World hog and pork prospects

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Title:
World hog and pork prospects
Physical Description:
v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics. -- Division of Statistical and Historical Research
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, Division of Statistical and Historical Research
Place of Publication:
Washington
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Swine -- Statistics -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Pork industry and trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
- HP-83 (Oct. 1936).
General Note:
Reproduced from typewritten copy.
General Note:
Description based on: HP-8 (July 9, 1930).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 026660448
oclc - 30588199
Classification:
lcc - HD9435.U5 A25
System ID:
AA00013004:00016

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Succeeded by:
Hog situation


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Full Text

UNITED STATES DEPARTEITT OF AGRICULTURE iV NTS DEIT
Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Washington "- .

HP-24 November iTO

WORLD HOG AiTD PORK PROSPECTS



QUARTERLYY SUI~MARY

Hog prices in the United States and Europe continued during most of

October near the low levels of late September, but during the last week in

October and the first week in November, prices in the United States declined

sharply.

The smaller number of hogs slaughtered in the United States during the

marketing year 1930-31 contrasted with the increased slaughtering in Europe.

Total exports of all hog products from the United States were the smallest

for more than 30 years. The decrease from last year amounted to 44 per cent

in the exports of pork and 26 per cent in those of lard. The reduction of

bacon exports was more marked than in the case of any other cured pork product.

The decrease in the export movement was slightly larger than the reduction in

slaughter supplies.

Hog numbers in all the important producing countries are larger than a

year earlier. In both Germany and Denmark new high records have been reached.

In Germany, however, a 10 per cent reduction in brood sows was reported in

September. Great Britain, Irish Free State, and the Netherlands also report-

ed increased hog numbers. Based on the June Pig Survey indications and on

hog slaughter during recent months, numbers in the United States are now

larger than a year ago.

Exports of pork from Continental Europe to the United Kingdom increased

to record high levels during the past year. Increased hog production in





HP-24 -2-

Germany along with increased German lard imports from Denmark and the Nether-

lands and reduced consumer purchasing power have greatly reduced United States

lard exports to Germany. However, thore has been substantiall increase in

the exports of lard from the United States to the United Kingdom.

Fairly favorable hog-fced price relationships have prevailed during

most of the past year in the United States, Germany, and Denmark. Declines in

hog prices have been more thrn offset by the sharp reduction in feed prices.

In the United States the very low prices of corn during August and September

resulted in a marked increase in the hog-corn ratio. However, advances in

corn prices during recent weeks have reduced the ratio considerably.

In the United States, slaughter supplies increased seasonally during

September and October and were also larger than in the same months of 1930. In

the last few months the seasonal reduction in the price spread between light

weight and heavy weight hogs has been greater than usual. During October

prices of all cuts of both fresh and cured pork showed further declines.

Lard prices .lso declined during the month.

Hog numbers

Hog numbers i: the important European hog producing countries continued
to increase ii, 1931, according to a recent report from Assistant.Agricultural
Commissioner Christy at Berlin. I. Germany and the ictherlands the number of
brood sows showed marked decreases from 1930, but increases in this class of
hogs wore reported in Dcenmark, Great Britain, and the Irish Frze State.

L:.test estimates snow a7i increase of 9 per cent in hog numbers in 1931 in
nine a/ Europuen hog producing or consuming countries compared with 1930. The
increase in the sapme countries last year was 14 per cent above 1929. plumbers in
these countries, where supplies have been increasing during the last 3 or 4.yearr

a/ Dcnmiark, Germany, Irish Free State, England and Walts, Scotland, Belgium,
Switzerland, Hungary and Rumania.





HP-24


are now 25 per cent greater than in 1929. 1lo figures are included for the
ietherlandsj in these totals. However, individulJ classes in that country,
with the exception of sows in farrow an.d hogs over 220 pounds, iicrenscd as
much as 18 to 33 per cent in June 1931 over tne pr ccdi,.g year, so it is
probable that total numbers in June 1931 excooded the nuinber on the sane date
of 1930 to an appreciable extent.

The number of brood sows at the latest dr.te available for 1931 in six
European countries w[.s 3,545,000, an increase of 3 per cent above 1930. The
increase between 1929 and 1930 re-chcd 21 per cent and in 1929 t-o number was
6 per cent above the average for 1927-28. Althou.-n esti;rates arc not avail-
able for the lethorlands the perce-tage ch'tus f:r each quarter of 1931
showed decre,.scs compared with the corresponding quarters of 1930.

Hog numbers in 30 countries, including the United States and Russia
numbered 139 million in 1930, a decrease of 9 per cent co.:pared with the average
for the years 1927-26 when hog nur.bors wcrc lr.rc-. Excluding these two
countries which -ave shown decreases of 8 and 46 per cent, respectively, since
that period, numbers in 28 countries show a:: incrorse of 3 per cent, the in-
cre.ses occurring in the principal hog producing and consuming countries of'
Europe.

Germany

According to official estimates Ihob nui:bcrs in Germany reached the record
figure of 25,348,000 on Septembsr 1, 1931. That this hijn nu :-bcr would be
reached in September was predicted several months ago by German experts who
expected the perl of the present production cycle to be reached at that time.
In Septoei.ubjr, 1930, the increase over the preceding year was 19 per cent, as
compared with the increase of 8 per cent in September this year.

Gc;rr.:-.y's imports of porl: products from the United States amounted to
151 million pounds in 1930, a decrease of 15 per ce.it compared with 1929.
Gerrany is the second i: ost important import.er of American lard, r.nd the third
most iimportnt importer of bacon from this country. Per copita consumption
a/ of United States pork' products in Gerrmny is estimated at 2.3 pounds in
1930 com.pard with 3.1 pounds in 1926 and 2.6 pounds in 1928. Total per capital
of pork in Gernmny in 1930 is estimated at 71.1 pounds compared with 63.9
pounds in 1927 and 75.3 pounds in 1928. Production of inspected pork in
Germany, amo -unted to 1,059 million pounds for the first half of 1931, an in-
crease of 17 per cent over 1929.

Netherl-.nds

Farmers in the Netherlands have been advised to reduce farrDwings this
fall, states Assistant Agricultural Cor-. Christy. Estimated percentage
changes for June showed a decrease of 13 per cent in' sows in farrow compared
with the sar.e date of 1930.

a/ No figures available on stocks carried over from preceding year or of
re-export of United States pork products.


-3-





HP-24


At the beginning of 1931 the nu:!ber of so:'s in furrow may be estimat-
ed at between 243,000 and 254,000. These estimates are based on the per-
centage changes-of 10 to 15 per cent over the number in farrow at the
beginning of 1930 as estimated by Dutch livestock extension agents. The
number of sows in farrow at the beginning of 1930 is officially estimated
at 221,000 ac=ordinu; to the Verslagen en liededeelingen van de Directic
van den Landbouw 1-20, I.o. 2. The nurmoer in farrow decreased from 239,000
at the beginning of 1926 to 201,000 at the same date of 1929 but showed
increases at the beginning of 1930 and 1931.

Denmark

Hog numbers in Denmark on July 15, 1931 reached 5,473,000, the largest
number ever reported for that country according to the Statistiske Efterret-
ninger. The rate oi increase, however, was considerably less than in 1930
when the number was 35 per cent over that of 1929.

Sows in farrow were reported as 437,000 an increase of 12 per cent
over the scme date of 1930 when the increase over the preceding year was 26
per cent. Pigs under the classifications of under 2 months and 2 to 4 months
were 8 and 16 per cent, respectively above 1930 while fat hogs over 4 months
increased 15 per cent. The number of fat hogs on July 1, however, was 1 per
cent less than the number on hand on January 1. In spite of low bacon prices,
hog production in Denmark has remained on fairly profitable levels.

Poland

Hog numbers in Poland on June 30, 1930, were estimated at 6,047,000,
an incrocse of 25 ;-=r cent over the 1929 estimate. Sows of 10 months and over
were estimated at 1,503,000. ITo stimate is available for this class in 1929.
Hogs under 6 inonths and from 6 to 10 months increased 37 and 16 per cent,
respectively, over 1S29. The Government has recently decided to assist Polish
hog breeders in the production of the proper type of b.con hog in order to
obtain iid hold a place on the English market.

Great Britain and Irish Free State

In Great Britain, hog numbers were estimated at 2,931,000 in June 1931,
an increase of 20 per cent over the numbers in June, 1930. In Irish Free
State the i:icrcaso was 16 per cent from 1,052,000 in 1930 to 1,221,000 in
1931. Brood sows incres.sed 26 per cent in Great Britain rnd 11 per cent in
Irish Free State.

Per czpita consumption of United States pork products in the United
Kingdom in 1930 is estimated at 8.7 pounds compared with 9.3 pounds in 1929
and 8.4 in 1928. Lard constitutes the bulk of the imports or approximately
60 per cent of the total.- Total per capital consumption of pork products in
1930-31 is estimated at 41.6 pounds compared with 37.4 pounds in 1929-30
and 41.9 pounds in 1928-29.




HP-24


Hogs: Number in principal pork! exporting and importing countries,
average pro-w.r, 1921-1930


Number in principal pork exporting countries a


Year


Average
pre-war c/ :

1921 ........:


1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931


*....... : 9


.........:
*
*
~*
*
I


g/ .....


i


:J
*


United
States
an. 1

Thou-
sands

53,300

58,602
59,559
69,044
66,361
55,568
52,148
54,788
60,617
57,410
53,238


: Irish :
Canada : Free : Sweden : Total
June : Stote : Jun : b/
: Jun c :


!ether-
Denmark: e
lands
SMay-June:

Thou- : Thou-
sands : sands
: .
2,715 : 1,305

1,430 : 1,519
1,899
2,855
2,868
2,517 :
3,122 :
3,731
3,363 :
3,616
4,872 :f/2,018


Thou-
saoids

1,023

:d/1,011




1,100 :

:'e/1,369


Thou-
sands

60,411

64,828
66,312
77,490
75,285
63,243
60,514
64,392
69,660
66,353
63,162


: 52,323 : 5,473 : : 1,221 ::
__ Number in principal pork importii,, countries
United : :Czecho- : Austa :
ino : QGermay: Frnceslov a Austria Italy Totanl
:ingo : Dec. h/: Dec. Frn. h/ : Dec. h/Mar-Apr. b/
: June : : :Dec. h/ :
:


Average
pre-war c/

1921 .........
1922 ........
1923 ..........:
1924 .........
1925 .........:
1926 .........:


1927
1928
1929
1930
1931


/ .........

