710 100 6,811 7,522 6,639 88

8,370 7,900 7,700 97 1,364 1,452 1,328 91
5,630 6,400 5,100 80 852 960 816 85
14,000 14,300 12,800 90 2,216 2,412 2,144 89

3,880 2,900 2,730 94 1,035 787 623 79
7,960 8,100 8,000 99 2,745 3,483 3,440 99
S11,840 11,000 o10730 98 3,780 4,270 4,o63 95

4,490 7,000 8,700 124 284 325 457 141

4,190 5,600 6,200 111 378 434 494 114
4,260 5,700 6,700 118 440 598 670 112
8,450 11.300 12,900 114 818 1,032 1,164 113

1,460 1,100 1,350 123 93 86 113 131

44,930 41,150 47,550 116 5,916 5,854 6,237 107
12,570 14,600 16,000 110 1,661 2,088 2,400 115
57.500 55,750 63.550 114 7.577 7,942 8,637 109

2,600 1,700 2,000 118 90 65 70 108
7,750 5,700 6,800 119 329 328 381 116
6,960 6,000 5,650 94 441 373 345 92

17,940 21,500 21,000 98 2,794 3,225 3,150 98
17,140 14,900 14,600 98 -
: 35080 36,400 35,600 98 --- ---


:269,680
: 293,950


270,090 270,080
289,610


:2,140,010 2,117,920 2,102,360
:2,164.280 2,137,440


37,690 42,212
39,390 43,960

204,341 221,732
206,041 223,486


38,227



207,137


1 For group and annual totals, averages of the yearly totals, not the sum of the crop averages.
2 Includes cabbage used for sauerkraut. 2/ Includes asparagus used for processing and cabbage for
sauerkraut. 4/ Includes crops for which seasonal sub-group estimates are not made.


TVS-126


OCTOBER 1957


- 2 -






TVS-126 3 OCTOBER 1957

- - -
THE VEGETABLE SITUATION


Approved by the Outlook and Situation Board, October 24,1957


C.
CONTENTS

Page Page :

: Summary ...................... 3 Frozen Vegetables *......... 15
: Outlook Trends ............... 4 Potatoes .. ......16
: Commercial Vegetables Sweetpotatoes .............. 19
: for Fresh Market ........... 7 Dry Edible Beans ............ 20
:Vegetables for Commercial Dry Field Peas .............. 22
: Processing ................. 11 List of Tables .............. 30
: Canned Vegetables ............ 12
: Special Article

: Consumption of Potatoes, Sweetpotatoes, Dry Beans and Dry Peas By
: Regions, Urbanization and Family Income, Spring of 1955........... 23
: Revised Consumption Series **..............- -.. ......-.-***...-.... 29


SUMMARY

Consumer demand for vegetables next year is expected to continue at
about 1957 levels since general business activity and disposable income of
consumers are likely to be maintained. Thus, the way prices received by
producers of vegetables for fresh market sale in 1958 compare with 1957 will
depend largely on the quantity produced and the pattern of marketing.

Indications for this fall are that supplies of commercial vegetables for
fresh market sale will be significantly smaller than last fall but slightly
above the 1949-55 average. Sharpest cut from a year earlier was in early fall
cabbage, which was in very heavy supply last fall. Among other important
items, significant increases in snap beans, cucumbers and lettuce were more
than offset by moderate to substantial reductions for carrots, cauliflower,
broccoli, celery, and Brussels sprouts.

Dry onion supplies this fall and winter will be about in line with the
1949-55 average, but moderately smaller than a year earlier. With smaller
supplies of most vegetables available, prices received by growers are expected
to average at least moderately higher this fall than last.

Supplies of canned vegetables available into mid-1958 are expected to
be a little smaller than the high levels a year earlier, but frozen vegetables
are likely to continue in record supply. Among major canned items,
tomatoes, tomato juice and most tomato products are expected to be down





OCTOBER 1957


from the heavy supplies of the previous season, but are likely to be moderately
to substantially above average; supplies of green peas, corn, and snap beans
promise to be near record. Indications are that other canned items, and all
frozen items will be in plentiful supply. Processing and distribution costs
are up for the 1957 pack, and wholesale and retail prices are expected to
average a little higher this season than last.


Fewer potatoes will be available into the spring of 1958 than the
burdensome supplies of a year earlier. October estimates indicate a fall
crop of 151 million hundredweight, 16 million less than last year; and Sept-
ember reports of planting intentions in Florida and California indicate a
winter production below the 1957 record. Marketing agreements and orders,
which restrict the marketing of tablestock potatoes to the more desirable
qualities and preferred sizes, are again in effect in several major produc-
ing areas. Also, to promote the orderly marketing of good quality potatoes
and increase returns to growers, the Department in September announced a
diversion program for 1957 fall crop potatoes similar to the one in effect
for the 1956 fall crop. With smaller supplies expected to be available
during the fall and winter, prices received by farmers are likely to average
substantially above the low levels of a year earlier.

Production of sweetpotatoes is slightly larger than a year ago, but
there are significant reductions in most commercial areas with storage facili-
ties. This means that supplies available in Northern markets this winter and
spring are likely to be down from a year earlier, and prices received by
growers are expected to average at least moderately higher than in the early
months of 1957.

Fewer dry edible beans will be available in the 1957-58 season than a
year earlier, when substantial quantities were delivered under the Government
price support program. Supplies of the different classes seem in better
balance than a year earlier when supplies of pea and red kidney beans were
very heavy, and those of pintos were relatively light. With smaller, better
balanced supplies and the same national average support rate, prices received
by farmers for the 1957 crop are expected to average a little higher than for
the 1956 crop.

Supplies of dry field peas available for distribution in the 1957-58
season are substantially above the 1949-55 average although more than a
tenth smaller than the heavy supplies of last season. Domestic outlets are
likely to take as many peas this season as last, but exports probably will
be smaller. Prices received by growers for the 1957 crop are expected to
continue at relatively low levels.

OUTLOOK TREND

To appraise production prospects for vegetables and potatoes in the
next 4 to 6 years, assumptions are necessary regarding the more important fac-
tors influencing economic activity and general demand. Population growth and


TVS-126





OCTOBER 1957


level of real income are the major factors influencing the demand for vege-
tables. Under assumed rates of growth, population in 5 years would reach
184-186 million. Real income also is likely to increase, continuing the long-
term trend.

The growth in population is expected to be the major force contributing
to any increase in total requirements for vegetables in the next few years.
The projected higher incomes are not expected to result in much increase in
overall consumption, but will be an important factor in determining the rela-
tive demand and rate of growth for individual items, and for vegetables in
different forms. Obviously, some of the assumptions may not prove valid,
thereby altering production prospects. Also, nutritional findings, technolo-
gical developments, and changes in modes of living, which do not lend them-
selves to precise statistical measurement, may alter or even reverse trends.


Vegetables

During the past two decades overall vegetable consumption, excluding
melons, has increased significantly. Annual rate of consumption of fresh and
processed vegetables (fresh equivalent) increased almost a fifth, from an
average of 170 pounds per person in 1937-39 to 202 pounds in 1954-56. Con-
sumption per person expanded rapidly during the war and immediate postwar
years, declined moderately as forces generated by the war subsided, then
tended to level off. Since 1950, the annual rate of consumption has been
fairly stable at a little more than 200 pounds per person. Overall vegetable
consumption is now relatively high. Any increase in rate of consumption
during the next few years is likely to be very small. But there is likely to
be a continuing trend toward use of more processed vegetables.

All of the increase in per capital vegetable consumption from the immedi-
ate pre-World War II period to the mid-1950's was due to an expansion in the
processed component. Consumption of processed vegetables (fresh equivalent)
increased 70 percent, from 56 pounds in 1937-39 to 96 pounds per person in
1954-56. Of the 40-pound increase, canned items accounted for 26 pounds, and
the rapidly expanding use of frozen vegetables 14 pounds. But per capital
consumption of fresh vegetables has trended downward in the postwar period,
and in 1954-56 was moderately lower than in the immediate prewar years. The
prospect of higher incomes, improved technology and increasing emphasis on
"convenience foods" suggests that the trend toward more processed and less
fresh vegetables per person is likely to continue. However, because of the
growth in population, total market requirements for fresh vegetables 4 to
6 years from now is likely to be larger than the 1954-56 average.

Consumption of melons per person was slightly higher in 1954-56 than
in the prewar period, with watermelons accounting for all of the increase.
Rate of melon consumption is likely to show a further slight increase in the
next few years.


TvS-126


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OCTOBER 1957


Potatoes and
Sweetpotatoes

Demand for potatoes has declined sharply from pre-World War II levels.
Despite the fact that prices of potatoes have failed to keep pace with prices
of all farm products, consumption per person declined from an average of
126 pounds in 1937-39 to 104 pounds in 1954-56. The introduction and expan-
sion of processed items, together with stepped up merchandising of both fresh
and processed products probably will slow any further decline in per capital
consumption. Thus, with more people to feed, total requirements 5 years from
now are expected to be moderately larger than in the 1954-56 period. However,
potatoes have been in oversupply in recent years, so that little or no in-
crease in production would be required to meet the larger anticipated
requirements.

Sweetpotato production and per capital consumption declined rapidly in
the postwar period. Lack of any sustained price strength for the much smaller
crops indicates a decline in demand. Annual consumption declined from an
average of almost 21 pounds per person in 1937-39 to 8 pounds in 1954-56.
Part of the decline in output was associated with disease and insect problems,
lack of sufficient satisfactory storage in some areas, and increasing prosper-
ity in the South, with an accompanying decrease in production of sweetpotatoes
for home use. Influence of some of the factors which have curtailed sweet-
potato production may have about reached their maximum effect. Although con-
sumption per person may show some further decline in the years just ahead,
total production 4 to 6 years from now may be near the 1954-56 level.

Dry Beans
and Peas

Annual consumption of dry edible beans in the postwar period has
fluctuated between 6.5 and 8.6 pounds per person. Although not clear cut,
there seems to have been a slight downward trend since 1950. During the next
few years, per capital consumption of dry beans may decline some, at least
partly offsetting the growth in population. No significant increase is ex-
pected in foreign demand. Production of dry edible beans in 1954-56 was some-
what above normal market requirements. Thus, little or no increase in produc-
tion would be necessary to meet anticipated requirements in the next
4 to 6 years.

During the last five years dry pea consumption has averaged slightly
more than half a pound per person. Consumption is expected to remain near
this level during the next 4 to 6 years, with domestic requirements for food
and seed expected to about keep pace with population.

The 1958 outlook for commodities is given in the appropriate section
of this report.


- 6 -


TVS-126





OCTOBER 1957


COMMERCIAL VEGETABLES FOR FRESH MARKET

Outlook for 1958

Prospects for a continued high level of employment and record or near-
record disposable income indicates that consumer demand for fresh vegetables
in 1958 is likely to be about the same as in 1957. General business activity
in recent months has been maintained at record levels, and prospects are that
it will continue high in the year ahead.

In the continued generally favorable economic climate anticipated,
prices received by farmers for fresh market vegetables in 1958, compared with
a year earlier, will depend largely on the volume produced and marketed.
Given normal weather it appears likely that supplies of fresh vegetables in
the first half of 1958 will be slightly to moderately larger than in 1957,
when plantings in some areas were curtailed because of lack of sufficient
moisture, and yields were cut by excessive rains in Florida and Texas. Should
supplies be significantly larger, prices received by farmers probably would
average at least moderately lower than those of 1957.

Substantially smaller supplies of fresh vegetables are expected to be
available this fall than last. Estimates available on October 1, on crops
which account for over 95 percent of total fall production, indicate that out-
put is likely to be about 9 percent under that of 1956, though slightly above
the 1949-55 average. Sharpest cut from a year earlier occurred in early fall
cabbage, which was in very heavy supply last year. Among other major items,
moderate to substantial reductions were also reported for carrots, cauli-
flower, broccoli, celery, and Brussels sprouts. Significant increases were
indicated for lettuce, cucumbers, and snap beans.

Supplies of dry onions available for fall and winter markets are
moderately smaller than a year earlier Production of late summer onions is
estimated at 16.3 million hundredweight, about 1.2 million less than in 1956,
but only slightly less than the 1949-55 average. With smaller overall sup-
plies of vegetables available, prices received by growers are expected to
average moderately to substantially higher this fall than last.

Information is not available on probable production of vegetables for
winter and spring harvests. However, the Department acreage-marketing guide
released in August recommends for winter vegetables a planted acreage 1 per-
cent less than in 1957. Yields near the average of recent years, on the
suggested acreage, would result in a production moderately larger than last
year. The acreage-marketing guide for 1958 spring vegetables will be
available for distribution early in November.


TVS-126


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OCTOBER 1957


Foreign Trade

On an annual basis, foreign trade in fresh vegetables is very small
compared with total domestic production. However, exports and imports of a
number of items are important to certain areas, particularly in the winter
and spring seasons. Cabbage, carrots, celery, lettuce, melons, onions and
tomatoes are the main items exported, with the bulk of exports going to
Canada. U. S. exports of fresh vegetables and melons in January-July 1957
amounted to about 580 million pounds, 4 percent more than in the same months
of 1956. Foreign demand is expected to continue strong, and exports in the
last half of 1957 and the first half of 1958 are likely to be a little larger
than a year earlier.

The bulk of United States annual imports of fresh vegetables and melons
originate in Mexico and Cuba. Cucumbers, peppers, tomatoes, turnips and
melons make up a large percentage of our imports, the majority of which arrive
in the winter and spring. Imports in the first 7 months of 1957 amounted to
about 340 million pounds, almost 6 percent more than a year earlier. Most of
the increase was accounted for by 35 percent more tomatoes, imports of which
were relatively light in the first half of 1956.

Imports of vegetables in the first half of 1958 will depend on several
factors. Weather conditions in this country and in Mexico and Cuba can
materially influence both the quantity and quality of the crops. The acreages
of cucumbers and staked tomatoes in Cuba are expected to show an increase of
about 500 acres for each. Indications are that there will be a substantial
decrease in ground tomatoes. The acreage of tomatoes on the West Coast of
Mexico may show a decrease of about 5 percent because of a shortage of irriga-
tion water in the Culiacan Valley in Sinaloa. But there may be a substantial
increase in miscellaneous vegetables for shipment in mixed trucklots.

The demand for cucumbers and tomatoes within Cuba and Mexico has been
increasing rapidly. Unless market prices are unusually high in the U. S., it
is likely that there will be a slight decrease in imports of these vegetables.

Outlook for Major
Fresh Vegetables

Cabbage

Supplies of cabbage available for market this fall are substantially
smaller than the large supplies available in the fall of 1956, but supplies
may be more plentiful this winter than last. The early fall crop for fresh
market and processing, which makes up about 95 percent of total fall produc-
tion, is estimated at 8.32 million hundredweight, down 28 percent from last
year and 14 percent below the 1949-55 average. Although production of early
fall cabbage for kraut on contract acreage is expected to be much smaller than
last fall, production of cabbage for open market sale also promises to be down
sharply.


TVS-126


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TVS-126


With fairly heavy carryover stocks of sauerkraut and expected higher
prices for fresh market supplies, packers are expected to purchase consider-
ably less cabbage from open market supplies this fall than last. Thus, sup-
plies actually moving into fresh market channels may be down a little less
than indicated production.

Growers in early September, reported intentions to plant 34,200 acres
of cabbage for winter harvest, a tenth more than was harvested last winter,
but almost a fifth less than the 1949-56 average. Although acreage is ex-
pected to be up in the Lower Valley of Texas, plants in seed beds have made
slow growth and there will be less early cabbage. Production estimates will
not be available for winter cabbage until December 10. However, 1952-56
yields by States, on the indicated acreage, would result in a production about
a fourth larger than last winter but substantially below average. Materially
less cabbage will be available from the fall crop to supplement winter produc-
tion. But these stocks are typically small compared with January-March
production, so that total supplies promise to be substantially larger than
last winter.

