World hog and pork prospects

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Title:
World hog and pork prospects
Physical Description:
v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics. -- Division of Statistical and Historical Research
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, Division of Statistical and Historical Research
Place of Publication:
Washington
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Swine -- Statistics -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Pork industry and trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
- HP-83 (Oct. 1936).
General Note:
Reproduced from typewritten copy.
General Note:
Description based on: HP-8 (July 9, 1930).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 026660448
oclc - 30588199
Classification:
lcc - HD9435.U5 A25
System ID:
AA00013004:00014

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Succeeded by:
Hog situation


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Full Text
t~\ f f, LI! J ,-L Le-
r( DO.LMNTS DEPT
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Washington
,, .'CR"SITORY
HP-21 August 1, -951
WORLD HOG AND PORK PROSPECTS



SUWvMARY

Indications now point to increased hog numbers in the United States

and Canada. Results of the June pig survey in the United States showed that

the spring pig crop exceeded that of 1930 and that a marked increase in

farrowings over last year will probably occur this fall. In Europe, however,

less favorable feed ratios have been discouraging breeding operations. It

is anticipated that September hog census returns for Germany will place total

numbers at all time record levels, but June declines in breeding sows point

to reduced farroying this fall and next spring. Hog prices in both Europe

and the United States declined further during July.

Hog slaughter in the United States continues to lag behind that of last

year. Demand, however, continues wacak. Most lines of pork products showed

weaker price tones during July, especially in cured products. In Europe,

indications are for a continuation of the heavy current slaughter and pork

production for the rest of 1931 and well into 1932. Continental cured pork

is reaching the British market in unusually large volume. Supplies from

Denmark are not as heavy as in recent months, but record receipts from other

4 continental countries keep total imports at high levels. Netherlands, Poland

i and the Baltic States are the important continental sources other than

Denmark. In spite of heavy receipts, however, stocks in British markets are

moderate and prices fairly steady.' Increased production in Germany is

cutting down imports of cured pork into that country.






HP-21


In lard, American prices were down sharply during July. The low

prices so far during the, current year appear .to be reflected in a larger

proportion of the hog carcass going into pork. In Europe, continental

production continues to hamper the demand for imported lard. July prices

in both the United Kingdom and Germany were materially lower than in June

and far below last year's levels, with some accumulation of stocks in British

markets. In Germany, the leading continental market for Ameirican lard,

competition with Danish lard is an increasingly important factor. Price

appears to be the main consideration, although flavor is also a factor.

The United States export trade in pork products declined further in

June. Bacon exports were unusually low, largely as a result of reduced move-

ment to Great Britain. Exports of hams and shoulders to that market were

up slightly, but the total export was down. Lard exports were lower principal-

ly because of increased Continentl European production. Smaller exports

to Germany have been general this season, but June exports to the United

Kingdom were also unusually small.


Hog Numbers

Additional evidence indicates that the peak of the present Continental
European hog production cycle has been reached, which is in contrast to con-
ditions in this country and in Canada where hog numbers are increasing after
having reached a low point in the cycle. Further increases in total numbers
were reported in Germany rad the Netherlands in the June estimates but a re-
duction in the number of brood sows points to a probable slight falling off
in total numbers in 1932, according to Assistant Agricultural Attache Christy
stationed at Berlin. The ratio of hog and feed prices has become unfavorable
in all European countries, with the possible exception of Denmark, states
Mr. Christy, and reduced farrowings are expected this fall. Even though
production in Europe is apparently beginning a downward swing, marketing are
expected to continue heavy well into 1932.







HP-21


.Hog nunbers in 4 a/;Europen countries.where supplies have boon
increasing for the last 3. or 4 years, showed. a still further increase in
1931 to 30,231,000 or 12 per cent above*1930. AlthouCTn actual figures are
not available for the Netherlands,, it seems certain that total numbers
showed an increase over a.year ago* as official' percentage chance s show
increases in all. classes except brood sows and fat hogs over 220 pounds.
The number of brood sows in the saine 4 countries, decreased from 2,132,000
in the summer of 1930 to 2,054,000. in 1'931, showing a definite trend toward
reduced breeding operations in Germany and Denmarj;. Total hog numbers,
as well as numbers of brood sows, however, increased in Irish Free Stae and
in Belginu, although the numbers ii those countries is small in. comparison
with numbers in Germany and Denmark.

There were fewer hogs in the. United States on January', 1 9 19 thlan
at the sane date the preceding year by 8 per .cent. However, there' as an
increase of 2.5 per cent .in the spring pig crop this y ear over 'that of
1930 and a prospective sharp increase in the number of. sows to fIarrow this
coming fall according to .the June Pig Survey.

The present low prices of feed and prospects for a large corn crop
in 1931, along with a restricted credit supply available for expanding
cattle and sheep feeding operations are the .principal factors responsible for
the markLed increase in hog production in the United States which is now
apparently under way. The hog-corn ratio during 'recent months has been
about normal but with wheat prices at very low levels, the hog-feed price
relationships are more favorable for feeding than the hog-corn :ratio indicates.
Since an increase in hog production requires a relatively small cashoutlay
and returns come quicker :than in cattle and:sheep production, and since
hog-feed price relationshipe,ore favorable, farmers in United States.are
apparently planning to utilize as much as possible of the surplus grain by
mar-keting it through hogs. .

Reports from various parts of 'Canada indicate that there was an
increase in the spring pig crop in that country also this year.. Hog numbers
in June last year were the lowest-since 1922.

Hog numbers in 1930 in 18 countries, exclusive of Russia, were still .
below the record number reported in.the years 1927 and 1928 by 2 per.cent.
Hog numbers in Russia decreased 36 per cent between 1929 and 193Q0.ad the
number on hand in the last named year was only 13,200,000 compared with an
average of 24,651,000 in 1927-28.


a/ Germany, Denmark, Irish Free State and Belgium.


~


-3-




L1ar-al


Hogs: Number in


principal pork exporting and importing countries,
average pre-war# 1921-1930


Y United
Year : States :
Jan 1 :
T :u
: Thou- :


Average
pre-war c/

1921 .......
1922 ........
1923 ......
1924 .......
1925 ........
1926 ........
1927 ........
1928 ........
1929 ........
1930 ........
1931 ........


.:
.:
.:
.:
.:
.:
.:
.:
.:
S.
*5





:.


sands :

53,300 :

58,602 :
59,559 :
69,044 :
66,361 :
55,568 :
52,148 :
54,788 :
60,617 :
57,410 :
53,238 :
52,323 :g


[umber in principal pork expo

*Nether- :
Denmark : laids : Canada :*
July :May-June. Jue ,:e
*
Thou- : Thou- :Thou- :
sands : sands :sands :
S
2,715: 1,305: 3,350:

1,430: 1,519: 3,905:
1,899: : 3,916:
2,855: : 4,405:
2,868: : 5,069:
2,517: 4,426:
3,122: : 4,360:
3,731: : 4,695:
3,363: : 4,497:
3,616: : 4,382:
4,928:f/ 2,018: 4,000:
S5,232:h/ 2,435:


rting countries a/
Irish :
Free : Sweden : Total
State : June :
June :
Thou- :. Thou-' : Thou-


sands : sands
S
1,046 1,023:

891:d/ 1,011:
938:
1,186:
987:
732: 1,100:
884:
1,178:e/ 1,369:
1,183:
945:
1,052:
1,221:


sands

60,411

64,828
66,312
77,490
75,285
63,243
60,514
64,392
69,6.60
66,353
63,210


: United
:Kingdom
: June

Average
Spre-war c: 2,754


1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931


.*......S:S





.0600osee.:
.S.... .S S*
.........:

.........:
.........:*
'.........:
*
* *


2,756
2,568
2,993
3,567
2,911
2,504
3,124
3,396
2,701
2,664


Number in principal pork importingf countries
o* :Czecho- :
Germany : France :slovaki: Austria: Italy.
Dec. / Dec. :Dec. ii: Dec. i/_Mar-Apr.
: : : : : :
: : : : :
22,533: 7,529: 2,516: 1,932: 2,685:

14,153: 4,941: 2,201: 1,326:j/ 2,509:
: 15,818: 5,166: : :
S 14,678: 5,196: :]/ 1,473:
:I/ 17,308: 5,406: : :
16,895: 5,802: : ::
: 16,200: 5,793: 2,539: :m/ 2,850:
19,424: 5,777: : :
22,899: 6,019: :
20,106: 6,017: : :
19,944: 6,102:f/ 3,088: :f 3,157:
23,365: : :


Compiled from official sources.
a/ Countries arranged in order of importance as exporting or importing countries.
b/ Total countries reporting each year, pre-war 1921-1929. c/ Average for five
years immediately preceding war wherever available. Otherwise for any years or
year within this period, unless otherwise stated. In countries having changed
boundaries estimates are for 1 year only of numbers within present boundaries.
d/ Census 1920. e/ September. f/ Census. g/ January 1, 1931. h/ Estimate
based on percentage change since June 1930 as furnished by Agricultural Attache
Christy. i/ Estimate for countries reporting as of December have been considered
as of January of the following year. j,/ Estimate for present boundaries for 1918.
k/ March. 1/ October. No estimate available for December 1923. m_/ Unofficial.