./ ..:


2,754 : 22,533

2,756 : 14,153
2,568 : 15,818
2,993 : 14,678
3,567 :1i7,308
2,c11 : 16,895
2,504 : 16,200
3,124 : 19,424
3,396 : 22,899
2,701 : 20,106
2,670 : 19,944
3,167 : 23,365


7,529 : 2,516

4,941 : 2,201
5,166
5,19 -:
5,406
5,802
5,793 : 2,539
5,777
6,019
6,017
6,102 :f/3,088
-:


1,932 : 2,685

1,326 :j2,509

/1,473


:L/2,850




:f/3,157


Compiled from official sources.
a/ Countries arranged in order of importance as exporting or importing countries.
b/ Tot,-l countries reporting each ye-r, pre-war 1921-1930. c/Averge for five
years irnruediately preceding war wherever available. Otherwise for any years or
year within this period, unless otherwise stated. In countries having changed
bound.-ries estimates ,re for 1 year only of numbers within present boundaries.
d/ Census 1920. e/ September. f/ Census. g/ Proliminary. h/ Estimate for
countries reporting as of December have been considered as of January of the
following year. i/ Estimate for present boundaries for 1918. j_/ March.
k/ October. Ko estimate availablee for December 1923. L/ Unofficial.


32,816

21,850
23,552
22,867
26,281
25,608
24,497
28,325
32,314
20,824
28,716


-5-


Thou- : Thou-
sands : sands

3,350 : 1,046

3,905: 891
3,916 : 938
4,405 : 1,186
5,069 : 987
4,426 : 732
4,360 : 884
4,695 : 1,178
4,497 : 1,183
4,382 : 945
4,000 : 1,052


*


Li


:*
:*





HP-24


Brood sows:


Number in principal pork and hog exporting and importing
countries reporting, pre-war and 1925 to 1931


Country


: Month :
of Pre-
:estimate: war
:estimate: war


Exporting
Countries:
United States...:Jan. 1
Denmark, sows 4 :
months and over:July
Canada ......... :June
Argentina ......:
Irish Free State:June
Sweden, sows ...:Sept.
Netherlands ....:
Sows in farrow :Jan. 1

Poland .........:
Hungary ........ :July
New Zealand ....:Jlan.
Rumania ........ :Jan.
Yugoslavia .....:Jan.
Importing
Countries:
England & Wales :June
Scotland .......:June
North Ireland ..:June
Total .......:June
Germany ........:
Six months to :
one year .....:Jan.
One year & over:
Total .......: -
France ......... Jan.
Belgium ........:Jan.
INorway ......... :June
Finland, sows :
over six months: Sept.
Czechoslo'vaiia
Spain .......... : ay


:Thou-
:sands




283


108
a/128

j:/ 201





bj:




332
18


0 S 0


:1925 : 1926 : 1927 : 1928 : 1929 : 1930 : 1931
* : ": .

Thou- :Thou- Thou- :Thou- :Thou- :Thou- :Thou-
:sands :sands :sands :sands :sands :sands :sands

:10,088:10,286:10,855:10,587:10,412: 9,924:10,044


*
:*
:*
:*
:*
*
:*
:*
*:
:*
*
:*
*
:*
:
:*
:*
:*
:*
:*


290:
533:

75:


214:


602:
-60:
1,042:
685:


316:
16:
11:
343:


391:
569:

93:


239:


547:
64:
1,017:
692:


301:
18:
16:
335:


396:
577:

124:
126:

232:

:e/
531:
69:
1,086: 1,
694:


393:
27:
25:
445:


344:
551:

115:


229:

761:
579:
82:
066:
662:


380:
22:
22:
424:


: :
434: 580: 631
537: 507: -
788:
96: 111: 123
164:

201:_/ 221:d/243 tO
: : 254
:e/i,503:
554: 497: -
75: 62: -
975: 812: 790



307: 316: 401
16: 18: 19
17: 20:
3A40: 354:


b_: : 462: 401: 625: 504: 556: 663: 673
: : 813: 8R: 1,126: 1,,21.8 1,03: 1,179: 1,496
S1,27 1,37 l: 1,~ 71: 1,;. 1 119: 1,842f2,169
b/: 90 779: 777: 776: 785 : 771: -
S124: 129: 187: 130: 130: 137: 141
41: 41: 39: 39: 46:

S : 39: 40: 43: 43 -
:305: 446:
:h/ 500: : : : 519:
0 0


Compiled from off'.cial sources.
a/ Boars Eand sona.
b/ Estimates r eorted as of December have been considered as of January 1 of
following ,ear.
c/ Total brood sows according to census in May-June numbered 242,000.
d/ Estimate based on percentage change in January 1931 over preceding year.
e/ Sows ten months and over. f See table page 23 for Septenber
figures 1931. g/ Excluding Alsace Lorraine. h/ Census 1924,


q


---


~


I


-6-




HP-24 -7-

Hogs: Slaughter in specified countries, average pre-war and 1914-1930


:United :Germany :Denmark :England :Scotland:Ireland :
:States :inspect-:in expt.:& Wales :sold off:purchas-:


Year :Federal : ed
:inspect-: slaugh-
: ed : ter


Average
pre-war / :

1914 .... ..
1915 .......
1916 .......
1917 .......:
1918 ... .. .:
1919 .......
1920 ......
1921 .......
1922 .......
1923 .......
1924 .......:
1925 .......
1926 .......:
1927 .......
1928 .......
1929 .......
1930 .......


Compiled from
abroad.


Thou-


Thou-
sands

31,759

32,532
38,381
43,084
33,910 :
41,214
41,812
38,019 :
38,982 :
43,114
53,334 :
52,873 :
43,043
40,656
43,633
49,795 :
48,445 :
44,265 :


official


Thou -:
sands

16,406


C/ :
C/J
c/


1,368
3,024
6,825 :
6,923
5,830
10,527 :
12,090
13,072 :
17,279 :
19,391 :
17,252 :
17,994 :


:slaugh-
:ter
: houses


Thou-
sands

2,503 :

2,858
2,594
2,542 :
2,479 :
324
456
930
1,641
2,215
3,414
4,024
3,766
3,838 :
5,098 :
5,673
4,994
6,132 :d/


:sold off:
:farms for.
:slaugh- :s.
:ter a :t


Tlou-
sands

3,487:

I
S
I
0


2,700:
3,471:
5,229:
3,691:
4,500:
3,588:
3,074:
3,680:
4,109:
3,245:
3,219:


farms
for


:ed by
:Irish


Laugh- :bacon
er a/ :curers
Thou- : Thou-
sands : sands

1,282:



: :
: :


: 874:
146 : 898:
173 : 1,030:
176 : 926:
245 : 955:
242 : 1,110:
S 911:
: 910:
: 1,050:
1,264:
1,142:
:d/ 1,037:
:


:Nether-
:land
Canada :receipt
:at 21
:mar-
:kets-
Thou- : Thou-
sands : sands

4,280 : 875

: 1,085
: 842
: 850
: 600
: 217
5,526 : 422
4,834 : 648
5,297 : 1,362
5,382 : 865
6,056 : 906
6,625 : 1,068
5,720 : 1,045
5,636 : 1,025
5,965 : 1,152
5,880 : 1,068
5,747 : 1,065
5,248 :


sources and cabled reports from Agricultural Cor.missioners


a/ For years ended May 31 following.
b/ Average for five years immediately preceding war period if available; other-
wise for any year or years within that period unless otherwise stated. In
countries having changed boundaries, the figures are estimates for one year only
for numbers within present boundaries.
c/ Not available for present boundaries. For former boundaries, the numbers
slaughtered are as follows; in thousands 1914, 19,441; 1915, 13,293;
1916, 6,348; 1917, 5,795; 1918, 2,430.
d/ Unofficial estimate of total slaughter in the United Kingdom and Irish Free
State based on methods of estimating published in The Agricultural Output of
England and Wales, 4,784,000 in 1930-31 compared with 4,759,000 in 1929-30 and
6,168,000 in 1928-29.






HP-24


Hogs: Slaughter in United States, Germany, Denmark, and Canada, by
months, seasons October September, 1928-29 to 1930-31 a/

: United States : 'Germany at : Denmark : Canada
Month : .iincpected : 36 points : export houses : inspected
: 1928-: 1929-::1930-:1928-:1929-:1930:028-:1929-:1930- :1928-:1929-:1930-
: 1929': 1930 ::1931 :1929 :1930 :1931 :1929 :1930 :1931 :1929 :1930 :1931


Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Jan.
Feb.
Iviar.
Apr.
May.
June
July
Aug.
Sept.