Because of the large fall crop and heavy stocks on January 1, prices of
cabbage were relatively low last fall and early winter. With materially less
fall cabbage in prospect than a year earlier, prices into early winter are ex-
pected to average substantially above those of a year earlier. After early
winter, however, larger anticipated marketing from the winter crop are
expected to hold prices somewhat below the relatively high levels of 1956.

Carrots

Production of carrots for early fall harvest was estimated in early
October at 4.5 million hundredweight, moderately less than last year, but
about in line with the 1949-55 average. Substantial quantities of the early
fall crop go to processors in the East and Midwest, and movement to freezers
in the Northwest is fairly heavy. However, with much heavier stocks this fall
than last, processors are likely to take substantially fewer carrots from the
early fall crop. The late fall crop in California is also down--from 2.7 mil-
lion hundredweight last year to 2.2 million. The decrease is due to reduc-
tions both in acreage and average yield. No information is available as to
the probable size of the winter crop. However, the Department acreage-market-
ing guide recommended for 1958, planted acreages 10 percent larger than in
1957 for Texas, and 15 percent less for Arizona and California. The suggested
acreage with yields by States near the 1953-57 average would result in a
production moderately below 1957, and substantially below the 1949-56 average.

Marketings of carrots in recent weeks have been moderately smaller
than a year earlier and prices substantially higher. For the week ended
October 19, f.o.b. prices in the Salinas-Watsonville District of California
averaged $4.65 per crate, 48 1-pound film bags, compared with $2.70 a year
earlier. Since supplies of carrots in the weeks ahead are expected to be


OCTOBER 1957


- 9 -






OCTOBER 1957


lighter than a year ago, prices this fall probably will continue above year
earlier levels. Also, should winter production be near the guide objective,
prices during early 1958 are expected to average higher than a year earlier.

Celery

Production of early fall celery has tended to decline in recent years,
while production for late fall harvest has expanded. The 1957 early fall crop
of celery is estimated at 623,000 hundredweight, a fifth less than last year
and 40 percent below the 1949-55 average. But the important late fall crop
is estimated at 3.4 million tons, only slightly less than last year, and a
fourth above average. Thus, total fall supplies are likely to be only moder-
ately smaller than in 1956, and at least moderately above the 1949-55 average.
Production in Michigan, which accounts for about half the early fall produc-
tion, is well below that of last year, and the season is expected to be
shorter. Shipping point prices during most of October were close to those of
a year earlier. With a little less celery available, prices to growers in the
next 6 to 8 weeks are likely to average near those of last year.

Information is not available on total probable acreage or production of
celery for winter harvest. The Department acreage-marketing guide recommends
a 1958 planted acreage 10 percent smaller than in 1957 in Florida and no
change in California and Arizona. Since Florida has the largest acreage, this
would mean an overall cut of 7 percent. The suggested acreage with 1953-57
average yields by States would result in a production slightly larger than
either 1957 or the 1949-55 average. Production at this level probably would
move to market at prices close to those of last winter. As of October 1,
however, about a third of the Florida crop was in, with plantings in the early
areas running about the same as last year.

Lettuce

Supplies of lettuce this fall promise to be moderately to substantially
above those of a year earlier, and materially above the 1949-55 average. The
early fall crop, estimated at 6.2 million hundredweight, is up moderately from
a year ago, largely as a result of increased acreage in New Jersey, New Mexico
and California. Acreage in California, which accounts for about four-fifths
of early fall production, was up 12 percent but yields in California and most
other states were down from a year earlier. The less important late fall crop
in Arizona, estimated at 2.4 million hundredweight, is expected to be about
15 percent larger than in 1956 and almost 45 percent above the 1949-55
average. Both acreage and prospective yield are larger than a year ago or
average.

Information is not available on acreage or probable production of
lettuce for winter harvest. The Department acreage-marketing guide suggests
a 15 percent larger acreage in Texas than in 1957, 15 percent less in


Tvs-126


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OCTOBER 1957


California, and the same acreages in Florida and Arizona. Since California
has about half the total winter plantings the recommendations would result in
an overall reduction in acreage of 6 percent. The suggested acreage with
1952-56 average yields by states would result in a production slightly larger
than in 1957 and at least moderately above the 1949-55 average.

Demand for lettuce is expected to continue strong. But with larger
supplies in prospect during the next two months, prices to growers are ex-
pected to average substantially below the relatively high levels of a year
earlier. If production for winter harvest is close to the guide objective,
prices received by growers this winter are likely to average near those of a
year earlier.

Tomatoes

The early fall crop of tomatoes in California appears slightly smaller
than in 1956, but substantially above the 1949-55 average. In recent weeks
movement to market has been lighter than a year ago, and prices have averaged
higher than in the corresponding weeks of 1956. Total acreage of tomatoes for
late fall harvest is only slightly smaller than last year with a substantial
reduction in Florida about offset by a sharp increase in Texas. However,
since Florida has much the higher yields, production for late fall harvest is
likely to be substantially smaller than last year, but about in line with the
1949-55 average. Prices this fall are expected to average above those of a
year earlier.

The acreage-marketing guide suggests 15 percent less acreage of winter
tomatoes in Florida than last year. Normal abandonment and 1951-55 average
yields on the recommended acreage would result in a production slightly
larger than that of last winter, and about a third above average. Acreage
of tomatoes on the West Coast of Mexico is down, and imports from that country
are likely to be a little smaller than last winter. However, this will depend
on production in Mexico and on the level of U. S. prices.

A Federal marketing agreement and order regulates the marketing of
tomatoes grown in Florida south or east of the Suwanee River. A committee of
tomato growers recommends to the Secretary of Agriculture the grade, size,
quality and maturity restrictions.


VEGETABLES FOR COMMERCIAL PROCESSING

Outlook

Supplies of processed vegetables through next spring are expected to
be a little smaller than the heavy supplies of last season, but substantially
larger than the 1949-55 average. Carryover stocks were considerably larger
at the beginning of this season, but production estimates on crops for
commercial processing indicate a pack well below the record 1956 pack.


- 11 -


TVS-126





OCTOBER 1957


Although supplies of some vegetables are very large, most items appear
to be in somewhat better balance with anticipated market requirements than a
year earlier. Biggest reductions in prospective output occurred in those
items which were in heaviest supply in the 1955-56 season. Among major canned
items, tomatoes, tomato juice and most tomato products are expected to be in
moderately to substantially smaller supply than the large supplies of a year
earlier. However, supplies of green peas, sweet corn, and snap beans are
likely to be near record.

Overall supplies of processed vegetables is smaller than a year ago,
and continued strong consumer demand is in prospect into mid-1958. Also,
generally higher material and labor costs this season mean higher unit costs
to packers. Thus, prices at the cannery are expected to average somewhat
above the relatively low levels of 1956-57. Distribution costs also are up.
Although promotion of some items will again be intense, and will include some
price concessions, the consumer is likely to find generally higher price tags
at the retail store.

There is as yet no indication of the 1958 acreage of vegetables for
commercial processing. However, assuming yields near the average of recent
years, it appears at this early date that a slight to moderate cut in acreage
in 1958 may be needed to avoid burdensome supplies in the 1958-59 season. The
acreage-marketing guide for processing vegetables will be released in January.

1957 Production For Processing
Substantially Below That of 1956

Reports in early October indicate that the pack of vegetables will be
considerably smaller this year than last, but substantially larger than the
1949-55 average. Planted acres of 8 important vegetables for commercial proc-
essing was down moderately from a year earlier, and yields of most crops are
expected to be somewhat lower. Aggregate prospective production of the 8
crops is down about a fifth from the 1956 record, but significantly above the
1949-55 average. Compared with a year earlier,-production is down substan-
tially for green lima beans, beets, contract cabbage for kraut, sweet corn and
tomatoes. Production of winter and spring spinach was about the same as a
year ago, while output of snap beans for processing promises to be moderately
larger, and that of green peas slightly larger. These crops make up more than
90 percent of the total tonnage of the 10 processing crops for which the
Department of Agriculture makes regular estimates. Production estimates are
not yet available on asparagus, cucumbers, fall spinach or open market
purchases of cabbage for kraut.

CAITED VEGETABLES

Outlook for 1958

Supplies of canned vegetables in the 1957-58 marketing season are
expected to be a little smaller than the heavy supplies of 1956-57.
Although the pack promises to be down substantially, this is largely offset


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by larger beginning stocks. Mid-year packer and distributor stocks of 6 major
canned vegetables--snap beans, green peas, sweet corn, tomatoes, tomato juice,
and sauerkraut--amounted to the equivalent of 46 million cases of 24/2's.
This was more than 50 percent larger than the light holdings of a year earlier,
and 18 percent above the 1949-55 average. Tomatoes, tomato juice and most
tomato products are expected to be down some from the heavy supplies of a year
earlier, but are likely to be moderately to substantially above average.
Supplies of green peas, corn, and snap beans promise to be near record. Indi-
cations are that all other items will be in plentiful supply.

Canned Peas

Indications are that green peas will be in heavy supply into mid-1958.
Acreage planted to peas for processing was down slightly from that of 1956,
but yields were moderately higher, and less peas were frozen. The result was
a canned pack substantially larger than last year or the 1949-55 average.
June 1 carryover stocks were about 1.5 million cases, 24/2's, larger than
carryover in 1956. Thus, supplies of canned green peas are near record levels,
and about 16 percent above the near average supplies of the 1956-57 season.
Strong consumer demand and industry promotions are expected to result in a
high disappearance rate for this item. However, because of the heavy supplies,
consumers are likely to find peas among the more attractively priced items.

Snap Beans

Indications are that snap beans will be in near-record supply during
the 1957-58 marketing season. Combined canner and distributor stocks at the
beginning of the current season were somewhat-smaller than the heavy stocks
of a year earlier. But the smaller stocks probably will be more than offset
by a moderately larger pack. Production estimates as of September 1 together
with earlier indications of acreage for canning, suggests that the canned pack
is likely to be up a little more than 5 percent. Should the pack be this
large, supplies would be slightly larger than last season and near the record
level for the 1955-56 season.

Another year of large total supplies of processed vegetables means con-
tinued stiff competition for the consumer's dollar. The large supply of snap
beans probably will again receive considerable promotional effort. Prices are
likely to average near those of the previous season.

Sweet Corn

The 1956 pack of sweet corn was an all time high. Despite a heavy rate
of movement into consumption, combined canner and distributor stocks at the
beginning of the 1957-58 season were more than 60 percent larger than the
light stocks of a year earlier and moderately above the 1949-55 average.
However, larger beginning stocks than a year earlier will be offset by a


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OCTOBER 1957





OCTOBER 1957


substantially smaller pack. The Crop Reporting Board in early October placed
prospective production of corn for processing at 1.47 million tons. This is
13 percent smaller than the record production of 1956, but 15 percent above
the 1949-55 average. A pack 13 percent smaller than 1956, would result in
moderately smaller supplies in the 1957-56 season than a year earlier. But
canned corn is still in very heavy supply. Wholesale and retail prices may
average a little above the low level of last season.

Tomatoes

Stocks of canned tomatoes, tomato juice and tomato products were sub-
stantially larger at the beginning of the current season than a year earlier.
Holdings of tomatoes were about 2.9 million cases, 24/2's equivalent, larger
than in 1956, and stocks of tomato juice about 8 million cases larger.
However, prospective production of tomatoes for processing is down about a
fourth from the 1956 record, more than enough to offset the larger beginning
stocks.

Should the total pack be down about in line with the indicated cut in
production for processing, supplies of .tomatoes, tomato juice and most tomato
products available for distribution in the current season would be materially
smaller than the record supplies of last season. However, supplies would
still be moderately to substantially above the 1949-55 average, with all
items in plentiful supply.

Apparent disappearance of canned tomatoes and tomato products during
the 1956-57 season was at a high level. With significantly smaller supplies,
and higher processing and distribution costs, both cannery and retail prices
in the first half of 1958 are expected to average above the corresponding
months of 1957.

Sauerkraut

Indications are that supplies of sauerkraut available in the 1957-58
season are likely to be slightly to moderately smaller than a year earlier,
but above the 1949-55 average. Larger stocks at the beginning of the season
probably will be more than offset by a material cut in production.

The Crop Reporting Board in early October estimated the production of
cabbage for kraut from contract acreage or acreage controlled by packers at
108,200 tons, down about a fourth from the large crop of last year, but sub-
stantially above the 1949-55 average. The cut in production from 1956
resulted from a drop in acreage and lower yields in all major producing States.

The above figure does not include open market purchases of cabbage for
kraut. Sucn purchases come largely from the early fall crop and usually
amount to 40 to 50 percent of total packer requirements. However, production
of cabbage for open market sale this fall is also expected to be down sub-
stantially from both a year earlier and the 1949-55 average. With the


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OCTOBER 1957


smaller production and expected higher prices this fall, open market purchases
by packers are likely to be substantially below the relatively heavy purchases
of a year earlier. Should supplies of kraut turn out to be only slightly
smaller than a year earlier, prices in 1957-56 probably would average near
those of last season.

Cucumbers for Pickles

Acreage of cucumbers for pickles is up about 10 percent from 1956.
Biggest increases were in the Southern States as a group, in Michigan, Wis-
consin, Ohio and Massachusetts. A production estimate will not be available
until November 12. However, yields by States near the 1955-56 average and
normal abandonment on the indicated acreage would result in a production
slightly to moderately larger than last year, and substantially above the
1949-55 average.

Other Vegetables
for Processing

Supplies of canned green lima beans promise to be moderately smaller
than last season, but about in line with the 1949-55 average. Stocks at the
beginning of the season were substantially larger than a year earlier, but
production for processing is down a tenth. Both acreage and prospective
production are down in all areas except the West. In California where a
large part of the crop is frozen, acreage is up 14 percent and prospective
production up almost 5 percent.

Supplies of canned spinach in the 1957-58 season may be about the same
to slightly larger than those of a year earlier, and substantially above the
1949-55 average. Stocks at the beginning of the season were somewhat larger;
and production of winter and spring spinach, which make up three-fourths of
the annual tonnage, was about the same as a year earlier, but almost a fourth
above average. Estimates of fall acreage and production for processing will
be available November 12.

Reports in early October indicated another season of above average
supplies of canned beets. Although prospective production for processing is
down a fourth from a year earlier, this is partly offset by much larger begin-
ning stocks. Total supplies are likely to be below the large supplies of last
season, but moderately to substantially above the 1949-55 average.


FROZEN VEGETABLES

Frozen vegetable supplies in the current season are expected to be
record large, continuing the growth of recent years. Although the 1957
frozen pack is expected to be somewhat smaller than in 1950, stocks at the
beginning of the current season were much larger.


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OCTOBER 1957


July 1 holdings of frozen vegetables amounted to 654 million pounds,
more than a third above those of mid-1956. Largest percentage increases com-
pared with a year earlier occurred in holdings of peas and carrots, Brussels
sprouts, cauliflower, mixed vegetables, sweet corn and green peas. But hold-
ings were also significantly larger for all other items. Although total pack
figures are not available for 1957, indications are that the pack will be
moderately to substantially smaller than the record 1956 pack. The 1957
frozen asparagus pack at 30 million pounds was 6 million pounds less, while the
pack of frozen peas at 293 million pounds was down 67 million pounds from last
year's record level. More potato products are likely to be frozen, continuing
the marked growth of these items.

Stocks of frozen vegetables on October 1 amounted to 988 million pounds,
297 million pounds above the 1952-56 average, and 119 million pounds more than
last year. Since the major portion of the pack occurs prior to October,
indications are that total supplies of frozen vegetables will be larger this
season than last.

Consumer demand for frozen vegetables in the 1958 season is expected to
remain strong. Supplies are again heavy, but processing and distribution costs
are up. Wholesale and retail prices of most items may average about the same
to a little higher than a year earlier.


