Consumer buying practices for selected fresh fruits, canned and frozen juices, and dried fruits, related to family chara...

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Title:
Consumer buying practices for selected fresh fruits, canned and frozen juices, and dried fruits, related to family characteristics, region, and city size
Physical Description:
v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Production and Marketing Administration. -- Fruit and Vegetable Branch
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Fruit -- Marketing -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Fruit juices -- Marketing -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Dried fruit -- Marketing -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
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federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )

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University of Florida
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Resource Identifier:
aleph - 028108249
oclc - 85234986
lccn - 2010229709
System ID:
AA00013010:00001

Related Items

Related Items:
Availability and prices of certain fresh fruits, canned fruits, canned juices, and dried fruits in retail food stores
Related Items:
Availability of certain fresh fruits and canned and frozen juices in retail food stores


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DE PAR ,'. :i ol '.:;I:UL I L:., LCON SM


CONS'JMER BUYING PRACTICES FOR SELECTED FRESH FRUITS,

CANNED AND FROZEN JUICES, AND DRIED FRTJrrS, RELATED

TO FAMILY CHARACTERISTICS, REGIUN, AND CITY SIZE



October 1951 March 1952

















United States Department of Agriculture
Bureau of Agricultural Economics
and
Fruit and Vegetable Branch
Production and Marketing Administration

Washington, D. C.
November 1952


Agriculture--Was bin gton






FOREWORD


This report sumarizes data on household consumer purchases of selected fresh
fruits, canned and frozen juices, and dried fruits during the 6-month period,
October 1951-March 1952. This is the third in a series of such reports, the
two preceding reports having covered the periods of October 1949-March 1950
and April-September 1950. Data for the former period are presented here for
comparative purposes. These data are developed from those appearing in a
current series of monthly reports entitled, "Consumer Purchases of Selected
Fresh Fruits, Canned and Frozen Juices, and Dried Fruits," and a series of
quarterly reports entitled, "Regional Distribution and Types of Stores Where
Consumers Buy Selected Fresh Fruits, Canned and Frozen Juices, and Dried Fruits."
This publication provides additional information concerning buying practices of
families as related to geographic region and size of city in which they live,
family income, family size and ages of children, age of housewife, and occupa-
tion and education of family head.

The data in this report on "average volume of purchases per buying family" are
calculated by dividing total purchases of each product during the 6-month
period by the total number of families making purchases at any time during the
period. Thus, they differ from the data given in the monthly and quarterly re-
ports on volume of purchases which represent total purchases by all families.

The States included in each of the geographic regions and the distribution of
population between regions are shown in figure 1.

In the classification for "size of comnmnity" the total populations of metro-
politan areas were used rather than populations within corporate city limits.

The "family income" classification was based on a division of family income
into four quartiles in each community size within regions. For example, in the
North Central region all farm families were divided into four groups of equal
size, based upon a ranking of incomes. Similarly, all families in cities of
under 10,000 population in the region were divided into four groups. In turn,
the families in each of the other city size classifications in the region were
divided into four groups. All of the families in the highest income quartiles
were then combined to form the "upper income group." Those in the next highest
quartile formed the "upper middle income group," and so on.

In the classification of data according to "presence of children" families were
recorded more than once if they had children falling within more than one age
group. Thus, a family having children in 3 different age groups was tabulated
with each of the three groups.

All data are collected from a representative national sample of household con-
sumers. This publication, like the monthly and quarterly reports, is issued
as a part of a program financed cooperatively by participating fruit industry
groups and the U. S. Department of Agriculture. The funds used by the U. S.
Department of Agriculture were provided under the Agricultural Marketing Act.



The report is based on data collected by the Market Research Corporation of
America under contract with the U. S. Department of Agriculture.






CONT EI'TS
Page

Summary*... *.. .. ..........*, .......... ....... .......... ,1

Frozen Conu.nt rated Juices...... ... ..... .. ..... ... ...*.... ... ..... 2

Ade Bases ani Si le Strength Ades ............. .....,.*..,..,. ... 3

Canned Juices.. .. *o .*, ......* .*. .. *.... ... .....e........e.......,, 5

Fresh Citrus Trlit... ..... ..... ...6.,............... 6

Dried Fruit.................,................ ......... ...... 8

Figure 1 U. S. population distribution by National Consumer Panal
Regions................ .. ...... ..... .......... ....... ...,.. 11

List of Tables

Table 1.- Frozen concentrated juices, ade bases, and single strength adess
Percentage of all families buying by family characteristics and place
of residence, October IcL)-March 1950 and October 194-l-ar i 1952...... 12

Table 2.- Frozen concentrated juices, ade bases, anJ single strength adess
Average number of purchases per buying family, by family characteristics
and place of residence, October 1949-March 1950 and October 1951-
March 1952... ... ................. ....... .....g....... ......... 13

Table 3.- Frozen concentrated juices, ade bases, and single strength ades:
Average volume of purchases per buying family, by family characteristics
and place of residence, October 1949-March 1950 &nd October 195i-
March 1952......... ............ ....... ........ .... .... ........ ........ 14

Table 4.- Frozen concentrated juices, ade bases, and single strength ades:
Average price paid by household consumers, by family characteristics
and place of residence, October 19i9-Marcb 1950 and October 1951-
March 1952..... ............................................... ....... 15

Table 5.- Frozen concentrated juices, ade bases, and single strength adess
Volume of purchases per 1,000 families, by family characteristics and
place of residence, October 1949-March 1950 and October 1951-March 1952. 16

Table 6.- Canned juices: Percentage of all families buying, by family
characteristics and place of residence, October 1949-March 1950 and
October 1951-March 1952. ..................................... .... 17

Table 7.- Canned juices Average number of purchases per buying family,
by family characteristics and place of residence, Cctober 1949-March 1950
and October 1951-March 1952.......................................... 19

Table 8.- Canned juices: Average volume of purchases per buying family,
by family characteristics and place of residence, October 1949-March 1950
and October 1951-March 1952.......................................... 21





Page


Table 9.- Canned juices: Average prices paid by household consumers, by
family characteristics and place of residence, October 1949-March 1950
and October 1951-March 1952.......................................... 23

Table 10.-Canned juices Volume of purchases per 1,000 families, by family
characteristics and place of residence, October 19L9-March 1950 and
October 1951-March 192................................................ 25

Table 11.-Fresh citrus fruit: Percentage of all families buying, by family
characteristics and place of residence, October 1949-March 1950 and
October 1951-March 1952............................................ 27
Table 12.-Fresh citrus fruit: Average number of purchases per buying
family by family characteristics and place of residence, October 1919-
March 1950 and October 1951-March 1952..... ............................ 29

Table 13.-Fresh citrus fruit: Average volume of purchases per buying
family, by family characteristics and place of residence, October 1949-
March 1950 and October 195-March 1952................................ 31

Table 14.-Fresh citrus fruits Average prices paid by household consumers,
by family characteristics and place of residence, October 1949-March 1950
and October 1951-March 1952...... ........ ............ ............. 33

Table 15.-Fresh citrus fruits Volume of purchases per 1,000 families, by
family characteristics and place of residence, October 1949-March 1950
and October 1951-March 1952.......... ....... ............ ............. 35

Table 16.-Dried fruit: Percentage of all families buying, by family
characteristics and place of residence, October 1949-March 1950 and
October 1951-March 1952................. ........ ............ ...... 37

Table 17.-Dried fruit: Average number of purchases per buying family, by
family characteristics and place of residence, October 1949-March 1950
and October 1951-March 1952.9............. ......................... 39

Table 18.-Dried fruit: Average volume of purchases per buying family, by
family characteristics and place of residence, October 1949-March 1950
and October 1951-March 1952................. ................... ......... 1

Table 19.-Dried fruits Average price paid by household consumers, by
family characteristics and place of residence, October 19l49-March 1950
and October 1951-March 1952.......... .............................. ... 43

Table 20.-Dried fruit: Volume of purchases per 1,000 families, by family
characteristics and place of residence, October 1949-March 1950 and
October 1951-March 192.......................... ...... ......... .. 5



ii -





CONSUMER BUYING PRACTICES FOR SELECTED FRESH FRUITS,
CANNED AND FROZEN JUICES, AND DRIED FRUITS,
RELATED TO FAMILY CHARACTERISTICS, REGION,
AND CITY SIZE


OCTOBER 1951-MARCH 1952


SUMMARY

Householders bought about 2-2/3 times as much frozen concentrated orange juice
during October 1951-March 1952 as in the corresponding period of 19W-50.
Much of this increase resulted from a sharp rise in the number of purchases
of this product between the two periods. On the other hand, purchases of
fresh oranges were comparatively unchanged from the level of 2 years earlier,
while those of canned single strength orange juice increased about 13 percent.

A much larger number of families bought fresh oranges during October 1951-
March 1952 than bought either frozen concentrated or canned single strength
orange juice. Eighty percent of all families bought at least some fresh
oranges during this period. In contrast, only about 40 percent of U. S.
families bought frozen concentrated orange juice, and only 43 percent bought
canned single strength orange juice.

The largest gains in the number of families buying frozen concentrated orange
juice continued to be among those families in the clerical-sales and laborer-
craftsman occupations. There was some indication of a decline in the volume
of purchases of fresh oranges among the clerical-sales and executive-profes-
siomal occupation groups, as well as among families in cities of between 10,000
and 100,000 population. Families in these cities, however, increased their
total purchases of frozen concentrated orange juice.

About 45 percent of the Nation's families bought dried prunes during October
1951-March 1952, compared with 41 percent 2 years ago. In theSouth, a sub-
stantially larger number of families bought dried prunes than in October-
March of 1949-50. Also more families in the lower income groups purchased.
The proportion of families buying dried peaches and dried apricots were down
somewhat, partly reflecting the rise in retail prices.

About 23 percent of the families reported buying imported dates during October
1951-March 1952, a somewhat larger proportion than bought domestic dates during
the period. However, total purchases of domestic dates exceeded those or im-
ported dates. This was partly due to the fact that in large cities, those
over 500,000 population, average purchases of domestic dates per family were
substantially larger than those of imported dates.

During the 6-months period October 1951-March 1952, household purchases of
grapefruit and canned single strength grapefruit juice were equal to 17,082,000
boxes of grapefruit. This total was up more than one-fifth from the corres-
ponding months of 1949-1950. Purchases of grapefruit were up 26 percent, and






-2-


canned juice purchases increased 15 percent, on a fresh equivalent basis. At
the same time, the average of prices paid by consumers for grapefruit declined
11 percent, and prices paid for canned grapefruit juice declined 30 percent.

Average volume of purchases per family buying canned grapefruit juice increased
substantially in the Pacific region during October 1951-March 1952, compared
with two years earlier, and was higher than in any other geographic region.
Average number of grapefruit purchased per buying family, on the other hand,
was highest in the North Central region and lowest in the Mountain-Southwest
region.

The amount of lemons householders bought during October 1951-March 1~2 was
about 9 percent more than in the same period two years earlier, while the
average of prices paid declined by the same percentage. Household purchases
of canned lemon juice increased in response to a decline of one-fifth in
prices paid for this juice.

Fbr all canned single strength juices together, the proportion of all families
that made purchases during October 191b-March 1952 was up slightly fr'-m the
corresponding period two years earlier, and the average volume purchased per
buying family increased 2 percent. Average purchases of canned single strength
juices per family, increased for all income groups except the highest.



FROZEN CONCENTRATED JUICES

About 40 percent of all families bought frozen concentrated orange juice one
or more times during the period October 1951-March 1952. This was a substan-
tical increase over the 28 percent that purchased in the corresponding period
of 1949-50, and was a marked increase over the 32 percent that bought in April-
September 1950 (table 1). During each of these three 6-month periods, the
proportion buying during any month was about one-half that for the period as
a whole.

Families whose breadwinners were engaged in clerical, sales, and service occupa-
tions, or were employed as laborers and craftsman, accounted for much of the
increase in tne number which bought frozen concentrated orange juice.

Families in the executive and professional groups continued to lead in the
proportion buying frozen concentrated orange juice and in the amount purchased
per buying family. Fifty-eight percent of this group made purchases of the
product during October 1951-March 1952, compared with 50 percent of the
clerical and sales group and 39 percent of the craftsman and laborer group
(table 1). Farm families showed a larger relative increase in the number
purchasing than those in any of the other occupation groups. Among farm
families, 14 percent bought frozen concentrated orange juice during October
1951-March Y152, compared with only 7 percent 2 years ago. These families,





-3-


however, averaged buying a somewhat smaller amount per family than those in
other occupations. The average for farm families was only 13 of the 6-ounce
cans per buying family, compared with 22 cans per buying family in the clerical
and laborer groups (table 3).

There were significant changes geographically in the proportion of families
buying frozen concentrated orange juice. The proportion more than doubled in
the Mountain-Southwest region--35 percent during the period October 1951-March
1952, compared with only 15 percent in the same months of 1949-50. The neAt
largest gains were those in the bouth and Pacific regions. The increases in
these regions, nonetheless, failed to overtake the Northeast region which con-
tinued to report the highest percentage of all families purchasing, 57 percent.
A factor that aided the Northeast in maintaining its leadership in the volume
of frozen concentrated orange juice purchased was the sharp increase from i.3
to 11.1 in the average number of purchases per buying family (table 2). There
were only moderate increases in the number of purchases per buying family in
the other regions.

The number of families with children under 1J years old that bought frozen
concentrated orange juice increased sharply in October 1951-March 1952, com-
pared with the same period of 1949-50 (table 2). The increase for families
without children,or for those with children over 13 years of age, was less
pronounced though still substantial.

About 57 percent more families bought frozen concentrated grape juice during
October 1951-March 1952 than in the corresponding period of 1949-50. Only
about 8 percent of all families bought this product, whereas, 40 percent
bought frozen concentrated orange juice. The increase in the number of families
that bought frozen concentrated grape juice was primarily among those whose
breadwinners were in the clerical, sales, craftsman, and laborer occupation
groups (table 1).

The percentage of families buying frozen concentrated grape juice was largest
in the Northeast where an average of almost 1 out of 6 families purchased with-
in the October 1951-March 1952 period. This compares with the North Central
and Mountain-Southwest regions, where 1 out of 11 families purchased, and the
Pacific region, where only 1 out of 15 families bought. The largest relative
increase in the number of buying families was in the South. However, only 4
percent of the fanmlies in that region reported purchasing frozen concentrated
grape juice at any time during the 6-month period.


ADE BASES AND SINGLE STRENGTH ADES

The October 1951-March 1952 period marks the first time in this series of
reports that family characteristics information has been obtained regarding
purchasers of ade bases and single strength ades.





-!-


Frozen lemonade base was bought by about 6 percent of the Nation's families
during October 1951-March 1952. It was purchased during this period by a
larger part of the families in the Pacific region--12 percent--than elsewhere.
In sharp contrast, only about 4 percent of the families in the South and the
North Central regions reported buying frozen lemonade base (table 1).

The rate of purchasing was considerably higher among upper income families
and among families living in the larger cities. Very few farmers made purchases
during this period, possibly in part because the product was not generally
available to them. Almost as large a proportion of childless families bought
frozen lemonade base as those with children.

Only about 2 percent of all families in the Nation reported buying shelf pack
(nonfrozen) lemonade base during October 1951-March 1952. Buying families
averaged about 2* of the 6-ounce cans each during the 6-month period (table 3).

Shelf pack (nonfrosen)orangeade base was purchased by about 7 percent of the
Nation's families within the October 1951-March 1952 period. Almost 10 per-
cent purchased in the North Central region, compared to only about 3 percent
in the Pacific region (table 1). More of the families in small towns, those
under 10,000 population, purchased orangeade base than was the case for the
large cities, which was also true for single strength orangeade. The propor-
tion of families that purchased was not particularly related to occupation.
Those in the executive and professional occupations, however, that bought
this product, purchased an average of 12 of the 6-ounce cans during the 6-month
period, compared with to y cans for the other occupation groups (table 3).
Families with children also averaged purchasing somewhat more than those with-
out children.

Canned single strength orangeade was purchased 1 or more times during October
1951-March 1952 by nearly 7 percent of the families in the United States (table
1). A somewhat larger proportion of families in the clerical-sales or craftsman-
laborer groups purchased than those in other pursuits. A larger proportion of
families with children bought single strength orangeade than did families
without children. Also more families in the South and Mountain-Southwest regions
bought single-strength orangeade than was reported in the other regions. In
the Northeast, however, the families which used canned single strength orange-
ade, bought it more often and their purchases were larger than those in other
parts of the country. Consequently, the per capital average of purchases in
the Northeast, including both buying and nonbuying families, was second only
to the Southwest where purchases were equivalent to an average of one 46-ounce
can for every two families during the 6-month period (table 5). A considerably
larger proportion of those families where the head of the family had only a
grammar or high school education purchased canned orangeade than did those where
the head was college trained.





-5-


CANNED JUICES


About 85 percent of all families bought one or more of the canned single
strength juices during the 6-month period October 1951-March 1952, compared
with 82 percent during October 1949-March 1950 (table 6). The average volume
of canned single strength juices purchased per family also was slightly
larger, averaging for all families, both buying and non-buying, 1.2 cases of
No. 2 cans compared with 1.1 cases for the 6-month period two years earlier.
Average amount purchased per family increased in all regions except the North-
east. The increase was largest in the Mountain-Southwest and Pacific regions.
Purchases of canned single strength juices by the highest income families
declined, but purchases by all lower income group families were larger (table 10).
Families in towns and cities bought more canned single strength juice than farm
families, purchases of those in the larger cities averaging highest.

Between the periods October 199-March 1950 and October 1951-March 1952, con-
sumer incomes, as well as the general level of food prices,increased. A
decline in the average prices of most canned single strength juices was an
exception to this general trena. between these two periods, in each instance
of a decline in the price of a canned single strength juice, there was an
accompanying increase in per capital purchases of the juice.

Canned single strength orange juice was purchased by h3 percent of all families
during October 1951-March 1952, about the same proportion as during the corres-
ponding months two years earlier. Prices paid by householders for canned single
strength orange juice during October 1951-March 1952 averaged 26.1 cents per
46-ounce can, 26 percent lower than two years earlier (table 9). Families who
bought canned orange juice purchased somewhat larger amounts than two years ago,
averaging about 6.1 of the 46-ounce cans per family. Average purchases per
buying family were higher in each geographic region except the Northeast (table
8). They also were higher for each income group except the highest where they
declined by one 46-ounce can per family.

Almost the same proportion of families bought canned grapefruit juice during
October 1951-March 1952 as in the earlier 6-month period--about 30 percent-
but they bought an average of 5 of the 46-ounce cans, about one can more than
in the earlier period. Prices paid by householders averaged 23.1 cents per
h6-ounce can, down JO percent from two years earlier (table 9). Purchases per
buying family were highest in the Pacific and Mountain-Southwest regions and
lowest in the South and Northeast regions (table 8)e Average purchases per
buying family declined in the Northeast region but increased in all other
regions compared with two years earlier. Farm families and those in small
communities bought more grapefruit juice in October 1951-March 1952 than two
years earlier, but those in large cities bought less.





-6-


The percentage of families buying orange-grapefruit blended juice during
October 1951-March 1952 also declined slightly compared with the same 6-month
period two years earlier--20 percent of all families made purchases compared
with 22 percent. Prices paid by householders for blended juice averaged 1/3
lower than two years earlier--2L.8 cents per h6-ounce can during October 1951-
March 1952. Families that maae purchases bought an average of 3.7 of the
l6-ounce cans, or about 12 percent more than in October 19l9-March 1950. The
average purchases per buying family declined in the Pacific region but increased
in all other regions except the Northeast (table 8).