Thou- : Thou- :Thou- : Thou-: Thou-: Thou-: Thou-: Thou-: Thou-:: Thou-: Thou-: Thou- 1
:sands : sands : s.nds :sands: ds: ands:sands:sands sands:sands :sands: sands: sands.
: : : : : : : : : : .
3,713: 3,857: 3,492: 455: 357: 418: 494: 501: 612: .200: 207: 160.
4,455: 4,499: 4,024: 411: 356: 278: 398: 395: 577: 232: 234: 168:
:5,782: 5,083: 4,647: 407: 382: 452: 442: 488: 612: 239: 221: .170
5,738: 5,001:.5,362: 388: 351: 391: 102: 438-:b/ 650: 249: 207: 166
: 4,478: -,024: 4,142: 367: 335: 405: 348; 407:b/ 509: 208: 168: 161
:3,645: 3,392:. 3,523: 411: 373: 503: 384: 442:b/ 638: 215: 168: .154,
:3,761: 3,480: 3,488: 395: 374: 423: 429: 529:b/ 566: 20.8: 162: 172
:3,798: 3,823: 3,-08: 391: 371: 428: 4135: 432:b/ 584: .187: 174: 158
: 3756: 3,689:. 3,251: 333:. 314: -148: 358: 478:b/ 565: 161: 159: 164
3,597: 3,187: 2,767: 340:: 361: 401: 432: 525:b/ 61-1: 159: 127: 148
:3,130: 2,72-: 2,500: 325: 344: 399: 393: 485.:b/ 604: 161: 124: 162
: 3,10-: 2,773:: 2,955: 346:. 351: 416: 422:. 595:b/ 584: 142: '140:c0/(94)


Tot.al : : : : :: : .. .
for : : : : : : : :
season:48,957:4;5,542:43,559:4,"569:41,299:-1, 96214,943:5,715: 7,115:2,361:2,091: 1,977

a/ Season accepted as most representative for the United.States.
b/ Adjusted front wcelly figures published in Lcndbrugsraadets Meddclelser since
October 2, 1930. c/ Estimated on basis of slaughter first three weeks.
d/ Preliminary.

United States

Based on the indications contained in the June 1931 pig survey as to.
the size ofthe spring pig crop and intentions to breed for fall farrow, end
on slaughter supplies during recent months, hog numbers on farms in the United
States are somewhat larger than they were a year ago. Hog slaughter in the
hog marketing year which began in October 1930 was the smallest in four years
and apoarcntly marked the end of a cycle in market supplies which began with
1926-27 and reached its perk in 1928-29. The June pig survey indicated that
there was a 2.5 per cent increase in the spring pig crop.

After declining steadily during September, hog prices in the United States
remained about steady during the first three weeks of October, but resumed".their
decline during the last week of October and the first week in November. Hog
prices have declined almost continuously since late July when the peak of the
summer rise was reached. During the week ended November 7 prices at Chicago
averaged $4.65 per 100 pounds, which was the lowest weekly average for that
market since in 1908. here has been a marked change in the price spread
"between light weight and heavy weight hogs during the past three months. In




HP-24 -


late July a prc.i.dina of nearly $3.00 per 100 pounds was being paid for light
weight hogs, but during most of October mediwun and navy weight hogs sold
at a slight premium ovcr the light weights. Although this shift in prices
is largely seasonal one, it was greater than usual this year since the
premium paid for light .eights this summer was unusually large. The normal
shift in the price spread for the different weights during these months is
due t3 the reduction in the number of packing sows in the market supply aid
the increase in the marhetings of licit weight hos from the spring pig crop.

Market supplies of hogs during October increased seasonally and were also
larger than those of the corresponding month of a .year earlier. The number of
hog s slaugjtcred under Federal inspection. during October, the first month of
the 1931-32 i-.rieting year, amounted to 3,772,000 head. This was an increase
of 27.6 per cent over the September slaughter ca.d was 8.0 per cent larger
than that of October 1930. The .vornge live. weight of hogs slaughtered, however,
was somewhat under that of a year ago. The October increase in slaughter over
that of last year was due both to a larger sr-ring pig crop and the tendency
to market new crop hogs earlier than usual.

Hog-feed price relationships -iave chan. ed materially during recent weccs.
Corn prices declined sharply during. August and S,3ptnembcr, and, since the
decline in hog prices during that period was relatively less than that of colrn,
the hog-corn ratio increased. Based on farm n prices the hog-corn ratio on
October 15 was 14.1 for the United States -and 15.3 for the Corn 3elt States as
compared with 10.7 ond 11.7, respectively, during October, 1930. Since October
15 market prices of corn have advanced materially while hog prices have
declined, and during the last week in October, based on Chica..o prices, the
hog-cori--rctio was 12.6 as compared with 12.0 in the corresponding week a year
earlier. The rr.tio was further reduced during the first woeek in iTovember.

The fresh pork market was much weaker during October. 1iarkct price de-
clines occurred on all cuts, but sharpest reductions occurred on light loins.
Duri;ni the last week of the month 8-10 pound loins at i-ow York averaged $13.80
which was $6.00 under the av.eraje during the last week in SeptLmber. 16-22 pound
loins at tat markettt -vera.;ed $11.60 during the last week 6f. October, which was
$3.55 under the average four weeks previous. Price declines also occurred on
all cuts cf cured pork. Duri:-. t:ic weetk ended October 31 12-14 pound regular
smoked he.?jis ct lT.-w York averaged .'19.00 as compared with $20.75 during the last
week in Septeiaber and $2- .50 during the corresponding week a year earlier.
8-10 pound #1 sweet pickle cured bacon avera. ed $15.00 as comnrared with $17.75
a month ea.rlier ca-d ;25.00 durii-.n the last week in October 1930.

Further declines in lard prices also occurred during ; October. During the
last wco: of the month,- the price of refined lard at Chica:o averrr.;ed $8.25,
which was 75 cents under the average a month crlier and $5.25 lower than that
of a jear earlier.

As a result of furt-er unfavorable factors i:: the foreign markets, exports
of Amnricrn lard a-d cured pork continued their dowvnward trend durin-: Se-ptmbcr.
Exports of bacon and of na-u.s cald shoulders decreased seasonally and continued
under the levels of all post-war years.


-9-





HP-24


Lard exports during S-ptrmnbr, a.moruntinr to 77,790,000 pounds wcro
10 per cent larger t-ian thi- AugL-.st movenc-t and. sliGhtly above those of
September, 1930. All countries except the United Kingdom took larger quanti-
ties than in Auuust. Gerr.anny took more than twice as much lard as in
August and 80 per cent mcjrc than year earlier. Takings by the United Kingdom
were 35 per cent under t-.osc of August but 18 per cent above those of
September 1930.

Total bacon exports during September amounting to 2,770,000 pounds were
15 per ce-t under those of August, and 44 per cent under the September 1930
movement, The reduction was especially severe in the United Kingdom, the move-
ment to that country countingn g to only 974,000 pounds as compared with
1,516,000 pounds in .-:gust and 1,349,000 pounds during September last year.
Takinrs of bacon by Germany, however, amounting to 612,000 pounds were. the
largest for any month since April 1930.

Total reports of hjTis and shoulders in September amounted to 5,037,000
pounds, which was 2- per cent smaller than in Au.agust and 22 per cent below
that of September last year. All of the principal importing countries except
Cuba tool: smaller quantities thea in August. The reduction amounted to 26
per cent for the United i-ingdom end 72 ner cent for Canada. Cuban takings in
September totaled 516,000 pounds, which was 23 per cent above the August
improvement and about 2.5 times larger then that of September 1930.

Totcl United St.tes exports of all hog products during the 1930-31
marketing year were the smallest for more than 30 years. Total exports of pork
decreased 140,000,000 pounds, or 44 per cent from those of a year earlier,
while exports of lard fell off 199,000,000 pounds, or about 26 per cent.
Practically all importing countries took smaller quantities of American cured
pork, and nearly cdl countries except Great Britain purchased less American
lard. The reduction in bacon e:-ports during the year was much more marked
than that of other hinds of cured pork due to the keener competition from other
pork producing countries, especially Dcnmark. The reduction in bacon exports
amountc-d to 57,981,000 pounds, or 53 per cent, whereas the exports of hams
and shoulders were cnly 36,786,000 pounds, or 29 per cent less than those
of the previous mArketing year.

A statistical summa-ry of the United States hog and pork situation for the
1930-31 markcting year, with comparisons, is shown on page 11 It will be
noted that the number of hogs slaughtered during the year just ended was 4.4
per cent under that of the previous marketing year, but due to the heavier
weights at which hogs were slaughtered the reduction in total dressed weight
amounted to only 3 per cent. The reduction in the export movement was slight-
ly larger tcnui the reduction in pork production so that when the decrease in
exports is tccen into account 1930-31 pork production provided a larger supply
for United Stctes consumption than in 1929-30. Consumptioit, however, was 2.6
per cent less than in the preceding year, with the result that the storage
holdings at the end of the year (October 1, 1931) were larger than at the
end of the preceding year, the increase amounting to 7.3 per cent. Stocks of
pork wore 6 per cent larger than the unusually small holdings on October 1
last year, mad lard stocks were 17 per cent larger than those of the
corresponding date in 1930.


-10-





- 11 -


United States: S3 tistical s-unmary of hog and pork situation,
Gctober-S3ptembcr, 1930-21, with comparisons


Item


_ O0ct.-3Sept.

Unit : Average :
:1925-26 to: 1929-30 : 1930-31
1929-30 :
: : :


* .


Inspected slaughter ....:
Carcasses condemned ....:
Average live weight ....:
Average dressed weight .:
Total dressed weight ,1
(excluding condemnedd:
Storage Oct. 1, beginning :
of season:
Frosh pork .............:
Cured pork ...........:
Lard ................. :
Total ......... ..... :
Imports: :
Fresh pork .............:
Pork, pickled and pro-
served ...... ..........:
Total ............... :
Available for consumption
.'/ .................... ..
Exports :
Pork ........... ... ..:.


Ibs.


:1950-31:1930-31
:as per-:as per-
:centae :centage
:of 5-yr.: of
: av. :1929-30
:Per :Per
: cent : cent


:45,221,378:45,542,,20:43,557,768: 96.32: 95.64
: 148,290: 129,:57: 123,501: 83.28: 95.25
233.21: 232.21: 235.18: 100.84: 101.27
: 176.68: 175.08: 177.41: 100.41: 101.33

: 7.927.076: 7.919.508: 7.682.591: 96.92: 97.01


96,387 :
444,829:
115,188:
656.404:


" : 7,571:
*


'I
i,

I.