POTATOES

Late Summer and Fall Crops
Smaller Than-Last Year, Planting
Intentions fown for Winter Crop

The outlook for potatoes during the next several months is consider-
ably more favorable than that of a year earlier. Acreage planted to potatoes
in 1957 in the late summer States was fractionally larger than in 1956 and
that in the fall States only 2 percent smaller. But weather was generally
less favorable, and yields were substantially below the high levels of 1956.
As a result, production of the late summer and fall crops combined is esti-
mated at 183 million hundredweight, almost a tenth less than last year but
about in line with the 1949-55 average. However, late crop potatoes have been
in surplus in most recent years. Although supplies now appear at manageable
levels, the indicated 1957 production is still moderately above the Depart-
ment's acreage-marketing guide recommendation.

It also appears likely that winter crop potatoes will be in smaller
supply than last winter. Growers of winter potatoes in Florida and California
indicated, in early September, intentions to plant 21 percent less acreage
than last year. Intended acreage in Florida was down about a third from last
year's record, while California was down 5 percent. If farmers plant close to
the intended acreage, yields near the 1949-55 average would result in a pro-
duction substantially below the 1957 record, but still more than 50 percent


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above the 1949-55 average. However, heavy damage to the fall crop in the Red
River Valley, may cause growers of red varieties in Florida to plant a larger
acreage than intended in September.

Information is not available on the probable size of the spring crop.
The Department acreage-marketing guide released October 14, recommends a
9 percent cut in total spring acreage from 1957 levels. Near average yields
by States, on the suggested acreage would result in a production of 28.4 mil-
lion hundredweight, almost 4.5 million less than last spring, and 1.5 million
below the 1949-55 average.

Less Than Average Proportion of
Fil Production in Eastern and
Central States, More in West

The geographic distribution of fall crop production is somewhat differ-
ent than the near normal distribution of 1956. In the East, indicated produc-
tion of 58.4 million hundredweight is down 14 percent from a year earlier,
largely as a result of smaller acreages and lower yields in Maine, New York
and Pennsylvania. In Maine, which accounts for about 60 percent of the Eastern
production, acreage was down 6 percent and prospective production down 11 per-
cent. Total Eastern production amounts to 39 percent of the fall total
compared with the 1949-55 average of 41 percent.

Production of fall potatoes in the Central States is estimated at
33.0 million hundredweight, about 20 percent less than last year, largely as a
result of lower yields. Declines in acreage in Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin and
Nebraska were largely offset by a 6 percent increase in North Dakota. However,
the crop in the Red River Valley the main producer of red varieties, was down
sharply from a year earlier, as a result of excessive rains. Also, keeping
quality of those potatoes is not expected to be as good as last year. Indi-
cated production in the Central States amounts to about 22 percent of total
fall output, compared with a 26 percent average for the 1949-55 period.

The fall potato crop in Western States continued to expand in 1957.
Both acreage and yields were up slightly from 1956, with production up moder-
ately. The increase in prospective production is due largely to a 4 percent
increase in acreage and higher yields in Idaho, which produces about half the
Western total, and higher yields in Colorado, The estimated production of
59.6 million hundredweight in the West amounts to 39 percent of the fall total,
compared with the 1949-55 average of 33 percent.

The relatively smaller supplies in the Eastern and Central parts of
the country, than a year earlier and average, probably means that farmers in
these areas will benefit most from any price increase resulting from the
overall cut in fall crop production.


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OCTOBER 1957





OCTOBER 1957


Foreign Trade

This country's foreign trade in potatoes is very small compared with
domestic production, and is conducted principally with Canada. U. S. exports
are generally about twice as large as imports. Our exports from July 1956
through June 1957 amounted to only 3.9 million hundredweight, about 600,000
hundredweight less than in the previous crop year, despite relatively low
prices during most of the period. Canada also had a large crop and took fewer
U. S. potatoes. Heavy supplies and low domestic prices discouraged U. S.
imports. United States imports for the crop year ended June 30 amounted to
1.6 million hundredweight, substantially less than in the 1955-56 season.
U. S. trade in potatoes in the 1957-58 season may be larger than in 1956-57.

Red River Valley Added to Areas
Covered by Marketing
Agreements and Orders

During the last several seasons marketing agreements and orders have
been in effect in a number of the major producing areas. The agreements and
orders authorized certain size, quality and maturity restrictions relating to
the marketing of potatoes produced in areas covered by the orders. The pur-
pose of such restrictions is to promote more orderly marketing of the crop
and to increase returns to growers. Following approval of growers in early
September and subsequent approval by shippers, the Department of Agriculture
issued a Federal marketing agreement and companion marketing order relating to
potatoes grown in the Red River Valley of North Dakota and Minnesota. A com-
mittee of producers and shippers is to recommend to the Secretary of Agricul-
ture the particular regulations to be put into effect.

In addition to the marketing order program in the Red River Valley,
Federal marketing orders for potatoes are now in operation in Maine; Colorado;
Washington; Idaho; Oregon; and the counties of Modoc, and Siskiyou in Northern
California. Federal agreements and orders are authorized in some other areas
but are not in effect.

Based on the prospective size and distribution of the 1957 fall crop of
potatoes, about 70 percent of the crop is covered by Federal marketing agree-
ments and orders. In addition, State agreements and orders restrict market-
ing of tablestock potatoes in some other areas.

The 1957 Fall Crop
Diversion Program

Production of fall crop potatoes at 151 million hundredweight, is down
about 9 percent from the large supplies of a year earlier. But present sup-
plies are moderately above the production recommendation in the Department's
acreage-marketing guide, and some areas may experience difficulty in marketing
their potatoes. To alleviate this situation the Department announced, in late
September, a diversion program for 1957 fall crop potatoes. The program is


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OCTOBER 1957


essentially the same as that of 1956, and will be available only in States or
areas where the industry develops and submits a marketing plan which meets the
requirements of the program. The program will be operated in any State or
area only when a price depressing surplus exists, but in no event beyond
May 31, 1958. In areas where the program is in effect, supplementary payments
will be made for potatoes of U. S. No. 2 or better quality diverted to starch,
feed or flour, provided the potatoes are at least 2 inches in diameter, or in
the case of long varieties weigh at least 4 ounces. Payments for diversion of
1957 fall crop potatoes will be at the same rates as those for the 1956 fall
crop. Established rates are 50 cents a hundredweight through December 31,
1957; 40 cents through March 31, 1958; and 30 cents through the remainder of
the program, but not later than May 31, 1958. With lighter supplies in pros-
pect, diversions of 1957 fall potatoes is expected to be much smaller than the
18.6 million hundredweight diverted from the 1956 fall crop. Of the 1956 fall
crop diversions, 12.6 million hundredweight qualified for supplementary
payments.

Prices for Fall and Winter Potatoes
Expected to Average Substantially
Above Those of a Year Earlier

Production of fall crop potatoes is down 9 percent from a year earlier
when heavy supplies resulted in a seriously depressed market. Marketing
agreements and orders which restrict marketing to the better grades are again
in effect in several important producing areas, and a diversion program is
available in approved areas as an outlet for lower grades of fall potatoes.
Also, production of winter potatoes is likely to be smaller than the record
crop of 1957. Although potato supplies are fully ample, they are significantly
smaller than a year ago. Prices for fall and winter potatoes are expected to
average considerably above the low levels of a year earlier.



SWEETPOTATOES

1957 Crop Substantially
Below Average

The 1957 crop of sweetpotatoes was estimated, as of October 1, at
17.2 million hundredweight. This is slightly larger than the 1956 crop, but
15 percent below the 1949-55 average. Larger production than a year earlier
was due to higher average yields as acreage was down 4 percent. Among the
more important States, substantial increases in production occurred in
California, Maryland, Mississippi, Virginia, and Texas, and a moderate in-
crease in North Carolina. Prospective production is down materially in
Georgia, South Carolina, New Jersey, and Louisiana. The smaller crops in
States with adequate storage facilities, especially New Jersey and Louisiana,
is likely to result in fewer sweetpotatoes in Northern markets this winter
and spring.


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OCTOBER 1957


Higher Prices
Probable for the
1957 Crop

Demand for sweetpotatoes in the current marketing season is expected
to be about the same as in 1956-57. But with smaller supplies available in
areas with suitable storage facilities, prices received by farmers are expect-
ed to average at least moderately higher this season than last. Prices
received by growers on September 15 averaged $2.98 per hundredweight, about
10 percent lower than in mid-September 1956. But the lower prices than a year
earlier probably were due to larger production in Maryland, Virginia and a few
other areas which market most of their sweetpotatoes at harvest. Price
quotations in producing areas indicate that the market by mid-October was
about in line with that of a year ago. In the week ended October 19, shipping
point prices in Southern Louisiana averaged $2.75 per hundredweight for U. S.
No. 1 Puerto Rican type sweetpotatoes, compared with $2.68 in the correspond-
ing week of 1956. Prices are expected to rise seasonally this winter and into
the spring, and are likely to average above year earlier levels.


DRY EDIBLE BEANS

Supplies Smaller Than Last
Season, But Ample

Substantially fewer dry edible beans will be available in the 1957-58
season than a year earlier. However, supplies appear ample to meet domestic
and anticipated export requirements. Supplies in 1956-57 were above normal
trade requirements and considerable quantities taken over by the Commodity
Credit Corporation were exported under special Government programs.

Stocks of dry edible beans on September 1, the beginning of the crop
year, were estimated at 1.5 million 100-pound bags. This compared with almost
1.8 million bags on September 1, 1956 and was only about half the 1949-55
average. Government stocks at the beginning of the season amounted to only
about 300,000 bags, and most of these were committed for sale or donation.
Production as of October 1, was also expected to be down--to 16.0 million
100-pound bags in 1957 compared with 17.1 million bags last year. Thus with
average imports, total supplies promise to be about 17.7 million bags, or
about 7 percent smaller than in the 1956-57 season.

Types Probably in Better
Balance Than a Year Earlier

Estimates of production by classes is not yet available. However,
October 1 estimates by areas indicate that production among classes is likely
to be more normal than last year, when production of pea and red kidney beans
was very large and that of pintos, reds, pinks, and blackeyes relatively small.


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OCTOBER 1957


Prospective production in the Southwest, where most of the acreage is
in pintos, is estimated at 2.0 million bags, almost a third larger than the
relatively low level of a year earlier, but 11 percent below the 1946-55 aver-
age. Production in the Northwest is estimated at 4.9 million bags, moderately
above both a year earlier and average. In Idaho, where Great Northerns,
pintos, and small reds are the most important classes, expected production is
down moderately from 1956 and substantially below the 1946-55 average.

Prospective production in the Northeast, and moderately below average.
In Michigan, which had a large surplus of pea beans from the 1956 crop, pro-
duction, and moderately below average. In Michigan, which had a large surplus
of pea beans from the 1956 crop, production this year is estimated at 3.9 mil-
lion bags compared with 5.4 million in 1956. Production in New York State,
where red kidney is the main class, promises to be about 1.1 million bags,
substantially below both last year and average. The October 1 estimate of
total production in California, at 4.0 million bags is about the same as in
1956, and moderately below average. Production of large limas is expected to
be about the same as a year earlier, but substantially below average; output
of baby limas is down sharply from both a year earlier and average levels.
Production of other beans in California, mainly blackeye, pink, and small white
is estimated at 2.7 million bags, 9 percent larger than last year and 18 per-
cent above the 1946-55 average.

Average Support Prices
for 1957 Crop Beans the
Same as for 1956 Crop

Support prices for most individual classes of 1957 crop beans were
lowered 4 to 9 cents per 100-pounds from 1956 crop levels. However, because
of the expected shifts in production toward classes with a higher level of
support and a 21 cent boost for Small and Flat Small White Beans, the national
average support price remains $6.31 per 100-pounds, the same as for the 1956
crop.
The following support rates will apply to the various classes of 1957
crop dry beans (U. S. No. 1 quality per 100-pounds): Pintos $5.59 to $6.09,
depending on area; Great Northerns $6.19 to $6.69; pea and medium white $6.54
to $7.04; small white and flat small white $6.92; red kidney $8.10; Pink $6.72;
small red $6.77 to $6.87; large lima $9.67; and baby lima $4.92 per 100-pounds.
Premiums for U. S. Choice, Hand picked, and U. S. Extra No. 1 beans will be
10 cents per hundredweight, except for pea beans on which the premium will be
25 cents. Discounts for U. S. No. 2 beans will be 25 cents per hundredweight.

Prices for 1957 Crop Beans
Expected to Average Moderately
Higher Than Those of a Year Earlier

Domestic demand for dry edible beans is expected to be about the same
in the 1957-58 season as a year earlier. But fewer beans may be exported
than in 1956-57, when large quantities moved abroad under special Government


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OCTOBER 1957


export programs. The way prices for each class compare with last season will
depend on the relative supply-demand situation. For example, pinto and black-
eye beans are likely to be lover, and pea, baby lima, and red kidney beans
higher in price than last season. However, with smaller supplies, better
balance by classes, and the same national average support rate, overall prices
received by growers in the 1957-58 marketing season are expected to average
moderately higher than those of the previous season.


DRY FIELD PEAS

1957 Crop Down Sharply
From 1956 but Substantially
Above Average

Supplies of dry field peas available for distribution in the 1957-58
season are substantially smaller than the large supplies of last season.
Stocks at the beginning of the current year were much larger than a year ear-
lier, but the 1957 production was cut sharply. Total supplies appear to be
materially above the 1949-55 average, but moderately to substantially smaller
than the heavy supplies of last season.

Production of dry peas in 1957 is estimated at 3.3 million 100-pound
bags, more than a fourth smaller than the large 1956 crop, but still 12 per-
cent above the 1949-55 average. Most of the reduction from 1956 was the re-
sult of big cutbacks in acreages in Idaho and Washington, the principal pro-
ducing states. In these states, wet weather at planting time was a big fac-
tor in the reductions. Acreage was reported down 30 percent in both Idaho
and Washington. If weather is more normal, farmers may be inclined to plant
a larger acreage in 1958. But to avoid the risk of continued surplus supplies
in 1958-59, growers would do well to hold 1958 acreage near or below the 1957
level.

Prices Likely to Average
Higher Than in Late Part
of 1956-57 Season
Total domestic demand for dry peas is expected to be about the same
this season as last, but exports are likely to be smaller than a year earlier
when the European crop was severely damaged by adverse weather. Thus, the
smaller supplies appear more than ample to meet domestic plus anticipated
export requirements.

During the early part of the 1957-58 season, prices have been substan-
tially below the relatively favorable levels of a year earlier, when strong
export demand kept prices from slumping, despite heavy supplies. Prices
received by farmers in mid-September averaged $3.36 per hundredweight, $1.33
less than a year earlier. Barring an unusually large export demand, prices
this season are expected to continue at fairly low levels.


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OCTOBER 1957


CONSUMPTION OF POTATOES, SWEETPOTATOES, DRY BEANS AND DRY PEAS BY REGIONS,
URBANIZATION AND FAMILY INCOME, SPRING OF 1955 l/

Households in the North Central Region reported a higher rate of con-
sumption of potatoes (fresh equivalent) in the spring of 1955 than any other
section of the country. The Northeast showed the second highest consumption
per person and the South the lowest. On the other hand, households in the
South reported the highest rates of consumption for sweetpotatoes, dry beans,
and dry peas. This was due partly to the relatively large proportion of farm
families in the South to lower average incomes in that region, and probably
to long established eating habits.

Persons in farm households in the United States used more potatoes
(fresh equivalent) than those in non-farm households. This relationship held
in all regions except the South, where rural non-farm dwellers reported the
highest rate. The higher rate of use reported by most farm households was
the result of a relatively high rate of consumption of potatoes in the fresh
form. Use of home-produced potatoes contributed to the higher rate. As mich
might be expected, farm families in each region used less frozen potatoes and
less potato chips than non-farm families. Farm households for the country as
a whole, also reported the highest consumption rate for dry beans and dry peas,
but urban dwellers used more sweetpotatoes per person during the week of the
survey.