More families bought canned lemon juice during October 1951-March 1952 than
two years earlier, while the average volume they purchased remained the same.
Lemon juice purchases were not related as closely to family income as purchases
of some other canned single strength juices (table 6). Volume of purchases by
small families averaged higher than for large families (table 8). Householders
paid an average of 10.2 cents per 5g-ounce can for lemon juice during the
period, one-fifth less than two years earlier (table 9).

The proportion of families that bought canned pineapple .uice during October
1951-March 1952 increased to Wk percent of all families from 39 percent during
the corresponding period two years earlier (table 6)e Prices paid by house-
holders during this period averaged 1/4 less than in October 19 9-March 1O50
and buying families purchased an average of about 1/5 more pineapple juice--
h4. of the i6-ounce cans. The gain was largest relatively in the Pacific and
Mountain-Southwest regions.

Canned tomato juice was bought during October 1951-March 1952 by almost the
sdme proportion of all families--43 percent--as during these same months two
years earlier. Purchases averaged 5.1 of the L6-ounce cans per buying family
during October 1951-March 1952, and prices paid by householders averaged 27.7
cents per 16-ounce can.

Prune juice was purchased by 16 percent of all families during October 1951-
March 1952, practically the same proportion as in October 1949-March 1950.
Both the percentage of families buying and the average volume of their pur-
chases increased sharply in the Mountain-Southwest region. Average purchases
by all families, however, continued to be highest in the Northeast region
(table 10). Average prices paid by householders for prune juice increased to
32.5 cents per 32-ounce bottle during October 1951-March 1)52 from 27.8 cents
during the earlier 6-month period.


FRESH CITRUS FRUIT


Although cost of all foods rose almost 20 percent between January 1950 and
January 1952, prices of fresh citrus fruit did not follow this general trend.
Prices which householders paid for fresh grapefruit during October 1951-March
1952 were down by an average of more than 10 percent compared with the same






-7-


period two years earlier, lemon prices were down almost as much, while prices
paid for fresh oranges averaged about the same. Householders bought during
October 1951-March 1956 practically the sr.me quantity of freshi orarnes as two
years earlier, even though purchases of frozen concentrated orange Juice
increased spectacularly during, this period. In addition, purchases of conned
single strength orange juice inire -sed compared with the same 6-month period
of 19L~-1950, raising hoiuelold purchases of oranges Lmd orange product, on
a fresh e ,uivalent basis, during October 1951-March 1>2 to the highest point
recorded for any 6-month period in this series. 1/ Ihe decline in the average
of prices paid for fresh grapefruit wa. accompFuiif. by a much larger prlpor-
tionate increase in the total amou-ln purchased. Household purchases of fresh
lemons during these months increased in proportion to the price decline, even
though purchases of canned lemon juice were up more thAn one-fifth anJ purchases
of frozen lemonade base were substantially lir, er. although prices paid by
householders for tangerines during October 19bl-Mardc 1952 averaged 11 percent
higher than two years earlier, the number of families buying increased.

The volume of fresh oranges purchased by householders during October 19Y1-March
19)2 was about e.ual to that bought during the corresponding 6-month period
two years earlier, but average purchases per buying family were slightly smaller
(table 12). Families that bought oranges during October lyS1-March ly52 pur-
chased an avera e of 9-1/J aozens eacn. Florida orange purchases averaged 7.2
dozens per buying families, while those of California-Arizona oranges averaged
5.2 dozens per buying family. However, not all families purchasing Florida
oranges also bought California-Arizona oranges (table 13). In each geographic
region, average purchases of families who bought California-Arizona oranges
during the b-month period were below those two years earlier, while average
purchases of families buying Florida oranges were larger in each region except
the Pacific (table 13). In the Mountain-Southwest region they increased by
60 percent.

Florida oranges were bought by 50 percent of all families during October 1951-
March 1952, compared with 48 percent during the corresponding months two years
earlier, while 52 percent of all families bought California-Arizona oranges
compared with 5h percent two years earlier. A smaller proportion of families
in each geographic region, except the Pacific, bought California-Arizona
oranges than during October 1949-March 1950 (table 11). On the other hand, a
somewhat larger proportion of families in the South and in the North Central
regions bought Florida oranges, and 38 percent of families in the Mountain-
Southwest region made purchases, compared with only 19 percent two years
earlier. The average quantity of oranges purchased per family was related
directly to income.


1/ "Consumer Fruit and Juice Purchases, April-June 1952," August 1952, USDA,
Bureau of Agricultural Economics and Production and Marketing Administration.






-8-


The average of prices paid by householders for California-Arizona oranges
during October 1951-March 1952, 47 cents per dozen, was almost 4 cents
higher than two years earlier, while that paid for Florida oranges, 34 cents
per dozen, was down 3 cents. The average of prices paid for all oranges
purchased by householders, however, was practically the same for both 6-month
periods (table 14).

Fresh grapefruit were bought by about the same number of families during October
1951-March 1952 as in the same 6-month period of 19h9-1950. The number of grape-
fruit purchased per buying family, however, increased from an average of 2-1/h
dozens to 21 dozens between the two periods. The number purchased per buying
family was larger in each geographic region except the Mountain-bouthwest and
Pacific regions, with the largest increase in the Northeast region (table 12).
Purchases per family were largest for the highest income group and smallest
for the lowest income group. However, lower middle income families purchased
slightly more grapefruit on the average than upper middle income families.
Prices paid for fresh grapefruit averaged 88 cents per dozen during October
1951-March 1952, 11 cents less than two years earlier.

Fewer families purchased fresh lemons during October 1951-March 1952 than in
the corresponding period two years earlier, 50 percent of all families compared
with 53 percent (table 11). The average number of lemons purchased by buying
families, however, was about the same, 1.8 dozens. Average purchases of
buying families in the Pacific region increased, but was off-set by slight
decreases in all other regions. Average purchases of families living in large
cities who bought lemons also decreased, while those of farm families were
higher, 2.2 dozens per family (table 13). Prices paid by householders for
fresh lemons generally were lower during October 1951-March 1952 than two
years earlier, averaging 46 cents per dozen compared with 51 cents. Prices
averaged lower in all geographic regions.

About one-third of all families bought tangerines during October 1951-March
1952, a slightly larger proportion than two years earlier. Families that
bought tangerines, however, bought an average of about 21 dozens each com-
pared with almost 3 dozens two years earlier (table 13). Average purchases
per buying family declined in all geographic regions. Prices paid for tangerines
were up an average of 11 percent during October 1951-March 1952 from the average
two years earlier, 34 cents per dozen compared with 31 cents. Prices paid
averaged higher in all geographic regions (table 14).


DRIED FRUIT

Almost i5 percent of all families bought dried prunes within the 6-month
period October 1951-March 1952, somewhat more than the 41 percent that pur-
chased during the corresponding period 2 years ago. This increase was primarily
the result of more families buying dried prunes in the bouth, Mountain-Southwest,
and Pacific regions (table 16). About one-fourth more families in tne South





-9-


bought dried prunes during October 1951-March 1952 than in the corresponding
period of 1919-50. In October 1951-March 1952, as in the earlier period, there
was a relationship between the age of the housewife and the purchase of dried
prunes. Forty-seven percent of the housewives over 45 years of age bought
dried prunes, while only 37 percent of those that were less than 35 years of
age made purchases. The proportion of families in the lower income group that
bought dried prunes represented a substantial increase over the October-March
period two years earlier. This increase occurred even though the average
price paid by consumers for dried prunes, 25.4 cents per pound, was somewhat
higher than it was in the same months of i Y9-50 (table 19).

Dried apricots were bought by about 13 percent of all families during October
1951-March 19i2, a decline from the 1> percent that purchased during this
period two years earlier. Associated with this decline, was a substantial
increase in the average price paid by consumers--about 61 cents per pound,
compared with 49 cents in October-December 1949-50. In most regions there was
a reduction not only in the number of families buying but also in the amount
each buying family purchased. In the Mountain-Southwest region, on the contrary,
there was almost no reduction in the number of families buying but instead a
marked decline in the average amount bought by a purchasing family (table 18).
Total purchases also declined considerably in the South. This was the result
of both fewer families buying and of smaller individual purchases in the stores.
For the Nation as a hole, the average number of purchases declined from 2.0
per buying family to 1.6, and the total amount bought per fanirly declined from
the average of 1.8 pounds in October-March two years ago to l.l pounds for
October 1951-March 1952.

About 7 percent of all families in the United States purchased dried peaches
during the period October 1951-March 1952, almost equal to the 7.6 percent
reported in these months of 19L9-50. The sliigt decline was possibly in
response to the substantially higher average price which consumers had to
pay for dried peaches during the October-March period of 1951-52,about 43
cents per pound instead of the 33 cents paid during the corresponding period
two years ago (table 19). The number of buying families declined in each of
the regions except the North Central and the Mountain-Southwest. 1he increase
in the number of families buying in the North Central region was just
sufficient to off-set the decline in the average volume purchased per family.
However, purchases declined substantially in all other regions. One of the
larger reductions in purchases, as well as in the proportion of families
buying, occurred in cities of 100,000 500,000 population. Not only did the
number of buying families in these cities decline by about one-third, but
total purchases dropped by more than 60 percent, compared to only about half
as large a decline for the Nation as a whole (table 20).

Only about 5 percent of the Nation's families bought mixed dried fruit during
the October-March period of the 1951-52 season, slightly fewer than in the
corresponding period 2 years ago. Prices paid for mixed dried fruit averaged






-10-


considerably above the level of two years ago--about 41 cents per pound, com-
pared with 32 cents in October-March 1949-50. Consequently, frequency of
family purchases of mixed dried fruit, as well as the size of purchases, were
below that of the earlier period, resulting in a substantial decline in the
amount of mixed dried fruit bought. Purchases also declined most sharply in
cities of between 100,000 and 500,000 population (table 20). In these cities,
the number of families buying was substantially lower, as were the average
frequency and volume of purchases.

Family characteristics of purchasers of domestic and imported dates were
obtained separately during October 1951-March 1952 for the first time in this
series of reports* Eighteen percent of the families in the United states
purchased domestic dates during the period, compared with 23 percent buying
imported dates. In the case of domestic dates, there was a much wider
variation by regions in the percent of families buying than for imported
dates. Forty-three percent of the families in the Pacific region bought
domestic dates, compared with only 7 percent in the South (table 16). For
imported dates, the largest percentage of families buying was in the Mountain-
Southwest region--28percent--while the smallest percentage was in the Pacific
region--12 percent.

The percentage of families buying imported dates was larger in cities under
500,000 than in the larger cities. In cities of over 500,000 population,
more families bought domestic dates than imported dates. Only about one-
half the proportion of families made purchases of domestic dates in towns of
under 10,000 population as in the larger cities. In addition, about one-half
as many farm families bought domestic dates as they did imported dates (table
16). Prices paid for domestic dates in small towns, however, were higher in
relation to imported dates than they were in the larger cities.

Except in the South, householders purchased domestic dates more times than
they did imported dates (table 17). Furthermore, during the 6-month period,
October-March ly51-52, purchasers of domestic dates averaged buying a larger
quantity each purchase than did buyers of imported dates. For both domestic
and imported dates, almost twice as large a proportion of the families in the
upper income group purchased as did those in the lower income group. A
larger proportion-of childless families bought domestic and imported dates
than those with children.






U. S. POPULATION DISTRIBUTION BY NATIONAL

CONSUMER PANEL REGIONS


U. S. DEARMETOFAGIULURIE480


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


BAE 48309






- 12 -


Table 1.- Prosen


Item


United States


concentrated juices, ade bases, and single strength adeas Percentage of all
families buying by family characteristics and place of residence,
October 19,9-March 1950 and October 1951-March 1952

s Frozen concentrated Juces I Single I Ad -be`a 2.
S Orange Grape Total / ,oraneada F Proe.n ShT?-p ck- sBhelf-pack
r199 TT97-, 1-f9i~-t i55Ti? T 9^'1",71 I9 --, 9-57 T- 195- rs I.7
a -'o0 -52 -50 1 -52 t-50 s -52 -2 -52 2 -52
Percent -


28.1 4i0.3


S.4 8.5 29.0 42.1 6.6


Geographic region
Northeast
North Central
South
Mountain and Southwest
Pacific

Size of community
Farm
City (Population)
Under 10,000
10,000-99,999
100,000-199,999
500,000 and over

Family income
Upper
Upper middle
Lower middle
Lower

Size of family
1 and 2 members
3 members
h and 5 members
6 and over

Presence of children /
No children
Under 6 years
6-12 years
13-20 years

Occupation of family head
Executive, professional
Clerical, sales, service
Craftman, laborer
Farmer
Unclassified

Education of family head
Grammar school
Some high school
Some college

Age of housewife
Under 35 years
35-44 years
45 years and over


L5.6
27.3
12.5
21.7
214.5


57.0
39.1
22.41
31.6
39.2


11.9
8.9
4.1
8.8
6.7


16.6
28.3
12.8
16.1
24.8


59.3
41.14
23.0
35.5
41.3


5.7
5.8
8.2
10.1
4.9


8.1 13.1 1.3 2.8 8.1 14.1 5.6


22.2
31.0
28.6
417.0


38.9
31.2
25.3
17.6

25.7
30.5
32.6
15.14


25.9
31.2
29.1
23.8


17.1
36.14
25.7
6.9
20.0


30.8
16.1
47.6
59.8


51.2
44.0
38.7
27.7

3l.8
l6.6
4t5.1
29.6


36.0
47.8
44.5
35.7


57.5
50.1
39.3
13.8
30.8


8.8
5.8
3.9
3.1L

1.5
5.0
6.8
14.


h4.
6.5
7.0
5.1


11.0
5.9
4.8
1.4l
3.8


7.1t
9.3
11.2
11.2
ll.l


12.2
7.7
7.8
6.14

6.3
8.8
11.3
6.0


6.7
12.0
10.8
7.6


13.5
10.1
8.2
3.3
5.1


18.5 27.8 3.2 5.6
33.14 49.5 6.0 10.5
13.1 57.6 10.0 12.9


32.6 15.2 6.0 11.5
31.4 66.2 7.4 10.8
24.6 35.8 4.1 6.4


23.2
31.9
29.7
47.9


39.7
31.8
26.3
18.3

26.7
31.3
33.1
16.8


26.8
32.1
30.3
21.1


18.1
36.9
26.7
7.3
20.9


19.3
34.2
44.0


33.14
32.3
25.3


31.7
48.6
50.1
61.8


53.6
45.5.
40.4
28.9

36.8
48.0
16.9
30.8


37.8
419.5
16.0
37.2


59.6
52.1
41.1
15.1
32.14


29.5
51.2
59.6


16.9
17.9
37.6


1/ Includes purchases of a small amount of frozen concentrated grapefruit and orange-grapefruit blended juices, in
iddLtion to other miscellaneous frozen concentrated juices.
2/ Family characteristics data not available for October 1949-March 1950.
/ Too few purchases reported for analysis.
V/ Classifications in this section are not mutually exclusive, therefore some families are included in two or more
groups.


Sources National Consumer Panel of Market Research Corporation of America


7.0
4.0
3.0
5.7
12.5


1.7 1.0


8.9
6.7
3.7
3.4

5.2
6.7
6.1
2.8


1.8
6.2
5.8
5.2


11.7
5.2
1.9
1.6
1.5


3.3
6.2
11.1


6.6
6.7
4.9






- 13-


Table 2.- Frozen concentrated juices, ade bases, and single strength adest Average number of purchases
per buying family, by family characteristics and place of residence,
October 19l9-March 1950 and October 1951-March 1952

Prozen concentrated juices Single "A baes 2
S/ abrength s -emonade I Orangeade,
Ieorange Grape Total Y orange oen I hel-pack shelf-pack
r-L1 T 7T97"'-1Tl T 5TS lW TT9~7tT 951- T- 95 5" 1 a 1951
-50 a -52 -50 t -52 1 -50 -5-2 -5-52 -52 -52 -52
umber----


United States 6.9 8.7 3.0 3.6 7.5 9.6 3.8 2.7 1.6 3.6

Geographic region
Northeast 8.3 11.1 3.0 3.9' 8.9 12.3 5.0 3.1 1.2 3.5
North Central 6.0 7.5 2.9 3.8 6.7 8.6 3.3 2.3 1.7 4.3
South 5.2 6.4 3/ 4.3 5.4 7.2 3.6 2.7 1.3 2.1
Mountain and Southwest 5.8 6.9 3T9 3.1 6.9 7.8 3.3 2.4 1.8 3.5
Pacific 4.8 6.5 1.7 1.4 5.1 6.8 2.6 2.7 2.2 2.6

Size of community
Farm 3.5 4.7 2.4 2.8 3.9 5.2 3.3 2.3 1.5 3.6
City (Population)
Under 10,000 5.1 6.6 3.1 3.2 5.7 7.6 3.5 2.2 1.8 3.6
10,000-99,999 6.5 7.2 2.7 3.9 7.1 8.1 2.9 2.9 1.4 3.8
100,000-199,999 8.1 8.8 2.9 3.2 8.9 9.5 3.2 3.5 1.6 h.2
500,000 and over 8.0 10.6 3.1 4.1 8.7 11.8 5.4 2.5 1.5 2.9

Family income
Upper 8.0 10.0 2.9 3.8 8.8 11.3 4.1 2.2 1.4 3.4
Upper middle 6.5 8.0 3.3 3.7 7.3 8.8 3.8 3.4 2.1 4.l
Lower middle 6.4 8.9 3.2 3.6 6.8 9.7 3.6 2.6 1.5 3.5
Lower 5.9 6.8 2.2 3.1 6.3 7.6 3.5 2.8 1.4 3.2

Size of family
1 and 2 members 5.5 6.4 2.1 2.7 5.9 7.1 1.8 2.3 2.0 3.6
3 members 7.4 8.8 2.4 2.0 7.8 9.6 3.3 2.8 1.1 2.2
4 and 5 members 7.3 10.3 3.2 4.5 8.1 11.6 1.6 2.9 1.14 .1
6 and over 8.2 8.5 4.6 5.7 9.0 9.5 5.4 3.1 2.0 4.3

Presence of children 4/
No children 5.9 6.9 2.1 2.5 6.3 7.6 2.4 2.1 1.9 3.1
Under 6 years 7.3 10.0 3.5 4.1 8.0 11.2 4.7 3.3 1.2 5.0
6-12 years 8.0 9.9 3.2 4.7 8.8 11.2 5.2 2.3 1.5 4.1
13-20 years 7.5 10.0 3.9 4.5 8.5 11.1 4.8 3.0 1.7 3.9

Occupation of family head
Executive, professional 8.5 9.7 3.3 3.8 9.6 11.1 3.5 2.6 1.2 3.2
Clerical, sales, service 6.3 9-. 2.3 3.5 6.8 9.9 3.6 2.1 1.5 2.9
Craftsman, laborer 6.1 8.8 3.1 4.0 6.9 9.8 4.1 2.8 1.9 l.2
Farmer 3.6 4.9 2.8 2.1 4.0 5.2 3.8 1.1 1.6 3.7
Unclassified 7.0 6.0 3.2 2.3 7.6 6.8 3.3 4.9 1.4 3.5

Education of family head
Grammar school 6.2 7.2 2.9 3.9 6.6 8.0 4.0 3.1 2.0 3.8
Some high school 6.4 8.9 2.8 3.6 7.0 9.9 3.7 3.0 1.3 3.3
Some college 8.3 10.3 3.2 3.2 9.3 11.14 2.7 2.1 1.2 3.6

Age of housewife
Under 35 years 6.8 9.3 2.6 2.6 7.4 10.2 l.7 2.4 1.1 h.4
35-11 years 7.7 10.1 3.8 4.8 8.6 11.5 4.0 2.8 1.3 3.7
45 years and over 6.4 7.4 2.3 3.1 6.7 8.2 3.2 2.8 1.8 3.4


/ Includes purchases of a small amount of frozen concentrated grapefruit and orange-grapefruit blended juices, in
addition to other miscellaneous frozen concentrated juices.
2/ Family characteristics data not available for October 1949-March 1950.
SToo few purchases reported for analysis.
1/ Classifications in this section are not mutually exclusive, therefore some families are included in two or more
groups.