Total
b/


32,816

21,850
23,552
22,867
26,281
25,608
24,497
28,'325
32,314
28,824


-4-





-5-
Brood sows: Humber in principal pork and hog exporting and importing
countries reporting, pre-war and 1925-1931


Month : : : : : : : :
Country : of .' : Pre-.: 1925 1926 : 1927: 1928 : 1929 : 1930 : 1931
;estimate: war .: : ::::
S: I:Tou-..:Thou- : Thou-:Thou- :Thou- :Thou- :Thou- : Thou-
: :sands. :sands :sands :sands :sands :sands :sands : sandi
- -- -


Exp o -trtilg


countries: :
United States : Jan.-1-:
Denmark, sows 4 :
months and :
over :..........: July
Canada .........: June
Irish Free State: June
Sweden, boars
and sows ......: June
Netherlands ....: May-June:
Poland ........:
Hungary .........: July
New Zealand ....: Jan. :
Rumania ........: Dec. c/:
Yugoslavia......: Jan.
*
:mporting
countries:
England & Wales : June
Scotland .......: June
North Ireland...: June
Total ........: June


Germany
Six months to :
one year .....:
One year and
over ........:
Total ........:
France .........:
Belgium ........:
Norway ......... :
Finland, sows
over six months:
Czechoslovakia :


283

108

128










332
18

- :


Dec. c/:




Dec. c/: e907
Dec. c/:
June

Sept.
Dec& By -0


*


:10,088:100,286:10,855:10,587:10,412':


290:
533:
75:





602:
60:
1,042:
685:



316:
16:
11:
343:


462:

813:
1,275:
779:
124:
41:

39:
305:


391:
569:
93:





547:
64:
1,017:
692:



301:
18:
'16:
335:


491:

882:
1,373:
777:
129:
41:

40:
7- :


396:
577:
124:

:
:
:b/
531:
69:
1,086: 1
694:



393:
27:
25:
445:


625:

1,126:
1,751:
776:
127:
39:

43:


344:
551:
115:

135:

761:
579:
82:
,066:
662:



380:
22:
22:
424:


504:

1,218:
1,722:
785:
130:


43:
:


434:
537:
96:




554:
75:
975:





307:
16:
17:
340:


556:

1,063:
1,619:
790:
130:


9,924:10,044


588:a/ 581
507: -
111: 123


242: 211

497: -
62: -
: --





315:
18:
20:
353:


663:d/ 673
-I
1,178: .,,it 9s
1,341:. :6'9
771: -
137: 141
46: -

446 : -
446: -


Compiled from official sources.
a/ January 31.
b/ Ten months and over.
c/ Estimates reported as of December have been considered as of January 1 of
following year.
d/ See table page 24 for June 1931 estimate.
e/ Excluding Alsace-Lorraine.


HP-21


I


--


I


I


s






HP-21


Ho&. Slaughter in specified countries, average pre-war and 1914-1930

United :Germa.ly:Denmark England. :Scotland Ireland Nether-
S states inspect- in :& Wales .:sold off purchas- : land
Year :Federa :ed ecpt. sold off:farms :ed by :Canada: receipts
inspect- slaugh- :slaugh- :farms far:for Irish at 21
Steer :ter :slaugh- slaugh- :bacon. mar-
*ed : :houses :ter a/:ter a :curers :kets
tThou- :Thou :Thou- :Thou- :Thou- :Thou- :Thou- :Thou-
:sainds : snds :sands :sands :sands. :sands. :sands :sands
Average : : : : : :
pre-warb/: 31,759: 16,406: 2,503: 3,487: : 1,28 .4,280: 875

1914 .: 32,532: : 2,858:: : : -. : : 1,085
1915 .: 38,381: / : 2,594: : -. 842
1916 43,084: : :2,542: .- -: 850
1917 33,910: : 2,479:: -. : 600
1918 41,214: : 324:. : : : 217
1919 41,812: 1,368: 456: 874: 5,2. 422
1920 38,019: 3;024 : 930:. 2,700: 146 : 898: 4,834: 648
1921 38,982: 6,825: .1,641: 3,471: 173 : 1,030:5,297: 1,362
1922 43,114: 6,923: :2,215: 5,229: 176 : 926: 5. 82: 865
192 53,334: 5,830: .3,414: 3,691: 245 : 955:' 6056: 906
1924 .. .. 52,873: 10,527: :4,024:. 4,500: 242 : 1,110: 6,625: 1,068
1925 43,043: 12090: :3,766: 3,588: : 911: 5,720: 1,045
1926 .' 40,656: 13,072: 3,838:. 3,074 910: 5,636: 1,025
1927 .:: 43,633: 17,279: 5,098:. 3,680: : 1,050: 5,965: 1,152
1928 .;: 49,7.95: 19,391: : 5,673: 4,109: : 1,264: D'880: 1,068
1929 .: 48,445: 17,252: 4,994: / 3,245: / 1,142' 5,747: -
193.0 .: 44,2.65 17,994: 6,12 3,17: 1,037:

Compiled from official sources and cabled reports from Agricultral Commissioners
abr.oad. '
a: For years ended May .31 following.
b1 Average for 5 years immddiatoly preceding war period if available,, other-
wise for any year or years within that period unless otherwise statedd, In
countries having changed boundaries, the fig-rcs are estimatQs .for 1 .year only
for numbers within present bouAdaries.
c/ Not available for present boundaries. For former boundaries, the numbers
sl-ughtorod are as follows; in;thousands 1914, 19;441; 1915, 13,293;
1916, 6,348; 1917, 5,795; 1918, 2,430.
d/ Unofficial estima1te'of total slaughter in the United Kingdom and Irish Froo
State based on methods of estimating published in The Agricultural Output of
England and Wales, 4,890,000 in 1929-30 compared with 6,178,000 in 1928-29.
j Unofficial estimate based on method of estimating outlined in The
Agricultural Output of Engl -nd and '7ales 1925.






HP-2i


Hogs: Slaughter in United States, Germ ny, Dcnmark, and C-nad:-,, by
months, reasons October September, 1928-29 to 1930-31 a

: United States G-eriuany at : Denmark Canada
: inspected : 36 points : export houses : inspected
.Month:1928- :1929- :1930- :1928-:1929-:1930-:1928-:1929-:1930- :1928-:1929-:1930-
:1929 :1930 :1931 :1929 :1930 :1931 :1929 :1930 :1931 :1929 :1930 :1931
:Thou- :Thou- :Thou- :Thou-:Thou-:Thou-:Thou-:Thou-:Thlou- :Thou-:Thou-:Thou-
:sands :sands :sands :sands:sands:sands:sands: sands:sands :sands;sands: sands

Oct. : 3,713: 3,857: 3,492: 455: 357: 418: 494: 501: 612: 200: 207: 160
Nov. : 4,455: 4,499: 4,024: .411: 356: 278: 398: 395: 577: 232: 234: 168
Dec. : 5,782: 5,083: 4,647: 407c 382: 452: 442: 488: 612: 239: 221: 170
Jan. : 5,739: 5,001: 5,362: .388: 351: 391: 402: 438:b/ 650: 249: 207: 166
Feb. : 4,478: 4,034: 4,142: 367: 335: 405: 348: 407:b 509: 208: 168: 161
Mar. : 3,645: 3,392: 3,523. 411: 373; 503. 384: 442:b/ 638: 215: 168: 154
Apr. : 3,761: 3,480: 3,488: 395: 374: 423: 429: 529:b/ 566: 208: 162: 172
I : 3,798: 3,823: 3,408: 391: 371: 428: 435: 32:b 584: 187; 174: 158
June : 3,756: 3,689: 3,251: 333: 344: .48: 358: 478:b 565: 161; 159:0/164
Total: : : : : :

month s3 9,126:36,858 :35,337: 3,548:3,243: 3,746:3,690:4, 110:'.5,861:1, 899:1,700:1,473
July : 3,597: 3,187: 340: 361: 432: 525: : 159: 127:
Aug. : 3,130: 2,724: 325: 344: : 399: 485: : 161: 124:
Sept.: 3,104: 2,773: 346: 351 : 422: 595: : 142: 140:
Total : : : : : : :
for : : : : : : :
season 48,957:45,542: :4,569:4,299: :4,943: : 2,61:2,091:

SSeason accepted as most representative for the- United St..tes.
b Adjusted from weekly figures published in Landbrugsraadets Middelelser since
October 2, 1930.
c/ Adjusted from weekly figures.


United States

The general level of hog prices in the United States during July averaged
slightly lower than in Juno. Prices declined during oth week ended July 4 but
after fluctuating within narrow limits during the 5 oers, ey advanced sharply
during the wook ended Auast i. Prices at Chicage 'vor:.god '6.,33 during July
as against $6.36 in Juno and ;8.73 in July 1930. Prices of light weight
butcher hogs, hovivcr, advanced steadily during the month and the top price of
$8.40 reached during the weck of August 1 was within 10 cents of the highest
top since the beginning of the current year. Good to choice hogs weighing
from 180 to 200 pounds averaged ,7.63 for the month as compared with $6.89
during Juno. Prices of hoevy weight butchers and packing sows wore unsteady
during the month, and the price spread betwoon light and heavy hogs continued
to widen. 180 to 200 pound butcher hogs avcragod $1.55 higher than
those weighing from 290 to 350 pounds and '3.64 higher than medium to
good packing sows as against '0.71 and "1.81 respectively, in July 1930.