Consumption of frozen potatoes and potato chips increased as income
increased. For the United States, the overall consumption of potatoes (fresh
equivalent) was lowest in families earning less than $2,000 per year. In
households with family of incomes of $2,000 and over however there appeared to,
be little change in potato consumption with changes in income. But this was
not consistent for the different regions. In all regions except the South,
rate of consumption was highest in households with family incomes of less than
$4,000 per year and somewhat lower in the higher income groups. In the South
consumption tended to be highest in households with family incomes of $4,000
and over.
Consumption of dry beans and dry peas tended to decrease as family in-
come increased. Although the relationship was not consistent among all income
groups, use of sweetpotatoes per person was also less in families with incomes
of $4,000 and more than in families with lower incomes.

/ Data for this article based on "Food Consumption of Households in the
United States, Northeast, North Central Region, South and West," 1955 Household
Food Consumption Survey, Report. Nos. 1-5. Single copies available on request
from the Office of Information, U. S. Department of Agriculture.


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OCTOBER 1957


These are highlights on potatoes, sweetpotatoes, dry beans and peas,
from reports on a household food consumption survey recently published by the
Agricultural Research Service and the Agricultural Marketing Service.l/ The
reports contain data on consumption of the above, among more than 200 food
items. The information was obtained by personal interviews with a nationwide
random sample of 6,000 households. Information was obtained on consumption
for the week preceding the interview, which was conducted in April-June 1955.
Data do not include food eaten in restaurants or used in institutional
feeding.

Because of differences in size of households, the food consumption data
obtained in the survey have been converted to consumption per person. This
was done by dividing the consumption per household by the average size of the
household, calculated in terms of one person being equivalent to 21 meals
eaten at home in the week reported. Also, in order to permit comparisons of
overall potato consumption, frozen potatoes and potato chips, shown in actual
pounds in the appropriate columns of the table, were converted to the fresh
equivalent basis. These fresh equivalents were then added to the fresh
potatoes to give total potatoes (fresh equivalent). Similarly, canned beans,
shown in actual pounds in the table, were converted to a dry basis. These
dry equivalents were then added to dry beans to give total beans (dry equiva-
lent).


Regional Differences

Households in the North Central Region reported a higher consumption of
potatoes per person than any other part of the country (table 2). The com-
bined usage of fresh and processed potatoes (fresh equivalent) in this region
was about a fifth higher per person than the United States average, and more
than 50 percent above the South which showed the lowest rate. The consumption
rate in the Northeast and the West was about an eighth and almost a fourth,
respectively, lower than in the North Central Region.

The high overall rate of consumption in the North Central Region was
due primarily to the larger use of potatoes in the fresh form, although the
use of processed potatoes, particularly potato chips was also relatively high.
For all households in the region, use of potato chips was about two-thirds
higher than the United States average, and half again as large as the West,
which had the second highest rate of use. On the other hand, the use of
frozen potatoes in the North Central Region was about in line with the
national average, slightly lower than in the West and a little less than half
of the Northeast.

The South not only reported the lowest overall rate of consumption of
potatoes (fresh equivalent), but use in each form--fresh, frozen and chips--
was below the national average and less than any other region. The use of
frozen potatoes, mainly frozen french fries, was particularly low in the
South, amounting to less than a fourth the national rate, and consumption of
potato chips was less than half the United States average.


TVS- 126


- 24 -







Table 2--Use of Potatoes, Sweetpotatoes, Dry Beans and Dry Peas per 100 persons, by
Region and Urbanization, United States, one week in April-June 1955 i/

Potatoes Dry Beans

: Total :Sweet-: :Total :Dry
Item :Frozen:Chips : fresh : pota-: Canned: dry Peas
:Fresh : (ac- : (ac- : equiva-: toes : Dry : (ae- : equiva-: /
:tual) :tual) : lent :: :tual) : lent


:Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds
Northeast
All families : 185.00 2.50 3.12 203.48 5.00 4.38 8.75 7.09 0.94
Nonfarm families : 178.55 2.84 3.15 197.97 5.05 4.10 8.52 6.74 ---
Urban : 165.70 3.24 2.91 185.12 5.50 3.24 8.41 5.85 ---
Rural nonfarm : 217.01 1.76 3.81 236.47 4.11 6.45 9.38 9.36 --
Farm families : 309.5050 50 2.75 321.70 5.75 6.50 9.75 9.52 ---

North Central
All families : 205.44 1.21 6.04 232.50 3.63 6.04 9.37 8.94 0.30
Nonfarm families : 192.21 1.25 6.54 221.37 4.05 5.30 9.66 8.29 ---
Urban : 180.00 1.56 6.87 211.22 4.69 4.38 9.38 7.29 ---
Rural nonfarm : 219.08 .61 5.85 243.94 2.15 7.38 9.85 10.43 --
Farm families : 274.55 .25 3.82 290.43 2.80 10.43 9.16 13.27 ---

South
All families : 143.18 .28 1.70 150.65 9.38 21.88 3.98 23.11 3.41
Nonfarm families : 141.42 .30 1.77 149.22 9.47 20.42 4.14 21.70 3.25
Urban : 125.40 .32 2.54 136.33 10.16 14.60 4.13 15.88 3.49
Rural nonfarm : 161.33 .27 1.33 167.30 8.27 27.47 4.27 28.79 3.20
Farm families : 150.47 p.47 152.35 8.53 27.49 2.84 28.37 3.32

West
-Al families : 159.05 1.27 4.13 178.62 2.86 12.70 6.98 14.86 0.63
Nonfarm families : 151.62 1.62 4.22 172.39 2.92 12.34 6.82 14.45 ---
Urban : 138.49 1.31 3.95 157.43 3.62 11.51 6.25 13.45 ---
Rural nonfarm : 195.33 1.56 4.36 216.51 .93 14.95 7.79 17.36
Farm families : 229.20 .00 3.65 243.80 1.22 14.11 8.27 16.67 ---

United States
All families : 174.77 1.20 3.60 192.05 5.71 11.41 7.21 13.65 1.50
Nonfarm families : 168.42 1.55 3.71 186.98 5.88 10.22 7.43 12.52 1.55
Urban : 156.55 1.92 4.15 177.76 6.07 7.35 7.35 9.63 1.60
Rural nonfarm : 193.37 .86 3.46 209.27 4.90 16.14 7.49 18.46 1.44
Farm families : 216.42 2.21 225.26 5.64 18.14 6.13 20.04 1.72

I/ Reported in Household Food Consumption Survey conducted by USDA. Data are for
items used at home, restaurant meals are excluded. A "person" is calculated on the
basis of a standard 21-meal week.
2/ Fresh plus the calculated fresh equivalent of processed; used conversion factor
of 2.4 for frozen potatoes; 4.0 for potato chips; and 0.31 for canned beans.
3/ Does not include beans or peas used in soups.


* Less than .005.


TVS-126


- 25 -


OCTOBER 1957





TVS-126


OCTOBER 1957


Although this article is not a cross-cc modity study, it seems apparent
that the South depends less upon potatoes for "starchy type" dishes than
other sections of the country. Of the other items included in this analysis,
households in the South use more sweetpotatoes, dry beans and dry peas than
families in other regions. Sweetpotato consumption per person was two-thirds
higher in the South than in the country as a whole, and about three times as
high as in the West, which reported the lowest rate; two and a half times as
high as in the North Central Region and almost twice as high as in the North-
east. The higher rate of use in the South may be due largely to the more
widespread production in that area, and the fact that most southerners are
accustomed to sweetpotatoes as a part of the diet. Dry bean and dry pea con-
sumption was also much higher in the South than in other regions. Dry bean
consumption per person was almost twice as high in the South as the national
average, while consumption of dry peas was more than twice as high. The high
rate of bean consumption in the South was due to the larger use of beans in
the dry form, as use of canned beans was much lower than in any other region.
The West, one of the main areas of production, showed the second highest rate
of consumption of dry beans, while the Northeast ranked second in pea consump-
tion. The high rates of dry bean and pea consumption in the South were due
in part to lower average income in that region and to established eating
habits. Some of the differences also appeared to be associated with differ-
ences in extent of urbanization.


Consumption by Urbanization

Persons in farm households reported a higher rate of potato consumption
(fresh equivalent) than those in non-farm households (table 2). Use of pota-
toes per person in farm households in the United States was a fifth higher
than in non-farm households. In the United States and in each region, except
the South, farm households used more potatoes than either urban or rural non-
farm. The higher overall rate of consumption in farm families resulted from
a greater use of potatoes in the fresh form. Use from home production contri-
buted to the higher rate. As might be expected, farm families in each region
used less frozen potatoes and less potato chips than non-farm families. Urban
families in the United States reported the highest usage of both frozen pota-
toes and potato chips. But this relationship was not consistent in all
regions. Rural non-farm households in the Northeast used more potato chips
per person than urban dwellers while in the West the rural non-farm group
used more of both frozen potatoes and potato chips.

Unlike potatoes, sweetpotatoes showed the highest consumption rate in
urban households. Use per person in the United States was about a fourth
higher in urban than in rural non-farm households, and somewhat higher than
in farm households. Urban dwellers, in each region except the Northeast re-
ported a higher rate of consumption than any other group. In the South par-
ticularly, this may have been due to the timing of the survey. By spring,
supplies stored on many farms for home or local use have been exhausted,
sweetpotatoes are not readily available in many rural areas, and shipped in
supplies are fairly expensive.


- 26 -







Table 3.--Use of Potatoes, Sweetpotatoes, Dry Beans and Dry Peas per 100 persons, by
Region and Family Income, United States, one week in April-June 1955 1/

SPotatoes Dry Beans /

:: Total :Sweet :: Total Dry
Item : :Frozen:Chips : fresh : pota-: :Canned: dry :peas
Fresh : (ac- : (ac- : equiva-: toes : Dry : (ac- : equiva-:
:tual) :tual) :lent : :tual) :lent
S:


Northeast
All families
Under $2,000
$2,000-$3,999
$4,000-$5,999
$6,000 and over

North Central
All families
Under $2,000
$2,000-$3,999
$4,000-$5,999
$6,000 and over

South
All families
Under $2,000
$2,000-$3,999
$4,000-$5,999
$6,000 and over

West
All families
Under $2,000
$2,000-$3,999
$4, 000-$5, 999
$6,000 and over

United States
All families
Under $2,000
$2,000-$3,999
$4,000-$5,999
$6,000 and over


:Pounds Pounds Pounds


185.00
234.15
203.53
175.74
165.57


205.44
219.13
225.26
201.24
187.02


143.18
136.71
136.50
156.38
132.67


159.05
187.96
172.82
148.56
147.32


174.77
166.26
183.23
176.92
166.61


2.50
.70
1.97
3.09
3.27


1.21
36
.45
.47
2.21


28
.00
.00
.81
.97


1.27
.00
.18
.98
2.71


1.20
*
.66
1.48
3.58


3.12
1.06
3.55
2.81
3.16


6.04
2.53
5.29
6.5c
8.28


1.70
.55
1.44
2.51
3.65


4.13
.4.01
3.04
3.44
5.76


3.60
1.21
3.08
4.28
5.61


Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds


203.48
240.07
222.46
194.40
186.06


232.50
230.11
247.50
228.37
225.44


150.65
138.91
142.26
168.36
149.60


178.62
204.00
185.41
164.67
176.86


192.05
171.10
197.13
197.59
197.64


5.00
5.28
4.83
3.36
6.64


3.63
3.61
6.90
3.09
2.41


9.38
7.40
12.08
8.71
5.13


2.86
.00
..57
2.07
5.07


5.71
6.08
7.83
4.18
4.52


4.38
9.86
5.45
3.43
3.05


6.04
12.64
6.81
5.78
3.93


21.88
29.86
21.59
17.94
11.40


12.70
16.42
21.50
10.55
6.02


11.41
23.70
13.77
8.13
5.20


8.75
9.86
9.77
9.43
7.04


9.37
8.66
9.16
9.53
8.47


3.98
2.74
3.79
3.99
4.33


6.98
5.47
11.84
5.18
5.09


7.21
4.86
7.51
7.82
6.92


Pounds Pounds


7.09
12.92
8.48
6.36
5.23


8.94
15.32
9.66
8.74
6.55


23.11
30.71
22.77
19.18
12.75


14.86
18.12
25.16
12.15
7.60


13.65
25.21
16.09
10.56
7.35


0.94






0.30






3.41
4.93
2.93
1.45
.74


0.63






1.50
3.34
1.57
.75
.66


I/ Reported in Household Food Consumption Survey conducted by USDA. Data are for
items used at home, restaurant meals are excluded. A "person" is calculated on the
basis of a standard 21-meal week.
2/ Fresh plus the calculated fresh equivalent of processed; used conversion factor
of 2.4 for frozen potatoes; 4.0 for potato chips; and 0.31 for canned beans.
_/ Does not include beans or peas used in soups.


* Less than .005.


TVS-126


OCTOBER 1957


- 27 -





OCTOBER 1957


Farm households in the United States reported the highest consumption
per person for both dry beans and dry peas. In the South and West, however,
rate of usage of dry beans was higher, and in the Northeast about as high in
rural non-farm as in farm households. Urban families in all areas reported
the lowest rate of consumption for dry beans. Rate of use by all urban house-
holds was only about half as high as for farm households. Dry pea consumption
was very small for the country as a whole, but was somewhat larger in farm
than in non-farm households. For regions other than the South, data are not
shown by urbanization, because of the few families reporting use of dry peas.


Consumption by Income Groups

The Food Consumption reports referred to in footnote 1, divide the
households into 4 to 9 income groups, depending on the sample count in each
region and urbanization group. Some of the items in this study were used by
few households during the week of the survey. Thus, in an attempt to obtain
a representative number of observations in each group, for purposes of this
article the households in all urbanizations combined have been divided into
only 4 income groups based on money income of the family. But the number of
observations in some cases is still relatively small and in a few cases in-
sufficient to show a detailed breakdown.

For the country as a whole, including all urbanizations, persons in
the lowest income group, family income of less than $2,000 per year, reported
the lowest average rate of potato consumption (fresh equivalent, table 3). In
households with family incomes of $2,000 and over, however there appeared to
be little change in potato consumption with changes in income. The lower
rate of consumption associated with the under $2,000 level of income appears
to be due largely to the influence of the South. This is the only region in
which reported consumption was lowest in the lowest income group. But the
relatively low rate in the South together with a relatively high proportion of
persons in the low income group, exerted considerable weight on the United
States average. In the South about 26 percent of the families reported
incomes of less than $2,000 compared with 12 percent in the North Central
Region, and only 9 percent in the West. In all sections of the country
except the South, rate of consumption was highest in households with family
incomes of less than $4,000 per year, and somewhat lower in the higher income
groups.

Consumption of frozen potatoes and potato chips per person tended to
increase as income increased. For the country as a whole, consumption of
potato chips was more than 4 times as high in households of $6,000 or more
family income as in those with less than $2,000. Use of frozen potatoes also
increased rapidly as family income increased.


- 28 -


TVS-126





OCTOBER 1957


There appeared to be no consistent relationship between family income
and consumption of sweetpotatoes during the week of the survey. However, for
the country as a whole consumption per person was considerably higher in house-
holds with family incomes of less than $4,000 than in those with incomes of
$4,000 and over. Consumption of both dry beans and dry peas were highest in
the lower income groups. For all households in the United States, use of dry
beans per person was more than 3 times as high, and use of dry peas 5 times
as high, in households with family incomes of less than $2,000 as in those
with incomes of $6,000 and over. The inverse relationship between family
income and use of dry beans was fairly consistent in the different regions.
Except for the South few households reported the use of dry peas, so that for
other regions no consumption figures are shown by income groups.