Source National Consumer Panel of Market Research Corporation of America









Table 3.- Frozen concentrated juLces, ada bases, and single Itrength adesi Ave rge volume of purchase 1
par buying family, by family characteriatics and place of residence,
October 1 49-March L'.. anid October 195i-March 1@..'

S- r.'ian .'nentrateJ ,'it :.:s a irle Ad, ba,
S~~ a t / l strength a Lemonade i rarigta i,
-i'ran'e Graim Tota V/ .-
Item I 1 I0 .uW.i ,a I Fro-en | b l 1 !'-nack "iel -pJ._
'19- Ti2 .T1~T, 1- iT L). TI 9' r T. T -4T
a -., -52 a -50 -,__, -5 s -' -52 a -52 -
6-ounce cans 3,- -


United States 13.4 22.2 h.3 5.3 14.3 23.5 .2 5.3 2.6 .

Geographic region
Northeast 17.1 28.2 4.3 5.3 17.9 29.7 7.0 5.5 1.7 8.7
North Central 10.7 18.8 3.8 5.8 11.5 20.3 5.4 3.8 2.8 10.7
South 9.0 16.2 4/ 6.6 9.2 17.5 3.8 5.1 1.5 1.9
Mountain and Southwest 11.1 19.8 7.5 5.8 13.2 21.8 1.9 4.1 3.2 6.0
Pacific 8.7 17.5 2.1 2.1 9.2 17.5 2.9 6.6 4.5 5.8

Size of community
Farm 6.1 11.9 3.6 5.8 7.0 12.6 5.0 5.5 2.1 7.9
City (Population)
Under 10,000 9.8 16.4 4.9 4.9 10.7 18.1 t.4 4.1 3.4 9.2
10,000-99,999 11.3 17.9 3.4 4.9 12.2 19.0 b.2 6.8 1.7 6.6
100,000-499,999 17.1 22.6 4.1 5.1 17.9 23.9 3.2 6.4 2.3 11.7
500,000 and over 15.3 27.3 4.3 5.8 16.6 29.0 8.5 4.5 2.3 6.6

Family income
TJpp1r 17.1 28-. 4.3 6.0 18.1 30.9 6.3 4.5 2.6 9.6
Upper middle 12.8 19.8 4.9 4.9 13.9 20.9 5.5 6.4 3.8 10.9
Lower middle 11.7 21.3 4.1 5.1 12.2 22.2 L. 5.3 2.3 7.0
Lower 9.4 14.5 3.2 4.5 9.8 15.8 4.0 4.7 1.9 6.2

Size of family
1 and 2 members 9.4 13.4 3.4 4.3 10.0 14.7 2.0 3.4 3.4 7.0
3 members 12.6 21.1 3.0 2.8 13.0 22.2 3.9 5.3 1.1 4.3
Sand 5 members 16.0 29.0 1.9 6.4 17.1 30.7 6.0 6.4 2.3 10.9
6 and over 16.9 23.9 5.5 10.2 17.3 25.6 10.9 7.0 3.6 11.7

Presence of children 5/
No children 10.5 14.9 3.4 3.8 11.1 16.0 2.9 3.8 3.2 6.2
Under 6 years 15.4 28.2 5.5 6.0 16.4 29.7 7.8 7.0 1.7 12.6
6-12 years 17.3 27.9 4.7 7.3 18.1 29.9 8.0 4.7 2.3 10.9
13-20 years 1.1 28.4 5.3 6.6 15.3 30.1 7.4 6.0 2.6 9.0

Occupation of family head
Executive, professional 17.5 26.7 4.7 5.8 19.0 28.8 4.2 5.3 1.7 11.7
Clerical, sales, service 11.7 22.2 2.8 5.3 12.2 23.3 4.4 3.8 2.3 5.3
Craftsman, laborer 12.6 22.4 4.5 5.5 13.2 23.7 5.9 5.3 3.2 9.0
Farmer 6.2 13.0 4.1 4.5 6.8 13.4 5.9 3.0 2.3 8.5
Unclassified 12.6 13.9 4.7 3.4 13.4 14.7 4.1 7.5 2.6 6.6

Education of family head
Grammar school 11.1 17.1 4.1 5.5 11.5 17.9 5.9 5.3 3.6 8.1
Some high school 12.8 23.0 a.I 5.3 13.4 24.5 1.7 6.2 1.9 6.8
Some college 17.1 27.7 4.7 5.1 18.3 29.4 2.9 4.1 1.5 13.2

Age of housewife
Under 35 years 13.4 25.0 3.6 4.5 14.3 26.5 6.5 5.5 1.7 9.2
35-44 years 15.4 27.5 5.5 6.8 16.6 29.2 5.5 5.5 2.1 10.2
45 years and over 11.9 17.3 3.2 4.5 12.4 18.6 4.4 4.9 3.0 7.5


/ Includes purchases of a small amount of frozen concentrated grapefruit and orange-grapefruit blended jiicas, in
addition to other miscellaneous frozen concentrated juices.
2/ Family characteristics data not available for October 1949-March 1950.
/ Number of 6-ounce cans except for single strength orangeade, 46-ounce cans.
5/ Too few purchases reported for analysis.
5/ Classification in this section are not mutually exclusive, therefore some families are included in two or more
groups.
Sources National Consumer Panel of Market Research Corporation of America






- 15 -


Table 4.- Frozen concentrated juices, ade bases, and single strength ades: Average price paid by
household consumers, by family characteristics and place of residence,
October 1949-March 1950 and Octcber 1951-March 1952

S- Frozen concentrated juices Sinrle 3 Ade bases 7
: r Gre strength Lemonade i Orangeade,
Item : Ornge Orpe orangeade /T Frozen : S.hlf-packT etelf--ack
t" 19-9:- 19-5 i 4 ll : T1 T 95-T-: tTOr 1951 -i5
S-50 -52 -5 52 -52 -5 -52 -5 -52
Cents per 6-ounce can 2/- -


United States 25.8 18.1 24.8 22.8 28.3 15.0 14.4 15.9

Geographic region
Northeast .25.5 18.0 23.7 22.5 28.4 16.5 13.7 15.7
North Central 26.2 18.1 25.2 22.4 28.5 16.2 14.9 15.8
South 27.2 18.6 3/ 24.3 27.9 18.2 14.1 15.4
Mountain and Southwest 26.9 19.2 27.8 24.8 28.0 15.5 15.0 16.3
Pacific 26.0 17.6 23.2 20.4 29.0 12.4 13.8 16.5

Size of community
Farm 26.6 18.4 24.5 23.1 28.1 15.7 16.8 16.3
City (Population)
Under 10,000 27.0 19.6 26.4 24.4 28.5 16.5 14.1 16.3
10,000-99,999 26.6 18.0 24.9 23.2 28.5 15.2 14.0 15.2
100,000-499,999 26.2 18.0 24.8 22.2 29.2 14.2 14.7 15.3
500,000 and over 25.2 17.8 23.9 22.2 27.9 15.0 14.1 15.6

Family income
Upper 26.0 18.3 24.8 22.4 28.5 15.3 14.8 16.1
Upper middle 25.8 18.2 24.7 22.9 28.0 14.2 13.8 15.5
Lower middle 25.5 18.0 25.1 23.6 28.3 16.6 14.5 16.1
Lower 25.9 17.7 25.0 23.0 28.4 14.3 14.9 15.9

Size of family
1 and 2 members 26.6 18.5 25.1 23.1 27.9 16.8 14.1 16.1
3 members 25.8 18.3 23.8 22.7 28.9 15.5 14.4 16.2
4 and 5 members 25.5 17.8 25.0 23.1 28.2 13.7 14.3 15.8
6 and over 26.4 18.5 24.9 21.6 28.3 17.9 15.9 15.5

Presence of children 2/
No children 26.3 18.4 24.7 22.9 28.2 16.3 14.3 16.0
Under 6 years 25.8 17.8 25.6 22.7 28.3 13.9 14.9 15.6
6-12 years 25.7 17.6 25.4 22.9 28.2 15.2 14.5 15.8
13-20 years 25.7 18.6 24.4 22.8 28.3 14.7 14.6 15.9

Occupation of family head
Executive, professional 25.9 17.9 24.6 22.7 28.9 14.9 13.8 15.4
Clerical, sales, service, 25.8 18.4 24.6 22.9 27.9 15.6 13.8 15.8
Craftsman, laborer 25.6 18.1 25.0 23.0 28.5 15.3 l1.l 16.1
Farmer 26.0 18.8 24.7 22.6 27.7 17.7 16.8 16.1
Unclassified 26.3 17.8 26.0 22.6 28.0 13.4 15.6 16.0

Education of family head
Grammar school 25.7 18.6 24.8 22.7 28.4 15.0 14.6 16.4
Some high school 25.8 18.0 24.2 23.1 28.1 15.3 14.3 15.5
Some college 25.9 17.8 25.5 22.6 28.1 14.2 13.8 15.4

Age of housewife
Under 35 years 25.5 17.4 24.3 22.6 28.1 14.1 14.1 15.3
35-44 years 25.8 18.1 25.3 23.1 28.6 15.3 14.8 15.7
45 years and over 26.0 18.6 24.3 22.7 28.2 15.1 14.3 16.0



1/ Family characteristics data not available for October 1949-!?50.
'/ Price per 6-ounce can except for single strength oranged-e, per 46-ounce can.
/ Too few purchases reported for analysis.
/ Classification in this section are not mutually exclusive, therefore some families are included in two or -.re
FrOUDS.
Source National Consumer Panel of Market Research Corporation of America,






- 16 -


Table 5.- Frozen concentrated juices, ade bases, and single strength adesa Volume of purchases
per 1,000 famllaes, by farnly characteristics and place of residence,
October 19l9-March 19'S and October I0'1-March 1952

S Frozen conc ntrated Juic s Slngle Adp bas.. ~7
range G rape Total 1/ strength
It-e -5 lorangead2/lrro je-r--n k shelf-pa
i-00 773,9r-0l;95 770 TTq-5"1-j-51 T-rs.5" -I -r.!-l
o -50, -52-1 -. -2 -50 -52 s -52 s -52 -52
Gallons Cases 3/ Gallons -

United States 177.2 419.1 10.8 21.2 193.1 163.1 35.3 1h.2 2.0 27.6

Geographic region
Northeast 364.5 752.4 16.2 29.8 389.8 824.3 42.8 18.2 1.1 23.4
North Central 137.2 346.7 11.6 24.0 154.0 393.3 33.6 7.2 3.1 49.5
South 52.1 170.2 L/ 12.7 51.7 188.6 33.6 7.2 .8 13.3
Mountain and Southwest 77.1 321.8 1i.5 23.8 99.4 362.1 52.5 10.8 2.0 19.3
Pacific 100.9 321.4 4.1 6.7 106.9 338.7 15.2 38.8 3.6 8.6

Size of community
Farm 24.6 73.3 2.3 7.5 27.5 83.2 29.7 4.4 1.0 25.9
City (Population)
Under 10,000 103.2 237.2 10.0 17.0 116.5 269.4 38.5 6.3 3.8 38.7
10,000-99,999 164.0 387.2 10.2 21.1 181.2 132.5 37.1 17.0 2.2 18.6
100,000-499,999 227.5 504.6 14.0 26.9 247.8 561.1 22.1 22.2 1.1 39.6
500,000 and over 349.8 765.1 16.8 30.8 375.5 840.5 45.9 20.2 1.5 16.1

Family income
Upper 309.9 691.2 17.8 34.2 336.6 777.2 41.5 18.7 1.8 34.2
Upper middle 186.8 409.2 13.1 17.7 206.3 145.9 40.7 20.1 2.7 36.2
Lower middle 138.4 387.0 7.2 18.7 148.6 420.2 32.8 9.2 2.0 22.8
Lower 77.3 188.4 5.1 13.4 84.7 213.9 29.7 7.5 1.7 17.4

Size of family
1 and 2 members 113.1 219.2 7.1 12.6 124.4 253.9 9.7 8.3 2.1 20.1
3 members 180.2 161.3 6.9 11.1 191.1 499.2 28.1 16.8 .6 12.4
4 and 5 members 213.3 613.4 15.9 33.9 266.5 675.4 53.8 19.2 2.6 43.9
6 and over 121.8 331.5 11.6 28.8 135.9 369.6 76.6 9.2 1.9 29.7

Presence of children 5/
No children 127.3 252.0 6.9 12.1 138.7 283.5 15.8 8.6 2.1 18.8
Under 6 years 225.3 631.0 16.8 33.6 249.4 688.0 59.8 20.5 1.1 31.3
6-12 years 237.2 583.0 15.3 36.7 258.9 614.0 68.0 12.8 2.1 39.3
13-20 years 156.3 474.8 12.7 23.6 173.3 521.5 60.0 14.6 1.8 31.9

Occupation of family head
Executive, professional 386.7 718.8 24.8 36.14 27.5 804.6 23.1 29.2 1.8 43.4
Clerical, sales, service 198.3 521.0 7.9 25.2 210.8 567.9 33.8 9.1 1.6 15.8
Craftsman, laborer 151.7 412.6 10.3 21.3 164.8 456.2 48.5 12.2 2.6 29.8
Farmer 20.4 87.8 2.6 6.9 23.3 95.1 32.8 2.2 1.3 27.2
Unclassified 119.0 200.2 8.2 8.6 132.0 223.6 26.0 15.8 1.9 18.9

Education of family head
Grammar school 95.8 222.1 6.0 14.6 103.5 247.8 14.7 8.2 2.7 23.9
Some high school 199.3 534.6 11.1 26.2 215.9 588.8 35.0 18.0 1.3 24.3
Some college 344.0 718.8 22.1 31.0 379.2 822.5 13.3 21.7 1.7 44.0

Age of housewife
Under 35 years 205.8 528.8 10.4 24.2 224.6 581.6 53.1 17.2 1.3 24.5
35-44 years 226.5 596.0 19.2 34.6 252.2 656.2 42.5 17.4 1.6 34.1
15 years and over 137.6 290.0 6.0 13.4 116.7 327.1 27.7 11.3 2.1 25.2


1/ Includes purchases of a small amount of frozen concentrated grapefruit and orange-grapefruit blended juices, in
addition to other miscellaneous frozen concentrated juices.
2/ Family characteristics data not available for October 1949-March 1950.
3/ Equivalent cases 24 No. 2 cans--432 ounces per case.
SToo few purchases reported for analysis.
3/ Classifications in this section are not mutually exclusive, therefore some families are included in two or more
groups.
Source: National Consumer Panel of Market Research Corporation of America










Table 6.- Canned juices: Percentage of all families buying, by family characteristics and pLace of residence, October
1949-March 1950 and October 1951-March 1952



: J=-nge- = : :
: Orange Grapefruit : grapefruit Tangerine Lemon : Apple
Item blend_
tem 199-5 951-52 9-5o: 95-52 9-5o 19-52
: : : : 1
: 19149-50: 1951-52: 1949-50: 1951-52: 1969-50: 1951-52: 19149-50: 1951-52: 1949-50: 195-52: 1949-50: 1951-52


- Percent -


United States


Geographic region
Northeast
North Central
South
Mountain and Southwest
Pacific


Size of community
Farm
City (Population)
Under 10,000
10,000-99,999
100,000-499,999
500,000 and over


Family income
Upper
Upper middle
Lower middle
Lower


Size of family
1 and 2 members
3 members
4 and 5 members
6 and over


Presence of children 1
No children
Under 6 years
6-12 years
13-20 years


42.5 42.7 30.2 29.7 21.8 20.4 5.8



11.7 37.5 30.8 28.3 29.3 22.6 9.2
42.6 43.2 27.1 27.5 22.9 24.1 6.8
14.8 49.8 27.5 29.2 11.8 11.7 2.3
43.6 45.3 33.1 36.2 15.0 16.4 3.j
38.9 39.0 41.8 35.5 23.6 23.5 2.3



36.3 45.9 21.4 24.2 11.5 13.3 2.5

46.5 48.5 30.9 31.8 21.6 20.2 4.8
43.5 42.4 31.2 27.3 22.8 22.7 4.6
46.4 43.8 33.8 32.7 23.4 21.3 7.4
41.3 35.2 34.1 31.1 28.3 23.5 9.4



44.6 43.1 34.4 31.8 25.5 19.0 6.2
43.3 41.9 30.3 29.5 23.7 23.1 7.0
4.7 43.5 27.1 29.3 20.6 20.6 4.7
40.6 42.4 29.0 28.3 17.5 18.9 5.5



37.7 39.2 33.9 33.0 21.0 21.4 5.0
40.9 39.9 28.0 29.4 22.0 19.6 6.0
15.5 45.6 30.6 27.4. 24.4 20.3 6.6
48.4 50.4 24.0 27.9 15.0 18.8 5.1



o0.1 40.2 34.3 33.2 22.2 20.6 5.3
42.6 44.2 23.0 24.3 18.5 19.7 5.6
45.7 45.0 27.3 24.3 19.8 20.9 6.6
46.1 46.8 29.0 31.3 23.5 19.5 6.5


Occupation of family head
Executive, professional *.1 39.7 36.1 33.0 28.8 22.4 7.7
Clerical, sales, service 41.0 40.7 35.8 33.0 24.7 24.2 7.0
Craftsman, laborer 43.14 43.4 28.0 27.9 21.6 20.6 6.0
Farmer 35.1 48.7 18.2 23.1 11.8 13.2 2.8
Unclassified 13.4 42.3 35.3 31.9 20.0 18.1 14.4


Education of family head
Crammar school
Same high school
Somane college


Age of housewife
Under 35 years
35-44 years
45 years and over


39.7 13.6 28.2 29.2 19.5 18.0 4.6
L5.1 1.8 29.9 28.3 22.0 21.9 6.3
45.1 42.2 35.7 34.2 27.2 23.9 8.2



41.8 46.0 La.4 24.7 16.7 20.3 6.4
42.0 43.1 29.9 26.0 23.4 Z).7 6.1
43.1 41.5 33.8 33.2 22.8 20.2 5.5


7.7 8.3 8.6 11.7 10.7


9.7
8.2
4.8
10.14
4.1


.a.1 9.7
9.4 11.1
3.8 4.5
5.8 4.7
8.1 9.3


15.8 13.4
9.2 7.6
5.9 6.1
10.0 13.2
22.2 19.5


5.6 4.2 6.0 3.7 3.8

6.4 6.9 6.5 6.6 5.9
10.6 9.9 10.4 11.1 9.0
8.4 6.9 6.5 1U.6 12.9
8.5 12.2 12.4 22.0 18.9


9.1 9.9
9.4 8.9
7.6 7.3
7.0 8.2



8.2 9.9
7.3 7.6
8.7 8.6
9.0 6.6



8.2 9.3
6.4 8.4
8.7 8.6
9.4 7.0



10.5 9.6
9.8 10.3
8.3 8.3
4.0 5.6
7.5 8.2


6.4 7.1 7.5
8.0 8.7 9.3
11.1 10.5 10.1


15.0 14.1
13.1 1o.4
10.3 io.6
8.6 7.7



9.9 9.8
11.0 11.2
14.8 12.0
8.3 8.3



O.0. 9.7
33.6 11.7
13.1 12.0
11.2 8.9



20.8 16.1
11.2 Il.3
9.9 9.6
3.3 3.8
11.6 7.7



7.8 7.4
12.3 11.5
20.8 18.5


7.0 7.7 12.2 13.6
8.9 8.9 13.2 12.7
8.4 8.7 10.7 8.8


Continued


Source: National Consumer Panel of Market Research Corporation of America.










