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World hog and pork prospects
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00013004/00001
 Material Information
Title: World hog and pork prospects
Physical Description: v. : ; 27 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics. -- Division of Statistical and Historical Research
Publisher: Bureau of Agricultural Economics, Division of Statistical and Historical Research
Place of Publication: Washington
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Swine -- Statistics -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Pork industry and trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: - HP-83 (Oct. 1936).
General Note: Reproduced from typewritten copy.
General Note: Description based on: HP-8 (July 9, 1930).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 026660448
oclc - 30588199
Classification: lcc - HD9435.U5 A25
System ID: AA00013004:00033
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Hog situation

Full Text
UNITED STATES E#ARTMIErT Ol AGRICULTURE;
Bureau of Aiculturai Economics
Division of Statist al and Historical Researca
Washington T


DoCMMET IV PT
* * II


I /


ui B ,PEQOSiTOyp"
HP-81 August 25, 1936


WORLD HOG AND PORK PROSPECTS

Quarterly Summary

The number of hogs slaughtered in the 1936-37 marketing year,

beginning October 1, probably will be from 10 to 20 percent larger than

in. 1935-36. Average weights of hogs marketed in 1936-37, however will

be lighter than in 1935-36, and may be as light as in 1934-35i following

.the 1934 drought.

Hog prices in 1936-37 probably will average about as high as in

1935-36, since the probable increase in slaughter supplies will be about

offset .by the further improvement in consumer demand now in prospect

log slaughter in the period from October to December 1936 is expected

to be much larger than that of the corresponding period a year earlier,

and a decline in hog prices is likely to occur during these months. As

slaughter supplies are reduced in the late winter and spring, however,

prices are likely to advance.

It is probable that producers have reduced materially the number

of sows to be farrowed in the fall of 1936 from the number indicated by

the June Pig Crop Report, in view of the very unfavorable feed crop

prospects which have since developed. The 1936 fall pig crop, therefore,

probably will be no larger, and may be smaller, than that of 1935. It

is also probable that the 1937 spring pig crop will be smaller than that

of 1936.

Exports of hog products are likely to increase somewhat in the

.first half of. the 1936-37 hog-marketing year, in view of the larger

domestic alaughter supplies of hogs in prospect. In the last half of





HP-81 2.

1936-37, however, the probable smaller domestic hog slaughter is likely to

be accompanied by exports no greater than in the last half of the present

marketing year. The current volume of exports is smaller than that which

could be absorbed by foreign markets under present policies limiting imports&

There are increasing indications of larger British import quotas for

cured pork after January 1, 1937. The increase, however, undoubtedly would

be accompanied by the application of import duties, the revenue to be used

largely for promoting British hog production. Meanwhile, hog numbers in

Great Britain are larger than a year ago. Increases also are apparent in

Denmark and some other countries interested in supplying the British cured-

pork market

Germany is the only important pork-importing country of continental

Europe to report a current upward movement in hog numbers. In virtually

all of the central European importing countries there is a definite trend

toward limiting hog production to the numbers for which domestically produced

feed'is available. This development suggests some increase in the fat import

requirements, including lard. At present most of the lard imports are being

secured through barter or exchange arrangements, largely with European

exporting countries.

Current trading practices indicate that there may be difficulty in

regaining a substantial share of the continental European lard market when

the American product becomes available in more usual quantities. This is

particularly true with respect to the formerly important German market,

which will remain virtually closed to American lard unless German commercial

policy is materially changed. It may be difficult also to overcome the

tendency to utilize fats other than lard which has developed during the

period of reduced American lard production following the drought of 1934.

This tendency is noticeable in Great Britain, the leading foreign market





HP-81 3.


for American lard, as Well as in central Auropean areas deficient in lard.

Concessions secured from foreign-countries in the reciprocal trade agree-

ments, on the other hand;, will tend to encourage exports of hog products,

especially lard, as domestic hog production is increased.

Hog Numbers in Principal Countries

Hog numbers in mid-summer 1936, in commercially important hog pro-
ducing countries were about 15 percent above the low point reached on the
same date of 1935. The 1936 United States spring pig crop increased 29
percent to 41,884,000 head. In six I/ European countries, for which mid-
summer estimates are available for 1936, hog numbers increased 6 percent
to 33,256,000, compared with mid-summer 1935. .A further, increase in these
countries appears ,to be in prospect, as the number of brood sows in June
1936 Was about 15 -erer.nt larger than in June 1935. These six countries
support about two-fifths of the total hog numbers in Eur.ope, 'exclusive of
the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. *The.nurwber of >odgs in -the Soviet
Union at the beginn-ing of 1936 was 26,200,000.compared with 17,100,000.in
1935 and only 11,500,000 in 1934. : .

Hog numbers in Germany increased 11 percent to 24',200,000 between
June 1935 and June 1936. The number of hogs is now only '0.8 percent smaller
than in the summer of 1934 and 1.5 percent smaller than in the record year
1931. There has been a 20 percent increase in young bred sows and an 11
percent increase-in older bred sows, this June as compared with last. Young
pigs up to 6 months showed an increase of 12 percent to 15,752,000 as com-
pared with June a year ago. The June 1936 estimate of, the number of
slaughter hogs and those being fed for slaughter was 4,164,000,- wh-ich was
6 percent more than in June of last year but 7 percent 'less 'than in June
1934.

In Great Britain (England, Wales, and Scotland)? the'number of
hogs reported on hand on June 1, 1936 was 4,037,000 and was 1- percent smaller
than at the same date a year ago, when it was unusually large. There were also
3% fewer brood sows than there were a year ago. The number of hoGs in
Irish Free State, which exports live hogs and bacon to Great Britain in
relatively large quantities, was 1,010,000:on June 1, 1936, 9 percent below
the number on the same date of 1935.

The June 13, 1936 hog estimate for Denmark was 3,374,000. While there
is no strictly comparable estimate for last year, the number reported on May
25, 1935 was only 3,056,000 and the number on July 15, 1935 was 3,034,000.
Bred sows were reported at 314,000 on Juno 13 this year, which was at least
15 percent more then in 1935 when the number on May 25 was only 255,000. The
number on July 15 of the same year was 271,000. A further expansion in hog
numbers this year is expected in the Netherlands where the early spring
estimate showed an increase of 8 percent above February 1935 in total numbers,
and 9 percent in bred sows. (See table of hog numbers in specified countries
in mid-summer 1935 and detailed table for Germany, Denmark, and Great Britain,
and Irish Free State.)
_/ Germany, Denmark, England and Wales, Scotland, Irish Free State, and Hungary.





HP-81 4.