Lard .. . ..
Total ............ .. : "
Stora:e Oct. 1 end of
season: :
Fresh pork .............: "
Cured pork ............: "
Lard ...................: "
Total ................. "
Apparent consumption _/ ..: "
Lard:
Production PFr 100 lbs.:
live weight ...........: lb.
Total ...............:1,000
: lbse


119,204:
481,204:
153,690:
754,188:

1,469:
:1


92,305:
355,122:
59.732:
507.159

540:


95.76:
79.83:
51.86:
77.26:

7.13:


77,43
73.78
38.87
67.25


36.76


:a/ 3, 35 3,442: 32293: 83.81: 95.82
11,506: 4,911: 3, 8L: 3 .3.5 78.15

: 8,594,9C6: 8,678,607: 8,193,588: 95.33: 94.41

S35,382: 310,436: 171,719: 51.20: 55.31
S 746,479: 761,906: 565,301: 75.47 73.94
1:,081:8 1,072,92: 735,070: 67.9: 68.54


: 103,990: 92,305: 81,757: 78.62: 88.57
433,236: 355,122: 392,879: 90.68: 110.63
: 112,809: .59,732: .69,637: 61.75: 116.58
S650,035: 507,159: 544,273: 83.73: 107.32
: 8,165,090: 7,099,056: 6,914,245: 84.70: 97.40


: 15.43: 15.20: 14.86: 96.51: 97.76

1.619,961: 1,600,140: 1,509,510: 93.18: 94.34


Apparent consumption d/ : : 875,861: 932,192: 936,244: 106.89: 100.45
Hogs, averEgo cost for : : : : : :
s laughter .............. :dolls.: 10.47: 9.59 : 7.11: 67.91 : 74.14
a :,ot reported separately prior to Janu"-y 1, 1928. The average shown is for
thrce years including a total in tilo first year of nine months.
1/ Total dressed weight + imports + storage October 1 beginning of season.
.g/ available for consumption (exports + storage October 1 end of season).
d/ Production + storage Octobor 1, beginning of season (exports + stora.o,


Hogs :


I__ __


, ,


--


---


--


HP-24


Lr.. a





HP-24


United States: Jumber of hogs slaughtered under Federal inspection,
by months, 1925-26 to 1930-31


Month


:1925-26 : 1926-27 : 1927-28 : 1928-29 : 1929-30 : 1930-31


:Thousands: Thousands: Thousands: Thousands: Thousands: Thousands -

Oct ..........: 3,314 :2,976 2,969 :3,713 :3,857 :3,492
Nov. .........: 3,646 .: 3,610 :3,688 : 4,455 :4,499 :4,024
Dec. .........: 4,533 : 4394 :4,869 :5,782 :5,083 :4,647
.Jan. ..........: 4,501 :4,514 :5,479 :5,738 :5,001 :5,362
Feb ..........: 3,351 : 3,395 :5,780 : 4,478 : 4,034 : 4,142
* Iar. .........: 3,562 :3,837 :5,140 :3,645 :3,392 :3,523
Apr. ........: 3,105 3,330 :3,446 :3,761: : 3,480 :3,488
May ........: 3,131 : 3,766 3,884 : 3,798 : 3,823 : 3,408
June .........: 3,430 :4,253 :4,078 : 3,756 :3,689 : 3251
July .........: 3,127. : 3,431 : 2984 3,597 :3,187 : 2767
Aug. ........: 2,834 : 3,050 2,545 3,130 : 2,724 : 2500
Sept..........: 2,616 :2,534 :2,508 : 3,104 :2,773 : 2,955


Total .....: 41,150 : 43,090 : 47,370


: 48,957 : 45,542 : 43,558


United States: Average live weight of hogs slaughtered, by months,
1925 1931


Month : 1925 : 1926 : 1927 : 1928 : 1929 : 1930 : 1931
: : : : : : :


Jan. .
Feb. .....
Mar. .....
Apr. .....
May ......
June....
July ....
Aug. .....
Sept... ...
Oct. .....
Nov .....
Dec. .....
Av. ..


: Pounds : Pounds

:212.1 :232.8
:215.7 : .234.8
:219.3 : 239.1
:225.0 :240.3
:228.5 :238.1
:230.9 :246.1
:241.1 :258.1
:245.8 :259.0
:239.0 :239.7
:229.2 :215.9
:221.6 :212.3
:224.6 :217.5
:225.5 :235.1


:Pounds

226.9
232.3
235.6
235.2
.235.4
238.2
251.2
253.8
240.4
225.9
218.3
217.6
233.3


:Pounds : Pounds

:225.0 :225.4
: 230.9 :227,9
:229.5 : 229,5
:225.5 :229.8
:230.3 :232.3
* 231.9 :239.6
:241.3 :250.0
:243.3 :249.3
233.0 :238.3
:226.6 : 228.8
:223.6 :220.1
:222.9. : 223.6
: 229.3 :231.7


Pounds :Pounds

229.3 :235.6
231.0 :234.2
230.2 :230.2
228.2 :235.0
229.9 :234.7
:239.5 :244.6
249.9 :257.7
245.2 :246.2
230.8 :229.1
221.9
220.5 :
226.5 :
231.2 :


Compiled from slaughterhouse reports.


Compiled from slaughterhouse reports.


-12-





HP-24


United States: Total bacon exports, by months, 1925-26 to 1930-31


Month : 1925-26 : 1926-27 : 1927-28 : 1926-29 : 1929-30 : 1930-31

: 1,000 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000
: pounds pounds pounds ponds :pounds :pounds

Oct .........: 13166 :11,742 : 7,709 :4,973 : 9,858 3,268
Nov. ........: 13,562 : 8,507 6,013 6,716 : 11,452 : 3,446
Dec. ........: 16,405 : 9,601 : 9,347 : 9,593 9,868 : 4,474
Jan. ........: 21142 : 10,015 : 11,660 13,014 13,324 : 5,275
Feb. ........: 14,960 : 9,642 : 10,921 : 11,286 : 12,184 : 4,8-10
Mlar. .......: 13,597 : 8,567 : 15,106 10,985 : 12,2-19 :3,91
Apr. ........: 11,570 : 7,417 10,073 : 10,L25 : 7,979 : 2,917
May .......: 12,225 : 7,852 : 9,692 : 14,395 :8,553 :2,388
June ....... : 9,472 : 10,301 : 9,620 : 12,761 : 6,413 : 2,097
July ........: 7,670 : 9,270 : 11,648 : 10,950 5,339 2,528
Aug. ........: 12,131 : 7,864 : 10,9-5 : 13,171 : 6,979 : 3,272
Sept.........: 14,870 : 11,620 : 6,881 : 10,228 73 : 2, 0
Total ....: 160,790 112,398 :119,615 :128,357 :109,171 11,190

Compiled from the Monthly Sumrmary of Forei&n Commerce of the United States.



United States: Total exports of hams and shoulders, by months, 1925-26
to 1930-31


Honth : 1925-26 : 1926-27 : 1927-28 : 1928-29 : 1929-30 :1930-31

:1,000 : 1,000 1,000 : 1,1,00 : 1,000 : 1,000
:pounds : pounds : pounds :pnds : pou:ids : pounds

Oct. ........: 14,494 : 10,347 : 7,632 : 4,747 7,580 : 5,259
Nov. ........: 16,243 : 13,105 : 7,374 : 7,637 : 11,656 : 10,089
Dec. ........: 19,827 : 12,675 : 9,905 : 8,518 : 6,957 : 5,825
Jan.........: 21,000 : 9,873 : 10,005 : 11,187 : 9,461 : 7,295
Feb. ........: 19,105 : 9,511 : 10,976 : 7,680 : 9,213 : 5,538
Mar. ........: 18,117 : 9,253 : 12,222 : 11,140 : 10,790 : 6,829
Apr. ........: 18,059 : 10,007 : 11,258 : 13,857 : 12,416 : 8,086
May .......: 16,682 : 13,092 : 11,390 : 11,246 : 13,845 : 9,969
Juni ........: 13,218 : 13,471 : 13,754 : 12,571 : 12,158 : 9,721
July ........: 13,512 : 13,158 : 13,557 : 12,621 : 13,779 : 9,071
Aug. .........: 15,972 : 8,215 : 13,402 : 10,849 : 10,841 : 6,623
Sept.........: 11,425 : 11,123 : 6,681 : 8,478 : 6,432 : 5,037
Total ....: 197,65- : 134 ,330 : 128,156 : 120,531 : 125,128 : 89,342

iCompiled from the monthlyy Sumanary of Foreign Commerce of the United States.


-13-






HP-24


United States: Total lard exports, by months, 1925-26 to 1930-31


Month : 1925-26 :.1926-27 : 1927-28 : 1928-29 : 1929-30 : 1930-31


9 5 S


Nov. .........
Dec. .........:
Jan. ..........:
Feb. ......... :
Mar. .........:
Apr. .........:
May .........:
June .........:

Aug. .........:
Sept .......... :


1,000C
pounds

44,745
39,979
68,840
76,670
65,356
64,259
63,160
58,154
56,482
45,873
54,273
61,577


Total ....: 699,368 ::

Compiled from the Monthly


:. 1,000
pounds

S46,988
43,488
62,680
59,842
:49,880
:. 53,010
: 67,345
:: 64,418
: 66,404
. 46,972
. 50,816
: 59,736


671,609


S1,000
Sounds

S50,355
49,636
S62,855
70,660
. 79,872
S79,929
56,554
S55,5O40
:: 53,436
: 52,940
. 50,658
S46,158
S708,593


1,000
pounds

59,865
67,716
86,358
89, 9"2
65,,')-I4
70,572
59,1-14
64,192
67, 7.2
64,274
55,427
58. 9.'9
G09,0 15


: 1,000 : 1,000
: pounds :. pounds

:70,698.:. 411,396
:83,257 : 42,552
:80,053 : 45,114
:73,291 : 68,882
:65,953 : 68,760
: 66,533 : .58,394
: 50,045 :. 44,7'69
:62,562 :. 39,623
:56,666 : 37,786
S51,670 : 33,324
:, 49,287 : 34,510..
:37,417 : 37,790
:747,432 : 553,401
*:


Summary of Foreign Commerce of the United States.