Table 6.-Cannd etJuices rtsartela of &ll fielia buying, by iy Ii..tr '
1919S-arh iO5 a*nrt Oc tober 9 r 'l ii



t-- -- -- -- -


I .i. 1':. Pru> i Tomo : aim As*I
Itm ---- --
i +.949-S0I i93-5, I94L9-SOI iySi-Si, l+91+9->0i i9S1i-i>: +i rY-" i: l'iYl)- !: i+9l-50l; :9 ii-S'Z5 j.vlt*9i-, i9U->?
r .;. OJi ..__ r


United Sttaes


Geographic region
Northeast
Ncrth Central
South
Mountain and Southeest
Pacific


Sise of community

City (Population)
Under 10,000
10,000-99,999
100,000-499,999
500,000 and over


Family inoum
Upper
'pper middle
Lower middle
Lower


Size of faly
1 and 2 members
3 members
I and 5 member*
6 and over


Presence of children /
No children
Under 6 years
6-12 years
13-20 years


16.0 16.1 38.6 44.2 16.3 O1. 1 l3.6



16.3 16.0 51.8 55.6 26.1 24.? 53.4
12.6 12.6 30.2 39.9 12.7 12.9 34.9
15.0 14..7 27.5 29.7 9.9 ,0.8 32.0
21.1 23.3 38.9 43.1 11.7 15.4 51.9
23.3 23.0 49.6 56.1 16.7 16.0 58.5


10.5 8.0 21.6 26.9


13.L 11.3 11.2 U. b 8t.5



50o, 12.8 13.8 8.9 90.2
38.9 11.3 10.4 78.7 82.1
30.3 6.6 5.9 71.0 77.4
47.8 9.4 10.7 83.6 85.8
55.5 19.0 17.4 89.3 89.2


7.2 7.3 21.2 21.1 3.3 4.1 62.9 68.7


14.2 13.7 32.7 35.8 11.8 -1.7 38.2
15.5 16.2 40.3 43.5 17.7 15.7 49.0
24.2 18.6 43.1 48.3 15.1 16.8 49.2
19.2 22.1 54.5 60.9 27.3 25.7 60.6



19..8 19.8 14.1 49.2 19.1 18.8 51.1
16.5 16.5 39.9 46.7 18.1 16.7 48.1
11.1 16.6 38.5 44.2 15.3 16.7 38.2
13.7 11.5 32.2 37.0 13.1 12.3 37.2



14.9 12.9 35.8 41.4 14.7 15.4 39.8
15.8 16.8 40.14 45.3 18.3 17.5 43.6
17.7 18.8 11.8 48.2 17.4 17.5 47.9
13.8 16.0 32.3 37.9 13.1 11.4 39.6



15.3 13.2 38.0 41.8 16.5 15.4 40.6
16.4 a.o 38.4 45.8 17.7 18.7 45.9
16.7 19.6 38.0 47.5 16.4 16.5 45.8
15.3 15.6 37.2 43.2 1.8 13.6 42.5


Occupation of family head
Executive, professional 18.8 21.0 46.0 51.7 17.1 19.9 59.5
Clerical, sales, service 18.2 19.6 45.1 49.6 21.7 21.0 52.4
Craftsman, laborer 16.2 16.8 39.8 14.4 17.5 15.9 13.7
Farmer 9.5 8.2 20.3 29.4 6.2 6.1 19.6
Unclassified 15.6 10.1 36.3 39.9 14.1 14.1 33.8


Education of family head
Grammar school
Son high school
Some college


Age of housewife
Under 35 years
35-14 years
15 years and over


15.1 12.9 32.8 37.2 13.8 3.4 35.0
16.1 18.4 43.4 50.4 19.3 18.4 49.4
18.2 20.5 44.8 51.6 17.5 19.6 54.9



16.7 22.0 37.5 44.l 16.2 17.0 48,2
15.7 18.5 40.3 50.6 19.2 19.3 46.9
15.9 13.1 38.1 40.9 14.8 14.2 39.9


38.1 9.9 6.5 79.7 8u.5
15.1 12.5 .3.14 86.7 87.0
46.0 14.3 14.1 89.6 80.5
59.0 16.9 17.3 91.7 92.6



50.9 U1.5 15.1 87.7 89.5
46.0 12.0 11.0 84.2 86.5
10.3 8.7 11.3 79.0 83.5
35.2 10.0 7.1 75.6 78.7



40.3 11.6 11.4 79.7 85.3
43.8 13.2 12.6 83.2 83.8
145.5 11.4 .1 83.5 86.1
42.7 6.5 8.C 76.7 78.6



39.9 11.6 11.0 81.6 83.5
46.4 12.2 10.7 80.2 84.7
44.7 10.5 10.0 81.3 84.4
44.h 8.65 1.1 79.3 83.7



55.9 17.8 17.1 90.6 92.5
52.5 14.3 16.4 89.5 91.6
42.1 10.3 8.9 82.9 83.1
21.4 3.0 4.2 59.4 68.9
35.2 10.9 8.5 78.4 82.2



35.4 8.2 7.3 74.5 78.9
47.9 12.3 13.5 86.7 88.7
55.3 17.3 17.8 90.3 92.2



51.3 10.3 11.9 80.5 85.9
43.1 10.9 .1.5 82.1 86.2
10.5 12.0 10.9 81.7 83.2


1/ Classifications in this section are not mutually exclusive, therefore some families are included in two or more groups.


Sources National Consumer Panel of Market Research Corporation of America.


4ns1 |,u*c^ 4' r^ii Jhteiric" ,










Table 7.- Canned juices: Average number of p rcrKses r-r buying family, by family characteristics and pL-ce of residence,
October i yl9-Marcr, 1950 and October 0951-March 1952




O: range : Grapefruit : grape r'ilt : T, ; : Lemon : Apple
Item : : bl
: 9169-50: 1951-52: 1919-50 1951-52: 1949-50: 191-52 199-50: 951-52: 9149-50: 1951-52: a199-50: 195S-52

Number -


4.4 4.3 3.5 3.6 2.9 2.9 2.1 2.1 2.1


2.4 3.6 3.5


Geographic region
Northeast
North Central
South
Mountain and Southwest
Pacific



Size of community
Farm
City (Population)
Under 10,000
10,000-99,999
100,000-499,999
500,000 and over



Family income
Upper
Upper middle
Lower middle
Lower


Size of family
1 and 2 members
3 members
4 and 5 members
6 and over


Presence of children i/
No children
Under 6 years
6-12 years
13-20 years


Occupation of family head
Executive, professional 1.5
Clerical, sales, service b.6
Craftsman, laborer 4.5
Farmer 3.6
Unclassified 3.9


Education of family head
Grammar school
Some high school
Some college



Age of housewife
Under 35 years
35-44 years
45 years and over


4.7 4.O
4.2 2.9
4.4 3.2
4.2 3.4
3.7 3.8


2.5 2.4
1.9 2.6
1.6 2.0
1.5 2.1
2.9 2.9


3.5 4.1 2.7 3.2 2.2 3.2 1.4 2.0 1.8 2.3 2.0 2.1


2.8 1.5
3.4 2.3
2.8 2.1
2.6 2.3


4.4 3.2
1.6 3.1
4.5 3.1
1.2 4.1



4.1 3.4
1.5 3.1
4.5 3.6
4.2 3.5




3.9 3.8
4.1 3.4
4.6 3.3
4.9 3.0



4.0 3.7
4.7 2.8
4.6 3.0
4.4 3.5



4.4 3.5
4.2 3.8
4.6 3.4
4.1 2.5
3.9 3.6



4.1 3.3
4.8 3.4
4.1 3.9



4.6 2.9
4.1 3.2
4.3 3.8


2.0 2.2
1.8 3.3
2.0 1.9
2.3 2.5



..8 2.6
2.1 2.1
1.4 2.0
2.6 2.8




2.1 2.7
1.8 2.4
2.1 2.5
2.3 1.8



2.2 2.9
2.0 2.2
1.9 2.2
2.0 2.0



2.1 2.1
1.9 2.6
1.7 2.6
2.0 1.8
3.1 2.8


2.1 2.7 2.9
2.3 3.3 3.8
2.1 2.9 2.4
2.8 4.4 4.3




2.3 4.2 3.5
2.2 3.3 4.o
2.1 3.5 3.5
3.2 3.3 3.0


3.1 1.7 1.8 2.5
2.8 2.2 2.1 2.7
2.6 2.4 2.5 2.0


1.9 1.7
2.4 2.3
1.9 2.8


Continued


Source: National Consumer Panel of Market Research Corporation of America.


United States










Table 7.-Cannd juioess Average number of purchases per buying family, by family characteristic and place of residen-e,
October 1919-March 10.0 and October 1951-March 19S2 Continued



S3 I I Vegeabe ALl
S G(rape i PineappLe I Prune i Tomato o tbi nation canned
Item J juil es
S 3 9- 3 9- A 5-5 19S
1949-50, 1951-521 1969-50s .1',9-:2, 1L99-50s L', -5>. L969-501 1951-52, 17h9-50: 1951-52: 1969-50s 1951-52


I I I 1 I I : I I 3 1
Number -


2.1 2.5 3.7 3.9 4.7 4.5 5.0 4.7 2.8 3.0 12.3 11.8


Geographic region
Northasat 2.5
North Central 2.5
South 2.1
Mountain and Southwest 2.3
Pacific 2.3


Sine of commity
Farm 1.8
City (Population)
Under 10,000 2.0
10,000- 99,999 2.8
100,000-499,999 2.A
500,000 and over 2.7


Faily incam
Upper 2.3
Upper middle 2.3
Loaer middle 2.h
Lower 2.1


Sise of family
1 and 2 members
3 embers
4 and 5 members
6 and over


Presence of children d/
No children
Under 6 year
6-12 year
13-20 years


16.5 14.9
10.0 10.0
9.2 9.2
10.5 11.9
13.2 13.2


2.1 2.1 2.7 3.1 3.7 4.1 I.1 1.8 2.7 6.8 8.3


3.0 2.7 4.2
3.2 3.5 4.1
3.6 3.9 4.7
1.7 5.0 5.3


3.9 4.8
3.9 4.6
3.8 5.1
3.9 4.2


4.2 -.1 2.14
5.2 1.9 3.2
5.5 1.6 2.3
5.6 5.1 3.0


4.7 3.3
1.7 2.9
4.9 2.2
4.5 2.3


3.4 4.2 1.5
3.5 5.1 1.5
1.5 .8 4.9
4.1 4.5 2.6


1.6 4.8 1.8
1.5 4.4 5.1
4.6 4.1 5.2
5.1 4.2 5.4


Occupation of family bead
aecutive, professional 2.0
Clerical, sales, service 2.4
Craftsman, laborer 2.5
Farer 1.7
Unclassified 3.2


Education of family head
Gramar school
Som high school
Seme college


Age of housewfe
Under 35 years
35-44 years
45 years and over


2.4 2.5 3.7 3.5
2.3 2.5 3.5 4.1
2.3 2.5 4.0 4.2



2.4 2.4 3.8 4.1
2.2 2.4 4.1 4.4
2.4 2.6 3.5 3.5


5.1 4.2 5.0 4.6 2.6
4.4 4.7 4.8 4.7 2.8
4.3 4.8 5.4 4.9 2.9



3.9 4.5 4.7 4.4 2.4
4.6 4.4 5.1 4.8 3.0
5.1 4.6 5.1 4.7 2.7


10.0 9.5
12.1 12.0
12.2 11.9
17.2 15.3



14.0 12.2
12.6 12.6
11.9 11.9
10.6 10.5



10.6 10.8
11.8 11.6
11. 2 13.1
11.2 11.6



11. 11.1
12.9 12.2
12.9 12.5
12.6 12.3



14.6 13.2
13.3 12.9
12.6 12.1
6.5 8.2
11.1 10.3


2.8 11.4 10.6
2.9 12.3 12.6
3.2 14.3 13.4



2.7 11.5 12.2
3.1 13.2 12.1
3.0 12.1 11.4


/ Classifications in this section are not mutually exclusive, therefore some families are included in two or more groups.



Sources National Consuaer Panel of Market Research Corporation of America.


S- I tI


United States










Table 8.- Canned Juices: Average volume of purchases per buying family, by family chAracteristics and place of
residence, October 9g9-March 1950 and October 1951-March 1952 -




: Orange : Grapefruit grapefruit : Tangerine Lemon Apple
Item : : : blend

: 1949-5o0 1951-5?: 1949-So: 1951-52: 1949-5o: 1951-52: 1949-50: 1951-52: 1949-50: 1951-52: L9yi-~0: 1951-52

Cans -


5.8 6.1 4.1 5.0 3.3 3.7


1.8 2.3 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.7


Geographic region
Northeast
North Central
South
Mountain and Southwest
Pacific



Size of community
Farm
City (Population)
Under 10,000
10,000-99,999
100,000-499,999
500,000 and over


3.8 3.8
3.1 3.9
2.6 3.8
2.6 2.9
3.4 2.8


4.9 5.8 3.5 4.1 2.7 4.7 1.4 3.1 5.5 5.5 3.0 7.6


6.2 6.5
5.3 6.3
5.4 6.3
6.3 5.6


Family income
Upper
Upper middle
Lower middle
Lower



Size of family
1 and 2 members
3 members
4 and 5 members
6 and over


Presence of children /
No children
Under 6 years
6-12 years
13-20 years


4.9 5.4
5.7 6.7
6.9 6.7
6.3 6.6


3.0 3.8
3.9 4.0
3.6 4.4
3.4 2.8



3.5 3.2
3.2 3.8
3.6 4.3
2.9 3.3



2.8 3.1
3.2 3.8
3.8 4.2
3.5 3.7


Occupation of family head
Executive, professional 7.1l
Clerical, sales, service 6.2
Craftsman, laborer 5.5
Farmer 5.4
Unclassified 3.8


Education of family head
Grammar school
Some high school
Some college



Age of housewife
Under 35 years
35-i,4 years
L5 years and over


5.2 5.6
6.2 6.7
6.4 6.3




5.4 6.1
6.5 5.7
5.5 6.3


5.1 3.1 4.1
5.2 3.3 3.5
4.3 3.7 3.3



3.8 3.3 2.8
4.5 3.4 3.3
5.4 3.3 4.1


5.7 5.3
5.9 5.8
5.3 5.8


Continued


Source i National Consumer Panel of Market Research Corporation of America.


United States


5.9
b.b
3.9
2.2
5.9


1.8 2.0
1.7 1.8
2.0 2.7
1.8 2.1


5.1 6.3
3.9 h.5
3.9 3.6
6.9 6.2


5.4 3.3 3.6
4.1 3.0 3.6
3.8 3.3 3.9
4.6 3.2 4.1


3.8 3.5
3.3 3.2
3.3 3.8
2.6 3.3
2.8 5.0










Table 8.- Canned juices Average vLuw of pur~:I laes er buiint famiy, by fa"iLy ccaracterlA tic and place of
residence, October L).-Marcn 1950 nd October I951-March 1952 Continued



S1 3 I I Va;etaa.e
S Grape a Pineapple Prune Toato combination
Ita 1 3 3
91 9-O 1 951-52 19419-50 195-52 ; 19919-50 1 1151-52 y4-t j 1951-52 z94I9-5o 0S1-5


a a a a


Cans / -


2.2 2.1 3.6 4h. 5.4 4.9 5.1 5.1 2.5 2.5


Omographic region
ar theast
North Central
South
Mountain and Sout.best
Pacific



Sie of community
Farm
City (Population)
Under 10,000
10,000-99,999
100,000-199,999
500,000 and over


1.8 2.8 2.4 3.8 3.8 4.2 4.9 5.1 2.3 3.2

1.8 1.8 2.9 2.9 5.0 5.1b .7 4.3 2.0 2.6
2.6 2.2 2.9 3.9 5.1 4.O 5.6 4.9 2.7 2.7
2.6 3.2 3.7 b.9 5.9 h.7 6.7 5.5 2.2 2.6
2.4 2.3 4.5 5.1 5.9 5.0 5.7 5.3 2.9 2.3


Family income
Upper
Upper middle
1.ower middle
Lower



Sile of family
I and 2 members
3 members
4 and 5 members
6 and over


3.9 4.9
3.5 h4.
3.8 4.0
2.8 4.2


5.6 3.1
4.9 2.8
5.2 2.1
41.3 1.6


1.7 4.5
4.7 4.9
5.5 6.2
2.7 6.3


Presence of children 2/
No children
Under 6 years
6-12 years
13-20 years


Occupation of family head
Executive, professional
Clerical, sales, service
Craftsman, laborer
Farmer
Unclassified


Education of family head
Grammar school
Some high school
Scme college


3.8 5.1
1.9 5.1
5.3 5.1
5.3 5.8


Age of housewife
Under 35 years
35- years
45 years and over


14.6 hl.5
4.8 5.1
L.1 5.9


I/ The figures for average volume are equivalent number of 4t6-ounce cane, except lemon juice, figures are Lquivalent a5-ounce cans,
and apple, grape, and prune juice figures are equivalent 32-ounce bottles.
/ Classifications in this section are not mutually exclusive, therefore some families are inclueo in two or more groups.


Sources National Consumer Panel of Market Research Corporation of America.