-7- -





IIP-21


Fodorally inspected sla-.htor daring July amno-untod to 2,767,000 head was 15
per cent smaller than 'that of Juno and 1-3.2 per cent under July 1930.: ..A
larger proportion of the supply consistc'd of packing sows, and the avorago
weight of hogs slaughtered was greater than. in Juno. Inspected slaughter
during the first 10 months of the current yo.r (October to July) was 4.8 per
cent undor that of the corresponding p. riod. in the 1929-30 marketing year.

After declining during the 2'wcoks:-.nded July 11, fresh pork prices
advanced sharply during the week en&dd July -18 but declined again during the
last 2 eeoks of the month. Prices woro higher at the'ond of-the month than
they vwore at the beginning, however, and most of the monthly avevoragos were
above those of Juno. The price sprbed between light and heavy loins continued.
to riden. 8-10 pound loins at ITew York averaged $20.86 for the month as
coimared with ..18.55 during June and $23.17 in July 1930, while 16-20 pound
loins in that market averaged $13.46 as against "13.81 in June and $15.58 in.
July last year. The cured pork mar-cet strengthened s.aneuhat during the month.
Prices ;f skinned hams at New York declined slightly but all other cuts
advanced. 12-14 pound regular smoked hans at New York averaged $20.38 as
compared with 'j19.50,in June and Q25.95 in July 1930. 8-10 -pound No. 1
sveet pickle cured bacon averaged "'19.28 as against $19.08 in June and $23.95
in July last year. Prices of dry salt backs which have been unusually low
in comparison with other cured prices during the last few months due mainly
to large supplies and hot weather, advanced modorately during July, averaging
$8,07 as against -8.50 in June and $8.60 in July 1930. Lard prices declined
shar-lly during the month, avor;.ging Q;8.65 at Chicago as Dgainst $9,53 in June
and the lowest f:r any month since September 1915. Sharp declines also
occurred in prices of l:.rd substitutes.

The relationship botv:-en hog prices and food prices in the United
States made relatively little change during the month. Corn prices declined
slightly as the i,.onth progressed but the monthlyy avercGe was slightly higher
than that of Juno. No. 3 Yellow at Chicago avoraCed 59.0 cents per bushel
as conpr.rod with 57.7 cents in June and 79.5 cents in July 1930. The hog-corn
ratio based on Chicago prices -w.s 10.7 in July as compared with 11.0 in Juno.
The rol-tion .:.f -h:-.t prices to corn prices permits the flooding of who.t to
hogs to an .dv:.ntago in many sections.

Exports of porl: and pork products during June continued the dorwnw.rd
trend which h h-.o prevailed during the current year. Total bacon exports
.mounting to 2,097,000 pounds wore 12.2 per cent under those of i y and
loss thin one-third of tho June 1930 moveomnt. Bacon exports for the first
9 months of the current year (October-Juno inclvsivo) wore 61.5 per cent
.sma-llr than in the corresponding period a year earlier. The reduction in
the o::port r.ovomcnt of bacon during Juno was the rcs.xlt of the sma.llor
t?2:ings by the United Kingdom. The movement to that c-untry, amounting to
993,000 pounds 'was 15.3 per cent under th-.t of .iay and 70 -or cent under
that of June 1930. Reductions in t-2cings pf b?.con during the first 9 months
of the current yoe.r from those of the corresponding period a ycar earlier
amounted to 59 per cent in the United KinCdon, 3-.- per cent in Cuba, and
93 per cent in Germany.

The export movement of hams and shoulders during June was reduced 2.5
per cent from that of Ia.y but takings by the United Kingdom, the principal
buyer of these cuts, as well as of bacon, incrossed 1.5 per cent. The movement






HP-21


to Cuba also increased moderately but exports to Canada were reduced to the
negligible quantit'. of 38,000 pounds as compared *iith 1,00S,000 in June 1930.
The e:cxort trade in h..is ard shoul.'er s ls ot been so seriously affected
during the current year as that of tacon, since these cuts do not receive
such keen competition from the pork produced in Europcan countries. But
during the first 9 months of the marketing year, exports of hams and shoulders
were also reduced from those of a year earlier. The reduction amounted to
26 per cent to the United Kingdom and 43 per cent to Canada. Exports to Cuba
increased 33 per cent, but reductions to other countries resulted in a
reduction of 27 per cent in the total r.ove;icn't.

Total lard o:ports in Juno amounting to 38,373,000 pounds :wro 5.3
per cent under those for -lay. This reduction was a result of reduced takings
by United Kingdom and Geor,.-..ny. Exports to Cuba were rore than twice as large
as those of .Ilay and the lar est sinc.- February. A slight increase also
occurred in the movement to the LJotherlands. Those increas.-s, hon7over, were
more than offset by reduction in the movo;.ient of 43 per cent to Gormany and
13 per cent to United Ilingdor. It was thl first month of the current calendar
year that lard exports to United Kingdom have been smaller than a year earlier.
The marked reduction in the movement to Germany reflects the increased
competition from production in Gernr.any anid the I.ar'cr lard imports into th.t
country from other European countries, especially Denmark. The total lard
export trade during t'h first 9 months of the current marketing year wore
about 27 per cent smaller than in the corresponding period in 19i2-30. Takings
wore reduced 44 per cent in Cuba, 41 in Gormany and 45 per cent in the
Netherlands during this period but the quantity takon by United Kingdom
increased 2.6 per cent.

The .storgo situation improved slightly durin-J June but stocks oon-
tinued sufficiently largo to exert a depressing influence on the live hog
and pork trade. Stocks of -ork on July 1 :a.iOU-itcd to 776 million pounds or
6 per cent smaller than those of t-o June 1, but were 16 per cent larger than
those of the July 1930 and not greatly different fro,. the July 1 5-year average.
Lard stocks, on the other hand, increased 12 per cent luring the month,
however, and on July 1 they were 4 per cent smaller t:an on July 1 last year
and 28 per cent smaller than the 5-year July 1 avjrage.

A statistical summary of pork production and distribution during the
first 9 months the current marketing year is shown on age 10 The number
of hogs slaughtered during this period iwore 4.1 per cent loss than a year
earlier. Due to the heavier weights, how;ev-r, total dressed wei:gt was only
2.4 per cent less. Adding storage holdings October 1,1930 and imports, the
amount available for consumption and exports was 5.6 per cent less But
exports wore reduced about 32 par cent and consu-mption 4 for cent even though
hog prices were 22.3 per cent lower thean in the preceding yecar: As a result
the reduced demand at home and abroad, storc.ge stocks on July 1, 1931 wvro
11.6 *)r cent larger than on July 1, 1930.

The low ratio of lard prices to pork prices apparently induced packers
to convert a larger proportion of the hog carcass into pork during the 9-month
period. Lard production per hundred pounds live weight of hogs was 4,6 per
cent loss than a year earlier. This tendency was not so marked during the
third quarter of the marketing year as during the first half, ho -vevr, which
is probably due to the heavy market movement of packing sows and slarp price
reductions on dry salt backs.


-9-






-10-


United States: Statistical summary of hog and pork situation,
October 1-June 30, 1930 and 1931


Oct June
S: : 1930-31 as
Item : Unit : 1929-30 : 1950-31: percentage
S: of 1929-30
: : : : Per cent


Hogs -
Inspected slaughter : Number :
Carcasses condemned .. "
Average live weight .. : Pound
Average dressed weight "
Total dressed weight
(excluding condemned) .:1,000 lbs.:
Storage Oct. 1 -
Fresh pork :1,000 lbs.:
Cured por : "
Lard .. "
Total . .: :
Imports, pork .
Available for consumption a/ "
Sports -
Pork. ... : ." .
Lard ... "
Total ..
Storage July 1 -
Fresh pork . "
Cured pork ... .
Lard . "
Total : "
Apparent consumption b/. .: "
Lard -
Production -
Per 100 pounds live weight Pound
Total . .:1,000 lbs.:
Apparent consumption c/. "
Hogs, average cost for slaughter dollar


36,858,331:35,336,644:


100,444:
.228.95:
172.86:

6,343,280:

119,204:
481,294:
153,690:
754,188:
4,095:
7,101,563:

249,684:
620,689:
870,373:

174,240:
504,981:
120,322:
799,543:
5,431,647:


15.39:
1,292,563:
705,242:
9.68:


94,563:
232.14:
175.72:


6,190,058:

92,305:
355,122:
59,732:
507,159:
3,018:
6,700,235:

134,087:
455,189:
589,276:

215,766:
560,374:
115,873:
892,014
5,218,946:


14.84:
1,211,451:
700.12:
7.52:


a Total dressed weight + imports + storage October 1.
Available for consumption (exports + storage July 1)
c Production + storage October 1 (exports + storage July 1)


95.87
94.14
101.39
101.65

97.58

77.43
73,78
38.87
67.25
73.70
94.35

53.70
73.34
67.70

123.83
110,97
96.30
111.57
96.08


96.45
93.72
99.27
77.69


HP-21







HP-21


United Statis: Number of hogs. slaughtered under Federal inspection,
.by months, 1925-26 to 1930-31
.* : ; : : .| : : U"
Month: : 1925-26 :.1928-27 : 1927;-28 : 1928-29 : 1929-30 : 1930-31
:Thou : s -., : .. ands:T:Ths:
:ThouSands:Thousands: Thousands: Thousands :Thousands :Thousands


Oct. ....0 ....:9
Nov. .....*****a
Deco .e********
Jan. *.........:
Feb. ....*....:*
lar. ....&.....:
Apr. .......*.:
May .........
June *.. ......:
July ....,....:
Aug. .........t
Sept. *.. **

Total .....