Canada


Prices of bacon hogs at Toronto for the month of September averaged $5.99
per hundred pounds compared with $7.29 in August and $9.07 in JLly. Last year
the September price was $12.21. The hog trade was very unsettled in October,
according to the Ontario Farmer. During one week in October hog prices declined
to a very low level according to a Government report. That week about $6.00
was paid at Toronto for bacon hogs -off cars.

By the middle of October 1931 hog marketing for the 41 weeks of 1931 ec-
ceeded tnose of the sane period of 1930 by 106,000 hogs, che figures being
1,927,000 and 1,820,300, respectively, according to the Letter on 'Canadian
Livestock Products issued by The Industrial and Development Council of Canddiah
Meat Packers. Lower hog prices with consequent lower pork prices in Adgust
and September tended to increase consumption somewhat at the end of May 1931.
The number of h'ogs marketed in Canada for the year to date was 83,000 less than
for the same period of 1930. -However, by the end of August marketings were
only 6,000 head under 1930. Increases in that month, normally one of the
lightest marketing periods, occurred in every province, states the above source.

An analysis of hogs marketed during August made by the Dominiorf Department
of Agriculture shows an average increase of 41 per cent for all provinces,
Saskatchewan leading with a 67 per cent increase. In tlbt province the hog,
cattle and sheep markets were overloaded during the summer months due to the
fact that many farmers were forced to market stock because of the widespread
and prolonged drought, according to a report from Consul Lee R. Blohm at Regina.


Oct.


e6..e....


A


-


-14-


: ,
:.

:.





HP-24


United IKingdom and Irish Free State

The departure of Great Britain from the gold standard late in September
has obscured somewhat the movement of prices of cured pork in the British
market. In American green bellies at Liverpool, dollar values reached and
maintained unusually low levels after the departure from gold. The October
average was only $10.22 per 100 pounds against $13.25 in September and
$20.10 in October 1930. The drop in dollar values on the American product
was not as great as on Danish Wiltshire sides but the October average of the
latter also was unusually low at $11.35 against $14.51 in the preceding
month and $19.44 a year ago. In sterling, October values of American green
bellies averaged only slightly lower in October than in September, while on
Danish Wiltshire sides, sterling prices in October were nearly 2 shillings
per cwt. below tnose of the preceding month. In .Iinrican short cut green
hams, dollar prices in October were down to an average of $15.72 and sterling
values also were easier.

November 1 stocks of cured pork at Liverpool stood at 1,641,000 pounds,
an advance of 96,000 pounds over the preceding monti. A year ago such stocks
stood at the unusually low November 1 level of 1,11-1.000 pounds. October
import figures are not yet available, but in Septeir:' :r b- oni imports of
105,978,000 pounds were in keeping with the heavy i: .orLe of recent months,
and were the largest September imports on record. Total bacon imports for the
year ended September 30, 1931, reached the record level of 1,218,528,000
pounds, an increase of 26 per cent over the preceding 12 months end 22.2
per cent above figures for 1927-28, the former record season. Bacon im-
ports from Denmark, comprising 66.7 per cent of the total imports, reached
the record level of 814,469,000 pounds. A feature of the season just closed
was the increase in receipts from continental countries other t- n Denmark.
Such receipts reached a total of 343,175,000 pounds and reprosr- ted 28.1 per
cent of the total against 23.4 per cent of the 1929-30 total. The 'letherlands,
Poland, the Baltic States and Sweden all contributed to the larger non-Danish
continental supplies.

Bacon imports from the United States reached a new low season's total
at 24,947,000 pounds against 60,383,000 pounds in 1929-30. In that year
receipts from the United States represented 6.2 per cent of the total imports.
In 1930-31 the correspondi-Lg figure was only 2.0 per cent. Receipts from
Canoda were even more sharply reduced than were those of the United States.
In hams the United States retained its leading position as a source of imports
into Great Britain, but there was somic increase ir receipts from continental
sources, while imports from the United States were reduced. Total ham
imports for the 1930-31 season just closed reached only 91,384,000 pounds.
That figure was 25,174,000 pounds under the 1929-30 total; was the lowest post-
war figure and also nearly 5,000,000 pounds under the average for the pre-war
seasons 1909-10 to 1913-14.

Lard prices in dollars at Liverpool broke sharply late in September
following the reduced exchange value of the pound sterling. The October aver-
age of $9.14 per 100 pounds for American prime steam western lard, while


-15-





HP-24


higher then the late September levels, was slightly under the complete
avorage for that month and was considerably below the average of $13.33 for
October 1930. Lard prices in Great Britain were at unusualty low levels
throughout the 1930-31 src.;on. Liverpool lard stocks on November 1, 1931
declined below those of tnc preceding month to reach 2,491,000 pounds.
Stocks on November 1, 1950 stood at 587,000 pounds, an unusually low figure.
September lard imports declined sJl.sonally to reach 17,022,000 pounds, but
were larger thal. the Scpteciber imports of any cf the three preceding years.
The United States continues as tie leading source of supply. Total imports
for the 1930-31 seoso. reached the unusually high fibarc of 305,755,000
pounds ar.inst 275,847,000 pounds imported in the 1929-30 season.

Thic continued heavier market supplies of fresh British and Irish pork
at London Central ifc-rkcts brought the October total to more than 10,000,000
pounds, the largest figure for any month since Decern.br 1928. Last year
such receipts stood -t only 7,972,000 pounds. Larger receipts at tnis time
of year are c. usual season.al activity. For the pork marketing year ended
September 30, 1931, the London receipts of such pork totaled 72,661,000
pounds cr.ainst 61,109,000 pounds for the preceding 12 months. Receipts of
fat pigs at certain representative British nr.rkets were seasonally larger in
October and were 11.7 per cent larger for the 1930-31 season than in 1929-30.


United Kin-dom: Bacon


imports from the United States, by months,
1925-26 to 1930-31


LMonth




Oct. ............


Jan. .............
Feb. ............
Mar ............*
Apr. ............
May ............:
June ............
July ............
Aug. ............
Sept ............
T)t-1 ........:
AU~ *
S~Pt *
T~t~ *


1925-26

1,000 :
pounds

11,947
9,962
15,889
16,237
17,226
15,427
11,951
10,758
7,995
9,430
7,386
12,142
146,350


1926-27 : 1927-28 : 1928-29 : 1929-30 : 1930-31


1,000 :
ocunds :


10,032
7,530
7,068
8,624
7,569
7,896
5,234
4,122
5,037
7,705
7, 79
5,494
83,790


1,000 : 000 : 1,000 : 1,000


pounds :

5,970
3,213
3,457
4,696
5,541
7,489
5,550
6,564
4,650 :
5,530
7,389
4,509
64,558


1





6


pounds

2,780
2,651
2,878
7,477
6,467 :
6,084
3,821
.0,480
7,043
6,775
6,437 :
3,242 :
6,135


pounds :

3,463
4,114
5,672
7,124 :
7,038
9,341
5,406
4,536
3,754
4,388 :
3,286
2,261
30,333


pounds


967
2,103
3,370
2,832
2,394
2,067
2,704
2,043
1,543
2,090
1,590
1,244
241,947


Compiled from Trade mad Uavigation of the United Kingdom.
"'r"


6


----


__ __ __


6


1
6


-16-





HP-24


- 17 -


United Kingdom: Bacon imports from Dormark, by months, 1925-26 to 1930-31


1925-26 :


1925-27


1927-28 : 1928-29 : 1929-30 : 1930-31


Oct. .....:
Nov. .....:
De *. s:
Jan. ....* .:
Fob. .....:
Mar. *.....:
Apr. .....:
i.I y .....:
Juno *...:
July .....:
Aug. .....:
Sept. ....:


1,000
pounds

31,690 :
29,306 :
40,377
31,207
50,172 :
36,205::
30,468 :
30,474 :
29,770
34,266 :
36,712
34,601


1,000
-pounds

34,557
38,931
40,194
41,803
42,4536
47,526
42,993
4, 205
51,795
50,710
46,941
48,143


1,000
pounds

50,090
50,257
52,244
54,975
53,912
54,675
52,745
51,109
51,636
4--,562
48,924
42,633


1,000
pounds

50,703
48,063
45,580
48,717
41,505
41,985
44,031
46,758
41,606
46,570
4)8,121
48,350


1,000 : 1,000
pounds : pounds


47,486
48,525
53 490
48,406
-4,4533
51,870
46, 204
56,206
54,456
55,213
55,066
39,751


70,906
6 1,433
81,294
66,819
67,246
65,505
63,224
67,190
66,161
68,704
68,094
67,893


Total ..


S395,51 :


Compiled from Trado c nd


530,234 :

ika.vigation


609,792 :


552,272 '


621,112 : 014,469


of the United Kingdom.


United Kingdom: Tot:al bacon imports, by months,


1925-26 to 1930-31


Month : 1925-26


: 1000
: pounds


Oct. .....:
Nov. .....:
Dec. .....:
Jan. .....:
Fob% .....:
Mar. *.... :
Apr. *....:
IM.y ...... :
Juno .....:
July .....:
Aug. .....:
Sept. ....:


66,983
60,259
01,951
66,329
65,933
71,126
64,527
60,794
61,4131
71,041
69,497
77,123


Total ..a


017,796 931,011


997,179 :


967,r-35. 1,210,520


Compiled from Trade and Navigation


Month


1926-27

1,000
pounds

73,275
76,183
7C,867
75,371
69,874:
32,407
71,277
76,630
0C,35.0
0,4105
74,.4030
00,159


1927-28

1,000
pounds

85,552
79,579
80,679
02,34- '
05,153
C7,041
03,025
00,759
06,307
79,212
06,062
71,796


1928-29

1,000
pounds

02,570
79,297
76,771
00,092
60,612
60,923
73,126
07,9.45
71,C94"
00,360
82,290
75,505


1929-30

1,000
pounds

72,402
74,068
05,603
74,801
73,721
04,631
75,096
04,615
03,277
05,457
04,750
00,206


1930-31

1,000
pounds

95,009
86,316
112,267
95,273
99,645
93,406
99,464
100,136
109,000
105,607
106,567
105,970


--------


---


933,033


of the United Kingdom.