United States


4.6 2.2
5.0 3.0
5.3 2.4










Table 9.- Canned juices: Average prices paid by household considers, by family characteristics and place of
residence, October 1949-March 1950 and October 1951-March 1952



S Oranga- I
: Orange I Grapefruit I grapefruit : Tangerine union : Apple
Iten: 1 : 1 Bld :: : :
1949-50: 1951-52: 1949-SO: L95L-528 19h9-50: 19$L-52: 1949-50: 1951-52: 1949-50: 1951-52: 1i99-501 L.,SL-52


United States


Geographic region
Northeast
North Central
South
Mountain and Southwest
Pacific


Size of community
Farm
City (Population)
Under 10,000
10,000-99,999
100,000-499,999
500,000 and over


Family income
Upper
Upper middle
Lower middle
Lower


Size of family
1 and 2 members
3 members
4 and 5 members
6 and over


Presence of children 2/
No children
Under 6 years
6-12 years
13-20 years


35.4 26.1 33.2 23.1 37.5


36.1
34.5
35.1
36.3
36.8


33.7
33..5
31.5
32.6
33.7


22.9
22.9
21.6
23.0
25.2


36.6
38.3
36.5
39.7
38.4


24.8 32.8 22.8 12.8 .0.2



24.4 32.4 22.5 12.8 9.9
24.4 33.8 23.9 12.7 10.3
23.3 30.3 19.3 13.0 12.3
27.0 39.6 22.9 14.7 12.2
29.0 34.5 26.8 12.2 9.9


36.2 27.1 33.7 23.9 38.0 25.4 34.8 23.2 12.5 10.3

36.3 26.4 34.3 23.6 38.4 25.5 32.1 25.2 13.4 11.6
35.1 25.8 34.5 22.8 39.6 24.4 33.8 22.5 13.1 10.5
34.5 26.0 30.8 22.5 36.6 24.6 34.4 21.6 13.3 10.0
34.2 25.2 32.7 22.7 35.9 24.2 31.8 22.2 12.3 9.8



36.0 26.6 33.4 23.3 37.8 23.8 33.2 22.7 12.9 10.3
35.2 25.8 33.3 23.1 37.5 25.0 32.6 22.3 12.8 10.9
35.2 25.9 33.5 23.7 36.9 24.8 32.3 24.5 12.8 10.4
34.7 26.3 32.6 22.4 37.7 25.7 32.6 22.7 12.8 9.8



35.4 26.0 33.2 23.1 38.0 25.1 34.1 24.0 12.5 9.9
35.9 26.1 33.3 22.9 38.3 24.8 34.1 21.8 12.9 9.8
35.8 26.1 33.1 23.2 37.1 24.7 32.3 22.4 12.9 11.0
33.4 26.4 33.1 22.8 36.2 24.9 32.6 22.3 13.4 11.7



35.9 26.1 33.1 23.0 38.0 24.8 33.2 23.4 12.6 9.9
34.1 26.2 34.1 22.9 37.0 24.3 33.5 22.2 13.4 11.6
34.4 25.9 33.1 23.0 36.9 24.7 33.0 22.6 13.4 10.7
35.4 26.1 33.5 23.2 37.0 25.0 32.2 22.8 13.3 10.6


21.1 22.1


24.5 22.7

20.4 19.1
23.1 24.0
21.5 23.u
20.8 22.5



21.2 21.2
22.0 23.1
20.3 22.3
20.9 22.7



23.5 23.8
20.2 23.8
21.1 21.0
20. 24.4



22.2 23.7
21.1 2L.0
20.7 20.4
21.0 22.9


Occupation of family head
executive professional 34.4
Clerical, sales, service 35.2
Craftsman, laborer 35.6
Fanrmr 36.2
Unclassified 37.0


Education of family head
Gra~nar school
Some high school
Some college


yge of housewife
Under 35 years
35-44 years
45 years and over


33.2
33.2
33.8
33.4
31.4


24.5 34.1 22.0 13.1 11.0
24.7 31.7 21.6 13.2 9.8
25.3 32.6 23.4 12.7 10.7
25.0 34.9 23.2 13.1 10.6
24.3 32.9 24.3 12.4 9.7


36.4 26.0 33.6 23.1 37.7 25.1 32.9 23.1 13.0 10.2
34.3 26.1 33.1 22.7 37.0 24.6 32.6 23.3 12.5 10.1
35.7 26.5 32.7 23.7 37.7 24.7 33.2 22.0 13.0 10.9



34.2 27.0 35.0 23.3 37.1 25.. 33.7 22.3 13.0 10.1
35.3 25.7 33.2 23.2 36.7 24.8 33.1 22.0 13.2 Il.8
35.9 26.1 32.9 23.0 38.0 24.7 32.2 23.6 12.7 9.9


20.9
22.7
22.5
22.2
25.3


20.4 22.9
21.3 22.4
21.5 21.3



21.0 22.9
20.7 22.1
21.8 21.9


Continued


Source National Consumer Pnel of Market Research Corpration of America.


__ __: : ::


: I










Table 9.- Canned JuoiaC Averag prices poild by household consumer, by fmlly characterlatics and place of
residence, October I'lV-Mardr. 1950 ard October LY i-Mar., 1952 Contin'ed




rap Pi apple Prun Taotato
c hrap, e Pineapple P Pruw a Toaato cabtoatlon


ItI


1 t 1
a I I t I 1
19h9-50 Ip951-52 1 i9tP8-0 I 1951-52 1949-50 a .'l-2 : A949-50 1i'si-5; 1949-50 a 19.-S2


- I e n I a -
Canta par can I/ -


Onlted State


Geographic region
Northeast
North Central
South
Mountain and Southeast
Pacific


Saie of ommnity
ram
City (Population)
Under 10,000
10,000-99,999
100,000-499,999
500,000 and over


Family income
Upper
Upper middle
Lower middle
Lower


Sir of family
1 and 2 members
3 -bers
4 and 5 members
6 and over


Presence of children 2/
No children
Under 6 yards
6-12 years
13-20 years


Occupation of fahmly head
BeCiutive, professia nal
Clerical, salss, serrice
Craft.an, laborer
Farmer
Uncla ssif.ld


Edseation of family head
rammr school
Sam hih school
Some college


Age atof housewife
Under 35 years
35-41 years
15 years ad over


40.0 36.9 38.6 29.1



10.2 36.9 37.3 28.41
41.3 37.0 41.3 30.7
11.2 3q.7 40.6 31.9
Ul.4 35.9 40.8 30.3
36.2 36.0 36.1 25.5



42.2 38.0 40.3 30.8

42.6 36.5 40.9 30.6
38.0 35.5 39.9 30.6
39.6 36.6 38.8 28.8
39.1 37.0 37.0 28.0



39.7 36.0 38.2 33.5
41.1 37.5 38.8 29.3
10.1 37.5 38.8 26.9
39.0 37.2 38.9 30.1



10.0 37.6 39.2 29.8
10.1 37.1 38.6 29.1
10.3 37.0 38.7 28.8
39.1 35.0 37.7 29.0



W0.3 37.1 39.0 29.5
38.9 36.7 38.1 28.7
39.4 36.6 38.7 28.9
40.5 36.2 38.5 29.2



40.4 36.3 38.7 28.6
41.4 36.8 38.6 28.9
38.8 37.1 38.4 29.3
42.7 37.3 40.8 30.5
39.2 36.6 38.1 29.0



40.6 37.6 38.9 29.6
38.6 36.5 38.6 28.9
10.9 36.7 38.4 28.7



39.1 37.. 38.& 28.7
10.3 37.1 38.5 29.0
40.2 36.5 38.9 29.3


27.8 32.5



26.7 31.5
30.0 34.0
29.8 33.9
29.6 34.2
24.9 28.7



29.3 34.6

29.1 34.8
27.9 32.8
27.9 32.1
27.1 31.2



28.5 33.0
27.9 32.3
27.6 32.3
26.8 32.1



28.1 32.9
28.0 32.8
27.3 32.1
28.3 32.4



28.1 33.1
27.1 32.1
27.7 31.9
27.8 32.1



27.8 32.5
27.8 32.5
27.8 32.5
29.5 33.6
27.1 32.4



27.6 32.3
28.0 32.6
27.8 32.6



27.8 32.1
27.3 31.4
28.1 33.2


25.4 27.7 34.4 39.0



25.0 28.0 32.3 38.9
25.7 28.5 34.8 38R.4
26.5 38.8 37.1 39.1
26.1 28.0 38.0 40.3
21.2 25.1 36.1 39.7



25.6 27.9 35.0 39.2

26.2 28.8 36.5 39.0
25.7 28.5 36.7 39.1
24.9 27.6 36.0 39.1
2L.8 26.9 32.2 38.7



25.5 27.5 35.4 38.9
25.4 27.9 32.4 39.4
25.5 27.8 34.3 38.9
25.0 27.9 36.1 39.0



25.4 27.7 34.2 39.2
25.7 28.1 34.9 39.1
25.5 27.6 34.4 39.1
24.1 27.8 33.2 37.8



25.6 27.7 34.6 39.0
25.2 27.6 35.2 38.9
25.2 27.5 33.9 38.9
25.3 28.0 33.3 39.1



25.3 27.5 35.4 39.1
25.5 28.0 35.3 39.3
25.4 27.9 32.6 38.9
25.2 28.0 35.2 39.4
25.0 27.2 34.8 37.5



25.3 28.0 32.7 39.1
25.6 27.7 35.7 39.1
25.2 27.4 34.9 38.9



25.6 27.9 35.5 38.6
25.7 27.8 33.1 39.7
25.1 27.7 34.9 38.8


SPer 6-ounce ca, except lemons Juice, per 5-ouno~ can; apple, grpe, and prune juice, per 32-ounce bottle.
SClassifiations in this section are not utually exclusive, therefore sanm families are included in two or more groups.


Sources National Consumer Panl of Market Research Corporation of America.




1


-25-


Table 10.- Canned juices: Volume of purchases per i,000 families, by family characteristics and place of
residence, October 1949-March 1950 and October i951-March 1952 I/



2 : -: orange- : r 1
a Orange : Grapefruit s grapefruit r Tangerine Lmon : Apple
1: 99-50a blend
S: 1 : I I : h I I I :
: 19-9-50r 1951-52: 91,-50: 951.-521 1949-50: 1951-52, 1949-50: 1951--2: A949-50: 1951-52i 1919-50: sLYS-52
: 2 :


United States


Geographic region
Northeast
North Central
South
Mountain and Sotthwest
Pacific


Size of community
Farm
City (Population)
Under 10,000
10,000-99,999
100,000-4.99,999
500,000 and over


Family income
Upper
Upper middle
Lower middle
Lower


Size of family
1 and 2 members
3 members
4 and 5 members
6 and over


Presence of children W
No children
Under 6 years
6-12 years
13-20 years


262 278 133 157 77



295 262 156 133 U7
295 302 99 143 76
230 289 105 131 33
246 294 178 206 43
414 195 192 259 85



189 285 78 106 34

309 335 122 162 70
243 281 129 183 95
269 293 183 170 89
276 211 169 165 101



323 267 145 175 94
274 285 130 159 80
270 313 122 126 79
186 212 136 167 55



172 204 161 185 62
213 247 123 165 74
337 324 131 132 97
351 418 93 131 55



208 229 158 193 78
261 314 76 107 60
337 320 108 97 69
311 328 130 153 80


80 11 18 6 6 19 45


Occupation of family head -
Executive, professional 341 270 160 165 116
Clerical, sales, service 290 240 176 178 87
Craftsman, laborer 257 304 116 131 75
Farzer 199 297 61 116 33
Unclassified 180 250 183 217 60


Education of family bead
Grammar school
Some nigh school
Some college


Age of housewife
Under 35 years
35-1b years
45 years and over


219 262 122 158 65
300 297 125 156 78
306 283 178 157 105



243 299 66 99 58
289 263 128 125 84
255 278 163 189 80


Continued


Source: National Consumer Panel of Market Research Corporation of America.










Table 10.- Canned juices Volum of purchases par 1,000 rimnil lPs, y faAily oharaceriatics and place o
res.lance October 19a9-rdr 19 arnd u .ober 1991-Marc 1952 /- Contlnued




V : 2 Vegetable I t1
Qrape : ir j..le : Prune : T SItem __ uioB .s 2

t 198-$0' 1951-52; 1949-50 19-f22 Ik-50Y$I:-52 9 49i9-0:t S-5! i99-O! i..-..2: -'lgl9-0: 149 -..2

as /-- --~


United States


26 29 146 208 66 58


Geographic region
Northeast 22
North Central 23
South 19
Mountain and Southwest 33
Pacific 51


Size of community
Farm
City (Population)
Under 10,000

100,000-499,999
500,000 and over


Family income
Upper
Upper middle
Lower middle
Laoer


Sie of family
1 and 2 members
3 members
4 and 5 members
6 and over


Presence of children /
No children
Under 6 years
6-12 years
13-20 years


14 17

18 18
30 26
45 45
34 38


Occupation of family head
Executive, professional 24
Clerical, sales, service 29
Craftsman, laborer 27
Farmer 12
Unclassified 42


Education of family head
Grammar school
Some high school
Some college


Age of housewife
Under 35 years
35-44 years
45 years and over


256 317 122 97
86 148 49 43
74 1o0 25 24
126 203 47 86
180 297 50 40



56 108 20 23

101 111 44 47
123 183 67 47
168 251 66 59
260 347 119 95



186 256 81 64
148 219 69 67
155 190 67 67
98 166 45 34



105 166 50 54
135 168 85 61
182 265 69 72
157 227 55 23



127 167 64 60
170 238 68 67
166 266 62 53
150 242 51 44



205 258 69 68
166 228 80 82
160 218 80 60
50 115 12 12
99 168 55 48



122 153 61 43
155 247 72 72
192 284 65 73



134 216 54 63
173 2A8 73 66
135 180 66 53


253 233 30



344 300 39
189 183 26
155 142 15
261 234 17
390 361 62



11 116 8

191 175 21
292 235 36
347 271 33
307 330 52



344 305 48
263 239 36
217 222 20
191 162 17



192 181 28
224 206 33
315 287 34
267 265 20



217 196 29
273 227 34
289 250 34
286 289 24



406 347 56
271 262 36
253 223 26
101 120 9
193 165 21



204 188 21
250 249 32
382 321 50



261 251 23
263 228 36
2?6 227 31


30 1,15 1,183


1,554 1,h3
969 i,o'
69~ 820
1,014 1,244
1,322 1,507



536 790

952 1,022
1,100 1,183
1,301 1,332
1,639 1,491



1,440 1,37;
.,146 1,254
1,062 1,i61
823 937



869 1,015
1,022 1,064
1,357 1,378
1,169 1,297



989 1,060
1,133 1,237
1,249 1,266
1,182 1,31h



1,596 1,462
1,283 1,273
1,107 1,172
501 785
918 1,069



927 994
1,161 1,295
1,511 1,475



989 1,177
1,212 1,207
1,109 1,173


I/ These figures represent the average volume of purchases per 1,000 faniles, based upon aLl families, including those that
did not make any purchases during the 6-month period.
2/ Includes purchases of other canned juices.
S Equivaent cases of No. 2 cans, 432 ounces per case.
Classifications in this section are not mutually exclusive, therefore some families are included in two or more groups.

Sources National Consumer Panel of Market Research Corporation of America.






-27-


Table 11,- Fresb citrus fruit: Percentage of all families buying, by family characteristics and place
of residence, October i9Y9-March 1950 and October 1951-March 952


California-Arizona
S oranges a Florida oranges All ranges / Tangerines
T*- orangBB


JLWMU1 4 5__ __ __ __ __ __ ___ __ __
199-0 1951-52 199-50 '19-52 919- 19!
-


51-52 L949-50
- Percent -


1951-52 1949-50 : 05J-52


United States


Geographic region
Northeast
North Central
South
Mountain and Southwest
Pacific


Size of community
Farm
City (Population)
Under 10,000
10,000-99,999
100,000-499,999
500,000 and over

Family income
Upper
Upper middle
Lower middle
Lower

Size of family
1 and 2 members
3 members
4 and 5 members
6 and over

Presence of children
No children
Under 6 years
6-12 years
13-2) years

Occupation of family head
Executive, professional
Clerical, sales, service
Craftsman, laborer
Farmer
Unclassi fled

Education of family head
Grammar school
Some high school
Some college

Age of housewife
Under 35 years
35-44 years
45 years and over


53.9


60.4
65.3
20.7
48.9
74.1


35.7
47.6
57.7
60.14
69.1


57.5
55.4
54.1
48.6


52.3
52.7
57.7
47.9


53.1
55.8
55.9
52.3


62.1
54.5
57.6
36.3
52.2


49.2
56.5
60.9


51.8
54.3
54.4


52.1


56.7
63.1
17.6
48.1
76.7


39.0
44.0
55.6
53.2
65.4


55.0
55.1
53.7
44.7


50.3
48.1
56.3
52.1


49.6
55.7
56.3
51.3


56.1
54.3
56.1
37.9
46.2


48.4
55.4
55.8


51.6
54.5
51.0


48.2 49.6


66.8
46.9
56.1
18.9
7.2


62.8
49.2
60.3
37.7
6.4


38.6 46.3


43.4
56.7
52.7
54.3


50.6
49.8
49.2
43.5


44.5
48.4
52.8
42.9


47.0
50.5
49.5
47.6


54.9
50.7
48.7
38.4
45.3


4. 4
48.3
55.2


46.3
50.2
47.9


43.8
47.7
57.7
53.2


51.0
50.4
52.1
45.0


47.1
48.8
53.0
48.1


48.3
52.8
50.3
51.4


54.2
50.0
50.0
46.4
45.1


47.7
50.3
53.8


44.7
54.6
48.5


Sources National Consumer Panel of Market Research Corporation of America.


82.3


86.4
84.5
76.3
77.2
81.0


74.9

79.9
87.1
86.3
86.3


85.5
85.8
81.2
77.0


78.1
82.6
85.5
82.0


79.6
84.6
85.4
84.2


88.0
82.2
83.3
75.9
79.1


79.3
84.1
86.5


80.3
84.8
81.6


81.2


83.7
83.14
77.4
75.5
80.8


76.8

76.8
81.7
d4.7
85.8


83.8
85.1
81.4
714.6


78.3
81.0
84.1
81.5


79.5
82.8
83.4
82.4


84.1
82.5
83.1
75.5
75.6


79.9
81.5
84.41


78.2
83.9
80.7


31.1


48.3
22.9
20.8
11.4
14.4


17.1
26.8
30.8
31.9
45.4


36.0
34.7
32.5
21.5


21.9
31.6
38.2
30.4


26.2
34.0
36.4
34.3


37.4
33.6
34.7
17.5
21.9


27.6
34.2
34.4


31.0
37.1
27.7


33.1


48.8
32.9
28.0
14.2
19.8


19.4
26.8
33.1
38.0
44.9


36.7
35.7
36.7
23.5


24.1
34.8
40.8
33.0


25.9
39.8
10.2
37.3


38.8
31.9
39.6
19.3
23.2


30.0
35.4
37.3


35.7
40.9
28.3


Continued









Table 1..- Fresh citrus fruit I'er*rentae of al fMaiits b yin by '* m!'( caracterisatla nd pic
of residence, October L~ii-i -rch a.4' -'. a cober -arrie i' ContlnU.d


All
a Lemui iaons ; Lues : ALl fr*a eitrus
6,r.|e ruir L
Item a :
ii'-'i 1951-52 i9a-S0 : 2'- : 9h-50 u -
recent -


United States c*.9 57.2 53.2 50.4 l.1 1.0 88.9 .3

Geographic region
Northeast 63.6 65.1 56.1 53.8 a.6 .7 92.7 ^..7
North Central 62.9 63.2 48.6 45.2 1.1 1.i. 90.8 49.7
South 40.2 44.1 52.6 50.6 1.8 1.2 S2.3 64.5
Mountain and Southwest 50.8 41.5 55.6 Su.4 1.7 1.3 85.8 83.6
Pacific 59.4 58.1 58.2 53.5 2.9 .6 88.2 Y-.5

Size of community
Farm 42.3 41.1 42.2 39.5 3/ 3/ 82.1 82.8
City (Population)
Under 10,000 53.0 50.4 49.0 46.5 1.4 2/ 87.3 85.9
10,000-99,999 61.7 60.0 56.7 52.5 1.6 1.9 93.5 88.7
100,000-499,999 62.6 65.0 61.3 55.4 3.0 2.0 91.5 91.2
500,000 and over 67.0 68.2 60.8 57.3 2.4 1.1 92.3 92.3

Family income
Upper 66.3 66.1 58.8 57.8 2.0 1.5 92.1 92.0
Upper middle 60.9 61.3 55.5 50.4 1.9 3/ 91.5 90.8
Lover middle 54.5 53.0 52.0 48.2 1.4 7/ 88.3 87.3
Lower 46.3 48.7 46.8 45.5 1.4 3/ 83.9 83.2

Size of family
I and 2 members 60.1 60.4 55.1 53.0 2.0 1.2 86.9 88.2
3 members 56.8 54.4 53.4 49.5 2.2 1.3 89.5 87.6
4 and 5 members 58.5 59.2 55.2 50.6 1.3 1.1 91.3 89.9
6 and over 44.2 47.0 41.9 43.9 2/ 3/ 85.0 85.2

Presence of children _/
No children 60.3 60.6 57.2 54.0 2.1 1.3 87.9 88.4
Under 6 years 52.5 51.1 47.2 43.5 1.6 / 89.4 87.4
6-12 years 54.1 54.2 49.5 46.3 1.3 90.7 88.1
13-20 years 54.0 52.9 50.7 49.0 1.4 3/ 88.8 88.5

Occupation of family head
Executive, professional 72.5 68.4 66.7 61.4 4.0 2.1 93.9 92.0
Clerical, sales, service 61.3 62.5 58.7 57.5 2.2 1.5 89.4 91.0
Craftsman, laborer 53.7 54.9 48.0 46.8 3/ 3/ 89.4 88.5
Famer 41.5 41.6 41.5 38.6 / 3/ 82.8 81.6
Unclassified 57.8 55.9 57.2 46.5 1.9 86.9 85.2

Education of family head
Grammar school 49.4 50.7 47.6 46.2 3/ 3/ 86.0 $6.1
Some high school 58.7 58.5 54.5 51.3 1.4 / 90.5 89.2
Some college 72.8 73.4 65.2 60.7 4.7 2.0 93.3 92.9

Age of housewife
Under 35 years 49.2 47.4 42.9 39.4 2/ 3/ 87.1 84.4
35-44 years 56.5 57.4 52.3 50.5 1.8 1.1 90.2 89.6
45 years and over 60.1 60.1 57.8 53.8 1.8 1.1 88.8 88.8




SIncludes purchases of Texas oranges and those which were not identified as to origin.
SClassifications in this section are not mutually exclusive, therefore some families are included in two
or more groups.
3/ Too few purchases reported for analysis.