Hogs: Numbers in specified surplus and deficit countries in
mid-summer 1936* with comparisons


Country


: Date :
: of : 1931
:estimate :


: Thou-
: sands
SURPLUS COUNTRIES :
Non-European: :
United States iJ .....: June 1 :
Canada ...............: : 4,717
European: :
Irish Free State .....: : 1,227
Denmark, in rural
communities ........ :June 1-20: 5,453
Netherlands ..........: May-June: 2,434
Poland ............... June 7,321
Hungary ............... July : 2,715
Latvia ..............: June 712
Estonia ..............: Summer : 323
Lithuania .. ...........: June 30 : 1569
Total 3 surplus
European countries :
reporting to 1936 : 9.395
DEFICIT COUNTRIES :
England and Wales .....: June 1 : 2,783
Scotland ..............: : 162
Northern Ireland ......: 236
Total United Kingdom .: : 3.181


Germany .............. .
Czechoslovakia ..'.....:
Norway .... .........:
Total 3 deficit
European countries :
reporting to 1936 ...:
Total 6 surplus and
deficit countries
reporting to 1936 ...:
Total 15 surplus and :
deficit countries '
reporting to 1935, :
excl.United States .
Soviet Russia ........:


tl
July 1
June


22,529
:5q3,088
: 317


25,474


: 34,869


: 55,586
: 14,400


1932


Thou-
sands


1933


Thou-
sands


: 1934
:*


Thou-
sands


39,698
3,639 3,801 3,654


1,108

4,886
2,244
5,844
2. 361
582
303


J. O .U J O v3.0 L..GQOC ,iJO.__


8,355 7,237 6,497 7,320 6,928

3,185 3,069 3,320 3,811 -3,801
165 167 206 255 236
220 271 380 458
3,570 3,507 3,906 4,.526
21,289 21,174 22,368 20,042 22,291
3,082 3,314 3,888 3,016
304 319 550 410 -


24,639 24,410 25,894 24,108 26,328


32,994 31.647 32.391 31,428 33.256


931


I


I
S 1935


Thou-
sands


32,380
3,549


: 1936


Thou-



41,884


968 1,088 1,010


4,407 3,027
(2,100)3/2,022
5,753 7,053
1,899 2,502
586 686
277 282


.2/3,056
4/1,629
6,703
3,176
802
289


3,374


2,544


50,602 49,374 52,194
11,600 12,068 17,450


49,542
22,550


Compiled from reports of United States Department of Agriculture officials
abroad, official sources and the International Institute of Agriculture. Figures
in parentheses interpolated.
I/ Spring pig crop, i.e., number of pigs saved December 1-June 1. Figures for
1931-33 being revised.
2/ May 25.
By August 1934 the number had fallen to 1,875,000.
4/ Augus t.
5/ Census, May 1930.


.*


.






HP-81 5.


United States

According to the 1936 Summer Hog Outlook report recently released
by the Bureau of Agricultural Economics, hog slaughter during the last
2 months of the present marketing year ending September 30 will be some-
what larger than was indicated by the number of hogs on farms over 6
months of age on June 1 as shown by the June Pig Crop report. Because of
the large increase in the 1936 spring pig crop, the number of hogs that
will be slaughtered during the first 6 months (October-March) of the 1936-37
marketing year, is expected to be larger than the slaughter for the same
period in either of the 2 previous years. The number of hogs to be
slaughtered in the entire year 1936-37 probably will be from 10 to 20 per-
cent larger than in 1935-36 and 1934-35, when the totals were the smallest
in many years. With short corn supplies and high cofn prices in prospect
as a result of the 1936 drought, average weights of hogs marketed in
1936-37 will be lighter than in 1935-36 and may be about the same as in
1934-35, following the drought of 1934.

As a result of the severe drought conditions prevailing over most
of the Corn Bolt in July, the indicated production of corn in that area
on August 1 was smaller than in 1934. In view of these unfavorable feed
prospects, it is probable that producers havo reduced materially the number
of sows to be farrowed in the-'fall of 1936 from the number indicated by
the June Pig Crop report, which was based upon breeding intentions reported
about June 1. The number of sows to be farrowed in the coming fall was
estimated in June to be 14 percent larger than the number of farrowed hogs
in 1935. Because of the development of the severe drought, the number of
sows farrowed in the fall of 1936 will probably be no larger and may be even
smaller than a year earlier. It is also probable that the 1937 spring pig
crop will be smaller than that of 1936.

Hog prices in 1936-37 probably will average about ad high as in the
present year, since the probable increase in the aggregate live weight of
hogs slaughtered will be offset by the further improvement in consumer
demand now in prospect. Prices in the early months (October-December) of
the 1936-37 year, however, are likely to decline because of the anticipated
increase in hog slaughter. The effect of the increased slaughter supplies
in this period upon hog prices will be offset to some extent by the further
improvement in consumer demand in prospect for hog products and a strong
prospective storage demand for these products. However, as slaughter
supplies of hogs are reduced in the late winter and early spring, an advance
in hoC prices at that time is probable.

After an advance in late June, hog prices weakened somewhat during
the first half of July, but v ain advanced toward the and of the month.
In late July and early August the top 'price of hogs at Chicago reached the
highest level since late September 1935. The July average price at Chicrgo
was $9.76 per 100 pounds compared with $9.88 in June and $9.49 in July last
year. The advance in hog prices in late July and early August was confined
almost entirely to hogs that wore well finished. Prices in hogs lacking
in finish tended to weaken in this period.






HP-81 6.


Hog slaughter under Federal inspection in July, totaling 2,692,000
head, was only 2 percent smaller th.,n in June, and was 57 percent larger
than in July last year, when the total was. the.smallest in over 30 years.
Although inspected slaughter for the first 9 months of the 1935-36 market-
ing year was slightly below the total for.the same period in 1934-35,
slaughter for the first 3 months of the summer marketing season (May to,
September) amounted to 8,010,000 head compared with 5,712,000 head during
the same period last year, when summer' slaughter supplies of hogs were the
lowest in about 25 years.' Slaughter supplies of hogs in July included .a
relatively large proportion of packing sows and hogs lacking in finish.
This is partly a reflection of the reduced feed supplies and advancing
feed prices resulting from the severe drought in the principal hog producing
areas. It is probable that further liquidation of such hogs will occur in
the next few months. With corn prices high relative to hog prices in
prospect this fall, it is likely that 1936 spring pigs will be marketed
early and that the proportion of the total hog slaughter for 1936-.37
occurring in October, November, and December will be relatively large.

The average weight of hogs at the seven leading markets in July was
258 pounds compared with 253 pounds in Jur.e and 254 pounds in July 1935.
The increase in average weights in the last 2 months was largely the result
of the increase in the proportion of packing sows in the supplies, rather
than the feeding of hogs to heavier weights. Although the average .weight
of hogs in July was heavier than in the preceding month, weights declined
somewhat after early July as a result of increased numbers of unfinished
hogs marketed.

Corn prices rose sharply during the month of July as severe drought
conditions continued. The average prices of No. 3 Yellow corn at Chicago
rose from a level slightly above 60 cents a bushel in early July to about
$1.00 at the end of the month, and in the first week of August reached an
average of $1.11. Since the average prices of hogs did not change greatly
during this period, the hog-corn price ratio dropped rapidly. Based upon .
Chicago prices for hogs and corn, the hog-corn price ratio for the week I
ended August 8 was 8.9 compared with 16.0 in early June, before drought
conditions became severe, and 12.9 a year earlier.' The hog-corn price
ratio during the remainder of the present hog marketing year and in the
first 3 months of the 1936-37 year will probably continue much lower than
in the first half of the current marketing year.