REVISED CONSUMPTION SERIES IN THIS ISSUE


Tables 4 through 9 of this issue of the Vegetable Situation
present revised series of data on civilian per capital consumption
of commercially produced fresh and processed vegetables, potatoes,
sweetpotatoes, dry edible beans and dry field peas. The tables
supersede those originally published in Agricultural Handbook No
No. 62, entitled Consumption of Food in the United States, 1909-
1952. The latter publication will be revised and re-issued this
fall. Because of a few generally minor revisions in data on
fresh vegetables not marketed, particularly in 1953, those tables also
supersede those published in the July 1957 issue of the Vegetable
Situation.

The basic data from which tables 4 through 9 were computed
have been revised in line with changes in production estimates
indicated by the 1954 Census of Agriculture, a more inclusive
adjustment for quantities of "minor vegetables" processed, which
are reported in production estimates for fresh market; and a shift
from a population series adjusted for underenumeration to the
Bureau of the Census' unadjusted population series. The unadjusted
population figure is a little smaller than the adjusted figure pre-
viously used and, except for other changes in the data, would raise
the consumption figure by a little more than 1 percent. However,
the net result of all revisions has been to lower the per capital
consumption rate for fresh vegetables as a group, and to increase
the rate for processed vegetables.


TVS-126


- 29-





TVS-126 30 OCTOBER

LIST OF TABLES

Table Title

1 Vegetables for fresh market: Reported commercial acreage and production,
average 1949-55, annual 1956 and indicated 1957 .........................

2 Use of potatoes, sweetpotatoes, dry beans and dry peas per 100 persons, by
region and urbanization, United States, one week in April-June 1955 .....

3 Use of potatoes, sweetpotatoes, dry beans and dry peas per 100 persons, by
region and family income, United States, one week in April-June 1955 ....

4 Commercially produced vegetables: Civilian per capital consumption,
United States, 1937-56 .................................. ...........

5 Civilian per capital consumption of selected commercially produced fresh and
process vegetables, United States, calendar years, 1937-56 ............

6 Fresh vegetables, commercial: Per capital consumption, farm weight, 1919-56

7 Vegetables, canned: Per capital consumption, 1909-56 ....................

8 Vegetables, frozen: Per capital consumption, 1937-56 ......................

9 Potatoes, sweetpotatoes, dry edible beans and dry field peas: Per capital
consumption, primary distribution weight, 1909-56 .....................

10 Vegetables, fresh, potatoes and sweetpotatoes: Unloads at 19 markets,
indicated periods in 1956 and 1957 with comparisons ....................

11 Vegetables, fresh: Representatives prices (l.c.l. sales) at New York and
Chicago for stock of generally good quality and condition (U.S. 1 when
available) indicated periods, 1956 and 1957 ............................

12 Vegetables, commercial for fresh market: Index numbers (unadjusted) of
prices received by farmers, as of 15th of the month, United States by
months, average, 1935-39; average 1947-49 and 1950 to date .............

13 Vegetables for caomercial processing: Harvested acreage and estimated
production, average 1946-55, annual 1956 and indicated 1957 .......****.

14 Canned vegetables: United States commercial pack 1955 and 1956 and canners'
and wholesale distributors' stocks, indicated periods in 1956 and 1957,
with comparisons ....................... .. ... .......... ..

15 Vegetables, frozen: United States commercial packs 1955 and 1956, and
cold-storage holdings, October 1, 1957, with comparisons ..........*.....

16 United States average prices received by farmers for important field crops,
indicated periods, 1956 and 1957 ....*.............................*...


L957





TVS-126 31 OCTOBER 195'
LIST OF TABLES Continued

Table Title Pag

17 Vegetables, fresh: Average price received by farmers, United States,
indicated periods, 1956 and 1957 ....................................... .

lb Potatoes: Acreage, yield per acre and production, average 1949-55, annual
1956 and indicated 1957 ................................................. 43

19 Potatoes: Price f.o.b. shipping points and wholesale prices (l.c.l. sales)
at New York and Chicago, indicated periods, 1956 and 1957 ............... 44

20 Sweetpotatoes: Acreage, yield per acre and production, average 1949-55,
annual 1956 and indicated 1957 .......................................... 45

21 Sweetpotatoes: Price f.o.b. shipping points and wholesale prices (l.c.l)
sales at New York and Chicago, indicated periods, 1956 and 1957 ......... 45

22 Beans, dry edible: Acreage, yield per acre, and production, average
1945-55, annual 1956, and indicated 1957 ................................ 46

23 Peas, dry field: Acreage, yield per acre, and production, average 1945-55,
annual 1956 and indicated 1957 .......................................... 46


7


__._~_ ~___





Table 4.-Commercially produced vegetables: Civilian per capital
consumption, United States, 1937-56


Fresh equivalent As percentage of annual total

Year Total Processed 2 Processed
ear fresh Fresh : : Fe
and : : : Fresh : : :
:: ed :: Total : Canned : Frozen :: Total : Canned : Frozen
processed:
: Pounds Pouunds Pods nds Pounds Pounds Percent Percent Percent Percent

1937 : 164.5 111.0 53.5 52.5 1.0 67.5 32.5 31.9 .6
1938 : 170.3 114.5 55.8 54.8 1.0 67.2 32.8 32.2 .6
1939 : 174.7 116.6 58.1 56.9 1.2 66.7 33.3 32.6 .7

1940 : 180.1 116.9 63.2 61.8 1.4 64.9 35.1 34.3 .8
1941 : 180.9 113.5 67.4 65.8 1.6 62.7 37.3 36.4 .9
1942 :193.0 118.3 74.7 72.1 2.6 61.3 38.7 37.4 1.3
1943 : 186.9 116.4 70.5 68.8 1.7 62.3 37.7 36.8 .9
1944 : 195.6 123.5 72.1 68.3 3.8 63.1 36.9 34.9 2.0
1945 : 222.0 133.8 88.2 83.8 4.4 60.3 39.7 37.7 2.0
1946 224.7 129.9 94.8 90.1 4.7 57.8 42.2 40.1 2.1
1947 : 206.8 122.4 84.4 78.2 6.2 59.2 40.8 37.8 3.0
1948 : 200.3 123.0 77.3 70.2 7.1 61.4 38.6 35.0 3.6
1949 : 194.4 115.8 78.6 71.6 7.0 59.6 40.4 36.8 3.6

1950 : 200.2 114.6 85.6 77.9 7.7 57.2 42.8 38.9 3.9
1951 : 201.8 111.6 90.2 80.3 9.9 55.3 44.7 39.8 4.9
1952 : 201.6 111.0 90.6 78.4 12.2 55.1 44.9 38.9 6.0
1953 : 201.8 108.3 93.5 81.0 12.5 53.7 46.3 40.1 6.2
1954 : 198.8 107.3 91.5 77.9 13.6 54.0 46.0 39.2 6.8
1955 : 202.1 104.6 97.5 82.2 15.3 51.7 48.3 40.7 7.6
1956 3/ : 204.3 104.0 100.3 83.2 17.1 50.9 49.1 40.7 8.4
1 E l i >1 ; l


c SI u M &AfJLt.L I"M 0J9J..LL*
2/ Data include pickles and sauerkraut in bulk;
sweetpotatoes, canned baby foods and canned soups.
/ Preliminary.


exclude canned and frozen potatoes, canned


I-J
O
kn







Table 5.-Civilian per capital consumption of selected commercially produced fresh and processed vegetables 1, United States, calendar years 1937-56

Fresh equivalent basis
Commodity
1937 1938 : 1939 1940 : 1941 :1942 : 1943 1944 : 1945 :1946 :1947 :1948 :1949 :1950 :1951 :1952 : 1953 :1954 :1955 :1956
Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds

Asparagus
Fresh :1.2 1.1 1.3 1.5 1.5 1.3 1.2 1.2 1.1 1.1 1.1 .9 .9 .9 .8 .8 .8 .7 .7 .7
Canned .70 .61 .77 .2 8.82 .92 .83 .85 .48 1.31 .77 94 .86 .88 .94 .87 1.03 .99 .88 1.00
Frozen : .06 .11 .06 .10 .11 .08 .12 .21 .28 .25 .23 .29 .25 .25 .26 .30 .32 .33 .31 .32
Beans, lima
Fresh .7 .8 .9 .8 .8 .7 .6 .6 .6 .7 .6 .6 .6 .5 .5 .4 .4 .4 .3 .3
Canned .48 .48 .55 .72 .78 .80 .60 .33 .47 .49 .48 .53 .52 .83 .70 .66 .66 .70 .72 .75
Frozen : .24 .20 .25 .30 .24 .54 .32 .38 .37 .60 .83 .84 1.09 1.14 1.22 1.59 1.62 1.47 1.59 1.64
Beans, snap
Fresh 4.0 4.8 5.0 5.0 4.6 4.9 5.3 4.7 4.8 4.7 4.0 4.1 4.1 3.9 3.8 3.4 3.5 3.3 3.4 2.9
Canned :1.29 1.50 1.55 1.70 1.68 1.93 1.94 2.12 2.44 2.39 2.01 2.09 2.16 2.49 2.36 2.51 2.58 2.67 2.93 3.02
Frozen .06 .06 .05 .05 .09 .13 .07 .20 .25 .25 .33 .37 .36 .45 .57 .67 .72 .81 .84 .91
Broccoli
Fresh .7 .7 .8 .6 .7 .6 .7 1.0 .9 1.0 1.0 .9 .9 1.0 .7 .8 .7 .6 .5 .6
Frozen .02 .02 .02 .01 .04 .05 .04 .04 .12 .17 .16 .23 .29 .29 .41 .58 .58 .63 .72 .70
Cabbage
Fresh 17.8 19.8 16.4 18.5 16.2 18.9 17.0 19.8 20.5 17.7 17.0 16.6 14.7 14.3 13.3 12.8 12.7 12.6 11.2 12.6
Canned 1/ 1.83 2.43 2.62 2.68 2.95 2.77 2.39 .85 1.36 3.01 3.14 1.48 2.56 2.43 2.98 2.55 2.50 2.53 2.43 2.38 1
Corn 8.3 8.3
Fresh 5.1 5.2 5.1 5.6 6.2 6.7 6.3 6.7 7.9 7.7 7.7 8.7 7.6 7.7 7.6 7.8 7.8 8.5 8.3 8.3
Canned 9.85 10.21 10.85 11.31 12.05 14.09 13.57 12.71 14.13 15.83 14.80 12.60 12.36 13.20 12.37 12.27 13.12 13.22 13.48 13.47
Frozen .13 .09 .16 .20 .17 .28 .10 .46 .54 .63 1.03 .97 .94 .88 1.28 1.63 1.86 1.79 2.13 2.77
Cucumbers
Fresh : 2.1 2.4 2.4 2.3 2.3 2.2 1.7 1.8 2.5 2.9 2.5 2.7 2.5 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.6 2.8 2.8 2.7
Canned / : 2.01 2.24 2.21 2.11 2.47 2.79 2.45 2.19 2.26 2.86 3.19 3.35 3.18 3.28 3.06 3.62 3.86 3.87 3.84 3.77
Peas, green ? :
Fresh : 2.3 2.1 2.3 2.1 2.1 1.7 1.6 1.7 1.6 1.4 1.1 .9 .8 .7 .6 .5 .4 .4 .4 .3
Canned 7.76 8.18 8.39 9.26 10.38 10.73 9.86 8.89 12.06 12.82 9.84 9.78 8.96 9.16 9.00 8.63 8.33 8.26 8.07 8.17
Frozen : .41 .42 .62 .58 .89 1.16 .75 1.59 1.76 1.69 2.29 2.55 2.10 2.43 2.85 3.35 3.52 3.92 3.78 4.21
Spinach
Fresh 2.6 2.5 2.9 2.7 2.6 2.5 2.3 2.2 2.3 2.0 1.9 1.7 2.0 1.7 1.6 1.5 1.4 1.1 1.0 1.1
Canned .88 .81 .81 .98 .81 1.14 .76 1.25 .99 1.45 1.01 .91 1.01 .84 1.08 .93 .91 .68 .83 .94
Frozen : .03 .04 .02 .07 .02 .23 .20 .32 .48 .36 .40 .56 .52 .68 .91 .90 .94 .94 1.04 1.01
Tomatoes
Fresh 12.8 13.8 14.1 13.3 13.1 14.0 14.1 14.4 16.1 15.4 13.9 13.9 13.5 12.9 13.3 13.1 12.8 12.9 12.8 11.9
Canned : 25.35 26.09 26.35 28.71 30.42 33.12 31.95 34.42 43.98 43.43 37.07 32.59 34.05 37.62 40.98 38.65 40.24 37.95 41.25 42.29


/ Data for processed vegetables include pickles and sauerkraut in bulk, and exclude quantities consumed in commercially produced soups, baby foods, and vegetable mixtures such
as peas and carrots, and succotash. 2/ "In-pod" basis. 3/ Sauerkraut, canned and bulk. 4/ "Cut" basis. 5/ Pickles, canned and bulk. 6/ Including canned whole tomatoes and
tomato products other than soup.


Data for the processed vegetables were converted to a fresh equivalent basis using factors presented in Conversion Factors and Weights and Measures for Agricultural Commodities
and Their Products (May 1952 edition), with the following exceptions: frozen broccoli, 1.333 beginning 1948; Brussels sprouts, 1.282 beginning 1937.







Table 6.--Fresh vegetables and melons, commercial: Per capital consumption, farm weight, 1919-56 Y

: Vegetables
Melons O
Leafy, green, and yellow Other Total
Year:ime : nion Total: vege-
YearTma-: : Let- :Green Onions Total es
hokes: aus : :benso sa e u Minor Total Beets: fl Celery Corn' e G arlic sl- Minor Total tables a am
'col : bage :rots : ac : :plant:" Garlic shi :melo-mei
.choke agus : beancoli .sprots:bae :rotsh: : :perpr:t.esc-: p. r : : bers plans: :lots n:melons:loups elons:
: ed) : : role : ed) : :. .
: Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb.