3,314
3,646
4,533
4,501
3,351
3,562
3,105
3,131
3,430
3,127
2,834
2,616

41,150


* 2,976
S3,610
S.4,394
S4,514
i 3,395
* -3,837
3 -3,530
S-3,766
S4,253
c 3,431
S3,050
a 2,534

: 43,090..


S2,969
S3,688
S4,869
S5,479
: 5,780
: 5,140
S3,446
3,884
S4,076
: 2,984
: 2,545
S2,508

: 47,370


3,713
4,455
5,782
5,738
4,478
3,645
3,761
3,798
3,756
3,597
3,130
3,104

48,957


3,57 3,492
4,499 : 4,024
5,083' 4,647
5,001 '5,62
4,034 : "4,142
3,392 : 3.3
3,480 3,488
3,823 3,408
3,689 : 3,251
3,187 2,767
2,24 :
2,773

45,542


United States: Average live weight of hogs slaughtered,
by months, 1925 1931

: : :
Month : 1925 1926 :1927 : 1928 : 1929 : 1930 :1931

: Pounds : Pounds : Pounds : Pounds : Pounds : Pounds : Pounds

Jan. ....;: 212.1 : 232.8 : 226.9 : 225.0 : 225.4 : 229.3 : 235.6
Feb. .....: 215.7 : 234.8 : 232.3 : 230.9 : 227.9 : 231.0 : 234.2
Mar.-....m: 219.3 1 239.1 :. 235.6 : 229.5 : &29.5 : 230.2 : 230.2
Apr.....i: 225.0 : 240.3 235.2 : 225.5 : 229.8': 228.2 235.0
May ..... 228.5 238.1 : 235.4 : 230.3 : 232.3': 229.9': 234.7
June .....: 230.9 2.6.1 :. 238.2 : .231.9 : 39.6': 23).5': 24..6
July .....: 241.1 258.1 : 251.2 : 241.3 : 250.0': 249.9 :
Aug. .....: 245.8 : 259.0 : 253.8 : 243.3 : '9.3' : 2o5.2 b
Sept. ....: 239.0 : 239.7 : 240.4 : 233.0 : 238.3': 230.B' 8 -
Oct.- ....: 229.2 : 215.9 : 225.9 : 2266 : 228.8' : 221.9 :
Nov......: 221.6 : 212.3 : 216..3 : 23.G 3 20.1' 221.5' 5
Dec. .....: 2,4.6 : 217.5 : 217,.6 : 2;2.9 : .223.6 : 226.5 :

0 a 0 *;.*
Av ... 2'25.5 235.1 : 233.3 : 229.3 : 231.7 231.2

Compiled .from slaughterhouse reports.







HP-21


*United Statos: Tdtal bacon exports,, by months, 1925-26- to 1930-31

8 .............. ....6 .. .. 6 6
Month : 1925-26 : 1926-27 : 1927-28 : 1928-29 : 1929-30 1930-31
*--- : "- : : : : *s. : _: .,
S1,00 .. 1,000. 1...1,000 1 1,000 : 1,000
0. pounds : pounds : pounds : pounds : pounds : pounds
: *' : : :6
Oct. ........: 13,166 : 11,742 :' 7,709 :.. 4973 :. 9,858 .3,268
Nov. ........ : 13;562 : 8*;507 : --6,:013 : 6,:716 :. 11i452 ... ,446.
Dec. '........: 16,405 : 9 9,601 : 9,347 : 9 593. : 9,868 : 4,474
Jan. *....:..: 21,!142 ':. 10,'015 119,660 :. 13;014 :. 13i324 ..5,275
Feb. .......: 14,980 : 9,642 : 10,921 : 11;286 : 12,184 ....4,040
Mar. '....a....: 13597 :* 8j567 : 15i106 :. 10,985 : 12249 ... 3,9,15
Apr. ........: 11,570 : 7;417 : 10,;073 :. 10;225 : 7,17.9. 2,917
May .........:' 12,225 :' 7,852 :- 9;692 : 14,395 8,553: 2,388
June'...;....: 9,472 : 10,301 :. 9;620 :. 124761 : 6,4413 .. 2,097
July ........: 7,670 :7 94270 :, 11648 10O95Q :5 5,339 ,....
Aug. ........:- 12,131 : 7:864 : 10'945 :. 13,171 : 6,9.00 ..
Sept. ....... : 14,870 : 11,620 :, 6a881 :. 10a288 : 4.973. ...,.
:__ : :_: : : :
Total.....' 160,790 '*112,398 :-119,615 : 128,357 :1099092,:

Compiled from the Monthly Summary of Foreign Commerce of the United States.


United States:


Total exports ofhams and shoulders, by months,
1925-26. to 1930-31


Month :






Nov. .......:
Dec. .......:
Jan. ......:
Feb. .....:
Mlar. .......:
Apr. ...... :
May ........:
June .......:
July .......
Aug. .......:
Sept. ....*.:


1925-26


1,000
pound's

14,494
16,243
19',827
21,000
19', 105
18,117)
18,059
16,682
13,218
13,512
15,972
11,425


: 1926-27


1,000
pounds

10,847
13,105
1:2,675
9,873
9,511
9,253
10,0D07
13,092
13,471
13,158
8,215
11,123


1927-28


1,000


1,000
pounds

.7,632
7 7,374
S9,905
10,005
10,976
-12,'222
:11,258
:11,390"
'137 54-
:13;557
13,402
6,681


a 1928-29

: 1,000
pounds

: 4-,747
* 7, 637
: 8,518
: 11-,187
7-,680
:: 11i-,140
: 13,857
: 11,246
: 12,571
: 12,621
: 10,849
:* 8,478
!


: 1929-30 .: 1930-31

S1,000 -: 1,000
:- pounds .: pounds
* .. .. .
:: 7,580 .:. 5,259
: 1P1,656 ::..10,089
S.6,957 *: .5,825
. 9,461 .. .7,295
: 9,213 :. 5.,538
: 10,790 .:....6,829
: 12,416 8.086
: 13,845:& 9,(69
s 12,158 : .. 9.,721
a 13,779 :: .
:10,820 :
s .6,432-:
* S


Total ...: 197,654
p


134,330 "


128,156 : 120,531


: 125,107


Compiled from the Monthly Summary of Foreign Commerce of the United States.


* *


*


-- --







-13-
HP-21

United States: Total lard exports, by months, 1925-26 to 1930-31

:: :
Month : 1925-26 : 1926-27 : 1927-28 : 1928-29 : 1929-30 : 1930-31

: 1,000 : 1,000 1,000 : 1,000 C 1,000 : 1,000
Si ounds : pounds pounds : pounds. : pounds : pounds

Oct. .........: 44,745 : 46,988 : 50,355 : 59,865 : 70,698 : 41,395
Nov. .........: 39,979 a 43,488 : 49,636 a 67,716 : 83,257 : 42,552
Dec. .........: 68,840 : 62,680 : 62,855 : 86,358 a 80,053 : 45,114
Jan. .........: 76,670 : 59t842 : 70,660 : 89,932 : 73,291 : 68,882
Feb. ..........: 65,356 : 49,880 : 79,872 : 65,924 : 65,953 : 68,760
Mar. .........: 64,259 53,040 : 79,.99 : 70,572 : 66,533 : 56,394
Apr. .........: 63,160 : 67,345 : 56,554 : 59,144 : 50,045 : 44,769
May ..........: 58,154 : 64,418 : 55,540 : 64,192 : 62,562: 39,623
June .........: 56,482 a 66,404 : 53,436 : 67,252 : 56,666 : 37,786
July .........: 45,873 : 46,972 : 52,940 : 64,274 : 51,670 :
Aug. .........: 54,273 : 50,816 : 50,658 : 55,487 : 49,287
Sept. ........: 61,577 z 59,736 : 46,158 : 58,329 : 37,417 :


Total ...... 699,368 : 671,609 : 708,593 8 809,045 747,432
a


Compiled from.the Monthly Summary of Foreign Commerce


of the United States.


Canada


The average price of bacon hogs at Toronto for the 5 weeks ended
July 30 was 49.03 per 100 pounds compared with $8.52 for the 4 weeks of
June and i12.22 for the month of July 1930. Prices the last 2 weeks of the
month, however, showed a decline, falling from 99.64 for the week ended
July 16, to 48.89 the following week and again falling to 48.50 for the last
week of the month. Unsettled and lower markets were a feature of hog trading
in the West as well as the East during the last week of July according to
the Canadian Government market report. One reason given for the drop in
price was the falling off in consumer demand owing to advanced prices of
pork and cooked meats during the hot weather vhich has resulted in a piling
up of supplies at various centers.