Source National Consumer Panel of Market Research Corporation of America.







-29-


Table 12.- Fresh citrus fruit: Average number of purchases per buying family by family characteristics
and place of residence, October 1949-March 1950 and October 1951-March 1952


SCalifornia-Arizona
S oranges Florida oranges t All oranges / : Tangerine


Item a__
19l9-50 1951-52 1949-50 : 1951-52 1949-50 : 1951-52
Number -


United States


Geographic region
Northeast
North Central
South
Mountain and Southwest
Pacific


Size of community
Farm
City (Population)
Under 10,000
10,000-99,999
100,000-499,999
500,000 and over


Family income
Upper
Upper midd-ie
Lower middle
Lower


Size of family
1 and 2 members
3 members
4 and 5 members
6 and over


Presence of children 2/
No children
Under 6 years
6-12 years
13-20 years


Occupation of family head
Executive, professional
Clerical, sales, service
Craftsman, laborer
Farme r
Unclassified


Education of family head
Grammar school
Some high school
Some college


Age of housewife
Under 35 years
35-44 years
45 years and over


: 1949-50 : 1951-52


6.3 6.2


4.3 4.4


11.9
8.7
7.7
7.7
8.3



6.0

8.1
9.1h
10. 4
12.3



9.7
9.6
10.1
8.0



8.9
9.1
10.0
9.1



9.3
9.8
9.5
8.8



11.0
10.9
9.14
5.9
7.8



8.5
9.6
11.1



8.8
9.7
9.h1


11.3
8.6
7.9
7.0
8.0



6.5

7.8
8.6
9.6
11.4



9.5
9.5
9.1
8.0



8.4
8.6
9.8
9.1



8.7
9.5
9.3
9.0



9.9
9.2
9.5
6.1
8.7



8.4
9.0
10.8



8.2
9.7
8.9


2.3 1.8


Continued


Source: National Consumer Panel of Market Research Corporation of America.






-30-


Tible 12.- Fresh citrus fruit Average number of purchases per buying l'nuiy by family char..r-.crt Licj
and place of residcnce,October Y9-M.rch i950 and October iy'-Mrarc L S. I..nIL Lr, I

^ ~ ~ -- ir~
Leno i L*- a 1re ai I.rxa
Item r.rutt
1949-50 19y-5:' 1(9-0J 1951-52 194'.0-50 1951-52 v 1W..-'.i : /,i-.
Nt-r -


United States 6.7 6.8 4.3 4.1 1.4 1.6 16.o ib./

Geographic region
Northeast 7.7 8.0 4.6 4.5 1.4 1.3 21.2 20.8
North Cetral 6.3 6.4 3.7 3.5 1.1 1.1 15.4 15.2
South 6.3 6.5 4.5 4.3 1.5 2.4 13.7 14.0
Mountain and Southwest 5.9 5.8 4.3 4.4 1.2 2.3 13.4 12.4
Paific 6.1 5.9 4.3 4.1 2.0 1.0 14.9 13.9

Size of community
Farm 4.5 4.8 3.8 3.9 2/ 2/ 10.3 10.7
City (Population)
Under 10,000 6.0 5.4 3.5 3.5 1.5 / 13.8 12.8
10,000-99,999 6.4 6.5 3.8 3.7 1.5 1.5 16.3 15.6
100,0.0-L99,999 7.8 7.5 4.4 3.8 1.2 1.2 19.1 17.7
500,000 and over 8.0 8.3 5.3 5.0 1.5 1.8 22.7 21.6

Family income
Upper 7.1 7.5 4.3 4.0 1.5 1.2 18.1 17.7
Upper middle 6.8 6.5 4.5 4.0 1.5 3/ 17.5 16.7
Lower middle 6.6 7.1 4.2 4.1 1.2 17.1 16.3
Loer 6.0 6. 64.1 4.4 1.5 13.7 13.9

Sise of family
1 and 2 members 7.4 7.7 4.8 4.5 1.4 1.6 16.8 16.1
3 members 6.5 6.3 4.3 4.1 1.4 1.4 16.1 15.3
4 and 5 embers 6.5 6.4 4.0 3.8 1.5 1.7 17.h 17.0
6 and over 5.3 6.6 3.7 4.2 3/ / 14.8 15.9

Presence of children 2/
No children 7.6 7.7 4.9 4.5 1.4 1.5 17.7 16.6
Under 6 years 6.0 5.9 3.4 3.5 1.5 / 15.8 15.6
6-12 years 5.9 5.9 3.7 3.6 1.5 15.8 15.8
13-20 years 5.7 6.0 4.0 4.0 1.7 32 15.5 15.5

Occupation of family head
Executive, professional 7.9 7.9 4.2 3.8 1.6 1.8 20.6 18.7
Clerical, sales, service 7.5 7.6 4.8 4.8 1.4 1.8 19.6 17.7
Craftsman, laborer 6.3 6.1 4.2 3.8 / 2/ 16.1 16.1
Farmer 4.5 4.9 3.7 4.0 / 10.1 10.8
Unclassified 5.7 7.0 4.2 4.3 1.3 14.2 15.4

Education of family head
Gramaar school 6.0 6.0 4.3 4.1 3/ 3/ 14.6 14.6
Same high school 6.6 6.7 4.2 4.0 1.6 16.9 16.?
Some college 8.0 8.6 4.5 4.4 1.3 1.8 20.9 20.6

Age of housewife
Under 35 years 5.7 5.4 3.3 2.8 / 3/ 14.1 -3.2
35-ht years 6.1 6.5 3.9 3.8 14 2.3 16.6 16.9
45 years and over 7.3 7.4 4.8 4.6 1.3 1.3 17.6 16.7




Includes purchases of Texas oranges and those which were not identified as to origin.
Classifications in this section are not mutually exclusive, therefore some families are included in two
or more groups.
3/ Too few purchases reported for analysis.


Source: National Consumer Panel of Market Research Cororration of America.









Table 13.- Fresh citrus fruit: Average volume of purchases per buying family, by family characteristics
and place of residence, October 1949-March 1950 ari October 1951-March 1952


Califrnia-Arizona
oranges Florida oranges All oranges 1 : Tangerines
Item : : :
1949-50 1951-52 1949-5o 0 1951-52 1949-50 '1951-52 1949-50 1951-52
Dozens -


United States


Geographic region
Northeast
North Central
South
Mountain and Southwest
Pacific

Size of community
Farm
City (Population)
Under 10,000
10,000-99,999
100,000-499,999
500,000 and over

Family income
Upper
Upper middle
Lower middle
Lower

Size of family
1 and 2 members
3 members
4 and 5 members
6 and over

Presence of children 2/
No children
Under 6 years
6-12 years
13-20 years

Occupation of family head
Executive, professional
Clerical, sales, service
Craftsman, laborer
Farmer
Unclassified


Education of family head
Grammar school
Some high school
Some college

Age of housewife
Under 35 years
35-44 years
45 years and over


5.38


4.80
5.25
2.66
5.07
9.15


3.90

4.87
5.10
4.97
6.53


6.43
5.61
4.81
4.55


4.34
4.57
6.03
7.50


4.63
6.05
6.20
5.91


6.04
5.26
5.77
4.02
4.08


5.20
5.1 .
5.72


5.80
5.81
4.98


5.21


4.34
5.13
2.63
4.61
8.59


4.65

4.77
4.59
4.93
6.07



5.95
5.57
4.71
4.48


4.47
4.55
5.65
7.19


4.48
6.21
5.63
6.05



5.50
4.55
5.73
4.91
4.49


5.05
5.13
5.80



5.35
5.40
5.07


7.26 7.17


8.99
5.59
7.46
2.34
2.34


9.00
5.92
7.50
3.77
1.61


5.78 5.78


6.54
7..48
7.54
8.38


8.04
7.36
7.77
5.69


6.65
7.48
7.19
8.54


6.87
7.86
7.79
7.20


9.21
8.09
6.67
5.49
5.82


6.20
7.70
7.56
8.21


7.80
7.48
7.03
6.31


6.05
6.76
7.94
8.72


6.53
7.57
7.93
7.48


7.28
7.35
7.56
5.29
7.42


6.51 6.63
7.05 7.00
9.13 8.90


6.59 6.70
7.50 7.78
7.35 6.95


9.97


12.17
8.84
8.99
8.49
9.97


7.40

8.62
10.22
11.13
12.28


11.25
10.15
10.21
8.13


8.16
9.30
10.96
12.28


8.93
11.43
11.11
10.09


12.20
10.83
9.92
7.29
7.80



19.02
10.08
11.97


10.03
10.68
9.52


9.33 2.90


11.29
8.68
8.70
6.55
9.57


3.35
2.62
2.62
2.05
2.02


7.73 2.97


8.09
8.72
9.82
11.25


10.14
9.86
9.33
7.86


7.58
8.25
10.63
12.49


8.06
11.16
10.63
10.15


10.17
8.89
9.96
7.75
8.52


8.65
9.36
11.13


9.03
10.63
8.72


2.47
2.90
2.31
3.29


2.88
2.73
3.26
2.68


1.99
2.56
3.1]4
4.30


2.36
2.79
3.38
3.66



2.59
2.83
3.19
3.05
2.06


2.97
2.90
2.78


2.88
3.28
2.62


Continued


Source: National Consumer Panel of Market Research Corporation of America.


2.58


3.19
2.44
1.99
1.55
.153


1.98

2.26
2.40
2.33
3.08


2.55
2.73
2.57
2.40


1.73
2.24
2.99
3.57


1.94
2.86
3.12
3.16


2.22
2.27
3.05
1.90
2.40


2.67
2.67
2.18


2.59
3.00
2.25










Table 13.- Fresh citrus fruit Average volume of purchases per buying ~ r.inly, by family characterltlcs
and place of residenOe, October 19iL'-M.-arh L 'J and October L'i-MAr- J L',' Continued



I grApefrult Lemons Limes All fresh citrus
99- 195 2 y9- tem' -2 19 -50 -5
1 .?69-50 : 1951-42 t 1949-so t -5 19h9-50 r .,-52 v L4J-9 ', -52


- o ze~n -


United States


Geographic region
Northeast
hNrth Central
South
Mountain and Southwe;t
Pacific


Size of camunity
Fara
City (Population)
Under 10,000
10,000-99,999
100,000-499,999
00,000 and o er


Family income
Upper
Upper middle
Lower middle
Lower


Size of family
I and 2 members
3 members
4 and 5 members
6 and over


Presence of children 2/
No children
Under 6 years
6-12 years
13-20 years


Occupation of family head
Executive, professional
Clerical, sales, service
Craftsman, laborer
Fanrer
Unclassified


Education of family head
Grammar school
Some high school
Some college


Age of housewife
Under 35 years
35-44 years
45 years and over


2.26



2.16
2.41
2.03
2.54
2.15


2.53
2.69
2.22
2.17
2.19


9.03 2.36


2.17
2.03
2.60
2.42



2.46
2.20
2.32
1.98



2.34
2.12
2.31
2.14



2.46
2.09
2.15
2.08



2.58
2.36
2.11
2.13
1.95


2.12
2.44
2.56
2.72



2.76
2.43
2.54
2.09



2.54
2.29
2.46
2.73



2.63
2.26
2.23
2.43



2.66
2.66
2.26
2.44
2.46


2.08 2.33
2.13 2.37
2.75 2.93



1.89 1.85
2.18 2.40
2.42 2.67


i.d i



1.73
1.34
2.42
2.17
2.07



2.10

1.57
1.53
1.98
2.02





1. 85
1.89



2.14
1.80
1.62
1.90



2.16
i. 43
1.58
1.69



1.69
1.95
1.78
2.08
1.80


1.85



1.72
1.29
2.41
2.13
2.30



2.21

1.b0
1.60
1.83
1.96



1.72
1.80
1.84
2.06



1.94
1.82
1.66
2.20



2.08
..62
1.52
1.81



1.48
2.03
1.72
2.20
2.18


1.97 1.98
1.71 1.73
1.80 1.75



1.37 1.17
1.60 1.55
2.10 2.14


g/ Includes purchases of Texas oranges and those which were not identified as to origin.
g/ Classifications in this section are not mutually exclusive, therefore soms families are included in two
or more groups.
3/ Too few purchases reported for analysis.


Source: National Consumer Panel of Mariet Research Corporation of America.


12.81 12.?2


.51
.63
.95
.72
1.12


.51
.57
1.18
.98
.50


15.62
11.56
11.56
10.84
12.34



9.50

10.87
12.75
14.43
16.22



14.49
13.17
13.12
10.31



10.83
11.94
14.0o
15.45



11.91
13.88
13.96
13.23



15.69
13.94
12.71
9.44
10.12



11.57
12. 88
15.57



12.01
13.69
12.59


1. 97
11.52

8.65
11.78



9.86

10.04
11.54
13.o5
15.18



13.32
12.96
12.34
10.01



10.12
10.98
13.85
15.97



10.90
14.01
13.66
13.25



13.22
11.98
13.03
9.90
11.02



11.39
12.19
14.46



11.05
13.74
1. 74









Table 1i.- Fresh citrus fruit: Average prices paid by household consumers, by family characteristics and
place of residence, October 19L9-March 1950 and October 1951-March 1952


: California-Arizora l i d
SCalornia: Florida ranges oranges t Tangerines
Item oranges
S1949-50 1951-52 1949-50 : 1951-52 1949-50 : 1951-52 : 1949-50 1951-52
: : : ts o -
Cents per dozen -


United States


42.9 46.7


Geographic region
Northeast
North Central
South
Mountain and Southwest
Pacific

Size of community
Farm
City (Population)
Under 10,000
10,000-99,999
100,000-499,999
500,000 and over

Family income
Upper
Upper middle
Lower middle
Lower

Size of family
1 and 2 members
3 members
4 and 5 members
6 and over

Presence of children 2/
No children
Under 6 years
6-12 years
13-20 years

Occupation of family head
Executive, professional
Clerical, sales,service
Craftsman, laborer
Farmer
Unclassified

Education of family head
Grammar school
Some high school
Some college

Age of housewife
Under 35 years
35-44 years
45 years and over


44.7
44.8
41.0
46.5
36.2


52.3
49.8
44.0
48.3
36.4


42.8 43.1


46.0
43.6
41.9
41.3


43.2
43.5
43.2
41.1


43.6
44.4
42.3
41.5


43.7
40.8
41.4
44.1


41.1
44.5
43.2
42.8
40.9


48.5
47.9
46.7
46.6


47.7
45.9
47.0
46.0


48.9
47.7
46.3
42.6


48.9
43.6
43.7
46.8


46.8
49.7
46.5
42.5
45.4


44.0 47.4
42.4 46.0
41.5 46.5


10.9 43.6
42.4 46.2
44.0 48.0


37.2


38.8
36.8
34.3
35.3
38.4


36.4

37.5
36.8
36.1
37.7


37.3
37.6
37.1
36.4


38.6
36.9
37.1
35.1L


38.1
36.7
36.2
36.5


37.0
37.3
37.2
36.1
38.5


37.0
37.4
37.0


36.6
36.8
37.6


34.1 39.3


35.6
33.7
31.6
35.8
144.5


40.5
41.0
35.5
39.2
36.4


34.0 38.1


34.5
35.2
32.7
34.3


34.4
34.0
34.1
33.8


35.3
33.7
33.6
33.9


35.2
33.3
33.3
33.5


34.4
34.0
33.6
35.1
34.7


41.0
39.3
37.5
39.2


39.8
39.7
39.2
38.1


40.7
39.2
39.2
37.6


40.4
37.9
38.3
39.4


38.4
39.6
39.9
38.2
39.4


34.2 39.8
33.7 39.3
34.5 38.5


33.4 38.0
32.8 38.9
35.1 40.1


39.6



41.0
42.0
33.0
43.8
36.7


31.8
31.1
29.0
34.6
S27.0


37.7 30.7


40.5
40.4
37.9
40.3


40.8
39.4
39.2
38.7


41.7
39.1
39.0
37.8


41.2
38.0
37.8
39.0


40.0
40.4
39.5
37.8
39.2


32.9
32.9
31.9
29.9


32.2
31.4
31.1
29.1


31.5
32.4
31.2
29.1


32.4
30.8
30.2
30.0


31.7
32.6
30.3
30.6
31.6


39.7 31.1
39.2 31.3
39.7 30.9


38.1 31.3
38.3 30.4
40.8 31.8


Continued


Sources National Consurmr Panel of Market Research Corporation of Auerica.