1919 :10.8 0.1
1920 :11.1 .1
1921 : 9.9 .1
1922 : 11.7 .2
1923 : 11.6 .2
1924 :11.9 .4

1925 :12.6 .4
1926 :10.6 .5
1927 :12.3 .4
1928 :12.0 .3
1929 :13.5 .3
1930 :12.9 .3
1931 :12.4 .3
1932 :13.5 .2
1933 :12.5 .2
1934 :13.5 .3

1935 :14.0 .3
1936 :12.6 .3
1937 : 12.8 .2
1938 : 13.8 .3
1939 :14.1 .3
1940 :13.3 .2
1941 :13.1 .2
1942 :14.0 .3
1943 :14.1 .2
1944 :14.4 .3

1945 :16.1 .2
1946 : 15.4 .2
1947 :13.9 .2
1948 :13.9 .2
1949 : 13.5 .2
1950 : 12.9 .2
1951 :13.3 .2
1952 : 13.1 .2
1953 :12.8 .2
1954 :12.9 .2

1955 :12.8 .2
1956 /: 11.9 .2


0.1 17.3 2.2 0.1 5.2 0.3 1.2 0.9
.1 27.3 2.4 .1 7.4 .4 1.3 1.0
.1 18.5 2.5 .1 7.0 .6 1.3 1.3
.1 23.0 2.8 .1 8.0 .7 1.3 1.5
.1 19.5 3.0 .2 8.4 .9 1.4 1.7
.1 24.0 3.1 .1 9.6 1.1 1.3 2.0


.3 3.6 / .1 22.0 3.0
.2 3.5 .1 22.2 3.4
.3 3.7 .1 23.1 4.1
.2 3.8 .1 19.8 4.0o
.3 4.5 0.1 .1 21.0 5.9
.4 4.5 .2 .1 18.4 6.1
.5 4.8 .3 .1 19.4 5.4
.6 4.5 .3 .2 19.2 5.4
.5 5.1 .4 .2 17.1 5.3
.5 5.1 .5 .2 22.6 6.0

.6 4.9 .6 .2 19.6 5.9
.8 4.4 .6 .2 17.9 6.2
.7 4.0 .7 .2 17.8 6.4
.8 4.8 .7 .2 19.8 7.0
.9 5.0 .8 .3 16.4 7.4

.8 5.0 .6 .3 18.5 7.7
.8 4.6 .7 .2 16.2 7.6
.7 4.9 .6 .2 18.9 8.0
.6 5.3 .7 .2 17.0 11.1
.6 4.7 1.0 .2 19.8 9.9
.6 4.8 .9 .2 20.5 11.7
.7 4.7 1.0 .2 17.7 9.6
.6 4.o 1.0 .3 17.0 8.7
.6 4.1 .9 .2 16.6 9.3
.6 4.1 .9 .1 14.7 8.5

.5 3.9 1.0 .1 14.3 8.8
.5 3.8 .7 .2 13.3 8.0
.4 3.4 .8 .1 12.8 7.9
.4 3.5 .7 .1 12.7 7.8
.4 3.3 .6 .1 12.6 7.6

.3 3.4 .5 .1 11.2 7.2
.3 2.9 .6 .2 12.6 7.3


.1 10.1 1.2 1.3 2.1
.2 10.7 1.4 1.3 2.2
.2 11.6 2.0 1.3 2.3
.2 12.4 2.2 1.3 2.3
.2 13.2 2.3 1.3 2.6
.2 12.8 2.6 1.5 2.4
.1 12.3 2.3 1.6 2.8
.3 11.2 2.5 1.4 2.6
.2 11.0 2.7 1.7 2.3
.1 11.9 2.3 1.4 2.5

.1 11.9 2.5 1.5 2.3
.2 12.5 2.5 1.7 2.7
.2 12.6 2.3 1.8 2.6
.2 11.5 2.1 1.9 2.5
.3 13.4 2.3 2.1 2.9
.2 13.2 2.1 1.9 2.7
.3 13.7 2.1 1.8 2.6
.2 13.6 1.7 1.8 2.5
.3 14.5 1.6 1.4 2.3
.3 16.4 1.7 1.8 2.2

.3 17.4 1.6 2.1 2.3
.3 19.3 1.4 2.2 2.0
.3 19.4 1.1 1.9 1.9
.2 18.7 .9 2.2 1.7
.3 17.9 .8 2.3 2.0
.3 18.6 .7 2.2 1.7
.3 18.5 .6 2.1 1.6
.3 19.8 .5 2.1 1.5
.3 19.6 .4 2.0 1.4
.2 19.5 .4 2.1 1.1

.2 19.9 .4 2.0 1.0
.2 20.1 .3 1.9 1.1


4.0 35.1 0.8 1.1
5.1 49.0 .8 1.2
4.7 4o.o .8 1.2
5.2 46.7 .8 1.3
4.8 44.4 .8 1.5
5.4 51.6 1.1 1.3
5.2 50.2 1.1 1.5
5.3 52.0 .9 2.4
5.5 55.6 1.2 1.8
4.8 52.5 1.4 2.0
4.9 57.7 1.7 2.5

5.5 56.2 1.7 2.3
5.9 57.1 1.7 2.7
5.6 55.4 1.5 2.6
4.7 52.7 1.5 2.5
5.8 60.6 1.8 2.4

6.2 57.8 1.5 2.4
5.5 56.9 1.6 2.7
5.7 56.4 1.7 3.1
6.2 59.1 1.8 2.9
5.3 58.7 1.7 3.3
5.4 60.1 1.7 3.5
5.1 57.4 1.6 2.6
5.9 60.6 1.4 2.7
5.8 62.2 1.3 2.6
5.3 65.4 1.2 3.1
6.1 69.8 1.1 3.5
4.7 65.1 1.5 3.6
6.5 64.0 1.3 3.3
6.7 63.2 1.3 3.4
5.5 58.8 1.2 3.1

5.3 58.5 1.1 3.0
4.4 55.0 .9 2.8
3.9 54.5 1.0 2.6
4.4 54.3 .9 2.4
4.9 53.7 .8 2.2
4.1 51.2 .8 2.2
3.4 51.8 .7 2.5


5.2 2.9 2.7
5.5 2.7 2.5
5.6 2.5 2.6
5.5 2.4 3.1
5.8 2.3 2.8
6.2 2.8 3.2

6.6 3.1 3.4
6.1 3.1 3.1
6.2 3.1 3.2
7.4 3.4 3.2
8.5 3.4 3.0

8.6 4.1 3.1
7.6 4.4 2.8
7.6 5.2 2.3
7.4 5.4 2.2
7.5 5.8 2.3
6.6 5.7 2.5
7.3 5.8 2.2
7.8 5.1 2.1
8.0 5.2 2.4
8.3 5.1 2.4

8.2 5.6 2.3
8.8 6.2 2.3
7.9 6.7 2.2
7.0 6.3 1.7
7.4 6.7 1.8

8.2 7.9 2.5
9.1 7.7 2.9
7.9 7.7 2.5
8.5 8.7 2.7
8.2 7.6 2.5

8.4 7.7 2.4
8.8 7.6 2.5
8.6 7.8 2.6
8.6 7.8 2.6
8.7 8.5 2.8
8.6 8.3 2.8
8.6 8.3 2.7


0.3 y/ 11.7 6.0 30.7 76.6 15.7 9.1 24.8 101.4
.4 0.1 14.3 7.4 34.9 95.0 22.6 9.2 31.8 126.8
.5 .1 12.2 6.8 32.3 82.2 25.5 9.4 34.9 117.1
.4 .1 13.0 7.8 34.4 92.8 27.5 9.8 37.3 130.1
.4 .1 13.2 7.2 34.1 90.1 20.1 9.0 29.1 119.2
.4 .1 13.8 8.5 37.4 100.9 25.7 10.0 35.7 136.6
.4 .2 13.7 8.5 38.5 101.3 24.2 10.2 34.4 135.7
.3 .2 13.4 8.5 38.0 100.6 26.5 9.9 36.4 137.0
.4 .1 13.5 8.6 38.1 106.0 20.7 10.1 30.8 136.8
.3 .1 13.4 8.5 39.7 104.2 20.1 10.5 30.6 134.8
.4 .1 12.5 9.3 41.4 112.6 21.4 10.7 32.1 144.7

.4 .2 13.0 9.4 42.8 111.9 23.2 9.8 33.0 144.9
.4 .1 10.1 9.0 38.8 108.3 22.2 10.6 32.8 141.1
.4 .2 11.0 9.1 39.9 108.8 18.2 8.9 27.1 135.9
.4 .1 11.4 8.4 39.3 104.5 17.6 7.7 25.3 129.8
.4 .1 11.4 9.4 41.1 115.2 17.8 7.8 25.6 140.8

.4 .1 11.0 9.2 39.4 111.2 18.7 8.5 27.2 138.4
.5 .2 13.3 9.4 43.0 112.5 17.6 8.8 26.4 138.9,
.4 .2 12.o 9.4 41.8 111.0 18.8 10.0 28.8 139.8.,
.5 .1 10.9 9.8 41.6 114.5 17.7 9.5 27.2 1.I.7,
.5 .2 12.6 9.7 43.8 116.6 15.8 9.6 25.4 142.0 '
.4 .1 11.7 10.0 43.5 116.9 17.4 9.1 26.5 143.4
.5 .2 11.0 9.8 43.0 113.5 15.1 9.4 24.5 138.0
.4 .2 12.3 9.9 43.7 118.3 14.5 8.0 22.5 140.8
.4 .1 10.9 9.8 40.1 116.4 13.8 7.9 21.7 138.1
.5 .2 12.7 10.1 43.7 123.5 18.4 9.6 28.0 151.5

.6 .2 13.4 10.5 47.9 133.8 19.5 10.2 29.7 163.5
.6 .3 13.4 10.3 49.4 129.9 19.4 11.2 30.6 160.5
.4 .2 12.6 8.6 44.5 122.4 18.1 9.9 28.0 150.4
.5 .2 11.8 8.8 45.9 123.0 17.5 9.8 27.3 150.3
.4 .2 11.3 9.0 43.5 115.8 17.9 8.9 26.8 1i2.6

.4 .2 11.3 8.7 43.2 114.6 15.8 9.1 24.9 139.5
.4 .2 11.4 8.7 43.3 111.6 17.2 8.9 26.1 137.7
.5 .2 11.3 8.8 43.4 111.0 17.1 8.6 25.7 136.7
.4 .2 10.9 7.4 41.2 108.3 19.0 9.2 28.2 136.5
.4 .2 10.7 6.4 40.7 107.3 19.3 9.6 28.9 136.2
.4 .3 10.4 6.8 40.6 104.6 20.0 9.2 29.2 133.8
.4 .2 11.1 5.8 40.3 104.0 18.8 8.6 27.4 131.4


1/ Excludes quantities produced in home gardens. Minor vegetables on basis of carlot shipment data estimated to be 43 percent "leafy, green and yellow" 1919-49, then increasing each year to
55 percent in 1955 and thereafter. Civilian consumption only, 1941 to date.
2/ Includes 0.1 pound of shallots in each year beginning 1929. In earlier years shallots are included in minor vegetables.

,/ Included in minor vegetables.
/ Less than 0.05 pound.

f/ Preliminary.








Table 7 .- Canned vegetables: Per capital consumption 1909-56 /

(Net canned weight)


Leafy, green, and yellow vegetables 2/: Tomato products 2/ Other vegetables 2/
PumpkinCatsup Paste Pul : Sweet- Other
Year :spragus : : : pe : Pumpin : : CatSUp Paste Pulp a Total
Year Aparas ima : Snap : Carrot Peas and : Spinach: Whole : and chill and and :and other: Beets Corn : Pickles :Sauerkrautpotatoes To
s: beans : beans :quash :tatoes : sauce sauce :vegetable: : : : :
:Juices 3/:


LO.

1909
1910 : --
1911 -
1912
1913 -
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919 -
1920 : 0.4
1921 : .3
1922 : .3
1923 : .4
1924 : .4
1925 : .4
1926 : .4
1927 : .4
1928 : .5
1929 : .5
1930 : .4
1931 : .4
1932 : .4
1933 : .5
1934 : .5
1935 : .4
1936 : .5
1937 : .5
1938 : .5
1939 : .6
1940 : .6
1941 : .6
1942 .7
1943 : .6
1944 : .6
1945 : .4
1946 : 1.0
1947 : .6
1948 : .7
1949 : .6
1950 : .7
1951 : .7
1952 : .7
1953 : .8
1954 : .7
1955 : .7
1956 : .8


Lb. LoD. L. LD.
.- --- 1.8
... 1.5
--- --- 1.4
1.4
-- -- -- 1.9
2.5
.--. 2.7
1-- -- 2.7
... .-- 2.4
2.4
-- --- 2.4
.. .7 -- 3.0
0.9 -- 2.8
.8 -- 3.0
.5 --- 2.8
0.1 .6 --- 2.9
.1 .7 -- 3.6
.1 .9 --- 4.3
.2 1.3 --- 4.6
.2 1.3 -- 4.3
.1 1.0 --- 4.2
.1 1.3 -- 4.1
.2 1.7 --- 4.4
.2 2.0 -- 4.6
.3 1.7 --- 4.1
.2 1.3 0.1 3.2
.2 1.1 .1 3.2
.2 1.3 .2 3.6
.3 1.4 .2 4.0
.3 1.5 .2 4.3
.3 1.8 .2 4.6
.3 2.0 .2 4.9
.4 2.1 .2 5.0
.5 2.3 .3 5.5
.6 2.3 .4 6.2
.6 2.6 .3 6.4
.4 2.6 .2 5.9
.2 2.9 .3 5.3
.3 3.3 .4 7.2
.4 3.3 .6 7.6
.3 2.7 .4 5.9
.4 2.8 .4 5.8
.4 3.0 .3 5.3
.6 3.4 .4 5.4
.5 3.2 .3 5.4
.5 3.4 .4 5.1
.5 3.5 .4 5.0
.5 3.6 .4 4.9
.5 4.0 .4 4.8
.5 4.1 .5 4.9


" "


Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb.


Lb. Lb.











0.2 0.4
.2 .3
.2 .6
.3 .8
.4 .5
.4 .6
.4 .5
.4 .7
.5 1.0
.8 1.3
.6 .8
.4 .6
.4 .5
.5 .6
.5 .8
.3 .8
.4 .9
.5 1.0
.4 .9
.6 .9
.7 1.1
.6 .9
.6 1.2
.6 .8
.5 1.4
.4 1.1
.6 1.6
.6 1.1
.6 1.0
.5 1.1
.6 .9
.6 1.2
.7 1.0
.6 1.0
.7 .7
.7 .9
.7 1.0


2.1 --
--- 2.5 --
-- 3.8 ---
- 4.3 ---
3.3 ---
-- 2.5
3.0 -
--- 2.8 ---
--- 2.8 --
-- 3.2
-- 3.6 1.6
0.3 4.0 1.2
.2 3.8 1.2
.2 3.2 1.8
.2 3.4 1.2
.3 3.4 1.3
.5 3.8 1.5
.4 4.4 2.5
.3 3.9 1.4
.3 3.7 1.2
.4 3.9 1.8
.6 4.2 1.8
.6 3.8 1.8
.3 3.4 1.6
.3 3.1 1.6
.4 2.9 1.7
.5 3.5 1.8
.5 4.1 2.0
.6 3.9 2.1
.6 4.0 2.3
.7 4.3 2.2
.8 4.5 2.2
.9 4.8 2.5
1.2 5.6 2.8
1.1 5.4 2.5
1.0 5.0 2.2
1.4 5.6 2.3
1.4 6.3 2.9
1.2 5.8 3.3
1.2 5.0 3.4
1.0 4.9 3.4
1.2 5.2 3.4
1.6 4.9 3.2
1.4 4.8 3.7
1.4 5.2 3.9
1.4 5.2 4.0
1.3 5.3 3.9
1.5 5.3 3.8


y Excludes soups and baby food. In years 1909-42 calendar-year data are derived from pack-year data by combining proportional parts of each pack year involved. Civilian con-
sumption, beginning 1941. 2/ Minor vegetables and, in earlier years, items not shown separately are included in "other". / Based on information available for 1944-46, tomato
juice comprises approximately 85 percent of the total, combination vegetable juices 13 percent, and other vegetable juices 2 percent. Combination vegetable juice contains
approximately 70 percent or more tomato juice. ~ Computed as a residual; includes miscellaneous greens, pimientoc,potatoes, mixed vegetables, and all items, especially in earlier
years, for which no separate data are available. 2/ Preliminary.


"


Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb.

-- -- 5.4 15.3
- -- 5.1 14.5
-- 5.5 15.6
S 6.6 18.7
-- 6.9 19.8
-- 6.8 19.2
- --- 6.3 18.0
-- 5.9 16.1
-- -- 7.1 18.9
- --- 8.9 22.3
1.4 --- 4.6 21.3
.8 0.3 2.1 18.5
.9 .3 2.0 16.9
1.2 .3 1.2 17.1
2.2 .3 2.5 21.5
2.1 .3 2.1 23.0
1.5 .3 2.5 25.7
1.3 .2 -- 25.9
1.6 .2 -- 22.3
2.0 .2 -- 23.0
2.0 .2 .1 25.9 I
2.3 .1 .8 28.4
2.4 .1 -- 25.3 Lo
1.7 .1 .3 22.1 \1
1.7 .1 --- 22.0
1.5 .1 .5 23.3
2.4 .1 .3 26.2
1.4 .1 .4 27.7
1.4 .1 .8 29.4
1.9 .1 1.1 31.1
2.0 .1 .8 31.8
2.1 .2 .7 34.4
2.3 .3 .8 36.9
2.1 .2 .5 39.7
1.8 .3 .7 37.0
.7 .3 .7 34.4
1.0 .3 1.2 43.2
2.3 .7 .8 46.8
2.4 .5 .9 40.5
1.1 .3 1.6 37.9
2.0 .5 1.6 39.1
1.9 .7 1.7 42.1
2.3 .4 1.6 42.2
2.0 .8 2.0 42.0
1.9 .7 2.1 43.3
2.0 .6 1.6 41.9
1.9 .8 2.0 43.5
1.8 .8 1.6 43.9 q






Table 8.- Vegetables, frozen: Per capital consumption, 1937-56 1/

Leafy, green, and yellow vegetables Other vegetables

:Potato:
Year Peas Pumpkin Brus- Corn. Rhu- : pro- Total
:Aspara-: Snap Lima : Car- : Peas and and Broc- sells Spin-: Other:Cauli-: cu Succo- barb ducts
gus :beans: beans: rots: carrots squash c sprouts: ach 2 flower basis tash


SLb. Lb. b. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Ib. Lb. Lb. Lb. Ib. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb. Lb.