Wholesale prices of "fresh pork declined during the first half of
July,'probably as a result of very high temperatures prevailing over most
of the country. This decline was Yecovered, however, in late July as
cooler weather served to stimulate the demand for meats. Prices of most
cured products weakened slightly during the greater part of July, but
advanced near the end of the month. The composite wholesale price of hog
products in New York in July was $21.35 per 100 pounds compared with $20.99
in June and $22.69 in the corresponding month last year.

Exports of both pork and lard in June showed a slight increase over
those in May. Lard exports exceeded those of a year earlier for the fourth
consecutive month, while the quantity of pork exported was only slightly
below that of June 1935. Exports of both pork and lard, however, in June





HP-81 7.


this year were considerably. below the June average for the years 1930-34.
For the first 9 months b'tOthe'present hog marketing year, total exports
of pork, amounting to slightly less than 50,000,000 pounds, were about
41 percent smaller than the shipments for the same period of 1934-35, and
were much below- those of earlier years. Exports of lard have increased
somewhat during 1936,- but for the first 9 months of the 1935-36 hog market-
ing year they were-about 40 percent less than in 1934-35. Shipments of
pork and lard fr6m principal United States ports in July exceeded those of
a year earlier.

With larger slaughter supplies of hogs in prospect in this country
in the first half of the 1936-37 marketing year, it is probable that
exports of hog products will increase somewhat in this period. In the
last half of 1936-37, however, the probable smaller domestic hog slaughter
is likely to be accompanied by a level of exports no greater than in the
last half of the present marketing year.

Canada
The price of bacon hogs in Canada continued to advance in July,
and for the 4-week period ended July 30 the average at Toronto was $9.05
per 100 pounds compared with $8.95 for the 4-week period of June and
$9.51 in the 4-week period of July a year ago.

The price of hogs has held up well despite an increase of 8 percent
in marketing in the first 7 months of the year. The price of bacon hogs
at Toronto during the first 7 months averaged $8.56 per 100 pounds
compared with $8.98 a year ago. The increased supplies cciginated
principally in Ontario, Quebec, and Saskatchewan. Marketings of live and
dead hogs in the principal provinces so far this year ha% 3 been as follows,
with percentage of the some period last year in parentheses: Ontario,
686,000 (127); Quebec, 229,000 (140); Alberta, 516,000 (96); Manitoba,
280,000 (84); Saskatchewan, 202,000 (109).

It appears from available statistics that domestic consumption of
commercially produced pork and pork products in Canada has increased
during the first 6 months of 1936 as compared with a ycar ago. Ext.,rts
have increased about 19 percent, live hogs being converLed to an equivalent
dressed meat basis.

There has been a fairly large increase in exports of live hogs and
bacon and pork to the United States so far this year. In June, almost
3,000 live h-:gs were shipped to the United States and over 1,000,000
pounds of pc.:'c,, bacon, and hams. Exports of live hogs to the United States
for the firct 6 months of this year, reported at 29,283 head, are almost
ten times as large as for the .. :.e period last year, and exports of pork,
bacon, and ham, reported at 5,974,000 pounds, are more than twice as large.
The live hog exports to this country in the first half of 1936 are larger
than for any whole year since 1927, when 195,000 head came to this country
from Canada. Pork, bacon, and ham exports to the United States so far
exceed shipments for any.year since 1929, but are very small when total
United States production and consumption of pork are considered. Exports
bf those items from the United States to Canada have also increased.






HP-81 8.


Bacon exports to the United Kingdom from -Canada for the first 6
months of this year amounted "to 72,000,000 pounds and were 2 percent
smaller than in the same period of 1935, but a little larger than in the
first 6 months of 1934. Shipments during the past 3 months have exceeded
those of last year, whereas those for the first 3 months showed a decrease.
Although bacon exports have been smaller during .the first 6 months of 1936
than a year ago, shipments of all pork products, amounting to 87,000,000
pounds, have exceeded the same period last year by 9 percent. This increase
is due to materially larger exports of lard, which have reached 14,515,000
pounds so far .this year compared with only 6,168,000 pounds in 1935 for
the corresponding period.

United Kingdom and Irish Free State

British plans for encouraging the domestic production of hogs and
pork include import duties on non-Empire pork products, according to Agricul-
tural Attache C. C. Taylor at London. It is anticipated also that the
imposition of duties will be accompanied by some relaxation of the present
pork import quotas, and by a higher scale of fixed prices to be paid for
British hogs. It appears unlikely, however, that any of the indicated
changes will become effective before January 1, 1937. Since the period
1929-31, non-Empire countries have lost about 40 percent of their cured-
pork market in Great Britain, partly through replacement by British and
Empire supplies, and partly through the reduction in total allowed imports.
Further displacement may be more gradual, but there is no immediate prospect
of a reversal of this trend.

The total cured-pork. quota for the period September-December 1936
has recently. been announced by the British Government at 1,590,683 hundred-
weight (178,156,000 pounds). This figure compares with 1,813,458 hundred-
weight (203,107,000 pounds), the quota for the current 4-mbnth period, and
represents a reduction of 12 percent. The average monthly rate of 44,539,000
pounds for the last 4 months of this year compares with 53,540,000 pounds,
the allowed total in September 1935, and 46,935,000 pounds, the average
monthly rate for the October-December 1935 period. The quota reduction for
the last 3 months of 1936 when compared with the rate for comparable months
of 1935 amounts to only 5 percent. The quota reduction for the last period
of 1935 also amounted to 12 percent when compared with the rate prevailing
in the immediately preceding months. See table page 10.

The United States share in the September-December total British quota
is again 8 percent, with an additional 0.1 percent allowed as an adjustment
in connection with imports previously made through Canada, or approximately
.14,431,000 pounds for the 4 months. The monthly rate is, therefore, around
3,608,000 pounds. Monthly .shipments from the United States through June
have averaged 3,058,000 pounds against an 'average allotment for the same
months of 3,922,000 pounds, leaving a total deficit for the 6 months of
5,182,000 pounds. Of this amount, 2,800,000 were relinquished by American
shippers during the early months of the year, leaving a redeemable deficit
for the first half of the year of 2,382,000 pounds. Since any deficit
occurring in the first quota period of the year is to be made up during the
second (May-August), shipments for July and August should average 5,337,000




EP-81 9.
pounds. This amount is only slightly higher than the June shipments of
5,031,000 pounds. If British prided tor American short cut green hams
remain attractive, it -would seem that the United States may wipe out the
deficit balance which has been accumulating since early in 1935S See table
page 10.

Liverpool quotations on American short cut green hams remained
steady during July at very close to $22.00 per 100 pounds. The average for
the month was the highest since last September and the highest July average
since 1930.