34.5


35.5
33.4
31.9
31.4
37.0


32.8

34.1
34.6
35.4
34.6


35.9
34.8
33.6
33.3


35.9
35.6
34.5
31.5


35.8
34.3
33.8
33.0


36.2
36.8
33.3
32.6
34.9


33.8
35.1
35.2


34.7
33.2
35.7









Table I4.- Fresh citrus fruit: Average prices paid by household oons:urs by family characteristics and
place of residence, October ',i'.9-Mrch 1';,' an October 1951-March 19'.' Continued


All
grapefruit Lemons Limes : All fresh citrus
Item
o JLJ-0J ': 1951-52: v-O 1c3-52 i' 192 ',, 9-.5 : '- l952,'
------------------------------------------- ~~ ~-----------------------
Cents per dozen -

United States 99.3 88.2 50.8 46.2 38.8 38.2 46.4 46.1

Geographic region
Northeast 112.2 95.5 52.6 49.2 57.1 54.2 47.2 47.5
North Central 91.3 82.6 63.0 56.1 47.8 42.9 48.8 1I8.
South 102.7 86.6 43.7 39.3 28.3 26.9 42.0 39.3
Mountain and Southwest 95.4 97.0 47.0 44.3 28.9 43.9 47.9 5u-.3
Pacific 85.8 82.0 44.9 41.1 33.4 35.0 42.9 42.7

Size of community
Fam 90.1 83.4 47.7 44.5 / 2/ 44.5 43.6
City (Population)
Under 10,000 97.2 87.2 52.3 45.0 44.0 3 48.2 46.2
10,000-99,999 100.6 87.4 53.9 47.6 45.9 36.4 46.3 47.3
100,000-499,999 105.0 92.6 50.6 46.0 24.4 28.5 46.7 46.0
500,000 and over 101.7 88.4 50.4 47.5 41.3 43.9 46.0 46.7

Family income
Upper 103.8 89.9 52.3 48.8 47.3 49.5 48.0 48.4
Upper middle 99.9 87.7 52.6 45.0 37.1 46.9 45.5
Lower middle 95.3 87.2 50.2 46.5 34.3 45.5 45.3
Lower 95.8 87.1 47.5 44.4 3>.2 44.6 44.8

Size of family
1 and 2 members 99.8 91.0 50.5 47.3 35.6 33.7 50.4 50.5
3 embers 100.4 86.6 50.3 45.4 38.4 34.4 46.6 45.6
4 and 5 members 99.7 86.4 51.6 46.1 46.5 46.7 45.7 44.6
6 and over 92.0 87.2 49.8 44.9 3/ 3/ 41.4 42.4

Presence of children 2/
No children 99.6 90.5 50.0 46.0 37.4 38.8 49.4 49.6
Under 6 years 97.8 84.9 52.1 44.8 45.2 / 43.4 42.5
6-12 years 98.0 86.7 52.2 47.1 36.8 43.8 42.9
13-20 years 98.4 85.0 50.8 45.6 35.3 44.9 44.0

Occupation of family head
Executive, professional 104.8 92.5 52.0 48.0 41.9 38.4 L7.5 48.2
Clerical, sales, service 98.5 90.2 49.6 47.1 31.5 42.3 46.8 48.5
Craftsman, laborer 99.2 85.2 51.9 46.5 2/ 3 45.8 44.3
Farmer 89.1 83.0 47.7 43.7 / 3 44.5 43.9
Unclassified 98.8 87.6 52.2 44.0 37.1 48.1 46.5

Education of family head
Gramar school 96.8 86.0 50.2 45.2 3/ 3 45.9 45.3
Some high school 99.5 87.3 51.2 46.5 39.4 Y 46.0 45.6
Scme college 102.2 92.8 51.3 48.5 39.5 32.1 47.8 48.6

Age of housewife
Under 35 years 97.8 87.1 52.3 47.1 3/ / 43.5 42.8
35-44 years 99.0 86.0 50.4 45.8 39.9 36.6 44.8 43.6
45 years and over 99.8 89.3 50.6 46.3 36.1 42.2 48.5 48.6




I Includes purchases of Texas oranges and those which were not identified as to origin.
S Classifications in this section are not mutually exclusive, therefore some families are included in two
or more gr ops.
2/ Too few purchases reported for analysis.

Source: National Consumer Panel of Marlet Research Corporation of America.









Table 15.- Fresh citrus fruit: Volume of purchases per 1,000 families, by family characteristics and place
of residence, October 1949-March 1950 and October 1951-March 1952 j/

--a IL --1 ...l. a lrd oa g l o : Ta


: oranges Florida oranges All oranges 2/ : Ta
oranges 3

1949-50 1951-52 1949-50 1951-52 1919-50 : 1951-52 1949-9
Dozens -


ngerinec


So : 1951-52


2,899 2,714 3,500- 3,556 8,203


Geographic region
Northeast
North Central
South
Mountain and Southwest
Pacific


Size of community
Farm
City (Population)
Under 10,000
10,000-99,999
100,000-499,999
500,000 and over

Family income
Upper
Upper middle
Lower middle
Lower

Size of family
1 and 2 members
3 members
4 and 5 members
6 and over


Presence of children 3/
No children
Under 6 years
6-12 years
13-20 years


Occupation of family head
Executive, professional
Clerical, sales, service
Craftsman, laborer
Farmer
Unclassified

Education of family head
Grammar school
Some high school
Sone college

Age of housewife
Under 35 years
35-44 years
45 years and over


2,901
3,427
550
2,481
6,779


2,461
3,237
463
2,217
6,589.


6,010
2,6i9
4,186
442
169


5,652
2,913
4,522
1,421
103


10,508
7,463
6,859
6,557
8,076


7,568


9,445
7,239
6,737
4,938
7,735


1,391 1,814 2,230 2,676 5,545 5,936


2,319
2,943
3,002
4,506


3,703
3,107
2,602
2,208


2,270
2,408
3,480
3,595


2,457
3,379
3,466
3,089


3,754
2,864
3,320
1,458
2,127


2,558
3,055
3,481


3,002
3,155
2,710


2,099
2,552
2,623
3,970


3,272
3,069
2,529
2,003


2,248
2,189
3,181
3,746


2,222
3,459
3,170
3,10o4


3,086
2,471
3,215
1,861
2,074


2,444
2,842
3,236


2,761
2,943
2,586


2,837
4,244
3,975
4,554


4,070
3,662
3,824
2,476


2,959
3,625
3,794
3,662


3,231
3,967
3,851
3,429


5,055
4,102
3,244
2,107
2,637


2,959
3,409
5,037


3,053
3,766
3,520


2,716
3,673
4,362
4,368


3,978
3,770
3,663
2,840


2,850
3,299
4,208
4,194


3,154
3,997
3,989
3,845


3,946
3,675
3,780
2,455
3,346


3,163
3,521
4,788


2,995
4,248
3,371


6,890
8,905
9,599
10,603


9,611
8,710
8,289
6,265


6,376
7,686
9,363
10,076


7,107
9,674
9,479
8,494


10,735
8,903
8,262
5,530
6,168


7,155
8,481
10,360


8,051
9,056
7,768


6,201
7,126
8,322
9,642


8,491
8,389
7,587
5,862


5,938
6,680
8,927
10,179


6,408
9,244
8,b614
8,366



8,555
7,337
8,274
5,846
6,438


6,905
7,647
9,389


7,057
8,912
7,025


903 851


1,615
861
546
234
290


1,557
803
557
220
303


509 384


662
891
736
1,493


1,040
947
1,060
576


434
810
1,200
1,308



659

1,232
1,257


969
951
1,104
535
450


822
991
954


891
1,218
726


606
794
885
1,383


936
975
943
564


417
780
1,220
1,178



502
1,138
1,254
1,179


861
724
1,208
367
557


801
945
813


925
1,227
637


Continued


Sources National Consumer Panel of Market Research Corporation of America.


Item


United States









Table 15,- Frr~a citrus fruit: Voluo' of -'irX.-, i-r 1,00 f lllati, by fanmi.y Sara-ct er,t aid pi c'
of residence, October l"l''.'--M'ir.r. I and October .r;r-:l.rch 19y? ji/ Contlnued


S All
s .e;t Leamons : Lines : All fresn citrus
Item gr e ru it
: -.' 1 -52 : 199- I !-i; -52 : -' : 19 -52 -'. .

Doze -


United States i, 85 ,419 980 932 13 8 1,3814 10,781

Geographic region
Noruteast 1,370 1,647 972 925 8 4 14,473 13,578
North Central 1,518 1,700 6s0 583 7 8 ij,L99 10,333
South 818 979 1,275 1,211 17 14 9,515 9,Su6
Mountain and Southwest 1,294 901 1,207 1,1i9 12 13 9,304 7,231
Pacific 1,278 1.272 1.205 1,230 32 3 10,881 10,543

Size of community
Farm 861 970 885 873 _/ /7,803 8,164
City (Population)
Under 10,000 1,152 1,068 771 744 11 / 9,486 8,624
10,000-99,999 1,250 1,464 865 80 82 11,919 10,236
1,00,000-99,999 1,628 1,664 1,214 1,014 23 17 13,200 11,902
500,000 and over 1,622 1,855 1,?.i', 1,123 19 8 14,967 14,0i

Family income
Upper 1,631 1,824 1,050 994 13 9 13,345 12,254
Upper middle 1,342 1,490 1,030 907 16 12,045 11,768
Lower middle 1,263 1,346 960 887 10 11,582 10,773
Lower 917 1,018 882 937 11 8,651 8,387

Size of family
1 and 2 members 1,408 1,534 1,180 1,028 15 9 9,113 8,926
3 members 1,204 1,246 964 901 17 11 10,651 9,618
4 ain 5 members 1,350 1,456 893 840 8 8 12,814 12,451
6 and over 947 1,283 796 966 ./ / 13,138 13,606

Presence of children 3/
No children 1,482 1,594 1,238 1,123 15 9 10,461 9,636
Under 6 years 1,099 1,155 674 705 12 / 12,409 12,245
6-12 years 1,162 1,209 781 704 9 12,663 12,034
13-20 years 1,123 1,285 859 887 14 11,747 -.,726

Occupation of family head
Executive, professional 1,871 1,819 1,130 909 32 18 14,737 12,162
Clerical, sales, service 1,449 1,662 1,146 1,167 16 12 12,465 10,902
Craftsman, laborer 1,135 1,241 853 805 11,360 11,532
Farmer 885 1,015 862 849 7,814 8,078
Unclassified 1,128 1,375 1,031 .,014 8,791 9,389

Education of family head
Grammar school 1,027 1,181 936 915 / 9,945 9,807
Some high school -,252 1,386 931 887 11 11,666 10,873
Some college 1,999 2,151 1,176 1,062 34 14,523 1L3,L33

Age of housewife
Under 35 yas 929 877 588 461 / 10,468 9,326
35-44 years 1,230 1,378 837 783 14 11 12,355 12,311
45 years and over I' 1,605 1,2LL1 1,151 13 7 11,176 LC,1125



1/ These figures represent the a-rage volume of purchases per 1,000, based upon all families including those
ihich did not make any purchases during the 6 month periods.
2/ Includes purchases of Texas oranges and those which were not identified as to origin.
2/ Classifications in this section are not mutually exclusive, therefore some families are included in two
or more groups.
_/ Too few purchases reported for analysis.
Source: National Consumer Panel of Mariet Research Corporation of America.






- 37 -


Table 16.- Dried fruit Percentage of all families buying, by family characteristics and place
of residence, October 1949-March 1950 and October 1951-Harch 1952

S Prunes 2 Apricots Peac-es
Item I -
1919-50 1951-52 1919-50 1951-52 19.9-50 1951-52
--- Percent -


United States 40.9 44.6 14.9 12.8 7.6 6.8

Geographic region
Northeast 45.6 45.1 16.9 14.9 4.0 3.5
North Central 43.3 46.4 16.1 14.3 3.4 4.0
South 31.1 39.1 9.1 6.5 18.5 15.3
Mountain and Southwest 40.0 45.9 21.7 21.1 12.5 12.6
Pacific 40.1 47.4 9.2 7.0 3.7 2.6

Size of community
Farm 30.1 37.1 9.4 9.5 7.7 6.8
City (Population)
Under 10,000 37.8 43.3 14.8 11.7 8.9 9.9
10,000-99,999 48.4 46.5 16.7 10.2 6.5 6.7
100,000-l99,999 40.9 47.6 19.2 16.8 12.6 8.2
500,000 and over 47.o9 48.2 16.5 11.9 5.1 3.5

Family income
Upper 6.14 46.5 21.6 18.0 8.5 6.9
Upper middle 42.3 46.9 14.4 11.4 8.0 6.0
Lower middle 39.4 43.0 12.8 12.1 7.3 7.1
Lower 35.6 42.2 10.9 9.3 6.7 7.1

Size of family
1 and 2 members 40.2 45.1 11.2 11.7 7.1 6.4
3 members 40.9 45.7 15.8 13.6 7.8 8.3
4 and 5 members 43.0 45.2 15.5 13.2 7.7 5.8
6 and over 35.9 39.3 12.9 13.1 8.3 8.8

Presence of children 1/
No children 42.4 45.7 16.9 12.8 8.2 7.2
Under 6 years 41.0 41.3 10.4 11.7 7.1 5.4
6-12 years 39.7 43.8 12.8 11.0 7.8 6.0
13-20 years 38.0 43.0 15.8 14.5 7.2 7.7

Occupation of family head
Executive, professional 47.6 50.9 21.3 18.5 7.2 6.1
Clerical, sales, service 44.4 45.8 15.5 14.3 8.4 7.2
Craftsman, laborer 39.0 42.9 14.0 11.2 7.7 7.1
Farmer 31.1 37.4 10.1 9.4 7.3 6.4
Unclassified 44.7 46.2 13.8 10.3 6.6 7.0

Education of family head
Gramar school 39.0 42.9 13.6 11.3 7.6 8.1
Some high school 40.3 43.9 15.1 12.9 7.4 5.3
Some college 46.7 51.3 17.8 16.8 8.0 6.3

Age of housewife
Under 35 years 35.2 37.4 10.3 10.3 7.0 6.6
35-44 years 41.3 43.9 13.5 11.8 7.5 5.3
45 years and over 42.8 47.3 17.5 14.1 7.9 7.7






Continued


Sources National Consumer Panel of Market Research Corporation of America






-1I -


Table 16,- Dried fruit Perc.ntage of all families buying, by I'a"lly craractexritica and place
of residence, October 1949-Marc-h 1'V50 an October IQcl-%ar-:r, I ContiLued

a Datrea _
Mixed f ut

1151-S211 1951-523 1'?4QL.0 1951-52 2 'Ar-: I '
Percent -


United States 18.3 22.8 25.9 39.2 5.4 4.9

Geographic region
Northeast 15.8 22.3 27.1 37.1 9.4 8.9
North Central 19.2 26.3 29.8 45.3 5.6 5.4
South 7.0 20.6 14.6 24.7 1.4 1.5
Mountain and Southwest 19.5 28.3 25.6 43.1 3.3 2.5
Pacific 43.0 12.5 34.6 50.9 3.2 1.7

Site of community
Farm 11.1 21.1 20.2 32.5 3.1 2.8
City (Population)
Under 10,000 13.1 23.6 22.4 35.8 3.1 3.0
10,000-99,999 22.2 25.0 34.3 46.1 5.2 3.7
100,000-499,999 23.7 26.0 28.8 45.0 5.2 3.1
500,000 and over 22.8 20.3 28.4 40.1 9.6 9.6

Family income
Upper 23.9 27.8 29.3 47.6 6.3 5.4
Upper middle 19.1 24.3 25.9 41.4 6.0 5.0
Lower middle 16.7 22.5 27.1 38.2 4.8 5.3
Lowr 13.7 16.6 21.3 29.7 4.5 4.1

Sie of family
1 and 2 members 20.3 22.9 30.4 40.8 5.6 4.9
3 members 17.2 23.9 23.4 39.2 5.2 4.9
4 and 5 members 18.8 23.3 26.9 40.3 6.1 5.1
6 and over 13.1 18.5 16.4 31.1 3.2 4.6

Presence of children 1/
No children 20.2 23.5 30.4 41.5 6.6 4.9
Under 6 years 15.0 22.3 20.4 34.9 5.0 5.3
6-12 years 15.9 21.5 22.6 35.9 3.3 4.7
13-20 years 17.1 21.8 24.3 37.4 5.3 5.0

Occupation of family head
Executive, professional 23.6 30.4 33.6 49.1 5.6 6.1
Clerical, sales, service 19.4 22.5 27.5 39.9 6.3 6.4
Craftsaan, laborer 17.1 21.5 23.1 36.8 5.9 5.6
Farmer 11.1 21.9 19.1 33.6 3.1 1.9
Unclassified 20.2 17.4 31.3 37.1 4.7 2.3

Education of family head
Grammar school 16.5 19.5 22.9 35.9 5.1 4.8
Some high school 17.8 24.2 26.5 39.4 5.4 5.0
Some college 24.6 29.3 32.4 48.4 6.0 5.3

Age of housewife
Under 35 years 15.0 17.2 17.3 28.8 5.1 4.4
35-U1 years 15.9 22.3 24.4 37.1 4.7 5.8
45 years and over 20.6 24.7 30.1 43.5 6.0 4.7



I/ Classifications in this section are not mutually exclusive, therefore some families are included irn to or more
groups.
2/ Includes dates unidentified as to origin.
/Family characteristics data not available for October 1949-Mhrch 1950.


Sources National Consumer Panel of Market Research Corporation of America






39 -


Table 17.- Dried fruits Average number of purchases per buying family, by family characteristics and place of
residence, October 1919-March 1950 and October 1951-Harch 1952


Prunes Apricots Peaches
Item
1919-50 1951-52 1919-50 1951-52 1949-50 1951-52
S- Number -


United States 2.7 2.7 2.0 1.8 2.1; 1.7

Geographic region
Northeast 3.0 2.7 2.1 2.0 2.0 1.7
North Central 2.5 2.4 1.9 1.8 1.1 1.3
South 2.7 3.0 2.0 1.9 1.9 1.5
Mountain and Southwest 2.8 2.7 2.0 1.6 2.6 1.9
Pacific 2.4 2.6 1.2 1.3 2.2 1.9


Size of community
Farm 2.3 2.4 1.5 1.6 2.2 1.6
City (Population)
Under 10,000 2.6 2.6 1.8 1.8 1.7 1.7
10,000-99,999 3.0 2.9 2.0 2.3 1.8 1.9
100,000-199,999 2.6 2.7 2.3 2.1 2.4 1.6
500,000 and over 2.9 2.? 2.1 1.6 1.9 1.8

Family income
Upper 2.6 2.8 2.1 1.8 1.6 1.6
Upper middle 2.6 2.5 1., 1.9 1.5 1.8
Lower middle 2.8 2.7 2.0 1.9 2.2 1.6
Lower 2.9 2.7 1.8 1.8 2.1 1.9


Size of family
1 and 2 members 2.9 2.6 1.8 1.7 2.0 2.0
3 members 2.6 2.6 2.0 1.7 2.1 1.6
4 and 5 members 2.7 2.7 1.9 2.0 1.9 1.6
6 and over 2.5 2.7 2.3 1.9 2.0 1.5

Presence of children 1/
No children 3.0 2.8 1.9 1.7 2.1 1.9
Under 6 years 2.4 2.3 2.1 2.0 1.7 1.6
6-12 years 2.4 2.1 1.9 1.9 2.0 1.5
13-20 years 2.6 2.7 2.1 1.9 2.0 1.5


Occupation of family head
Executive, professional 2.7 2.7 2.1 1.8 1.8 1.8
Clerical, sales, service 2.9 2.7 2.0 2.0 2.1 1.7
Craftsman, laborer 2.8 2.7 2.1 1.8 1.9 1.6
Farmer 2.1 2.3 1.5 1.7 2.3 1.7
Unclassified 3.0 2.7 1.5 1.6 1.8 1.9


Education of family head
Grammar school 2.8 2.6 1.9 1.9 1.8 1.7
Some high school 2.6 2.5 2.0 1.7 2.2 1.7
Some college 2.8 3.0 2.0 1.9 2.2 2.0


Age of housewife
Under 35 year 2.2 2.2 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9
35-44 year 2.5 2.1 1.9 1.9 1.9 1.6
45 years and over 3.0 2.9 2.1 1.8 2.1 1.7







Continued


Sources National Consumer Panel of Market Research Corporation of America









Table 17.- Dried fruit, Average number of purchases per buying family, by family character atics and plae of
residence, October 19L'-March 1950 and October 1'51-March 195? Continued

SDatees
uomest s I-muort tW2 xed fr. .ist
Item A--I
1951-522: 1951-5221/ 1919-50 1951-5?2 1-:'- ,1-1?
Number -