Hog supplies, as represented by grading at stock yards and packing
plants were heavy during July, amounting to 230,000 compared with approximate-
ly 189,000 during June and 181,000 in July a year ago. Sales at stock yards
during July were also heavier than in June, amounting to approximately
92,000 compared with 87,000 for June and only 68,000 last July.






-14-
HP-21

Reports from various parts of Canada indicate that there was an in-
crease in the spring pig crop. *Las.t year..the number of hogs was lower than
in any year since 1922, numbering only 4 .million. High prices recently paid
for hogs in relation to other farm products in general have -encouraged farmers
to increase producti-on this-yoar. --In. any instoiiaes the number of breeding
sows kept V:as reported as doubled or treblod.

Hog production during 1930. ws the smallest i-n 5 years according to
the Annual Livestock Market and M1eat Trade Reviewf or 1930.: The average
weighted price -however, was. only 1Q cents per hundred pounds bloww .1929. figuress
Cumulative figures of grading for the 30 weqks ended-July 3q .Asbw .tha
1,362,000 hogs were gradedd at *stock yards and packing plants .this..yqewr a re-
duction of 3 per cent as compared with 1930, Inspected slaughqr .:or 29 weeks
ended July 27 is estimated at 1,085,000 a decrease of. 7 per .cent.compare.d ith
slaughtering for the first 7 .months..of .1930 .when:the number .kUtlQd wa
1,165,000. ........


-Unitod .lingdom. ... .
"' . .
Tho suggestion of seasonal.forces at work in.British..oured.pork.markets
was reflected in the. July average of 14,66 per 100 pounds for Danish Wiltshire
sides at Liverpool, according to.cabled advices from Agricultural Attache
Poley at London. That figure represented an'advance of 41l.l9'btor the June
-average, but was still unusually low for July and nearly '2.00 under the pre-:'
war level. The usual July dip in Liverpool values of American green bellies
placed the avora.oe'for that item at $13.47, down 60 cents from Juno and the
lowest July average in the post-war period. American short cut green hams,
however, wore higher at 418.33 under the influence of limited supplies. The
July average was the highest since last January. Monthly receipts of hams,
most of which come from..the United States, have been consistently lower than
in 1930.

August- 1 stocks of cured pork at Liverpool stood at 3,711,000 pounds,
down 829,000 pounds from figures for the preceding month and also lower than
last year. July import figures are not yet available, but for June, total
bacon imports into the United Kingdom reached 109,000,000 pounds. That figure.
was second only to the record import of more than 112,000,000 pounds of last
December. Practically all of the increased imports of recent months have been.
coming from continental countries other than Denmark. Of those, Netherlands
is the most important, with Poland, the Baltic States and Sweden sending more
bacon than usual to the British market. Total.bacon imports for the current
season to June 30 vere 26.9 per cent' larger than for the same period of 1929-3Q
Imports from Denmark- for the same period of 1930-31 were 35.2 per cent above
last season. June receipts from the United States were among the lowest
on record.

Lard prices at Liverpool reacted from the advance made in June to aver-'
age 49.45 per 100 pounds, dovn 16 cents from the average of the preceding
month. The current average was 1.75 lower than last year and S2.41 under the
pre-war average for July. August 1 lard stocks at Liverpool were placed at
4,581,000 pounds, the largest since October 1929. Lard imports for June,
totaling more than 27,500,000 pounds, wore unusually heavy for that month and





-15-
HP-21

were above the figures for any June since 1927. Total lard imports for the
current season to June 30, most of v.hich are supplied by the United States,
were 11.3 per cent larger than imports for the corresponding months of 1929-30.
Since last October the monthly lard imports have boon larger than last year
except in January. So far this season lard imports have reached an unusually
large total.

The continue heavier British supplies of domestic pork woere reflected
in another increase for July in receipts of hogs at leading markets. The
total number so recorded to July 31 since October 1, 1930 is about 10 per cent
larger than for the corresponding 1929-30 total. Seasonally moderate volumes
were recorded for July receipts of fresh British and Irish pork at London
Central Markets, but the current figure was larger than that of last year. The
cumulative total of that item to July 31 was 15.3 per cent in excess of the
corresponding 1929-30 figures.

Hog numbers in Irish Free State reached 1,221,000 on June 1, 1931,' or
the largest number on record according tc a cabled report cf the June census
furnished by Agricultural Attache Foloy stationed at Lcnaon. This is an increase
of 16 per cent over 1930. Brood sows numbered 123,000 in 1931 an increase of
11 per cent over 1930 but owre below the record number reported in 1927 by
1 per cent. Irish Free State supports almost one-third of the hogs raised in
the British Isles and exports live hogs, fresh pork and bacon to England.


United Kingdom: Bacon imports from the United States,
by months, 1925-26 to 1930-31


Month : 1925-26 : 1926-27 : 1927-28 : 1928-29 : 1929-30 : 1930-31

:1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000
: pounds : pounds : pounds : pounds :pounds : pounds

Oct. ............: 11,947 : 10,032 : 5,970 : 2,780 : 3,463 : 967
Nov. ...........: 9,962 : 7,530 : 3,213 : 2,651 : 4,114 : 2,103
Dec. ............: 15,889 7 7,068 : 3,457 : 2,878 : 5,672 : 3,370
Jan. .......:....: 16,237 : 8,624 : 4,696 : 7,477 : 7,124 : ?,832
Fob. ...........: 17,26 : 7,569 : 5,541 : 6,467 : 7,DP8. : .,394
Mar. ...........: 15,427 : 7,896 : 7,489 : 6,084 : 9,541 :, 2,067,
Apr. .......:....: 11,951 i 5,234 : 5,550 : 3,821 : 5,406 :' 2,704
May ............: 10,758 : 4,122 : 6,564 : 10,480 : 4,A55 : 2,04
June ...........: 7,995 : 5,037 : 4,.650 : 7,043 : 3,754 : 1,543
July ...........: 9,430 : 7,.705 : 5,.530 : 6,775 : 4,388 :
Aug. ...........: 7,386 : 7,479 : 7,.389 : 6,'437 : 3,286
Sept. ..........: 12,.142 : 5,494 : 4,509 : 3,242 : 2,261


Total ........ 146,350 : 83,790 64,558 66,135 60,383 :
Compiled from Trade and Navigation of the United Kingdom.





IH-21


United Kingdom: Bacon imports from Denmark, by months,
1925-26 to 1930-31


Honth


S1925-26


1926-27


: 1,000 : 1,000 :
: pounds : pounds :


Oct. .......
Nov. ........:
Nov. ........:
Dec. ,. ......:
Jan. *.......
FOb. ........ :
Mar. ........
Apr. ... .....:
May ......... :
June ........ :
July .........:
Aug. ........
Sept. .......

Total ..


31,690
29,306
40,377
31,207
30, 172
36,205
30,468
30,474
29,770
.34,266
-36,712
.34,601-


34,557
38,931
40,194
41,803
42,436
47,526
42, 99 3
44,205
51,795
50,710
46,9ie1
48,1-13


395,548 : 530,234


1927-28

1,000
pounds

50,090
50,257
52,244
54,975
53,942
54,675
52,745
51,109
51,636
44,562
48,924
42,033


:1928-29


S1,000
Sounds

. 50,703
: 48,0.33
45,580
48,717
:41,508
:41', 985
S44,031
46,758
'41,886
46,570
48,121
48,350


609,792 : 552,272


.1929-30 1930-31

:1,000 : 1,000
: Jounds : pounds

: 47,486 : 70,906
: 48,525 : 61,433
:53,490 : 81,294
:48,406 :' 66,819
:44,439 : 67,246
: 51,'870 : 65,505
:46,204 63,224
: 56,206 : 67,190
: 54,456 : 66,161
55,213
55,066
: 59,751


621,112 :


Compiled from Trade and Navigation


of the United Kingdom.


United Kingdom: Total bacon imports, by months, 1925-26 to
1930-31


*Moonth: : 1925-26 1926-27 : 127-28 1928-29 :1929-30 1930-31

S.. : 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,0000 : 1,000 : 1,000
S : Dounds : pounds ': ouhds : ouhds : ounds : pounds

Oct. .......: 66.,983 : 73,275 : 85,552 : 82,378 : 72,402 : 95,809
Nov. ........: 60.,259 : 76,138 79,579 : 79:,297 :- 74,868 : 86,516
Dec. ........: 81,951 : 78,867 '80',679 ': 76,771 : 85,603-: 112.,267
Jan.. .......: 66,329 : 75.,371 : 82,344 ': 88,092 : 74,,801 : 95-,273
Fcb.. ........: 65,935 : 69, 874 : 85,153 ': 68,612 : 73,721-': 99-,645
Mar. ........: 71,126 : 82,487 : 87,041 ': 68,923 : 84,631 : 93,406
Apr. ........: 64,527 : 71,277 : 83,815 : 73,126 : 75,096 : 99,464
iay .........: 60,794 : 76,630 : 88,759 ': 87,845 : 84,'615 : 108,136
June. ........: 61,431 : 88,348 : 86,387 : 71,894': 83,277 :' 1-09,080
July ........: 71,841 : 84,105 : 79,212': 80,360 : 85,457 ":-
Aug. .......,: 69,497 : 74,480 : 86,862 : 82,290': 84,758-: '
Sept. .......: 77,123 : 80,159: 71,796 : 73,505:' 88;206 :
:* : .