Total imports of ham into the United Kingdom amounted to a little
over 53,000,000 pounds for the current season, October 1, 1935 to June 30,
1936, a reduction of 5 percent from those of the comparable 1934-35 period
and of 36 percent when compared with those of the 1929-30 period. Imports
from the United States, at about 27,000,000 pounds, represented 51 percent
of the total, and those from Canada, at 20,000,000 pounds, 38 percent. The
remaining 11 percent of total imports was furnished almost entirely by the
Irish Free State, Poland, and Argentina.

Liverpool bacon quotations during July were well maintained at the
high levels of the past few months, Danish Wiltshire sides reaching $20.65
per 100 pounds, the highest monthly average in over a year, and Canadian
green sides $18.23, the highest since last October.. American green bellies
were quoted on the Liverpool market during July for the first time since
March, averaging $16.71 per 100 pounds, the highest average in over 2 years.

Total bacon imports into the United Kingdom during the 9 months of
the period, October 1, 1935 to June 30, 1936, amounted to 545,000,000
pounds as against 590,000,000 last season and 972,000,000 in the peak year
1931-32. Of the- total imported, Denmark supplied about 54 percent, Canada
14 percent, the Irish Free State over 7 percent, and the'Netherlands
approximately the same. About-18 percent of total imports during this
period came from-minor suppliers, with the United States sending less than
0.5 percent.

Liverpool:lard quotations continue well below those of last year,
averaging f,:,r July $12.37 per 100 pounds against $14.46 in July 1935.
Imports of lard into the United Kingdom, which amounted to about 125,000,000
pounds for the first 9 months of the 1935-36 season, were 23 percent smaller
than:those of the corresponding period last year, and 521percenzt smaller
than:the record imports 6f 2 seasons ago. The United States share of
imports so far this season has been less than 37 percent, whereas during
the same months of last season it was 67 percent and of 1933-34, 93 percent.
Canada, since thd first 6f 1936, has supplied*more than any other one
country, with Brazil, Hungary, and the-Balkan countries each sending a
considerable amount. A number of other countries also hdve participated
in the trade to an unusual degree.

Fat consumption in .the United Kingdom was maintained during 1935
despite a 50-percent decrease in lard imports and a slight decrease in the
imports of butter end edible oleo fats. These deficiencies were trade up
by increased imports of vegetable oils, oil seeds, and whale oil. After
allowing for exports and re-exports of oil, the net importation of oil seeds,
oils, and fats was 1,278,000 long tons in 1935, which was 2 percent less
i

":'..HE





HP-81 10.; ,

than in 1934 but 3 percent more than-2 yegrs ago. Even this smail decrease
of 2 percent (26,000 tons) does not indicate any real .decrease in con-
sumption because during the year butter stocks were reduced 5,000 tons,
the decrease in net soap exports represented a further saving of over
4,000 tons of oil. Stocks of whale oil and. pssibly,oil seeds were reduced
during the year, and the domestic .output of lard and animal fat, dripping,
etc., was increased 5,000 to 10,000 tons.

It appears reasonably certain that there was no appreciable quantita-
tive change in the total oil and fat consumption in the United Kingdom
between the years 1933 and 1935, although the proportionate composition
of the total was materially altered. ..Margarine consumption in 1935 was
nearly 12,000 tons more than in 1934 and the consumption of lard compounds
and shortenings was probably 25,000 to 35,000 tons higher..

Supplies of British and Irish fresh pork, as reflected in the London
Central Markets, have been larger during the first 9 months of the current
season than in any comparable period since October-June 1931-32. Receipts
of over 62,000,000 pounds at these markets represented an increase of 9
percent over those of October-June 1934-35.


United Kingdom: Total cured pork allocations, September 1-December
31, 1936, and to the United States, January 1-December 31, 1936


:Ttal allocationoSept.1-Dec.31 : Allocations to United States
:Percentage: : Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1936
Country : share of : Allocations : :Allocation : Imports
: total : H.d a: lonth :/' 2/
Hundred- : 1,000 : :000 00 : 1,000
: Percent : weight : pounds : 1936 : pounds pounds
S S S
Denmark ......: 63.50 : 1,010,083: 113,129: Jan. : 3,877 : 2,324
Netherlands ..: 9.50 : 151,115: 16,925: Feb. : 3,642 : 2,148
Pplvxtd ......: 7.95 : 126,459: 14,163: Mar. : 3,990 : 2,597
Sweden .......: 4.70 : 74,762: 8,373: Apr. : 3,862 : 2,354
Lithuania ...: 2.95 : 46,925: 5,256: May : 4,146 : 3,895
Estonia ......: .75 : 11,930: 1,336: June : 4,014 : 5,031
Finland ....: .40: 6,363: 713: July : 4,146 :
Latvia ........: .70 : 11,135: 1,247: Aug. : 4,146 :
USSR .........: .85 : 13,521: 1,514: Sept.: 3,608 :
Argentina ....: .70 : 11,135: 1,247: Oct. : 3,608 :
United States.:_/ 8.00 :3/ 127,255:3/ 14,253: (Nov. : 3,607) :
: : (Dec. : 3.608) :
Total.....: 100.00 1,590.683" 178.156 : 46.254

Division of Foreign Agricultural Service.

1/ Final figures with all adjustments-made.
a/ Not adjusted for re-exports..
3/ Plus 0.1 percent of total to allow for adjustments in connection-with
imports through Canada. .





SP-81 11.


United Kingdom: Total bacon imports, by months, 1928-29 to 1935-36


:1928-29 :1929-30 :1930-31


S S


: 1931-32 1
* S


1932-33 :19i 3-34 :1934-35:1935-36
S


1,000 1,000
rounds -pguds


72,402
74,868
85,603
74,801
73,721
84,631
75,096
84,615
83,277
85,457
84,758
88.206


95,809
86,316
112,267
95,273
99,645
93,406
99,464
108,136
109,080
105,607
106,567
105.978


1,000
rounds


109,051
105,372
109,857
101,159
112,538
125,818
108,150
89,052
111,194
102,004
104,395
101.571


1,000
pounds

114,310
114,458
92,817
96,602
78,231
95,152
85,173
92,804
91,029
87.203
83,3 1
83-069


1,000
rounds

83,272
81,117
66,612
72,209
68,345
72,271
75,675
79,089
70,351
76,298
70,528
64.943


1,000
pounds

65,537
66,325
68,370
70,773
60,415
62,878
66,651
67,156
62,070
68,519
69,308
64.237


1,000
pounds

58,170
61,147
64,374
59,628
56,962
62,750
61,392
60,040
60,555


Total : 933,093 967,435 1,217.548 1,280.161 1,114,209 880,810 792,239
Foreign Agricultural Service Division. Compiled from Trade and Navigation of
the United Kingdom.