L937 0.03 0.05 0.11 V 0.15 4/ / 0.01 0.02 / 0.03 5 0.40
L938 :.05 .05 .09 / .15 0.01 .02 .02 .02 5 .41
L939 .03 .04 .11 .22 0.01 .01 .02 .01 0.01 .04 .50

L940 .05 .04 .13 4/ .21 4/ .01 .01 0.01 .04 .01 0.01 .05 / / .57
L941 : .05 .07 .11 0.01 .32 .01 .03 .0 .01 .01 .4/ .04 .67
L942 :.04 .10 .24 .01 .41 .01 .02 .03 .02 .13 .01 .01 .07 / 1.10
1L943 : .06 .05 .1, 4/ .27 .01 .03 .03 .02 .11 4/ .02 5 .74
L944 :.11 .16 .17 .03 .56 .02 .07 .03 .05 .18 .06 .11 1.63

L945 :.14 .20 .17 .02 .62 .02 .08 .08 .05 .26 .04 .04 .13 0.01 .04 5/ 1.90
L946 : .13 .20 .27 .04 .60 .04 .03 .12 .07 .20 .06 .07 .15 .01 .05 2.04
L947 : .11 .26 .38 .07 .81 .04 .06 .11 .04 .22 .09 .04 .25 .01 .08 0.01 2.58
L948 : .14 .29 .38 .05 .91 .07 .05 .17 .07 .31 .10 .09 .23 .05 .02 .05 2.98
L949 : .13 .28 .49 .10 .75 .04 .03 .21 .12 .29 .11 .10 .22 .05 .02 .07 3.01

L950 : .12 .35 .51 .08 .86 .06 .06 .22 .09 .38 .15 .09 .21 .05 .03 .12 3.38
L951 : .13 .45 .55 .09 1.02 .08 .06 .31 .13 .50 .22 .13 .31 .06 .04 .23 4.31
L952 :.15 .53 .71 .11 1.16 .10 .06 .44 .14 .50 .33 .18 .39 .08 .04 .36 5.28
L953 :.16 .57 .73 .13 1.25 .09 .07 .43 .18 .51 .30 .16 .45 .06 .03 .31 5.43
L954 :.17 .64 .66 .17 1.40 .11 .09 .47 .16 .51 .36 .17 .43 .07 .05 .44 5.90

1955 :.16 .66 .72 .21 1.34 .10 .09 .54 .17 .57 .54 .19 .51 .06 .04 .74 6.64
L956 6 : .16 .72 .74 .14 1.50 .08 .11 .53 .21 .56 .37 .19 .66 .03 .02 1.22 7.24


Civilian consumption


only, beginning 1941.


Included with leafy, green, and yellow because most items included are considered to be greens.
Computed from unrounded data.
Less than 0.005 pound.
Included with "other."
Preliminary.






TVS-126 37 -

Table 9.- Potatoes, sveetpotatoes, dry edible beans, and dry field peas:
consumption, primary distribution weight, 1909-56 ]/


OCTOBER 1957


Per capital


Year : Potatoes : Sweetpotatoes : Dry edible beans Dry field peas
: 2] 2/ :: 4/

: Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds


1909
1910
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1914
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956 /


187
198
157
179
189
157
185
143
146
174
152
140
156
143
174
154
157
128
141
147
159
132
136
134
132
135
142
130
126
129
122
123
128
127
125
136
122
123
127
105
110
106
113
101
106
106
106
100


26.2
26.2
24.0
24.0
23.6
22.1
25.3
24.5
27.9
26.7
29.3
29.1
27.2
28.9
24.8
17.6
17.7
21.1
25.0
20.7
22.4
18.3
20.6
27.7
24.0
24.4
25.6
19.8
21.5
21.3
19.7
16.2
18.4
20.4
21.4
19.7
18.3
17.2
14.5
11.5
11.7
12.1
8.1
7.3
8.0
8.0
8.2
8.0


6.8
6.5
6.3
6.8
6.1
6.4
5.8
5.1
7.5
7.4
5.4
5.7
4.8
5.1
5.9
7.8
7.3
7.6
8.7
8.6
7.8
9.5
8.8
7.4
7.1
9.1
8.4
9.0
7.8
9.6
9.3
8.4
8.8
11.1
8.9
8.1
7.8
8.7
6.5
6.8
6.9
8.6
8.1
8.1
7.6
8.2
7.3
7.5


0.5
.4
.5
.7
.6
.9
.8
.5
.6
.6
.6
.7
.7
.5
.6
.8
.8
.8
.7
.5
.8
.4
.8
.7
.5
.6
.6
.4
.7
.7


I/ Civilian consumption only, beginning 1941. 2/ Farm weight basis, calendar years. Includes
farm garden produce but not nonfarm. / Cleaned basis, calendar years. 4/ Cleaned basis, crop
years beginning approximately September of year indicated. 2/ Basic data inadequate.
6/ Preliminary.






Table l0.--Vegetables,.fresh, potatoes and sweetpotatoes: Unloads at 19 markets, indicated periods in 1956 and 1957, with comparisons

(Expressed in carlot equivalents)
1956 1957

June July June July
Commodity : :
c Rail, Rail, Rail, Rail,
boat, mco im- boat, Im-
p:. Tt TruckT u : Toal : Truck Total: b Truck: : Total: boat Truck: i : Total
and a ports and ports and ports and ports.
: aairair air air :
: : : : : : : : : : : : : : :


Asparagus
Beans, lima, snap
and fava
Beets
Broccoli
Brussels sprouts
Cabbage
Cantaloups and other
melons 1/
Carrots
Cauliflower
Celery
Corn
Cucumbers
Escarole and endive
Lettuce and romaine
Onions, dry
Onions, green 2
Peas, green
Peppers
Spinach
Other cooking greens
Squash
Tomatoes
Turnips and rutabagas:
Watermelons
Other vegetables
(including mixed)


TOTAL ABOVE

Potatoes
Sweetpotatoes

GRAND TOTAL


5 625


1,237
191
110


31 1 494


-- 1,327
--- 203
--- 209


1,530
226
89


1,542
229
110


155 2,258 19 2,432 34 2,145 21 2,200


4,817
1,100
82
1,790
1,391
161
28
2,890
1,614

140
442
1
8
10
2,108
6
5,144


1,813
659
557
1,608
1,325
1,650
246
4,091
757
472
102
493
392
491
524
2,956
147
4,350


6,824
1,759
639
3,398
2,717
1,811
276
6,981
2,567
477
242
949
393
515
534
5,064
191
9,574


5,109
816
57
1,192
380
42
4
3,034
790
2
90
73
9
10
1,095
8
3,057


2,215
596
385
1,428
2,309
1,780
336
3,500
1,525
486
108
1,120
240
418
581
4,224
133
6,612


7,324
1,412
442
2,622
2,690
1,842
340
6,564
2,381
489
198
1,199
249
418
592
5,342
150
9,669


679 1,501 320 2,500 329 1,192 183 1,704


:22,772 28,555 885 52,212 16,164

8,661 4,886 374 13,921 4,778
29 320 -- 349 8

:31,462 33,761 1,259 66,482 20,950


33,209
6,652
281

39,142


65 1,608 1
4 189 2
59 83 -

73 2,267 30


2,720
774
113
1,320
697
87
12
1,907
1,543
24
60
151
3
3
1,364
1
2,285


1,497
633
456
1,175
1,476
1,713
268
4,102
1,051
414
73
692
247
380
467
3,647
144
4,909


352 1,417


366 49,739 13,618 29,402


10,476
303


7,169 5,518
2 251


426 60,518 20,789 35,171


-- 17


1,674
195
142

2,370

4,227
1,407
570
2,498
2,173
1,808
290
6,042
2,661
441
133
853
250
383
476
5,014
175
7,207


3
26

13

3,628
642
28
1,077
275
18
1
2,946
1,067
6
66
79
17
1
740
4
2,175


1,337
210
55

2,229

2,128
617
321
1,241
2,879
1,747
322
3,472
1,794
482
64
963
205
401
503
4,467
96
7,981


8 1,777 251 1,457


231 43,251 13,063

2 12,689 6,070
2 255 2


34,988
6,602
259


235 56,195 19,135 41,849


1,340
210
81

2,248

5,756
1,259
349
2,320
3,154
1,793
323
6,455
2,970
490
130
1,049
222
401
510
5,211
100
10,156


25 1,733

226 48,277

3 12,675
12 273

241 61,225


/ Except watermelons. 2/ Includes shallots, chives, cipolinas, leeks, scallions, and green onions.
Markets include: Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, Dallas and Ft. Worth, Detroit, Los Angeles, New Orleans, New York,
Oakland (California), Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, St. Louis, San Francisco, Seattle, Kansas City (Missouri), Denver, and Washington, D. C.








Table 11.--Vegetables, fresh: Representative prices (l.c.l. sales) at New York and Chicago
for stock of generally good quality and condition (U.S. No. 1 when available)
indicated periods, 1956 and 1957

: Tuesday Nearest Mid-Month
Market State
and of Unit : 1956 1957
Commodity : Origin


Sept. 18


:Oct. 16 :Sept. 17 Oct. 15


New TYeW

Beans, snap, green,
Valentine
Beets
Broccoli
Cabbage, domestic round
type
Cantaloups
Carrots, bunched
Carrots, topped, washed
Cauliflower, catskill
Celery, Golden Heart
SCelery, Pascal
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Escarole
Honey Dews
Lettuce, Iceberg type
Onions, yellow, medium
size
Onions, yellow, large
size
Peas, green
Peppers, green
Tomatoes

Chicago

Beans, snap, green,
Valentine
Beets, bunched
Cabbage, domestic round
type
Cantaloups
Carrots, topped, washed
Cauliflower

Celery, Pascal type
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Honey Dews
Lettuce, Iceberg type,
dry pack
Onions, Spanish
Peas, green
Peppers, green
Tomatoes, green, ripe
and turning


: Virginia
: New Jersey
:California

: New Jersey
:California
:California
:California
: New York
:New York
:California
: New York
:New Jersey
:New Jersey
:California
:California

: New York

:Idaho
:California
:New Jersey
:California




:Louisiana
:California

:Illinois
: California
:California
:Michigan

:California
:Michigan
:New Jersey
:California

: California
:Colorado
: California
: Illinois

: California


:Bu. bskt.
:1 3/5 bu. box 30 buchs.
: 14's small crt.-bunches

1 3/5 bu. box
:Jumbo crt.
:4 doz. pony crt.
:48-1b. film bag crt.
:Crt. 12's
: crt. (3-4 doz.)
:2-21 dos 6" crt.
:Bu. bskt.
: Bu.
: 1 bu.
6-8 jumbo crt.
:2-doz. crtn.

50 lb. sack

:50 lb. sack
:Bu. bskt.
: Bu. bskt.
:6x6 lug boxes




: Bu. hamper
: 14's crt.

:50-60 lb. crt.
35-45 jumbo crt.
:48-1b. film bag crt.
: Long Island type crt.
18's
:2-3 doz.
: Bu. bskt.
:Bu. bskt.
:9-12's flat crt.

:2 doz. heads, crtn.
:3" and 1 gr.-50 Ib. sac]
: B. bskt.
:Bu. bskt.
6x6 Igr. Lug Box.
wrapped


Dollars Dollars


'E














































k


/ 1 1/9 bu. crate.

/ Per bushel.

3/ Illinois- 1 3/4 bu. box 20 bchs.


Dollars Dollars



--- 4.25
.85 .87
3.75 2.88

.90 .87
5.75 12.34
5.17 4.17
4.82 4.34
2.29 -
2.15 2.25
3.31 3.45
4.25
1.09 2.25
1/.78 1/.81
3.62 3.64
3.22 4.02

1.10 .92

2.70 2.58
5.13 5.38
1.27 ---
3.75




--- 3.25
2.62 ---

1.10 1.15
5.25 8.00
4.25 4.15

1.60
3.25 3.00
3.50
1.00 ---
3.25 3.25

2.65 ---
2.20
4.65 5.00
--- 2.00

3.40


TVS-126


OCTOBER 1957


- 39 -


2/0.6
3.75

1.25
6.50
7.00
6.40
1.63
4.38
4.93
3.50
1.50
1.00
4.03
4.34

1.05

2.27
4.38
1.38






/1.75

1.40
5.35
5.40

2.00
4.00
1.75
1.60
3.50

2.85
2.20
4.12
1.75

3.75


3.75
2/.06
4.21

1.13
10.00
6.41
6.34
1.50
3.25
3.63

2.50
1.25
3.93
5.59

1.37

3.03
4.13
1.25
2.80




3.25
3/.85

1.35

5.35

1.65
3.10


3.35

4.75
2.15
3.25
1.50

5.25







Table 12.--Vegetables, commercial for fresh market: Index numbers (unadjusted)
of prices received by farmers, as of 15th of the month, United States
by months, average 1935-39; average 1947-49, and 1950 to date

(1910-1914=100)

Period Jan. : Feb. r. Apr. May June :July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov.: Dec. Av.


1935-39 :114 121 133 130 125 98 87 82 81 90 103 115 107
1947-49 :288 305 310 308 277 215 207 196 193 204 241 246 249

Year
1950 : 257 213 195 276 231 211 200 170 156 165 214 249 211
1951 :338 346 288 333 276 215 203 197 190 211 290 343 269
1952 :301 249 294 341 311 294 289 240 203 224 266 281 274
1953 : 263 262 249 254 251 289 246 201 192 198 224 235 239
1954 : 246 227 230 262 243 201 225 195 175 197 234 229 222

1955 : 250 255 249 264 259 216 203 204 224 217 244 232 235
1956 : 255 267 267 244 259 290 263 204 181 208 266 263 247
1957 /: 237 236 252 294 315 283 288 248 221
1 Revised. In addition to the vegetables included in the series published prior to January
1954, the following have been added; broccoli, sweet corn, cucumbers, and watermelons.
2/ Preliminary.



Table 13.-Vegetables, for commercial processing: Harvested acreage and
estimated production, average 1946-55, annual 1956, and indicated 1957

Harvested acreage : Production
S10-year : Prelim- 10-year :' 1957 as
Commodity : average 1956 inary average : 1956 cated : percent-
1946-55 1957 1946-55 :1957 age of
: : : : : 1956
Acres Acres Acres Tons Tons Tons Percent

Beans, lima/ : 97,800 loo,340 94,250 83,740 107,930 96,740 90
Beans, snap 125,620 132,260 148,000 259,400 328,990 346,000 105
Beets : 16,520 20,820 18,250 139,100 200,100 150,770 75
Cabbage for kraut
(contract) : 8,780 9,460 7,600 97,500 147,500 108,200 73
Corn, sweet : 453,510 445,330 432,100 1,287,800 1,693,000 1,474,900 87
Peas, green : 427,260 475,120 452,690 435,340 545,160 556,220 10o
Spinach
Winter and spring 1/: 26,790 26,860 27,120 93,840 115,180 115,400 100
Tomatoes :379,920 350,580 302,000 3,162,700 4,600,350 3,384,500 74

Total to date :1,536,200 1,560,770 1,482,010 5,559,420 7,738,210 6,232,730 81

Asparagus 88,190 109,560 -- 105,720 117,500 -- -
Cabbage for kraut
Open market : 7,810 6,910 -- 94,400 111,400 -- -
Cucumbers :133,440 119,180 -- 273,940 330,200 --
Spinach (fall) : 6,580 6,400 26,750 23,490 -- --

Acreage and
production :1,771,680 1,802,820 -- 6,044,700 8,320,800 -

/ 1949-55 average.