Total.. 817,796 : 931,011 3: 7,179 933,093 : 967,435
Compiled from Trade and Navigation of the United Kin
Compiled from Trade and Navigation of the United Kingdom. .


-16-






H---21


United Kingdom: Total han iTmorts, b- months, li25-26 to
1 : 0-31


'onth


i'.35 26:1926 27:192' 28:1928 29'1?29 30:1970 -l
*


1,000
-)oundZ

5,484 :
6,782 :
7, 39
8,788 :
8,232 :
6,828 :
8,981 :
1-1,136 :
10,499 :
12,042
12,073 :
8,073 :


1,000
*ouxlds


]


8,105
8,125
.',347 :
7,920 :
7,939 :
8,601 :
9,553 :
12,298 :
10,983 :
14, 391
12,02-, :
7,235 :


, 000
poundss

5,792
5,755
10,111
7,101
6, 07
5, 37
7,597
,204
9,773


Total. .: 141,348 : 106,538 : 107.289 : 110,257 : 116558 :

Compiled from Trade 1'nd Navigation of the United Xingdom.

United Xingdorm: Total lard imports, b., months, 1-25-26 to
1930-31

Month : 1125-26 : 126-27 : 1-27-28 1928-29 : 1929-50 : 193C-31


. .












Total.....:
.lllll:
l l l ll. *

lillI*








Totnl .....


1,000 :
pounds :

16,811:
19,654:
21, .03:
20,848:
24,261:
23,753:
28,172:
18,843:
20,953:
23,07-:
19,14-8:
25,361:


262_ 281


1,000 :
poun ds

21,569:
12,710:
13,772:
21,665:
19,136:
20,989:
27,032:
24,264:
28,534:
26,003:
17,571:
22,330:


255 F38 R!


1, 000 :
pounds

17 ,60:
21,058:
22,351:
27,794:
28,421:
33,840:
23.o031:
24,398:
19,596:
24,667:
21,8-14:
13,346:


27 7.75;


1,000 :
pounds

18,079:
21,551:
17,- -80:
35,923:
20,752:
22,234:
21,612:
26,479:
20,498:
25,977:
21,204:
16,899:


277A r88;


1,000
pounds :

21,844:
2- ,004::
27,160:
27,559:
25,187:
24,310:
18,218:
S20,772:
21,078:
31,801:
20,438:
12,976:

275.847:


Compiled from Trade and Navi ation of the


Oct. .
Nov. .
Dec .
Jan. .
7ob. .
Mar. .
Apr. .
Hay
June .
July .
Au.S .
Sept.


1,000
pounds

9,479
11,613
13,404
13,615
13,066
12,516
12,252
12,076
10,945
10,482
10,- 51
11,4 49


1,000
ounmds

6,929
8,762
11,318
8,847
6,513
6,910
6,523
3,208
12,410
12,034
8,282
8,902


1,000
-'ounds

7,802
5,836
7,817
6,896
9,062
9,234
7,993
9,334
10,782
11,404
13,59'4
7,505


Oct- .
Nov. .
Dec. .
Jan. .
Fcb. .
Mar.
Apr.
May
Juno .
July .
Aug. a
Sept.


1, 000
-oounds

22,897
27,751
27,270
21,459
32,576
26,608
25,276
23,771
27,586


-- -


- -


To a 9 2 -


-17-


United Kin,dom.






-18-
Cont inental urope

Countries Important in .British liarket Suillies


'D e rL-naz k

Figures on Danish hog production will iot be available until after the
census of July 15 has beei com-leted, according to the July hog re ,ort from
Assistant Agricultural Commissioner D. ?. Christy at Berlin. As indicated
in earlier reports, the January 15 census of this year already showed some
indications of a slowing down in production, but the important'position of
hoes in Danish agriculture precludes any exteAsive decrease in'production.
Instead, there appears to-be a concerted-effort on the 'art of'Dhnish
farmers to extend their markets. Since the loss of part'of the English
bacon'market, due to reduced buying power in nng;land, and to increased-com-
petition especially from Notherlands and Poland, the Dan'es-have been-looking
for other markets. *Jith this in mind, it is iruored that some'attempt-is
being made to produce a hog more suitable for'the "orman'trade.

While the change indicated above is not yet apparent, Danish producers
have succeeded in increasing their sales of lard to G-ormany at the expense of
United States producers. This has been done by quoting lower prices and by
flavoring their lard to suit the 2-erman taste as in somb parts of 3Grmany
lard is -orcforred to butter.


Denmark:


Total bacon exports, 1925-26 to


S
S


month h


1925-26 : 126-27


:1,000
: vound

Oct.. 35,52
Nov : 31,31
Dec. .. : 32,92:
Jan. : 32,73
cob. .. : 33,10
Mar. : 36,7?8
Apr. : 31,3
1May ... : 29,09.
Jun' ... : 33,81
July : 3354
Au : 34,87'
Sept. 34,27.
Total .....; 399,40
"arcoinsatning mod. Udlandy
a/ Preliminary.


1,000
-)ounds

37,860
38,9'43
42,952
44,572r
42,1 79
49,449
39,303
49,555
49,691
47,279
47,003
47,374
533.1'66


S1927-28
1,000
p: pounds

46,189
45,9 99
56,405
:54,002
: 50,310
: 56,028
S50,682
52,009
50,332
: 46,680
46,941
S45,461
: 600.998


1928-29
1,000
pounds

45,295
49,319
48,652
40,830
41,472
42,079
45,648'
49,160
41,773-
43, 857
49,004
49 4-42-
546.531


1929-30 1930-31
:1,000 : 1,000
pounds : pounds

:45,310 : 67,869
:51,819 : 64,822
:48,165 : 70,486
:51-,543 :- 92,424
: 43,310 : 64,921
: 51,301 : 68,244
:*46,615 : 66,Z25
: 57-,154 :a/66,012
: 51,050 :-
53,403
: 56,432 :
.' 61,539 :
: 617,641 :


Danish hog food ratios were unfavorable
recovery in bacon prices toward the end of the


during most of June, but a
month gave a more favorable


aspect to the situation. Da.:ish bacon prices dropped to unusually low
levels around the middle of Junc, This dcclin2 was due to the wecknoss of
the English bacon market whcrc, in addition to the low purchasing power,
there was an accumulation of bacon stocks from Denmark, Holland and Poland.
Those stocks have now boon partly cleared and prices havo improved. The
Juno hog food ratio did not support claims that pig raising in ECmaork had


1930-31


~---


I


~


..


-


m m I ,


~- -.~--






-19-


reached unprofitable levels. As a matter of fact, the hoe feed ratio for the
years 1909-1V14 averaged only 3.3, whereas that of June 26 was 9.5, according
to Mr. Christy.

The mid-s.umner hog estimate for Denmark is not :ct avuil.blo. Lnst
July hogs numbered 4,928,000 and by January 1931 had increased to 5,232,003.
As the number of brood sows in January was about 'i,000 loss than in July, a
slight reduction in numbers may be sho.m in the July estimates for 1T31. No
marked decrease in production is expected, however, due to the close intor-
rclationship between hog production and D.nish fnrming, especially dairying.
From July 1, 1-30 to June 30, 1931 the number of hogs Glaulhtcrcd in that
country reached about 6,918,000 an increase of 29 per cent over the previous
year.

Netherlands


Hcavy marketing of Netherlands -pork will continue throughout the
rest of this year but the -*cak of the -rroduction circle has now been reached
and farrowings this fall may be cxpoctcd to decrease, Hr. Christy reports.
The hog feed ratio has become decidedly unfavorable in s-ito of the decline
in corn prices during Mary. Results of the Dutch hoL census of June 1, 1931
indicate that the peak of production has already boon reached. Compared
with the corresponding census .of last ye-r, the number of sovs in farrow
shows a substantial reduction. This will undoubtedly be reflected in do-
croasod farrowings this fall and lighter markctings during the coming year.
The high numbers of light and medium weight -ibs now on hand, however, point
toward heavy marketing during the remainder of this year and for the first
few months of 1932.

The number of sows in farrow in the Nethcrlands on June 1, 1931 was
only 87 per cent of the number in farrow in June 1.30. No estimate is avail-
able of the total number of hogs on hand on Juno 1, 1931, but figures for
various classes based on the percentage changes since last Juno point to an
increase in total numbers this year. Pigs under 6 vccks show an increase
of 18 per cent over the s.mc date of 1Q30, hogs up *to 132 pounds, an in-
crease of 33 per cent, aind hogs weighing from 132 to 220 pounds, an increase
of 22 per cent. Hoavy hogs, over 220 pounds showed a decrease of 5 per cent.