United Kingdom: Total ham imports, by months, 1928-29 to 1935-36


Month :1928-29 :1929-30 :1930-31 :1931-32 :1932-33 :1933-34 :1934-35 :1935-36
* S S: S S S


1,000
rounds

8,105
8,125
9,347
7,920
7,989
8,601
9,539
12,298
10,983
14, 91
12,024
7. 236


1,000
pounds

5,792
5,755
10,111
7,101
6,507
5,337
7,597
9,204
9,773
11,165
7,429
5,613


1,000
pounds

7,217
7,550
8,596
4,602
5,146
6,530
5,754
9,664
8,466
11,661
9,091
S.978


1,000
pounds

7,497
7,998
6,578
7,100
5,556
5,981
7,874
10,737
9,207
13,568
8,489
9. 267


1,000
pounds

6,992
7,932
6,155
4,743
4,233
7,288
7,542
7,234
7,021
11,984
9,357
4.962


1,000
pounds

5,419
5,887
5,951
5,012
5,223
5,623
7,119
7,378
8,408

6,072
5.219


1,000
-ounds

4,797
5,074
7,395
4,839
5,011
5,456
4, 33
7,202
8,745


Total : 110.257


116.558


91,384 91.265 99.853 85.443 7.5,97


Month


1,000
rounds


Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
Uay
June
July
Aug.
Sept.


82,378
79,297
76,771
88,092
68,612
68,923
73,126
87,845
71,894
80,360
82,290
73.505


S


Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
May
June
July
Aug.
Sept.


1,000
pounds

6,484
6,782
7,339
8,788
8,232
6,828
8,981
14,136
10,499
12,042
12,073
8.073


Foreign Agricultural Service Division. Compiled from Trade and ixavi.ation
of the United Kingdom.


,


J


6 978


,


Total : 110 257 116 558




HP-81 12.


United Kingdom: Arrivals of Wiltshire sides in Great Britain from
continental countries, by weeks, 1935-36 and comparable -eriods
1934-35 and 1935-36 I


Week
ended
Season
1935-36
Oct.-Dec.
Jan. 3..
10 .. :
17 .. :
24..
31 ..
Feb. 7 ..
14.. :
21..
28 ..
Mar. 5 ..
13 :
20 ..
27 .. :
Apr. 3 ..
10 ..
17..
24 ..
May 1 ..
8 ..
15..
22 .. :
29 ..
June 5 ..
12 ..
19 .. :
26..
July 3 ..
10..
17 ..
24 .. :
Totals to date:
1935-36 :
1934-35 :


Danish : At London :Canadian
at all : : : : : Lithu- : at all
orts :.Danish Swedish. Ditch : Polish : anian : or.ts
Bales Bales Bales Bales Bales Bales 3.les


* I


424,372
29,554
30,174
31,790
31,944
31,187
31,057
32,932
33,760
30,150
32,044
21,759
31,060
22,389
23,476
32,692
21,624
30,285
31,135
31,507
31,984
31,750
31,337
31,575
32,560
31,635
22,085
31,720
31,399
31,549
32. 367


1,375,452
1,484,102


704,793
777,529


75,751
51,314


96,6622
101,229


112,731
110,029


77,362
60,180


258,14,
301,852


Transmitted by the London, England, Office of the Forei;n Acricultural Service.
1/ London Provision Exchange. Sides are backed 4 to 6 to the bale, according
to weight of sides. The most popular bale is that carrying 4 sides with the
total weight ranging 220-260 pounds.


I


219,132
14,916
15, 350
15,929
16,022
15,.759
15,170
15,734
16,501
15,314
15,755
16,682
16,303
16,162
16,942
17,022
16, 501
15, 283
15,894
15,615
16,314
15, 687
16,512
17,209
17,229
16,:12
16, 75
16,016
16,891
16, 713
17. 344


16,686
1,386
1,153
1,429
1,283
1,397
1,027
1,221
1,415
1,661
1,167
1,523
1,.--84
1,335
1, 122
1,5?":
1,275
1,283
1,348
1,297
1,277
1,371
1,180
1,215
1,172
1,160
1,347
1,308
1,352
1,358
1.348


28,823
1,599
1,745
1,929
1,754
1,814
2,043
1,850
2,129
2,298
2,301
2, 6?74
2,743
2,525
2,693
1, 638
2,349
2,450
2,726
2,315
2,163
2,464
2,217
2,523
2,453
2,498
2,437
2,446
2,293
2,465
2.275


35.628
2,216
2,866
2,210
2,582
3,042
2,995
2,427
2,345
2,289
2,927
2,485
2,532
2,652
3,02939
3,260
2,960
2,795
2, 669
2,752
2,072
2,302
2,030
2,437.
2,244
2,409
2,466
2,308
2,536
2,561
2.395


23,092

2,565
2,075
2,450
2,695
3,217
1,950
1,703
1,916
1,813
1,793
1,705
1,561
1,565
1,551
1,726
1,768
1,797
1,776
1,320
1,518
1,S40
1,755
1,749
1, 732
1,770
1,827
1,886
1,679
1-728


65,931
* 6,024
6,938
:7,234
.6,730
-6,408
*6,101
:6,-942
'6,830
6,011
6,168
6,068
5,011
5,925
5,944
5,743
6,078
6,799
6,765
6,667
3,122
6,210
6,464
6,860
6,134
6;329
6,201
6,462
6,:969
7 ,'145
6,934


v


.


I






HP-81 13


United Kingdom: Total lard i-.-orts, by months, 1928-29


to 1935-36


Month 1928-29:


1929-30'


1930-31


1931-32' 1932-33,


1,000
mounds


Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
May
June
July
Aug.":
Sent. :
Total:


18,079
21,551
17,480
35,923
29,752
22,2Z4
21,612
26,479
20,498
25,977
21,204
16,899
277,688


1,000
rounds


21,844
24,004
27,160
27,559
25,187
24,810
18,218
20,772
21,078
31,801
20,438
12,976
275,847


1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
rounds rounds pounds pounds pounds


22,897
27,751
27,270
21,459
32,576
26,608
25 276
23,771
27,586
28,539
25,001
17,022
305,755


17,329
19,234
21,276
28,188
37,323
31,248
11,805
20,565
25,390
22,221
16,477
18,5561
270,112


19,799
21,305
17, 58
24,391
31,490
31,269
22,788
24,305
25,026
28,673
31,403
29,484
'30 .581


25,407
23, 01
25,855
34,945
26,975
23,568
22,984
34,335
39,S95
22,564
24,151
19,200
322,980


26,932
22,582
17,365
15,351
16,921
19,725
14,508
16,009
13,628
16,374
15,526
9,063
204,28-4


1,000
pounds

12,161
12,700
10,096
15,321
16,302
12,689
17,758
12,261
15,714


Foreign Afrricultural Service Division. Compiled from Trade and Navigation of
the United KinEdom.



United Kingdom: Bacon i.aports from Denmark, by months, 1928-29 to 1975-36


1930-31.


1931-32:


1,000 1,000


1932-33. 1933-234


1,000


1,000


rmu1is pounds pounds pounds rounds


1934-35.