- 18 -


United Kingdom: Total hcm imports, by months, 1925-26 to 1930-31


.ionth : 1925-26


1,000
pounds


Oct. 6....:
Nov. .....:
Dec. .....u

Feb .....
lIcr. .* ...
Apr. .....:
May ......
Juno ..... :
July .....:
Aug. .... *
Sept. *...:

Total ..


9,479
11,613
13,404
13,615
13,05
12,516
12,252
12,07E
10,945
10,4L
10,451
11,449


:1926-27 : 1927-28 : 1928-

S1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000
: ounds :L pourAs : ound


6,929
8,762
11,318
8,847
6,513
6,910
6,523
9,208
12,410
12,034
8,282
8,902


7,802
5,836
7,817
6,896
9,062
9,264
7,993
9,334
10,782
11,404
13,594
7,505


6,484
6,782
7,339
8,788
8,232
6,828
8,981
14,136
10,499
12,042
12,073
8,073


141,348 106,638 : 107,289 : 110,257
!


: -1929-30 :


S1,000
: pounds

S 8,105
8,125
9,347
7,920
7,989
8,601
9,539
: 12,298
10,983
14,391
12,024
S 7,26


: 116,558 :
* 6


Compiled from Trade and lNavigntion of the United Kingdom.


United Kingdom: Total lard imports, by months, 1925-26 to 1930-31


Month : 1925-26

: 1,000
:pounds

Oct. .....: 16,811
1ov. .....: 19,654
Dec. .....: 21,403
Jan. ....: 20,848
Fb. .....: 24,261
I.ar .....: 25,753
Apr. .....: 28,172
May ......: 18,843
Juno .....: 20,953
July .....: 23,074
Aug. .....: 19,148
Sept. ....: 25,361


1925-27


1,000
pounds

21,569
12,710
13,772
21,665
19,136
20,989
27,032
24,264
28,564
26,006
17,571
22,360


1927-28


1,000
pounds

17,360
21,058
22,351
27,794
28,421
33,840
23,081
24,398
19,596
24,667
21,84--
13,346


1928-29


1,000
pounds

18,079
21,551
17,480
35,923
29,752
22,234
21,612
26,479
20,498
25,977
21,204
16,899


1929-30 : 1930-31


1,000
pounds

21,844
24,004
27,160
27,559
25,187
24,810
18,218
2.0,772
21,078
31,801
20,438
12,976


S1,000
: pounds

: .22,89
. .27,75
S 27,27P
S 21,45
32,57
2 26,60
25,27
2.3.,77
.27,58
: 28,53
25,00
17,02


Total ..: 262,281 s


255,638


277,756


277,688 : 275,847 322,777
*__ -


Compiled from Trado and E'cvigation of the United Kingdcm.


:
:t
*
*
*
*
*
:*



:


1930-31


1,000
pounds

5,792
.5,755
10,11.
7,101
6,507
5,337
7,597
9,204
9. 773
11,.165
7,429
5,613


91,384


7
1
0
9
6
8

1
6

8
1


*
*


-1 --


I
- ----------


i'


i m m m


HP-24


*
*







October hog slaqughterings in Ireland for curing, at 141,000 head,
were in keeping with the heavier production of recent months as against
those of last year. For the season ended September 30, 1931, such
slaughtering reached 1,051,0D0 head but were slightly smaller than for the
1929-30 season. Irish Free State authorities are now considering imposing
Sa tariff equivalent to 9 cents a pound upon bacon imports into that country,
according to Consul Leslie E. Woods at Cobh. The proposed duties are said
to be aimeid primarily at imports from Poland and Latvia. About 70 per cent
of the bacon iimporteo into the Irish Free St.'te originates in the United
States. Practically 90 per cent of such imports come to Ireland via
England, chiefly through Liverpool.

During 1930 and the first 7 months of 1931, the Irish Free State
bacon curing industry lost ov.r $6,000,000 worth of cxport business in
addition to losses from imports into the domestic market, accordingg to
estimates forwarded b-: Consul Woods. The loss-s indic.:Lted .wro-due largely
to continental competition in the British market, chiefly from Danish, Polish
and iTcth1rlands bacon. During the period of declining bacon values, however,
the value of exports of live hogs and fresh pork incre.orsol by 4,000,000..
According to Irish Govcrnmjnt statistics there has beon a fairly steady
increase during the past ycar in the numnbr of b-con pigs nvailablo to Irish
curors.

Conti nontal E3urc po

Countries Important in British ML'ar!;kt Su plio

Dornmr k

Current figures oni Danisih 1ho ntu.bers show th'.t Donni rk is pormconently
ongrcod i-L production on scle considlr-.bly hi-hur than in any former yoer.
Co:n:.onting on the July 15, 19'31 total of 5,473,000 ho's in DonaLrk, i:r.
Christy points out the significance. in pot ential por! supplies of the
11 per cent increase over July 1930 fi;Lures in the nuL;ibr of sows in farrow.
Hr points out further that there was an advance of 15 rpcr cent in the inu~mber
of pigs two to four months old as wcll as an 8 per cent increase in pigs
under two months of aeo.

Mark.tings -of Danish por, products continue unusually heavy. In
view of the high quality products and ccononiical production and marketing
methods in use, it is evident th-.t Dorunarl: is prepared to fight for
existing markets and to attempt the development of new ones. Despite the
low bacon prices secured during the past season, hog -production has remained
fairly profitable,

iog-food ratios show that the low prices of corn .nd barley have
allowed a profit in most cases but in some cases, returns have boon reported
below the cost of production. Prolimiinary figures indicate that Danish
bacon exports totaled the record figure of 809,785,000 pounds in the 1930-31
season, an advance of 31 per cent over 1929-30, the preceding record year.


-19-


H.P-24





HP-24 -20-

Lard exports for the first 11 months of the 1930-31 season totaled 48,000,000
pounds, an advance of 57.9 per count over the corresponding period of 1929-30.
Germany took the bulk of the lard exports.

Consul Lestor L. Schnarc at Hamburg reports the Gorman moat trade
papers as announcing the early erection of a new plant for preparing lard for
export.

Denmark: Total bacon exports, 1925-26 to 1930-31


Month : 1925-26 : 1926-27 : 1927-28 : 1928-29 : 1929-30 : 1930-31

1,000 : -1,00 0 ,000 : 1,00 1,000 03 O5o -OO
p pounds ; ouds : pounds : pounds : pounds : pounds

Oct. 35,526 :37,860 46,129 45,235 45,310 67,869
hov. : 31,316 : 38,943 : 45,999 : 49,319 : 51,819 : 64,822
Dec. 32,921 42,952 : 56,405 48,652 48,165 70,486
Jan. : 32,783 44,572 :54,002 40,830 51,543 72,424
Feb. 33,103 42,179 50,310 41,472 :43,310 64,921
.ar. : 36,789 49,449 56,028 42,079 : 51,301 68,244
Apr. 31,370 39,303 : 50,682 45,648 46,615 : 66,325
May 29,094 49,555 52,009 49,160 57,154 65,622
June 33,810 49,691 50,332 41,773 51,050 : 62,767
July 33,542 47,279 46,680 43,857 53,403 : 71,142
Aug. 34,879 47,009 46,941 49,004 56,432 65,998
Sept. : 34,274 47,374 45,481 49,442 : 61,539 :a/ 69,165

Total : 399,407 : 536,166 : 600,998 : 546,531 : 617,641 :a/ 809,785

Varcomsatning med Udlandet.
_a/ Preliminary.


Netherlands

Hog marketing in the Netherlnds continue at a high level. Farmers
have been advised, however, to reduce farrowings this fall. Hog prices
are still on a low level but recently hog-feed ratios show some improvement.
There has been some decline in feed prices, particularly corn and a moderate
increase in pork prices. The foreign trade in pork and bacon increased
substantially during the current calendar year. Total exports of pork
amounted to 37,919,000 pounds during the first 6 months against 25,353,000
pounds during the corresponding months of 1930. The value of the exports,
however, decreased from 11.6 million guilders (4.63 million dollars) in
1930 to 9.4 million guilders (3.78 million dollars) in the first 6 months
of 1931. Of the various items comprising the total exports of pork, bacon
is the most important, almost all of which goes to the United Kingdom.
During the pork marketing season ended Soptomber 30, 1931, the United Kingdan
imported 117,000,000 pounds of Netherlands bacon against 87,000,000 pounds
in the preceding 12 months.






-21-


I* NotheIrl .nds: Q.artcrly sl.aught:r of hols in bo.ttoil.s and on
farms, for fresh rork, 1929-1531


Year and pl-cc First Second T..ird Fourth
of sla1ughtor qart r quarter quarter : qLuarter Total

: Kunbor : iunbur : ITiubr : NuIabcr : umbor
In abattoirs:
1929 .. 309,700 : 243,200 : 27,200 : 313,900 :1,11,0
1930 .. : 287,200 : 268,900 : 315,600 : 425,400 :1,297,103
1931 ... .: 413,800 :/452,755 :

Farm slaughter:
1929 ... 85,500 : 15,900 : 3,300 : 116,900 221,600
1950 . 7,400 : 20,600 : 6,000 : 165,000 : 268,0 .1
1931 .... .. 112,800
Total 'b/slau.gh.cor-:: :
cd in ab'.ttoirs
and on f.:rms -
929 .: 95,200 : 259,100 : 250,500 : 430,800 :1,355,600
1930 363,600 ; 283,500 : 321,600 : 590,400 :1,565,100
1931 : 526,600

af From monthly estimatoo published in Foodstuffs'Round t'-he ''rld, United
States Dc:part.'Lcnt -f Comrmrce.
bJ In addition thc nunbcr killed for bacon during the first qu rtcr of i131
wa.s 241,800 compared t. only 209,700 during the saic period of 1'30.