United States 2.0 1.8 2.2 2.3 1.7 1.5

Geographic region
Northeast 2.0 1.9 2.3 2.1 1.9 1.6
North Central 1.7 1.7 2.2 2.1 1.6 1.5
South 1.2 1.9 1.7 2.1 1.9 1.1
Mountain and Southwest 2.0 1.8 2.0 2.2 1.6 1.4
Pacific 2.6 1.4 2.5 2.7 1.2 1.0

Size of community
Farm 1.5 1.6 1.9 2.0 1.6 1.3
City (Population)
Under 10,000 1.7 1.7 2.0 2.1 1.5 1.5
10,000-99,999 2.0 1.9 2.2 2.3 2.3 1.6
100,000-499,999 1.7 2.3 2.1 2.5 2.0 1.1
500,000 and over 2.5 1.6 2.5 2.5 1.6 1.6

Family income
Upper 1.9 1.9 2.1 2.3 1.7 1.6
Upper middle 2.2 1.8 2.3 2.1 1.3 1.1
Lower middle 1.7 1.9 2.1 2.2 2.2 1.5
Lower 2.1 1.8 1.9 2.3 1.8 1.5

Size of family
1 and 2 members 2.2 1.8 2.3 2.1 1.4 1.6
3 members 1.8 1.8 2.1 2.1 1.5 1.3
4 and 5 members 1.9 1.8 2.2 2.3 2.0 1.6
6 and over 2.3 1.9 2.1 2.4 1.7 1.4


Presence of children 1/
No children 2.0 1.9 2.3 2.3 1.5 1.5
Under 6 years 2.0 1.0 2.1 2.3 2.2 1.5
6-12 years 1.9 1.7 2.0 2.2 2.0 1.6
13-20 years 1.9 1.8 2.1 2.3 2.1 1.4

Occupation of family head
Executive, professional 2.1 1.9 2.4 2.1 1.7 1.7
Clerical, sales, service 2.2 1.7 2.3 2.4 1.5 1.6
Craftsman, laborer 1.9 1.9 2.1 2.3 1.7 1.4
Farmer 1.6 1.6 2.0 2.0 1.7 1.4
Unclassified 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.3 2.3 1.1

Education of family head
Grammar school 1.9 1.7 2.1 2.3 1.8 1.4
Some high school 1.9 1.7 2.3 2.2 1.6 1.5
Some allege 2.2 2.1 2.3 2.6 1.8 1.8


Age of housewife
Under 35 years 2.4 1.6 2.3 2.5 1.5 1.5
35-44 years 1.7 1.7 2.0 2.0 2.2 1.6
15 years and over 2.0 1.9 2.2 2.1 1.6 1.5



1/ Classifications in this section are not mutually exclusive, therefore some families are included in tc. or more
groups.
2/ Includes dates unidentified as to origin.
Y/ Family characteristics data not available for October 1949-Harch 1950.
Source: National Consumer Panel of Market Research Corporation of America


- Vo -






41 -

Table 18.- Dried fruits Average volume of purchases per buying family, by family characteristics
and place of residence, October 1949-March 1950 and October L951-March 1952


S Prunes Apricots Peaches
Item
S1949-50 s, 1951-52 : 1949-50 : 1951-52 1949-50 1951-52
Pounds -


United States 4.0 3.8 1.8 1.4 1.9 1.5

Geographic region
Northeast 4.3 3.9 1.8 1.6 2.0 1.l
North Central 3.7 3.1 1.7 1.5 1.3 1.1
South 3.8 4.0 1.9 1.5 1.9 1.6
Mountain and Southwest 3.9 4.0 2.0 1.3 2.1 1.6
Pacific 4.3 4.4 1.2 1.0 2.2 1.7

Size of community
Farm 3.6 3.8 1.6 1.3 2.4 1.6
City (Population)
Under 10,000 4.0 3.8 1.6 1.4 1.7 1.6
10,000-99,999 4.4 3.9 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.6
100,000-199,999 3.6 3.8 2.3 1.6 2.2 1.3
500,000 and over 4.1 3.8 1.7 1.3 1.7 1.4

Family income
Upper 3.9 4.1 1.9 1.4 1.6 1.2
Upper middle 3.8 3.5 1.6 1.5 1.8 1.5
Lower middle 4.1 3.8 1.9 1.5 2.1 1.4
Lower 4.2 3.8 1.6 1.4 2.4 1.8

Size of family
1 and 2 members 4.3 3.7 1.7 1.4 1.8 1.6
3 members 3.6 3.6 1.9 1.3 2.1 1.6
4 and 5 members 4.0 3.9 1.6 1.5 1.9 1.3
6 and over 3.8 4.3 2.1 1.6 2.0 1.6

Presence of children 1/
No children 4.4 4.0 1.7 1.4 1.9 1.6
Under 6 years 3.4 3.4 1.7 1.5 1.6 1.4
6-12 years 3.6 3.6 1.7 1.4 2.1 1.5
13-20 years 3.9 3.9 1.9 1.5 1.9 1.4

Occupation of family head
Executive, professional 3.9 3.7 1.7 1.4 1.7 1.4
Clerical, sales, service 4.1 3.8 1.6 1.6 2.0 1.4
Craftsman, laborer 4.0 3.8 2.0 1.4 1.8 1.5
Farmer 3.4 3.7 1.5 1.4 2.5 1.4
Unclassified 4.7 4.0 1.5 1.4 1.7 1.8

Education of family head
Grammar school 4.1 3.8 1.8 1.5 1.7 1.5
Some high school 3.7 3.7 1.8 1.3 2.2 1.4
Some college 4.2 4.1 1.7 1.5 2.1 1.6

Age of housewife
Under 35 years 3.2 3.1 1.5 1.2 1.8 1.5
35-44 years 3.6 3.5 1.6 1.5 1.9 1.4
45 years and over 4.4 4.1 1.8 1.5 2.0 1.6






Continued


Sources National Consumer Panel of Market Research Corporation of America









Table b1.- Dried fruit Average volume of purchases per buying famiLy, by family characteristics and place
of residence, October 19Lo-Qarch 19\,u and October 19'1-March 1152 Continued

a L'ate.s


Pounds -


United States 2.4 1.2 2.1 2.3 1.9 1.4


Geographic region
,fort.east 1.9 1.3 1.9 2.1 2.2 1.6
North Central 1.8 1.2 1.9 2.0 1.6 1.3
South 1.1 1.3 1.1 1.5 2.5 .9
Mountain and Southwest 2.2 1.3 1.9 2.1 1.6 1.2
Pacific 4.4 .9 4.3 4.I 1.4 .8


Size of community
arm 1.6 1.2 1.9 1.9 1.7 1.2
City (Population)
Under 10,000 1.9 1.2 1.8 2.0 1.6 1.4
10,000-99,999 2.6 1.3 2.1 2.3 2.1 1.4
100,000-l99,999 2.4 1.5 2.2 2.6 1.9 .9
500,000 and over 3.0 1.1 2.5 2.6 2.0 1.5


Family income
Upper 2.7 1.3 2.2 2.b 2.0 1.6
Upper middle 2.7 1.2 2.2 2.1 1.3 1.2
Lower middle 2.0 1.2 2.1 2.1 2.2 1.4
Lower 2.2 1.2 1.9 2.2 2.3 1.3


Size of family
1 and 2 member 2.7 1.2 2.3 2.4 1.1 1.1
3 members 2.0 1.2 2.0 2.0 1.6 1.1
4 and 5 members 2.1 1.3 2.0 2.4 2.4 1.7
6 and over 2.7 1.1 2.5 2.4 2.9 1.2


Presence of children 1/
No children 2.5 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.5 1.3
Under 6 years 2.5 1.3 2.3 2.5 2.3 1.2
6-12 years 2.2 1.2 2.1 2.2 2.8 1.5
13-20 years 2.2 1.4 1.9 2.3 2.8 1.5


Occupation of family head
Executive, professional 2.8 1.3 2.3 2.5 2.0 1.7
Clerical, sales, service 2.6 1.1 1.9 2.4 1.6 1.5
Craftsman, laborer 2.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 2.0 1.2
Farmer 1.6 1.2 2.0 1.9 1.9 1.2
Unclassified 2.5 1.2 2.0 2.3 2.7 1.0


Education of family head
Grammar school 2.1 1.2 2.1 2.2 2.0 1.2
Some high school 2.1 1.2 2.0 2.2 1.9 1.6
Some college 3.1 1.4 2.2 2.8 1.8 1.5


Age of housewife
Under 35 years 3.3 1.1 2.4 2.9 1.5 1.3
35-4 years 2.0 1.2 1.9 2.0 2.9 1.l
45 years and over 2.4 1.3 2.2 2.3 1.6 1.4



I/ Classifications in this section are not mutually exclusive, therefore some families are included in two or more
groups.
2/ Includes dates unidentified as to origin.
5/ Family characteristics data not available for October 1949-March 1950.

Sources National Consumer Panel of Market Research Corporation of America


- 142 -






- 43 -


Table 19.- Dried fruits Average price paid by household consumers, by family characteristics and place of
residence, October 199-!arch 1950 and October 1951-March 1952
3 3

Prunes Apricote Peaches
Item
1949-50 1951-52 :1949-50 1951-2 1949-50 1951-52
ents per pound -


United States 22.9 25.4 48.9 60.7 32.6 42.8

Geographic region
Northeast 22.1 25.1 50.7 60.8 33.7 42.1
North Central 24.1 25.8 49.8 60.6 35.4 45.1
South 23.3 26.4 47.7 61.8 31.7 41.5
Mountain and Southwest 24.0 25.9 43.6 59.4 34.0 45.5
Pacific 20.2 23.1 52.1 63.6 27.8 40.5

Size of community
Farm 23.1 25.5 1..9 58.8 31.5 43.5
City (Population)
Under 10,000 23.3 25.7 49.7 61.7 33.8 43.0
10,000-99,999 23.4 25.7 49.6 61.8 33.9 42.8
100,000-499,999 23.8 25.5 46.6 60.8 32.3 41.7
500,000 and over 22.0 24.9 50.7 60.3 31.9 42.7

Family income
Upper 23.0 25.6 50.0 61.8 32.5 "4.6
Upper middle 23.2 25.2 47.8 62.2 32.2 .4.2
Lower middle 22.6 25.3 49.4 58.7 32.7 1.3
Lower 22.7 25.4 47.1 59.7 33.2 41.9

Size of family
1 and 2 members 23.0 25.8 48.5 58.9 32.9 43.4
3 members 23.4 25.1 48.2 61.8 33.3 41.7
4 and 5 members 22.5 25.2 49.3 61.3 31.6 43.1
6 and over 22.8 25.1 49.9 61.3 33.8 43.1

Presence of children 1/
No children 23.0 25.6 48.3 59.5 32.6 43.6
Under 6 years 22.5 24.6 5009 60.7 33.3 41.0
6-12 years 22.7 24.9 49.1 61.2 32.1 40.1
13-20 years 23.0 25.4 49.0 61.6 32.7 43.8

Occupation of family head
Executive, professional 23.7 25.9 49.7 62.7 31.9 13.9
Clerical, sales, service 22.7 25.3 50.0 59.5 32.1 40.4
Craftsman, laborer 22.7 25.0 49.0 60.1 33.3 43.1
Farmer 22.9 25.4 46.0 59.9 32.1 45.0
Unclassified 22.2 25.6 46.1 61.5 33.3 42.6

Education of family head
Grammar school 22.5 25.6 48.9 59.8 33.3 42.3
Some high school 22.8 25.0 48.9 61.5 32.2 41.2
Some college 23.2 25.4 48.9 61.4 32.2 I11.0

Age of housewife
Under 35 years 22.6 25.4 48.8 61.7 32.4 43.1
35-44 years 22.7 24.9 50.3 61.2 33.7 42.5
45 years and over 23.0 25.6 48.4 60.3 32.2 42.9





Continued
Source: National Consumer Panel of Market Research Corporation of America






- 44 -


Table 19.- Dried fruit Average price paid by household consumers, by family characteristics and place of
residence, October 1949-March 1950 and October 1951-March 1952 Continued

Dateas
IaDomestic --f7mortred a -ots --27 Mixe d frulta
S1951-523/ 1951-52 11 L9L-50 s 1951-52 9lo-u lsi-52
-- Cents per pound -


United States 29.8 45.2 34.2 33.9 32.3 40.6

Geographic region
Northeast 31.1 12.7 33.6 31.0 30.9 39.2
North Central 31.5 13.2 36.4 34.1 34.7 42.4
South 35.8 51.0 47.4 15.8 33.8 40.8
Mountain and Southwest 34.3 47.1 10.0 38.8 31.9 43.6
Paciflo 26.9 45.8 27.0 27.9 35.0 12.7

Sise of community
Farm 31.8 44.2 35.8 34.8 35.3 14.7
City (Population)
Under 10,000 33.2 46.7 37.5 36.3 35.3 12.0
10,000-99,999 30.1 15.8 35.0 34.3 36.0 13.0
100,000-499,999 29.8 45.9 36.5 34.7 32.8 39.7
500,000 and over 28.3 43.5 30.1 31.1 29.7 39.4

Family income
Upper 28.9 45.9 33.9 34.1 31.6 10.9
Upper middle 29.9 15.9 35.2 33.8 35.1 42.4
Lower middle 31.0 16.5 33.7 34.8 32.8 39.6
Lower 30.0 1b.5 34.0 32.5 30.5 39.8

Sise of family
1 and 2 members 30.2 16.2 33.2 34.2 36.6 11.5
3 members 31.1 17.0 34.7 36.0 35.3 13.6
4 and 5 members 28.6 13.9 35.5 32.5 30.1 39.5
6 and over 29.9 43.1 31.8 34.0 28.0 36.6

Presence of children 1/
No children 30.3 16.6 33.9 34.7 36.1 11.6
Under 6 years 28.7 12.8 33.6 33.0 31.0 12.5
6-12 years 28.3 13.6 34.2 32.8 28.4 37.3
13-20 years 30.3 12.6 35.6 33.1 27.9 39.6

Occupation of family head
Executive, professional 30. 145.2 34.3 34.7 32.14 12.8
Clerical, sales, service 29.3 14.5 35.6 32.9 34.6 39.1
Craftsman, laborer 29.5 45.8 33.0 34.1 30.0 38.8
Farmer 33.5 13.5 35.5 34.4 35.6 11.5
Unclassified 28.9 17.2 33.9 33.2 31.1 17.8

Education of family head
Gramar school 31.3 45.0 34.4 34.1 31.5 40.2
Some high school 29.6 45.0 34.1 34.0 32.0 I1.0
Some college 28.0 46.0 31.1 33.3 31.7 40.9

Age of housewife
Under 35 years 29.14 7.2 31.5 33.2 33.7 11.1
35-i4 years 29.8 13.2 35.1 33.8 29.1 37.8
45 years and over 30.0 15.8 33.6 34.1 34.4 12.3



I/ Classifications in this section are not mutually exclusive, therefore some families are included in two or more
groups.
2/ Includes dates unidentified as to origin.
Y/ Family characteristics data not available for October 1949-larch 1950.
Sources National Consumer Panel of Market Research Corporation of America






- 45 -


Table 20.- Dried fruit: Volume of purchases per 1,000 families, by family characteristics and place of
residence, October 19l9-March 1950 and October 1951-March 1952


S Prunes s Apricots s Peaches

1949-50 1 1951-52 1949-50 1951-52 1949-50 $ 1951-52
Pounds -


United States 1,629 1,699 260 186 147 102

Geographic region
Northeast 1,970 1,754 297 231 80 50
North Central 1,584 1,582 274 212 U4 41
South 1,208 1,514 170 96 352 249
Mountain and Southwest 1,515 1,822 U41 274 30l 200
Pacific 1,718 2,086 114 69 84 45

Size of community
Farm 1,083 1,1410 150 124 188 U1
City (Population)
Under 10,000 1,517 1,658 235 170 150 154
10,000-99,999 2,114 1,832 292 178 115 105
100,000-499999 1,491 1,795 1l40 270 277 106
500,000 and over 1,948 1,808 287 195 86 49

Family income
Upper 1,823 1,911 401 257 132 86
Upper middle 1,591 1,656 228 168 148 91
Lower middle 1,604 1,634 238 186 150 107
Lower 1,501 1,595 177 131 159 125

Sise of family
1 and 2 members 1,735 1,678 236 164 128 105
3 members 1,454 1,636 296 182 160 129
I and 5 members 1,740 1,767 253 203 149 74
6 and over 1,370 1,686 269 206 166 137

Presence of children 1/
No children 1,856 1,828 291 177 157 11I
Under 6 years 1,1415 1,408 178 178 117 78
6-12 years 1,144 1,559 211 158 163 89
13-20 years 1,168 1,694 294 220 134 111

Occupation of family head
Executive, professional 1,865 1,888 369 266 123 82
Clerical, sales, service 1,816 1,759 255 225 172 101
Craftsman, laborer 1,555 1,613 274 160 137 106
Farmer 1,040 1,369 149 128 181 92
Unclassified 2,081 1,830 207 161 111 127

Education of family head
Grammar school 1,596 1,622 239 172 130 122
Some high school 1,492 1,607 266 169 160 75
Some college 1,956 2,314 304 257 169 101

Age of housewife
Under 35 years 1,145 1,163 151 125 121 98
35-.1 years 1,502 1,545 222 175 140 72
15 years and oer 1,889 1,949 323 210 161 119





Continued


Source, National Consumer Panel of Market Research Corporation of America






- i6 -


Table 20.- Dried fruits Volume of purchases per 1,000 families, by family charaoterietics and place of
residence, October 19l9-Maroh lv5u and October 1951-March 1952 Continued


,S t e-,--rm t "Tt"Z Mix-,ed fruits
1951-521:/ 1951-521 19-5o : 1951-52 19L9-Q 191-52
Pounds --

United States 448 282 549 902 105 68

Geographic region
Northeast 297 281 521 783 208 139
North Central 338 311 566 901 89 72
South 71 276 165 378 35 14
Mountain and Southwest 438 376 487 896 54 30
Pacific 1,909 117 1,498 2,240 43 13

Siee of camuanity
Farm 173 256 385 621 52 32
City (Population)
Under 10,000 214 278 402 705 49 41
10,000-99,999 568 328 734 1,069 125 50
100,000-499,999 569 395 623 1,170 101 29
500,000 and over 682 216 699 1,030 191 148

Family income
Upper 652 361 659 1,147 126 87
Upper middle 514 294 562 1,006 80 59
Lower middle 331 270 581 791 108 75
Lower 298 200 400 665 105 55

Sise of family
1 and 2 members 550 274 691 975 77 67
3 members 349 280 463 764 82 54
4 and 5 members 445 296 539 971 146 85
6 and over 347 259 406 743 9L 51

Presence of children 1/
No children 501 291 659 954 99 63
Under 6 years 381 290 475 859 116 66
6-12 years 348 261 469 790 94 70
13-20 year 378 294 165 875 147 76

Occupation of family head
Executive, professional 668 395 776 1,228 110 105
Clerical, sales, service 506 257 529 946 99 96
Craftsman, laborer 389 269 512 831 121 69
Farmer 177 267 387 652 60 22
Unclassified 497 214 626 846 125 23

Education of family head
Graamar school 347 234 484 786 104 60
Some high school 432 283 544 851 10 78
Some college 773 416 725 1,346 110 78

Age of housewife
Under 35 years 492 196 412 827 77 59
35-44 years 315 265 458 723 136 82
45 years and over 505 316 655 1,018 98 66



1/ Classifications in this section are not mutually exclusive, therefore some families are included in two or more
groups.
2/ Includes dates unidentified as to origin.
SFamily characteristics data not available for October 1949-March 1950.
Source: National Consumer Panel of Market Research Corporation of America
























































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