1935-36


1,000 1,000
pounds -)ounds


Oct. : 50,703
Nov. : 48,033
Dec. : 45, 60
Jan. : 48,71.7
Feb. : 41,508
Mar. : 41,935
Apr. : 44,031
May : 46,758
June 41,886
July : 6,570
Aug. : 48,121
Sept. : 48,350
Total: 552,272


;oreign Arricultural Service Divis
the United Kingdom.


ion. Co-,nilcd from Trade and Naviration of


1933-34x


1934-35:
*._ 5


1935-36


Month ;

:


1928-29:


1923-30,
1,'90O


1,000
nounks. s


17,436
-.8,525
52, 490
18,405
--4, -39
51,970
45,204-
56,206
54,456
55 213
55,066
59,751
621,112


70,906
61,433
81,294
66,819
67,246
65,505
63,224
67,190
66,161
68,704
68,094
07,893
8141,469


.71,154
72,521
77,.467
73,217
75,213
88,046
76,032
48,717
82,653
72,174
70,019
57.587
874,900


75,730
70,445
59 ,32
57,307
50,-195
59,092
51,023
59,195
55,517
53,125
53,152
48,558
692,971


47,545
44,588
37,159
40,106
34,684
10,128
. 41,524
43,595
41,006
45,676
43,503
37,384
496,908


34,403
30,798
34,912
31,951
30,129
323 r3'6
32. 746
31,727
32,262


37,837
33,158
37,773
33,856
31,8142
35,824-
35,931
36,996
34,020
38,482
40,3379
38,130
41-0,241


m





HP-81 14


Countries Important in British Market. Sunplies

Dem.ark.- The upward tendency in banish hog numbers increased the
total to 3,374,000 head on June 13, 19361 the largest figure for any census
period since. January 1934, according to Agricultural Conmmissi6ner H. E. Reed
at Berlin. The increase in bred s.w.s, under way since late 1934, resulted
in current figures for that class being larger than at any time since November
1932, when the first British restrictions on imports became effective. The
upturn in numbers is seen as a test of the Danish production control plan,
which has proved satisfactory in -eriods of declining and of fairly stable
numbers. Any increase in the British market outlet would be favorable to
Danish producers, since that market is the dominant factor in the calculations
uoon which the determination of "sur-lus" or low-pr-ice hours is based. By
June 20, prices being paid for surplus hogs were r' sultin. in a decidedly
unfavorable hog-feed price ratio for such hojs. The production of high-price
or nonsur-?lus hogs was still profitable, but prices of these have shown a
downward tendency since last March.

Danish bacon exports for the first 9 months of the 1955-36 season
wore 8.5 percent smaller than in 1924-C5, in line vith the British restric-
tions on imports. The s:nrller export figure coincided during the first half
of 1936 with increased Danish market supplies of hogs. Luring the same "
period, the exorts of live hogs and lard, mostly to Germany, were not large
enough to offset the decline in bacon exports. The present situation is
difficult, but Danish authorities hesitate to reduce hog. numbers materially
in view of the possible enlargement of the British quota.;. Danish production
policy, therefore, cannot take definite shape until British olans are finally
announced. Meanwhile, it am-ears that Denmark will have a surplus of hogs.

Other sunTvying countries.- Hog numbers in Sweden have been declining
since 1933. Slaughter in the first 5 months of 1936 was c.maller than that
of a year earlier, despite some increase ovr- last year in figures for Hiarch,
April, and May. The increase in recent months has forced prices down somewhat.
Bacon exports have shown little change from last year's i'iures, but bacon
imports arc larger this -c.-r than last. Lard exports hzvc bee- larger than
last jear, and imoorts hav2 been smaller. In Norwy.y alcjv there has boen a
decline in total hcg numbers this /jcr, although there ha. beon so-e increase
in the numbers of sows and young pigs. The April 1936 census for that country
suggests reduced marketing this summer, with some increase developing late
in the ./ear. Slaughter this yeer has been smaller than in 1935. Lard imports
are running smaller for 1936 than in 1935, but imports of fat pork have
increased substantially.

Slaughter and exports in Lithuania were larger than last year in the
first half of 1936, despite the moderate decline in hog numbers noted in
the past few ears. A reexport trade via British ports has moved additional
volumes of becon this year, with Great Britain and Russia also taking more
lard and live hogs, respectively. Lithuanian hogs .are marketed under a
fixed-price system. Heretofore the fixed prices have proved so high as to
require a subsidy payment for the absorption of losses on much of the pork
exported. Additional business on that basis a-neats to be expected, since
improvements in slaughtering establishments are being undertaken.




HP-81 15


Denmark: Official 1936 midsummer estimate of hog numbers compared
with earlier years

Boars: Brood zovs i Other hours (new classification)
: 4 : : : l 132 : 77 I
4 Date onths: : Not :12ounds: to : Under Suck-:
Date :months: In : Toto:1.
: and :farrow: in Tot and: 12 77 :li : Total
: over :farr : over : ounds'dounds: :ijs
: Thou- Thou- Thou- Thou- Thou- Thou- Thou- Thou- Thou-
: sands sands snnds sends sands s3nds sands sands sends

July 15, 1933 : 25 280 164 444 827 997 1,068 1,029 4,290
Oct. 14, 1933 : 24 244 161 405 825 951 1,075 916 4,169
Dec. 15, 1933 : 23 212 150 362 740 892 974 733 3,724
Jan. 16, 1934 : 21 210 141 351 639 817 890 726 3,474
Mar. 1, 1934 : 22 237 110 347 549 743 792 631 3,1i4
Apr. 14, 1934 : 22 238 110 348 039 694 719 659 3,081
June 1, 1934 : 22 284 115 363 595 664 672 711 3,027
July 15, 1934 : 21 231 124 355 523 647 737 774 3,057
Oct. 15, 1934 : 20 216 117 333 590 711 734 720 3,108
Dec. 1, 1934 : 20 238 106 344 621 346 745 353 3,029
Jan. 15, 1935 : 19 253 105 358 451 667 762 36S 2,925
Mar. 1, 19:5 : 20 255 114 369 508 637 738 695 2,967
Apr. 13, 1935 : 20 241 132 373 463 629 740 813 3,03S
May 25, 1935 : 20 255 125 380 500 635 797 724 2,056
July 13, 1935 : 20 271 112 383 453 733 772 673 [,024
Aug.. 24, 1925 : 21 259 124 283 545 693 742 782 3 ,166
Oct. 5, 1935 : 21 264 141 405 534 JS3 792 860 2,295
Nov. 16, 1935 : 21 278 132 410 565 674 882 765 3,318
Dec. 28, 1935 : 21 278 127 405 450 723 885 7.2 3,216
Feb. 8, 1935 : 21 270 137 407 518 722 816 779 3,263
Mar. 21, 1933 : 22 289 140 429 558 700 823 819 3,254
May 2, 1933 : 23 308 132 440 562 686 852 768 3,331
June 13, 1936 : 24 314 141 455 559 700 826 910 3,374


Compiled from Statistiske Efterretninger, published by the Statistical Depart-
ment of Denmark, and reports from A-ricultural Co: missioner H. Z. Reed, United
States Department of Agriculture.