During the first quarter of 1931 the number of hogs slaughtered at
abattoirs and on fans was 527,l00(0 an increase of 39 per cent over the
average for the 2 preceding years according to Consul Hoover. In addition
242,000 wore killed for bacon compared -.ith 210,000 for the first. carter
of 1930.






HP-21


ITctheCrl-.nds:


Quarterl. sla.uhtcr of hoc's in abattoirs and on
faris, for fresh n-orl, 1929-1931


Year f.nd place of
slaughter


In abattoirs:
1929 .
1930 ..
1931 .


Farm slaughter :
1929 .
1930 ... .
1931 . :
Total a/ sla.uwht:rcd:
in abattoirs a.nd
on. farms -
1929 .. :
1930 .
19310 .... :
1931 ...


* .
* .
* .


: first
a quartor
: umnbcr

:309,700
:287,200
:413,800


85,500
76,400
112.800


395,200
363, 00
526,600


Sccnd :
auartor:
Numb er :

243,200:
268,900:



15,900:
20,600:





259,100:
289,500:


Third
quart or
NJunb or

247,200
315,600


3,300
6,000


250,500
321,600


: fourth :
:quarter :
: Ilumbcr :

: 313,900:
: 425,400:



:116,900:
:165,000:


Total
NTTb cr

1,114,000
1,297,100



221,600
268,000


430,800: 1,335,600
590,400: 1,565,100
:


a/ In addition the number killed for bacon during the first quarter of 1731
was 241,800 compared to only 209,700 durin, the samn period of 1930.


Totherlands: ITumiber of hogs according to ccns'uscs, 1910, 1921,
and 1930
I


Consuses


: : .Pis : Hogs up : Hogs 132: Hos :
:3reoding : under 6 : to 132 : to 220 : over 220: Total
: so/s : woeks J: ounls : ooundds : pounds : ho s
:ThoThsands:husands : Thousands :T Thus.nds : Thlusands: Thousands
S a S S :


'8ay--Junc : : : : : :
1-10 ....: 130 : 279 : 380 : 1,260
Hlay-June :
1921 ..... 147 : 371 : 1.148 : 1,519
May-Juno : :
1930 ....: 242 : 472 C40 263 : 101 :2,018
Mar. 1931 : : : : : :
(cst.)a : 571 : 1,053 : 430
Juno 1931 a: : 557 : 1,250 : 321 : 96
Vcrslag ovae don Landb.-uw in Noderland 1-728, Coimmrcial Attachd J. T. Van
Wicecl, January 16, 1931.
a/ Estimates based on pcrcontagi increase over Juno 1-)30 numbers as furnished
by Asst. Agricultural Commissioncr Christy.


C


,


-20-






HP-21


Netherlands: Estimated percentages of increase of hogs on specified
dates in 1930 and 1931 compared with preceding year


Sows
Date : in
Sparrow
: Per cent

Mar. 1, 1930 ....: + 30

June 1, 1930 ....: + 20

Sept.l, 1930 ....: + 15

Dec. 1, 1930 ....:+10 to 15

Mar. 1, 1931 ....: slight

June 1, 1931 ....: 13


:*
:*


Farrows :Pigs over
under :6 weeks to
6 weeks :132 pounds
Per cent : Per cent

+ 15 to 20: +10

+ 15 to 20: +15

+15: +10 to 15

+10 to 15: +15

+ 5: + 5 to 10

+18: +33


Hogs
:132 to 220 :
: pounds
:Per cent

+5

:+ 10 to 15

: +10:

:+ 30 to 40 :

: +10:

: +22


Hogs
over
220 pounds
Per cent

slight increase

+5

slight increase

+10

little change

5


Based on reports furnished by Livestock Extension Agents and forwarded by
Agricultural Attache Steere and Asst. Agricultural Commissioner Christy.
Plus sign indicates increase; minus sign, decrease.

As reflected in British import figures, Netherlands bacon exports to that
country in June reached record levels. British sources indicate an import of
13,651,000 pounds, an advance of 1,655,000 pounds over the May imports and
4,930,000 pounds more than in June 1930. Earlier figures nearest approaching
those of June 1931 are recorded for August 1928, when 13,614,000 pounds were
received from the Netherlands. Total British imports from that source for the
current season to June 30 were 30.1 per cent larger than corresponding
figures for 1929-30.

Poland

Very little information is available at present on Poland, Mr. Christy
reports. Had Germany ratified the commercial treaty with Poland permitting
transit of all kinds of fresh meat through Cermany, the Polish hog industry
would have received quite a stimulus. Until this treaty is ratified, however,
the situation is not much different from that reported earlier. As previously
mentioned, exports of live hogs to C echoslovakia have practically ceased
but this has been offset to some extent by a rapid increase in exports of pork
and bacon, principally to England. The Government, of course, is interested
in developing the hog industry and last year established a plan for breeding
hogs on all State lands. From January 1 to May 30, 1931 Poland exported a
total' of 48,062,000 pounds of bacon, against 18,641,000 pounds in the same
months of 1930. Practically all of the exports in both years went to the
United Kingdom. Of further interest to United States breeders is the tendency
to increase Polish lard production. At present Poland imports most of its
lard from the United States, but if the Government's plans for expanding the
production of lard type hogs in eastern Poland are successful, the demand
for American lard will undoubtedly decrease.


-21-








HP-21


Indications arc that Polish hog breeders intend to concentrate to
an increasing degree on cured pork exports to the British market, accord-
ing to Consul Stewart E. McMillin art Warsaw. Limitations placed on im-
ports of Polish hogs and pork products by neighboring countries are said
to be forcing more of the Polish products into the British trade. So far,
however, bacon from Poland has not attained the level of quality most
desired in the British market.

Gcrmany .

The seasonal strength of Germbvn hog prices in July raised the Berlin
average for heavy hogs to $9.59, according to IMr. Christy. ,hat figure,
however, was still unusually low, being $4.70 below the July 1930 average and
$2.12 under the pre-war' avraCo for that month.I The June 1.91"average' was
$9.36. The continued higher Gennan feed prices: were reflected in a June
average of 56 cents per 100 pounds for feed potatoes at Breslhu and of' $2'15
per 100 pounds for barley at Leipzig. The hog-feed ratio ih Germany continues
to assume a less favorable aspect.

July slaughterings at 36 centers averaged considerably heavier than
last year, according to preliminary figures. .Te June 1931 slaughter, at
448,000 head was the largest for any month since March 1928. Killings for
the current season to June 30 were 15.5 per cent larger than last season
and second only to those of the record season 1927-28. Based upon the relatioii
ship of the December and June census numbers to marketing, there appears to
be no reason to muatrially change his previous slaughter estimate, Mr. Christy
states. For the first time, it has been possible to make some statistical
use of the June census anrd the results corroborate those obtained through use
of the December census alone. Marketings during the first 5 months of this
year are 15 per cent greater than for the corresponding period last year and
inspected slaughter for the first quarter of 1931 exceeds the slaughtering
for the first quarter of 1930 by 20 per cent. Inspected slaughter, therefore,
is still expected to exceed 20 million head.

Results of the recently published June 1 hog census emphasize the
prospects for a further decline in the demand for American pork products, Mr.
Christy reports. A decline in hog numbers is not expected to occur before
'the latter part of this year. Marketing of hogs are expected to continue
on a high level with the pea: of the movement occurring during the coming
winter, but even next spring's marketing are expected to be somewhat above
the corresponding period of 1931.

Hog~numbered 22,528,000 on June 1, 1931, an increase of 14 per cent over
the estimate for June 1930. The increase over the same time of the preceding
year, however, was not so large as was reported for March 1, 1931 when the
increase over the sane date of 1930 was 17 per cent. A 29 percent decrease


-22-






HP-21


in the-number of brood sows of 6 months to 1 year indicates a pronounced
tendency toward reduced breeding operations. This redaction however, will
probably'not affect total supplies'until next spring or:ssuirmer# The number
of sows of 1 year and over was approximately the same as in June 1930.
A reduction of 2.6 per cent in total sows in farrow would seem to be signi-
ficant but Mr. Christy states that:owing to frequent misunderstanding of
the question as contained in the census schedule-these figures are not as
reliable as other parts of the census. On Mlarch 1, 1931 an increase of 8
per cent was shown in these-figures over the same date a year earlier.
Probably of most importance is the decline in breeding sows.6 months to 1.
year of age, which is accompanied by a corresponding decrease in the numbers
of such sows in farrow. While these declines are practically offset by
increases in the number of older breeding sows, the fact remains that we may
look for some.decline in farrowings this fall and a gradual reduction in,
total numbers during the coming.year.

Although the rate of increase is slowing down, German hog numbers
continue to increase substantially.and are now reported to be 22,528,000 head,
an increase of 13.8 per cent over last June. Due to the usp.al.seasonal swing
of production, the peak of hog numbers is not expected -to be reached until
September. With another census available at that time,, competent authorities
estimate the total number will reach 25 million head, the largest in history.
The increase in total numbers of 13.8 per cent on June 1, may be compared
with 19,4 per cent on September 1930; 17.1 per cent on December 1930 and 16.8
per cent on March 1931, each being expressed as a percentage of the correspond-
ing month a year previous.