TVS-126


_ 40


OCTOBER 1957







Table 14.--Canned vegetables: Commercial packs 1955 and 1956 and canners' and wholesale
distributors' stocks 1956 and 1957, by commodities, United States

: Pack : Stocks
: : Canner 1/ : Wholesale distributors 1/
1955 1956 :
S1955 1956 Date : 1956 :1957 Date :1956 1957
: : :


Major commodities
Beans, snap
Corn, sweet
Peas, green
Tomatoes
Tomato juice /i

Total


Minor commodities
Asparagus
Beans, lima
Beets
Blackeye peas
Carrots
Okra
Pickles
Pimientos
Pimpkin and squash
Sauerkraut
Potatoes
Sweetpotatoes
Spinach
Other greens
Tomato products:
Catsup and
chili sauce
Paste
Pulp and puree
Sauce
Vegetables, mixed


Total, comparable
minor items


Grand total
Comparable items


1,000
cases
24/2's


23,371
24,075
27,376
24,727
26,921


1,000
cases
24/2's


23,982
35,668
29,248
29,883
43,552


126,470 162,333


6,248
2,806
7,539
1,836
1,833
238
./21,507
2/1,000
4,204
2/8,678
2,707
5,053
6,005
2,501


5,422
3,395
9,691
875
3,075
212
1/22,756
349
5,097
,/13,149
2,902
5,063
6,409
2,224


18,382 24,678
2/8,760 2/12,487
4,287 6,158
10,061 12,065
3,019 3,341



116,664 139,348



243,134 301,681


July 1
Aug. 1
June 1
July 1
July 1


1,000
cases
24/2's


4,879
1,794
1,769
2,456
2,168


1,000
cases
24/2's


4,345
4,808
3,318
5,742
10,210


July 1
July 1
June 1
July 1
July 1


13,066 28,423


Mar. 1 1,656
Aug. 1 911
July 1 1,406

July 1 512
--e--
---

July 1 408
Aug. 1 4/1,518


Mar. 1 1,220


July
July
July
July


2,264
6/754
6/162
6/-1448


1,673
1,082
2,787

1,046



1,612
9/3,789


1,575



6,345
/2,260
1,091
3,832


1,000
eases
24/2's


2,608
2,900
2,767
3,007
2,485


1,000
cases
24/2's


2,372
2,988
2,755
2,619
2,439


13,767 13,173


Apr. 1 683
July 1 508
July 1 997

July 1 400



July 1 460
July 1 723


Apr. 1 677


July
July
July
July


12,259 27,092



25,325 55,515


1,341
N.A.
599
712


7,100


643
504
1,060

407
---,e

462
658


671



1,748
590
579
512




7,244


20,867 20,417


/ Converted from actual cases to standard cases of 24 No. 2 cans by S&HR Branch of AMS.
2 Includes combination vegetable juices containing at least 70 percent tomato juice.
/ Crop for processing converted to a canned basis by applying an overall conversion factor
(pickles 68, sauerkraut 54, and pimentos 29 cases equivalent to 1 ton fresh).
/ Reported in barrels; converted to 24/2's by using 14 cases to the barrel.
5 Estimated, basis California pack.
California only.


N.A. Not Available.

Canners' stock and pack data from National Canners Association, unless otherwise noted.
Wholesale distributors' stocks from United States Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census.


------- --


TVS-126


- 4l-


OCTOBER 1957




TVS-126


Table 15.- Vegetables, frozen:
cold-storage holding


United States commercial packs 1955 and 1956 and
as, October 1, 1957, with comparisons


: Packs Cold-storage holdings
:October 1
Commodity 1955 1956 a October 1, October 1,
n ty 1955 1956 average 1957 I
1952-56 1956 1957
: 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds
Asparagus 28,669 37,674 21,140 29,151 31,633
Beans, green
and wax 120,967 137,744 93,409 114,712 117,129
Beans, lima 117,697 143,538 103,003 117,390 130,873
Broccoli 96,240 118,287 29,179 38,509 36,843
Brussels sprouts : 23,142 43,989 9,707 8,036 13,223
Carrots 34,389 51,010 2 2 2/
Cauliflower : 40,085 47,159 9, 14,82 18,1
Corn, cut 70,041 118,153 87,799 104,515 119,297
Corn-on-cob 6,932 20,422 3/ 3/ 3/
Mixed vegetables : 30,662 42,082 2 8,32 13,532
Peas 231,216 359,661 218,74 294,591 323,023
Peas and carrots 13,890 24,139 2/ 5,644 8,796
Pumpkin and
squash : 17,863 24,158 2/
Rhubarb 5,573 7,448 2/ 2/
Spinach : 110,347 104,511 40,193 38,772 45,552
Succotash 7,219 12,421 2/ 2/
Kale : 5,622 4,041 2/
Okra 13,647 13,084 2/ 2/
Peas, Blackeye 10,227 6,738 2/ /
Potato products : 128,890 189,685 2/ 19,006 43,751
Turnip greens 9,495 10,345 2 2
Miscellaneous
vegetables : 16,882 16,749 84,700 75,235 86,375

Total : 1,139,695 1,533,038 691,558 868,687 988,171

/ Preliminary. 2/ Included in miscellaneous vegetables. 3/ Corn-on-cob included with cut
corn.

Pack data from National Association of Frozen Food Packers.


Table 16.- United States average prices received by farmers for important
field crops, September 15, 1957, indicated periods, 1956 and 1957

Average : 1956 : 1957

August : Janaury
Commodity and unit : 1909- : 1947- :September : : August : September
: July : December: 15 : Jl : 15 : 15
1914 : 1949

: Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars

Potatoes, per cwt. : 1.14 2.46 1.60 1.56 1.80 1.70
Sweetpotatoes, per cwt. : 1.60 4.28 3.32 5.30 3.87 2.98
Beans, dry edible, per cvt. : 3.37 9.92 6.91 7.18 6.99 6.63
Peas, dry field, per cwt. : --- 4.60 4.69 3.61 3.57 3.36


- 42-


OCTOBER 1957





OCTOBER 1957


- 43 -


United States, Sept
United States, Septe


fresh: Average price received by farmers, per cwt.
aber 15, 1957 indicated periods, 1956 and 1957


: 1956 : 1957
Ocodity Aug. Sept. July Aug. Sept.

Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol.

Beans, snap 7.15 8.15 12.00 9.00 7.90
Broccoli 8.45 7.75 6.90 7.20 7.80
Cabbage : 2.15 1.55 2.80 2.45 2.45
Cantaloups : 3.35 3.35 b.4o 4.45 4.30
Carrots : 3.60 3.20 5.30 5.00 4.70
Cauliflower 4.45 3.b5 4.25 4.10 5.20
Celery : 3.60 2.90 4.70 3.45 4.10
Corn, sweet 3.60 3.10 4.70 4.00 3.65

Cucumbers : 3.55 4.15 4.75 4.05 3.90
Lettuce 2.95 3.25 4.60 6.60 4.20
Onions : 4.70 2.00 3.35 1.70 1.60
Peppers, green : 7.20 5.00 11.50 7.10 5.20
Spinach 6.25 5.25 6.90 7.30 6.30
Tomatoes 8.20 4.25 8.50 7.00 6.10
Watermelons 1.15 1.05 1.65 1.60 1.30



Table 18.- Potatoes: Acreage, yield per acre, and production, average 1949-55,
annual 1956, and indicated 1957

:Acreage: Yield per acre : Production
Seasonal Harvested : For :Average: : Indi- :Average: : Indi-
Group :Average: 1956 :harvest:1949-55: 1956 : cated :1949-55: 1956 : cated
:1949-55: : 1957 : : : 1957 : : : 1957
: 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
: acres acres acres Cwt. Cwt. Cwt. cwt. cwt. cwt.

Winter :22.6 33.8 45.0 156.6 155.6 151.3 3,554 5,260 6,810

Spring
Early : 23.7 26.1 31.8 131.4 154.1 133.4 3,110 4,022 4,243
Late : 201.7 165.9 174.3 133.8 146.7 164.1 26,853 24,330 28,610

Summer
Early : 124.9 100.1 99.9 80.2 94.9 88.5 9,980 9,503 8,843
Late : 218.0 187.7 192.3 152.7 181.0 167.5 33,042 33,967 32,213

Fall
8 Eastern : 307.0 282.2 265.3 199.1 240.1 220.0 61,179 67,756 58,357
9 Central : 340.3 293.3 292.2 114.1 140.7 112.8 38,818 41,267 32,951
9 Western : 270.6 296.4 299.3 184.4 194.4 199.1 49,922 57,611 59,578
Total : 917.8 871.9 856.8 163.4 191.1 176.1 149.919 166,634 150.886

United States:1,508.8 1385.5 ,400.1 150.4 175.9 165.4 226,458 243,716 231,605


JL LU.


TVS-126


V rtbma1l~l a


ml, *





OCTOBER 1957


Table 19.--Potatoes: Price f.o.b. shipping points and wholesale price
at New York and Chicago, indicated periods 1956 and 1957

Week ended

S. : 1956 : 1957
Variety State Unit 1
Sept. Oct. Sept. Oct.
15 13 : 1 12
S: Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol.
F.o.b. shipping
points


Various varieties,
mostly Katahdin

Katahdin, unwashed


Cobblers and
Chippewas,
unwashed


Rochester,
New York

West Michigan:
Points

South Central:
New Jersey


U. S. No. 1
50 lb. sack :

U. S. No. 1
50 lb. sack

U. S. No. 1
100 lb. sack:


1.14


.88


2.52


.88 1.23 1.24


.80 1.08 1.08


1.75 2.06


STuesday nearest mid-month


Terminal Markets


New York


Cobblers,
Chippewas,
unwashed

Russets, washed
2 inch minimum


Chicago

Russets


Round Reds


Long Island

Idaho-Oregon


Washington

Wisconsin


Prices submitted for Tuesday of
at New York and Chicago.


:50 lb. sack : 1.34 .99

:50 lb. sack : 2.55 2.39




:100 lb. sack: 3.90 3.48

: 100 lb. sack: 2.25 2.00

each week by the Market News


1.15 1.15


2.37


2.38


3.25 3.25

3.35 3.00


representative


)


1<

Sept.
11
Dol.


1957


Oct.
9
Dol.


Sept
1C
Dol.


Oct.
8
Dol.


TVS-126


- 44-


~5t


I








Table 20.--Sweetpotatoes: Acreage, yield per acre and production,
average 1949-55, annual 1956 and indicated 1957

Acreage Yield per acre Production
Group : Harvested
and : : For : Average : : Indi- : Average : : Indi-
State : Average : harvest : 1949-55 : 1956 : cated :1949-55 : 1956 : cated
:1949-55 :1956 : 1957 : : : 1957 : : : 1957

:1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
:acres acres acres Cwt. Cwt. Cwt. cwt. cwt. cwt.
Central
Atlantic 1/ 38.1 36.9 37.9 83 88 87 3,174 3,238 3,285
Lower
Atlantic 2/ : 111.4 71.5 68.0 51 57 59 5,680 4,108 3,996
South
Central 3/ 205.7 161.2 151.7 49 53 58 10,172 8,540 8,758
North
Central 4/ : 3.7 3.1 3.2 53 52 60 196 160 192
California : 11.4 12.0 13.0 68 73 73 773 876 949

United States :373.1 284.7 273.8 54.0 59.4 62.7 20,179 16,922 16,180


/ New Jersey, Maryland, and Virginia. 2/ North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida.
Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Texas. 4/ Missouri
and Kansas.




Table 21.--Sweetpotatoes: Price f.o.b. shipping points and wholesale price
(l.c.l. sales) at New York and Chicago, indicated periods, 1956 and 1957

Week ended

S1956 :1957
Item : State : Unit :_

: : Sept. 15: Oct. 13 : Sept. 14: Oct. 12


SDol. Dol. Dol. Dol.
F.o.b. shipping points
Porto Rican Southern Louisian
: points : 50 Ib. crt. : 2.91 2.62 2.88 2.80
Golden and Oklahma : Eastern Shore,
: Virginia : Bu. bskt. 1.96 2.11 1.58 2.16

Tuesday nearest mid-month
Terminal markets 1956 1957

Sept. 11 : Oct. 9 : Sept. 10 : Oct. 8
SDol. Dol. Dol. Dol.
New York
Golden and Oklahoma : Virginia : Bu. bskt. --- 2.08 1.81 2.90

Chicago
Porto Rican : Louisiana : 50 lb. crt. : 3.55 3.30 3.60 3.75


F.o.b. prices are simple averages of the range of daily prices, compiled from Market News Service
reports. The market prices are representative prices for Tuesday of each week and are submitted by the
Market News Service representative at each market.


TVS-126


-45 -


OCTOBER 1957







Table 22.-Beans, dry edible: Acreage, yield per acre, and production,
average 195-55, annual 1956 and indicated 1957 I/

Acreage Yield per acre Production 2
States : :
Harvested
and Harveted For : :Indl- :: Indi-
lases Averagervest: 1956 : cated ra 1956 : cated
:19 5-551956 1957 : : 1957 : : 1957
1945-55: 15 195:
: 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
acres acres acres Pounds Pounds Pounds bags bags bags

Maine, New York, Michigan : 591 623 633 910 1,104 803 5,350 6,879 5,083
Nebraska, Montana, Idaho :
Wyoming, Washington : 311 275 289 1,529 1,704 1,711 4,742 4,686 4,944
Colorado, New Mexico,
Arizona, and Utah : 357 233 219 656 656 911 2,250 1,528 1,996
California
Large lima 73 60 61 1,553 1,707 1,650 1,138 1,024 1,006
Baby lima 57 32 20 1,498 1,747 1,650 844 330
Other 186 19 1,172 1u 175 22149 2.A2 2s.4

Total California 321 g27 274 1 J1 1.446 1.456 4,231 4.021 3.990

United States 1,580 1,409 1,415 1,058 1,215 1,132 16,573 17,114 16,013


SIncludes beans grown for seed.
Bags of 100 pounds, (cleaned).




Table 23.-Peas, dry, field: Acreage, yield per acre and production,
average 1945-55, annual 1956 and indicated 1957 1/

Acreage Yield per acre Production 2/

Harvested
State d : For : : : Indi- :A g Indi-
: g harvestt Average 1956 : cated Average: 1956 : cated
Average 1956 : 1957 194555: : 1957 194555 : 1957
:1945-55. : : : .
:1,000 1,000 1,1,000 1,000 1,000
acres acres acres Pounds Pounds Pounds bags bags bags

Minnesota 4 6 7 892 1,300 1,200 38 78 84
North Dakota : 6 4 4 907 1,250 1,200 64 50 48
Montana 8 5 4 1,072 1,240 1,300 88 62 52
Idaho : 99 144 101 1,184 1,400 1,200 1,167 2,016 1,212
Wyoming 4 5 3 1,278 1,280 1,600 58 64 48
Colorado 11 9 15 844 860 900 93 77 135
Washington : 161 154 108 1,140 1,360 1,400 1,844 2,094 1,512
Oregon 13 8 10 844 1,500 1,600 119 120 160
California 12 7 4 1,046 1,300 1,600 112 91 64

United States :320 342 256 1,123 1,360 1,295 3,584 4,652 3,315


seed and peas harvested


- 46 -


1/ In principal commercial producing States. Includes peas grown for
dry.
/ Bags of 100 pounds (cleaned).


TVS-126


OCTOBER 1957







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 1262 09060 7283


U. S. Department of Agriculture
Washington 25, D. C.


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