Poland

Hog n3rices in Poland have advanced rnnterially this .ear, and the rela-
tively hi;,h prices are regarded as a doterront to the generally in'provcd
Polish cx'nort trade in hogs, pork, and lard develo-ed in 13925 nd 1.'35. The
improvement in export markets nrompted the Govcrnment to ur.,e an increase
in breeding operations last year. If available -roduction a:d ..rkLtinL
data are correct, howcvcr, it ap-oeers thnt considerable liquidation has taken
place despite the official admonitions.





HP-81 16


There are increasing indications of potential hog shortages relative
to the continued expansion of export requirements experienced so far this
year. There is a firm demand for., feeder rigs, and the hog-feed price ratio in
May 1936, based largely on hog -orices and potato -orices, was the most favor-
able since 1930. Feed prices have beer favorable' since August 1935, but
expansion in production has not been great enough
so far to influence hoc. prices .:aterially. The current situation is causing
some ap-rehensi'on regarding the ability of Poland to compete with other
pork-exporting countries where n-rocuction is definitely increasing. The
present large volume of trade with the United Stetcs in canned hans is
regarded in Poland as onlr temporary.

Continental Euronean Imnorting Countries

Germany.- Des-pite some increase in domestic production, the problem
of adequate fat supp-lies in Germany remains to be solved, 'Mr. Reed states.
Recent reports, however, sug_-f.-st that current German trade -olicies contem-
-late no additions to su-olies of fats through imports from the United States.
June imports of lard from all sources ,v.ere among the smallest for any month
on record, being only slightly in excess of 1,100,000 minds. Prior to
1933, imports in June averaged about 16,000,000 -"ounds. Denmark was the
leading source of imports in June this year, with 647,000 pounds. The small
remainder was divided among 6 other Euro-ean countries.

The increase in German ho- numbers this year has been the outstanding
development in the current German fat situation. The June 1936 hog census
(excluding, the Saar) shoved total nol numbers to be 3.35 percent larger than
the avcra.e June numbers in the rrjceding 5 years. Other percentage increases
over the average figures yere: slauchtcr ho..s 5.3, young hours 4.0, bred
sows 4.0. The 1936 increases over 19-5 fiuarcs were considerably lar-cr
than the increases over the 5-year Pvurage. Difficulties may be encountered,
however, in carrying the ho:s on the relatively small supplies of food on
hand pending the availability of the 1936 crop.

The total June 1 stocks of the leading f-eds (rye, barley, potatoes)
in first and second hands stood at a fi'.urc bout 24 ncrccnt belo'.- that of
a yerr corlier. While farmers are using man.; other types of feed, it is
apparent that feeding operations have bcon relatively expensive in recent
months. The German policy at present is to confine livestock production
largely to the numbers which can be carried on domestic feeds. The current
expansion in hog numbers has brought forth official advice to producers to
feed no more hogs than they cpn -rovide for from their o'n food crops.

The increase in marketings which began in October 1925 continued
through the first half of 1936. For most of the ti.nc since early Aoril,
marketin&s have been larger than those of a year perlier. Slaughter in
May and June also exceeded last yc!r's fi-ures, and avcr?'.c weights have
been above 1935 figures, -orincipally because of the premiums paid for heavy
hours. In February 1936 about 45 percent of the total hog slau .htor included
arrivals wei,.hin- over 120 kiloranms (265 pounds). In June, that weight
class accounted for over 51 percent of the total slaughter despite the rela-
tively hi-h cost of feeds. For the first 9 months of the 1935-33 season,
however, total receipts at 14 leading markets were 21.5 percent below the
corresponding 1934-35 figure, with slaughter at 36 -ooints showing a decline
of 23.1 ncrcont.







HP-81 17


Germany, excluding the Saar: Official 1936 June estimate of hogs,
by classes, cL,:.-pcred with earlier years

:Farrow: Younr : Hogs 6 months to 1 year: Hogs over 1 year
June : under: pigs : Total : Brood sows : Total: Brood sows : Grand
1-5 : 8 :8 weeks: excl. : :In farrow: excl.: :In farrow: total
: weeks: to 6 : sows & :Total: (preg- :sows &: Total: (preg- :
: : months:boars 1/: : nant) : bors: : nant) :
: Thou- Thou- Thou- Thou- Thou- Thou- Thou- Thou- Thou-
: sands sands sands sands sands sands sands sands sands

1931 : 6,027 10,351 3,425 693 409 246 1,663 1,021 22,529
1932 : 5,501 9,832 3,456 608 374 240 1,534 938 21,289
1933 : 5,139 9,752 3,751 652 422 250 1,511 978 21,174
1934 : 5,283 10,436 4,196 547 338' 272 1,519 949 22,368
1935 : 4,556 9,523 3,659 554 355 277 1,361 866 20,042
1936 : 5,370 10,382 3,928 652 425 236 1,522 958 22,200


Division of.Stctistical and Historicr;l Research; compiled from cable received
from Commissioner H. E. Reed, and original official sources for earlier years.
l/ Boars under 6 months to 1 year in June were as follows in thousands: 1931,
54; 1932, 46; 1933, 46; 1934, 44; 1935, 46; 1936, 47. Boars of 1 year and
over in June were as follows in thousands: 1931, 71; 1932, 73; 1933, 72;
1934, 71; 1935, 66; 1936, 63.




Imports of bacon in June, at 1,500,000 pounds, were slightly larger
than in other recent months, with Netherlands in the leading position as
a source. Total pork supplies in June were not so l-rge cs those of a year
earlier, but the quantity available moved into consumption slowly, and a
fair proportion of current slaughter ':ent into storage. The German level
of all meet prices is relatively high, ;-ith reduced beef supplies seen
as an important contributing factor. Unfavorably ':arm -eather hcs hindered
the substitution of pork for the relatively more expensive beef. Increased
imports of booeef have not been sufficiently large to offset reduced donestic
supplies.

Czechoslovakia and Austria

In Czechoslovakia and Austria t"lere is a pronounced tendency to confine
hog production to the carrying capaciLy of domestic feed supplies. This
policy indicates the definite encouragement of exchanging industrial exports
for live hoes and 1ork products produced in Hungary, Yugoslavia, Poland,
and other European porl:-exporting regions.

Czech regulations li:..Ating hoc production and feed imports reduced
hog numbers by 23 percent in 2 years, the January 1, 1936, total being
2,735,000 head. In view of rose.it policies, no i:ncrev.se is exujected in
the near future. A more liberal attitude tows.rd American lard has been
developed. The earlier policy of making imports of A:norican lurd contingent






HP-81 18

on imports received from other countries has boon abolished. In the first
4 months of 1936, 1,184,000 ',ou; :1s of Ameorican lard were imported against
only 77,000 pounds in the corresp~-,.nding 1935 period. By June 1936, the
price of American lard at the Czech frontier was lower than the price of
either Hungarian or Yugoslav lard, but quotas and export aids offset the
price advantage considerably. The superior hooping quality of American
lard, however, has prompted the Czech authorities to purchase such lard
for storage in preference to European lard.