Poland

The Polish ho industry,, h.s undergone some'i notcwcrthy ch".nges in
recent yoc.rs, Lir. Christy reports. Thu c:portablo Lurplus of ab .ut one million
head of live hogs was formerly to.kcn by Germany and Czcchoslovaki.. IDue to
various prohibitive moasurcs, exports to those countries have practically
ceased. Zxports to Austri-a, hjowovcr, haveb boon maintained, and recent tradc
negotiations reo expected to incrce.se the contingent of Polish hogs entering
Austria. Polr-nd has had some success in dovoloping Man czport tr:.do in b'-con
to replace the l-ast trade in hogs. From 1928 to 1j30, exports 'f bacon to
England incro.sod over 400 per cent, with further increase in sight for
1931. Stops have beon taken to st.nd:-rdizc Polish bacon along the lines of
British rnrkot requircr.ints.





HP-24


G rmany

The October decline of Berlin prices oi heavy hoes to "9.60 per 100
pounds was somewhat seas en..l, but that level was unusually low for the month and
well below the pre-/war av:-.'3ge. Current values, however, are still somewhat
higher than the low points reached last ,ay and June. eed prices have continued
the downward tender-s of recent months, but hog prices have declined consider-
ably more sharply tr-,.-i ha-,v feed prices. September hog receipts at 14 centers,
at 309,000 head were -uIC.or tiose of last year, but larger than in September 1929.
Receipts for the season ended September 30 were 7.8 per cent larger than in
1929-30 and second onl7 to the 1927-28 figures, which wore the largest of any
post-war season. The Septembor slaughter at 36 centers increased seasonally
over the two prc.ccr..i..~ months, reaching 416,000 head, the largest slaughter
for that month in thi post-w;ar yenrs. The 1930-31 season's total slaughter at
those points vw.s 15.4 per cent larger than for the 1929-30 season.

Some pertinent points in connection with the increase in hog numbers as
reported by the roc .it census arc: (1) A number of hogs to be fed out on the
largo amount of relatively cheap food or hand following the harvest season;
(2) it is estimated that about 6,800,000 hogs to be used for home slaughter are
included in thi- Septe-mb.:r census. In the winter months, homo slaughter and .in-
creased demand in the cities reduce numbers considerably, with the low point
of the yoer usually coning in March; (3) chanigos in census age groups, Wnich
wore apparent only to a slight extent in Juno, havo now become more pronounced.
Of particular significance is the docreaso of nearly 10 per cent in the number
of sows in farrow. Thiis group is now no larger than in 1929. The number of
young pics has declined almost 30 per cent from last year's levels and the
number of young sows in farrow declined still more.

The increase in hog numbers is confined to those regions in which produc-
tion is on a small Zcalo and vhorec hogs are fattened on potatoes and other home
gro-%wn foods. In such areas as Schloswig Holstein, however, whore large amounts
of foods must be purchased, hog numbers have shown a considerable decline since
June 1, due to unfavorable hog food ratios. In spite of unusually largo markot-
ings, prices of pork have not declined as much as might be expected. This is
due, apparently to the lighter average v;eight of hogs marketed, ,Mr Christy
sta.ts, whiich is in accordance with a plan rccommnoidod to farmers by the
Committee of Exports. heorcas the average weight of hogs marketed in Berlin
in September 1930 vas 249 pounds, the avorc.go weight in Septomber 1931 was
only 231 pounds.

The s onvh -t stronger tone of the Hamburg lard market in October brought
the avor.go price for the month up to .,010.27 por 100 pounds. The advance was
evident in local currency quotations Ias voll as in dollar values. The current
strength is a continuation of the slight upward movement in ovidenco since last
August. Current values, however are unusually low for October. Harch is the
only month so fc.r in 1931 in which the Hamburg lard prico avoragod more than
i11.00. Honvy domestic proCuction and increasingly severe competition from
Denmurk and itthorlonds have reducod tho German dcm',nd for American lard. As



",;]


- 22.-






- 25 -


r a result, imports of Americ:n l.rd irto Grmr:-v/ hay:. declined sh"arly since
Juno, The, A- ri.-__r roduo t is :till th: l:':i : 'I: .,.1 i2i t':-, r: .:: 1 ...
import records, but imports of Draisch l.rd have bo':; at least clqual to thos
iof last yacr in rocc-t months, .and imports from ;Lot;L.rlands have increased
heavily.

The dlpi.rture from U1h. cold strc'.frd by D3rnm.r,: gives t;.-.t country c.
mctarial comrotitivo a.dv-'.:tg-.;1 inj C-Grman l.rc. m.rkcts. cL:i..Lk of S':dish
and Hung:-a'ian lard c.l.so ha.-v incrJc.sod over last yo.r's fi-urcs. For the sCa-
son closed Septombor 50, 190!, ihc;wovor, total l.rd imports into -ormaniy .;lre
20 per cent smaller th:.n t:soso of the 1929-20 season. The largo incrc.ase in
domestic f.t .roduc [:Li'n is, ci' coursoc, a factor of -.1imcl.ry imi.porta.reo in cur-
tailing Gcrmn.-i imp:r': of :mnric'.n lard. In addition, -r.nish ar.- Dutch prices
have boen considorcd ir.ore f.a or:.bl-. Dr.nish lard., in p-.rticular, h:Is a- ready
slc-: in ComnTic-' ov.i;- to a flavor closely resembling tlic.t of the domestic
product. Dr.nish l.rl.r is acceptable as a substitute for butter as sprad..
Amcricjn lc.rd, on the other h-nd, is used mainly for cooking, P'r. Christy
sta.tos.


Germa.ny: Hog numbers on Septomber 1,


1930 anC. 1931


Item


S 1930


: Millions
AgE groups -


* e cn


: _: Per cent
: 1931 : chago

: Millions Per cent
* :


Belovw 8 wucoks ....................: 52 : :52 + 4.3
8 ;eoks to 6 months ...............: 9.1 10.98 : + 11.9
6 months to 1 year ................: 5.13 5.39 + 5.2
1 year and over .......... .... 1.97 : 2.17 : + 10.4
Total hogs ........... 23.42 : 25.' : + 2
BrcodinC: sov;s included in the :
b ov fii-ur. s :
Bolcv one year ....................: 0.81 : 0.57 29.9
Above one y:ear ...................: 1.47 1.66 : + 15.2
Total so s ...................: 2.26 : 2.23 : 2.1
Sows in farrow -
Below one yoc.r ...................: 0.4-4 0.28 : 57.6
Above one yecar .............. .... 0.86 : 0.90 : + 4.8
STotal in fa.rrov ..............: 1.30 : 1.18 : 9.6
Assistant Agricultural Commnissionor D. F. Christy, Berlin. Figures z-re pro-
liminary returns of the census taken as of Soptoinber 1, 1931.


~


lipP-24





HP-24


Germany: Total imports of lard, by months, 1925-26 to 1930-31


IIonth 1925-26 1926-27 : 1927-28 1928-29 : 1929-30 1930-31

: 1,000 : 1,3:0 : 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000
: ponds pounds : oornds ds : pouns : pounds : pords
S S


21,357 :
21,715 :
17,216 :
20,818 :
16,044 :
17,17 :
23,511
16,333 :
19,307 :
24,817 :
13,324 ;
14,760


20,5'53
14,437
12,192
16,159
16,375
22,305
18,546
14,311
14,555
13,711
13,829
14,760


13, 240
15,793
19,373
24,841
13,688
17,686
22,848
19,640
13,528
14,233
13,080
13,065


20,480
18, 831
21,031
24,337
15,686
17,364
17,886
14,545
13,669
13,591
12,961
12,716


: 14,364
S 9,704
10,254
16,155
:20,042
22,413.
: 25,286
13,538
10,204
5,586
5,064
;./11,357


"5%-4'~--~- "f'fW 'i -oY/o-'----- -' ";"I~ ....... '
Total 212,529 : 226,428 ; 191,713 : 201,015 ; 203,177 /161,957

Ifonatliche ITachwveise eiber den AuswvirtiJe"n Handel Deutschl-nds.
a' Preliminary.


Germany: Total bacon imports, b-: months, 1925-26 to 1930-31


l month 1925-26 : 1926-27 1927-28 1928-29 1929-30 1930-51

: 1,00 1,0D0 : 1,000 : 1,330 : 1,>00 : 1,000
: podils : pounds pounds s pounds 0pou-. : 1pouLds

Oct. : 2,442 : 2,025 1,019 a 817 : 1,839 : 1,728
cov. 959: 2,118 945 11 : 1,560 : 1,881
Dec. 1,265 : 2,007 : 913 : 1,050 : 1,111 : 1,715
Jan. 1, 11 1,595 : 905 : 1,302 1,377 : 2,052
Feb. 2,021 : 1,493 1,213 769 : 1,607 : 2,566
iar. 1,745 1 127 625 : 908 : 2,29 2 ,470
Apr. 1,775 867 : 418 765 1,795 1 ,,7 687
'h' : 1,758 847 : 322 : 795 : 1,139 2,248
June 1,947 : 778 : 602 : 687 : 937 : 1,764
July : 1,452 : 606 : 421 1,102 : 882 : 2,155
Aug. : 1,877 474 : 383 953 : 1,432 : 2,067
Sept. : 1,999 : 912 : 523 : 1,023 : 986 : /4,188
Total .: 21,151 14,849 8,28C : 10,982 : 16,904 :a26,521

.onatliche ITachwveise ifoer den Ausvi#rtigen Handel Deutschlinds.
a/ Preliminary.


Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Jan.
Feb.
.a.r.
Apr.


July

SAet.
Septt.


21,389
5,536
8,525
19,559
2-.' .?O4
2 ,398
21.396
16 732
18,443
17,125
17,143
17.819


-24- .





HP-24 -25-

Other Countries

Czechoslovakia

Effective September 17, 1931, the import dut: levied by Czechoslovakia
upon hogs weighing over 150 kilograms (331 pounds) was reduced to 90 crowns
per 100 kilogr,1.as (1.21 cents per pound). The lower-rate is regarded .s a
temporary measure, according to a report rol.i the Americ-n Legation at
Prague. It is understood t.hat the reduced rate on hogs wvas granted in
return for a reduction in the Hungarian itpuort duty, on wood. The reduction
in the Hungarian rates applies only to the period December 7 to Deco.uber 31,
1931. A report from Consul Lester L. Schnare, dated October 1, 1i31, states
that lard marketing conditions in Czechoslovakia woer :.iore fs.vor-.ble to the
American product than in recent .ionths. American la.rd was beinri offered in
that country at prices with which producers in southeastern Zuropo found it
difficult to compote. There has been no inprovemcnt in the market for fat
backs.

Argontina

Of the 3,769,000 hogs recorded in the 1930 census for Argcntina, about
61 per cent or 2,294,000 head wore of definite enough strain to be
classified according to breeds, according to ..ssistrant Agricultural
Commissioner C. L. Luodtke at Buenos Aires. The classification as submitted
by' J.Ir. Luedtko appears below.

Duroc-Jrsey 1,073,992 28.5 per cent of total
Bcrkshire 719,375 19.1 "
Poland-China .. .. 500,579 13.3 "
Other hogs 1,474,292 39. "
3,768,738 100.0

In 1930, Argentina killed less than 1,000,030 hogs. In addition to
lack of numbers of suitable hogs, othcr pointss mado as rot .rdin.", the Argentine
hog industry wore: (1) Losses duo to disease, unsanitary conditions, -.nd
lack of knowlcd o and carol.ss handling on fr.rms; (2) the 2 per cent export
tax on pork products; (3) local taxes on the iniustr-' ir.posed b- provinces
and municipalities.

Venozuela

Regulations issued during Septcmbor in Vanozuela. require th.t 1 :rd
imports shall beo ccomjpaniod by a certificate of origin, according to Consul
George T. Summorlin '.t Caracas. The regulations specify that such certificates
must*conform:vwith the pure food laws of the country of origin and must state
clearly that the lrrd is made from hogs which have been certified as healthy
both before r.nd ?ftor slaughtor. The now order is regarded a much nooded
protection for the firms handling high quality lard in the Venezuela market.





HP-24


Hogs and Pork Products:


-26-
Indices of foreign supplies and demand


Oct. Sept.
1: 09-10 : 1t 4-3 5 : :
Country and item : Unit :to 1913-14:to 1923-29:19C2-28 1928-29:1929-30:1930-31
average : average :
UIII TED I(I D001 :: : : : : .
Production : : : : :
Fat pigs, cer- :
tain markets :100)' s: 593: 6014 644: 680: 581: 649
Sur plies,
domestic fresh:1000 : : : :
por, London :pounds: : 54,639: 79,996: 74,744: 61,109: 72,656
Imports- .
Bacon : : : : :
Denmrk : 2-3,250: 502,406:609,792:552,272:621,112: 814,469
Irish F.State : : : 54,347: 58,668: 61,670: 43,702: 31,536
United States : 184,037: 104,767: 64,558: 66,135: 60,383: 24,947
Canada 42,948: 76,357; 39,771: 23,234: 15,136: 3,156
Others .. 43,800: 164,341224,790:229,782:227,102: 343,175
Total : 517,035: 902,218:997,179:933,093:967,435:1,218,528
Han, total .. : 96,675: 127,520:107,289:110,257:116,558: 91,334
Lard, total. : : 210,237: 27,076:277,756:277,688:275,847: 305,755
D2I."LLRK : : : : : : :


xD-orts :
Bacon .: "
C.2YADA: : :
Sla-ghter -
Hogs,inspected :1000's:
.-AiyY;


1,687:


500,948:600,998:546,531:617,641: 809,785


2,563: 2,587: 2,361: 2,091:


rru ccion :
I:.g receipts : : :
14 cities .: : : 3,215: 4,180: 3,465: 3,379: 3,645
Hog slaughter : : : : : :
36 centers ..: .aj 4,430: 4,009: 5,183: 4,563: 4,300: 4,962
Imports :1000 : : :
Bacon, total :pounds:a/ 2.728: 15,898: 8,289: 10,98-: 16,904: 26,521
Lard, total : :a 193,843: 217,286:191,713:201,015:203,177: 161,957
UIT2'iTD STATES: : : :
Slaughter -
Hogs,inspected :1000's: 31,641: 46,066: 47,370: 48,957: 45,542: 43,559
.ports -
Bacon :1000 : :
United Kingdolu:pounds: 130,737: 64,747: 43,007: 47,484: 48,191: 20,537
ermany 1,497 11,27 8,70: 8,00: 6,120 1,199
Cuba .. : 8,138; 20,386: 18,664: 15,720; 16,131. 9,718
Total : 181,31: 140,742:119,615:128,357:109,171: 41,190
Ha.s, shoulders :
United xincdola: : 140,392 10,761:.105,949: 95,936:100,723: 73,803
Total 163,966: 167,766:128,156:120,531:125,128 89,32
Lard :
United Kingdom: : 169,138 225,342:231,084:234,767:258,052: 260,535
Germ:ny 137,720: 192,304:164,022:201,672:163,738: 104,90
Cuba : 38,426: 80,361: 82,079: 82,220: 75,532: 44,293
Netherlands :" : 36,408: 40,429: 33,060: 43,579: 43,174: 23,402
Total :" : 468,416: 722,124:708,593: 09,045:747-,42: 5553401
/ Four-year average only; figures for July,A~gust and September,1914 not
available.





SHP-24


Hogs and Porl; Products: rorein; and domestic average prices .'r 100
po-unds for Lo ;,.onth intilcato-, ind stoz':ks ....t t'i
enJ oZ e,.clh nOith

S Se-.t. : St. : S ,jt. : A.. Se e;t.
Itei-I : 1909-1913: 1525-1929: :


averac:o : avara: e : 1'30
Dollars : Dollars : Doll.rs


Prices -
HOGs, Chicago,
basis packers' and
shippers' q..otations .
Corn, Chicago,
No. 3 Yellow .
Hogs, heavy' ,
Berlin, live weight .
Potatoes, Breslau feeling
Barle:, Leipzg. .
Lard -
Chicago .. .
Liverpool .
Hamburg ...
Cured pork -
Liverpool -
American short cut
green han-Ls .
A-ierican '.reen bellies:
Danish '.7iltshire sides:
Caniadian Green sides



Stocks -
7'- -.... .


8.15 : 11.36

1.23 : 1.67

12.37 : 17.42
.33 : .46
1.73 : 2.16

11.24 4 15.95
12.50 15.59
51.14 : 16.33




14.50 : 26.03
S23.17
16.70 : 26.08
15.69 :a/24.70
1,000 : 1,000
pounds : pounds


1





1
1
J1


9.76 :

1.68

3.08
.32 :
-3
2.00

.4.25 :


.3.38


21.12
S 20.10
19.44
19.56
: 1,0DO
: rounds


; 1953 : 1531
: Dollars : Dollars


1


1


5.98 :

.82

1.63
.29 :
1.68

8.32
8.80
.0.01 :


5.41

.75

11.23
.22
1.63


C9.24
10.10


: 18.47 : 18.03
: 13.25 : 1-.29
: 16.62 : 14.51
S b : b/
: 1,030 : 1,.00
: pounds : d pounds


Liverpool : : : ;
hanis, bacon and shoulders : 4,970 : 3,394 : 3,426 : 1,545
Lard, refined 9,566 : 952 : 5,761 : 3,633
United Stat.s :
Processed pork cj .. : 541,216 : 447,427 : 595,063 : 474,636
Lard in cold storage .: : 115,188 : 59,732 : 96,047 : 69,657

aJ Three-,rear :.vora,.ro onli
b/ Ho quotation.
Dry: salt curod and in process of cure; pick'lci, cured, and in process of
cure, and frozen.


-- -


-27-


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li








HOG-FEED RATIOS AND HOG SLAUGHTER
UNITED STATES, GERMANY. AND DENMARK
UNITED STATES: HOG-CORN RATIOS AND HOG SLAUGHTER


RATIO
PER CENT O
AVERAGE

140
120
100
80
60
NUMBER
THOUSAND

4.,200
4.000
3,800
3.600
3,400
3,200

RATIOS
PER CENT O
AVERAGE
160
140
120
100
80
60
40
20
NUMBER
THOUSAND

1,600
1,.400
1,200
1,000
800
600

RATIOS
PER CENT 01
AVERAGE

100
80

NUMBER
THOUSAND!

500


300


F

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r -
-.. ........







Ig eyrai 1
GERMANY: HOG-FEED RATIOS AND HOG SLAUGHTER








'I I I
I
\F J 1A-i.__gptfoes rtio _____ #_ ^ __'o I .-












i





INSPECTED SLAUGHTER
(I2-MONTH MOVING AVERAGE




DENMARK: HOG-FEED RATIOS AND HOg SLAUGHTER
F *- n r 1











-- ri -- --




illtZ I = -'- l I=
,





















INSPECTED S UGHTER 2-MOT No AVER -_'AGE )

1924 1925 1926 1927O 1928 1929 1930 A1931 1932


U 5 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


l, 2 I 1 III ni uFL AGICULiI




,ii ulvtN TY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08865 0758
:. "iiiiii ia


I
I


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