The increased Czech interest in imported pork supplies resulted in
imports of live hogs in excess of 80,000 head in the period January-April
1936 against r.bout 40,000 head in those months last year and-only 15,000
head in the 1934 period. Despite the larger imports of hogs, lard, and
bacon this year, per capital consumption of pork in the form of meat was
smaller in the first 4 months of 1936 than a year earlier. Because of
the imports, however, there was an increase over last yeer in the consumption
of pork fat.

In Austria, hog numbers are now ct about the level which can be sup-
ported on hone-produced feeds, according to Mr. Reed. In general, the
policy of exchanging industrial goods for pork and lard has been fairly
satisfactory, with European extorting countries supplying the Austrian
requirement for imported products. The Austrian commercial commitments,
however, include no allowance for imports of American lard, nor are they
likely to, so long as present arrangements prove tolerably satisfactory.
Arrivals of foreign hogs It Vienna markets in the first half of 1956 were
larger than in 1935, but not large enough to offset the smaller marketing
of domestic hogs. Prices of both pork and lard have moved upward in recent
months.

Switzerland and Belgium

Switzerland is another country wherein steps have been taken to
confine hog production to the number for which domestic feed is available.
This policy resulted in hog numbers as of April 21, 1936 being 20 percent
below the 1935 figures. With imports cf hogs also being curtailed, prices
advanced fairly steedily during the first half of this year, the May level
being r.bout 40 percent higher than th, t of a year ago. There has been
some tendency toward larger imports of American lard.

In Belgium, hovercr, lard imtoorts from both the United States and
Netherlands have declined and imports from France have increased. Hog
slaughter in Belgium this year hais been smaller than in 1935, despite some
apparent increc-e in hog numbers as of January 1, 1936. There wore also
some imports of fresh pork this year, whereas there vere none in the corre-
sponding months of 1935. Such imports came from Poland, Lithuania, and
Netherlands.





EP-81 19.


Hogs and pork products Indices of foreign supplies and demand


Oct6 -dune


Country
and item


UNITED KINGDOM:
Supplies, : :
domestic,fresh :1,000 :
pork, London... :pounds:
Imports-
Bacon- :
Denmark ......: "
Irish F.State.: "
United States.: "
Canada .......: :
Others ....... :
Total ...... :
Ham, total ....: ".
Lard, total ...: "
DEiA APX:
Ixrports- :
Bacon ........... "
CANADA: : :
Slaughter- : :
Hogs, inspected. :1000' s:
GEEIAANY:
Production- :
Hog receipts
14 cities ....: "
Hog slaughter :
36 centers ...: "
Imports- :1,000
Bacon, total ..:pounds:
Lard, total ...: "
UNITED STATES: :
Slau.to.r- : :
Hogs,inspected. :1000' s:
,Loorts-
Bacon- :1,000
United Kingdom: pounds:
Germany ......: :
Cuba ........ : :
Total ......: :
Rams,shoulders- :
United Kingdom: "
Total ......: :
Lard-:
United Kingdom: :
Germany ......: "
Cuba .........: "
Netherlands ..: "
Total ...... "


: : 1909-10 : 1924-25 :
: Unit :to 1913-14:tq 1928-29:


-


1932-33:
*


1933-34:
*


1934-35:
*


nunar inc


W 7


average






183,450:

137,269:
30,934:
31.,879:
383,532:
69,952:
165,613:





1,303:





3,361:

2,002:
153,048:


25,445:


97,094:
1,267:
5,707:
132,490:

104,711:
121,737:

133,246:
108,850:
27,801:
28,209:
363,895:


44,567:


376,447:
40,280:
81,579:
57,200:
121,150:
676,656:
93,143:
204,650:


375,286:


2,078:



2,448:

3,047:

13,140!
167,285:


36,706:


50,224:
9,163:
15,802:
107,458:

108,516:
129,627:

176,59?:
147,661:
61,670:
32,346:
561,145:


63,177:


538,136:
15,597:
3,888:
25,225:
277,728:
860,576:
68,4'8:
218,021:


553,23Z:


2,170:



2,364:

3,202:

23,269:
176,443:


36,675:


2,054:
1,213:
3,236:
12,285:

46,549:
53,718:

210,091:
118, 7S;:
8,863:
31,575:
445,661:


53,850:


370,345:
24,826:
3,943:
77,103:
192, 822:
669,041:
59,140:
257,065:


390,095:


2,299:



2,651:

3,474:

20,308:
98, 351t


35,344:


2,203:
2,471:
3,582:
17,465:

41,453:
48,448:

2 4 )GC:
5N;,084:
1L', -1-7/:
19,573:
426,281 :


: : 'Oct:-June


60,959:


323,250:
35, 834:
2,395:
83,732:
144,964:
590,175:
56,020:
163,321:


328,612:


2,258:



2,610:

3,505:

19,676:
41, 7"0:


25,556:


1,354:
0:
3,436:
6,399:

37, 36:
44, ,9S:


2,513:

10:
130,781:


avera e :


1935-36




65,721


292,274
39,834
1,214
'77,185
134,512
545,018
53,352
125,302


300,624


2,388



2,047

2,692

17,998
69,173


23,673


598
29
983
2,433

28,723
31,162

50,466
0,127
17,965
40
79,024





KP-81 20.


Hogs and pork products: Foreign and
pounds for the month indicated, and


domestic average pri
stocks at the end of


Item : 1909-13 : 1925-29 : June : May
Saveraffe : average : 1935 : 193J
: Dollars Dollars Dollars lollaa


Prices:
Hogs, Chicago,
basis packers'
and shippers'
quotations .......
Corn, Chicago,
No. 3 Yellow .....:
Hogs,heavy,Berlin
live weight ......
Potatoes, Breslau
feeding .......... :
Barley, Leipzig ...:
Lard-
Chicago ..........
Livernool ........
Hamburg ..........
Cured pork-
Liverpool-
American short :
cut green hamhs *
American green :
bellies ........ :
Danish Wiltshire :
sides ..........:
Canadian green :
sides ...........


Stocks:
United States-
Processed pork.:/ :
Lard in cold
storage .......


Three weeks.
Two weeks.
Dry salt cured and
cure,and frozen.


7.90

1.16

10.87

,37
1.73

10.77
11.86
14.05



15.40



15.84

15.01
1,000
nour.d s


11.22

: 1.70

15.17

.60
2.47

15.26
15.71
16.18



25.24

21.73

24.96

23.16
1,000
pounds


788,481

165,588


9.27

1.52

16.08

* .86
3.15

'15.19
13.64


9.5



17.7(

3.3


11.1;
12.2
11.8


19.83 21.2

13.89 Nomin


21.15

18.75
1,000
pounds


445,307

84,680


20.0


17.5
1,C000



440,6

99,6


in process of cure; pickled, cured, a


- - 0 - -


A


IllllllilliH i bIMIII
3 1262 08865 0170

ces per 100 ..
each month



: June
S 1936 '
rs Dollar




3 9.88

3 1.14

0 17.70

7 -3.41 :


2 11.28
5 11.83'
3 12.61



8 21.95

al N6minal

9 20.33

i5 18.08 "
'1,000

29.. ..u ng

18 431,292

56 106,892




ind in process of