It appears probable that hog marketing will continue on a level above
last year for some months yet. Probably the nearest counterpart to this year
is 1928. As can be seen from the census figures, there is a si able increase
in young pigs and this will tend to swell marketings during the coming fall
and winter. Although farmers have already been advised .by the German council
of experts not to decrease their present numbers, some slackening of market-
ings may be looked for in the spring of 1932. With the present feed hog
ration, this advice is likely to be ignored by many breeders as present opera.
tions are distinctly unprofitable, especially for tnose who feed much grain.
Neither prices nor purchasing power are expected to show any decided improve-
ment for some time, which further strengthens the probabilities of a reduction
in numbers.


-23-




HP-21 -24-

Germany: Number of hogs according to detailed classification,
specified dates 1914, 1927-1931

:Young pigs :6 months to 1 year : 1 year and over
8 : Breeding : Total: Breeding :Total ;
Date of :.Under :weeks : sows : excl.: -sows ;excl. : Total
census :8 :to 6 : In : :sows &: In : sows &: hogs
:weeks :months:farrow; Total; boars:farrow:Total :boars :
:Thou- :Thou- : Thou- :Thou- ;Thou- :Thou- :Thou- zThou- :Thou-
:sands :sands :sands ;sands :sands :smnds :zands :sands :sands

June 2, 1914 : 14, 825 714 : : 1,531: : 22,118
Dec. 1, 1927 : 4,379: 9,910: ; 504 : 5,185: : 1,218: 1,584: 22,899
June 1 1928 : 4,926: 9,557: :707 : 3,390: : 1,150: 335: 20,187
Dec, 1, 1928 : 4,003: 8,487: :556 : 4,520: : 1063: 1,3721 20,106
June 1, 1929 ; 4,160: 8,099 : 671 : 2,341: : 1,145: 275: 16,795
Sept.1, 1929 ; 5,373; 8,290: : 652 : 3,585: : 1,208: 387: 19,604
Dec. 1, 1929 : 4,412: 8,679: :663 : 3,880: : 1,178: 1,006: 19,944
Mar. 1, 1930 : 5,012: 8,555: 455 : 722 : 2,712: 792 : 1,229: 315: 18,649
June 1, 1930 : 5,091: 9,178; 574 : 876 : 2,909: 915 : 1,356: 280: 19,805
Sept.l, 1930 : 6,522: 9,809: 442 : 812 : 4,256: 861 : 1,467: 440: 23,423
Dec. 1, 1930 : 5,440:10,003: 368 : 673 : 4,730: 939 : 1,496: 893: 23,365
Mar. 1, 1931 : 5,750:10,231: 425 : 706 : 3,176: 927 : 1,517: 291::21,790
June 1, 1931 : 6,027:10,350: 409 : 693 : 3,424: 921 : 1,663: 246: 22,528
Compiled from Deutcher Reichsanzeiger, Viertel jahrshefte and cables from
Agricultural Attache at Berlin.


In recommendations made recently the German council of hog experts points ,
out that no reduction in numbers is necessary because the tendency has been to
produce a lighter, leaner type of hog. If such a development were carried
far enough it might offer a ray of hope for the lard producer in the United
States, according to Mr. Christy. As a matter of fact, during the fit'st 5 months.
of 1931, imports of lard into Germany from the United States have been only
6 per cent less than during the corresponding months last year. Total imports
of lard, however, have been greater than last year so that imports from the
United States make up a smaller proportion of the total than in past years.
During the past 10 years imports of United States lard have constituted 86.1 per
cent of all imports. For the first 5 months of 1931, however, they have made
up only 74.9 per cent of the total imports compared to 85.5 per cent for the
same period last year.

This decrease in imports of American lard as a percentage of total
imports is attributed to keener competition from European producing countriesv
especially Denmark. With the consumers purchasing power to low, the demand
for lard as a butter substitute is naturally increasing, its principal competitor
being margarine, Denmark has taken advantage of this fact and is producing
a lard of more acceptable flavor than the American product. It is to be noted
that German and Danish producers flavor their lard to please the consumers'
taste. A more important factor is the lower price quoted on the Danish product,







HP-21


Germany: Total imports of lard, by months, 192.5-26 to 1930-31


*
Month i 1925-20 : 1926-27 : 1927-28 : 1928-29 : 1929-30 : 1930-31

S1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000
Pounds : pounds : pounds : pounds: pounds : pounds

Oct. ........... 21,389 : 21,387 : 20,533 :: 13,240 : 20,480 : 14,364
Nov. ..........: 5,'336 : 21,715 : 14,437 : 15,793 : 18,831 : 9,704
Dec. ..........: 8,525 : 17,216 : 12,192 : 19,373 : 21,081 : 10,254
Jan. ..........: 19,559 : 20,818 : 16,159 : 24,841 : 24,367 : 16,155
Feb. ...........: 24,964 : 16,044 : 16,375 : 13,688 : 15,686 : 20,042
Mar, a .........: 24,098 : 17,176 : 22,305 : 17,686 : 17,364 : 22,413
Apr. ..........: 21,396 : 23,511 : 18,546 : 22,848 : 17,886 : 23,286
May ..........: 16,732 : 16,353 : 14,311 : 19,640 : 14,545 : 13,538
June ..........: 18,443 : 19,307 : 14,555 : 13,528 : 13,669 :,/10,141
July ..........: 17,125 : 24,817 : 13,711 : 14,233 : 13,591 :
Aug. .........: 17,143 : 13,324 : 13,829 : 13,080 : 12,961 :
Sept...........: 17,819 : 14,760 : 14,760 : 13,065 : 12,716 :
Total .......: 212,529 : 226,428 : 191,713 : 201,015 : 203,177 :

Monatliche Nachweise aber den Auswartigen Handel Deutschlands. a/Preliminary.


Germany: Total badon imports, by months, 1925-26 to 1930-31


Month :




Oct. .........
Nov. ..........
Dec. ...........:
Jan. ..........:
Feb. .........
Mar. ..........:
Apr. ..........
May ..........:
June ..........:
July .......... :
Aug. ..........:
Sept...........
Total ........:


1925-26

1,000
pounds

2,442
959
1,265
1,911
2,021
1,745
1,775
1,758
1,947
1,452
1,877 :
1,999
21,151


1926-27


1,000
pounds

2,025
2,118
2,007
1,595
1,493
1,127
867
847
778
606
474
912
14,849


1927-28 :

1,000 :
pounds

1,019
945
913
905
1,213 :
625
418
322
602
421
383
523
8,289


1928-29

1,000
pounds :

817
811
1,050
1,302 :
769
908
765 :
795
687
1,102
953
1,023 :
10,982


1929-30 : 1930-31

1,000 : 1,000
pounds : pounds

1,839 : 1,728
1,560 : 1,881
1,111 : 1,715
1,377 : 2,052
1,607 : 2,566
2,239 : 2,470
1,795 : 1,687
1,139 : 2,248
937 :a/ 1,764
882
1,432 :
986 :
16,904


Monatliche Nachweise uber den Auswartigen Handel Deutschlands. a/ Preliminary.


--


W


-25-






H?-21


Othor Countrics



It is ostirated that from 30 to 40 per cent nore nativ: hogs are boing
marketed in Bol'ium this year than last, according to Consul '. S. Roinck at
Antwcrp. Plnctiful native supplies have rctardod business in Amcrican pro-
visions. Little or no business is be-in& done in American fat backs. In
picnics of 6 to 8 pounds, a fow small .sales were roeortcd for early Juno at
prices'of 10.0-11.1 cents 5per -_und, 'for prompt shipment. Lator, "however,
an advance to 12.2 cents discouragod'furthor-activity. Stocks arc reported
as nil. Unemployment is regarded as 'seriously handicapping salcs and future
prospects for sales of the'Amorican product are not bright. In-lard, the
demand'ha.s been iegligiblo'owing to the l.rgo quantities-of B61Gianvand
IDtch lard ;hich'undersells the American product by'about 1.8-cents per
pound. '
t
Malta .

The United States continues to be the main source of foreign lard *
supplies in-;lalta, according to Vice Consul, C. S. Ricc,-at Valette.- During
the first quarter of 1931 the United States furnished 77 per cont.of.the total
imports against 87 per cent in the corresponding .priod of 1930. The decrease -
was caused by the receipts :.f larger quantities from the Netherlands. Imports
from that source ;wre 75 per cent larcgr in the 1931 period than a yoer ago.
Total lard imports into 2,'1lta daring the first quarter of 1931 reached
612,224 pounds of which 471,383 pounds came from the United States. In the
1930 period imports totaled 494,139 pounds of which 430,902 pounds. were
Am.-rican.

Australia

Exports of hog: carcasses. from Australia for the period. July 1, 1930
to February. 28, 1931,: totaled 81,346 against 14,047: in the corresponding
period of 1929-30, according to. Consul'J. C. Hutson: at Melbourne. Of the
1930-31 total, 14,000. carcasses: came from: the State of Victoria against
nearly. 5,500 carcasses in 1929-30. In Victoria the. results of the current
season have been. regarded as favorable.

A feature of the trade wis the situation of practically no profits
bcinj made despite the favorable conditions existing during the season.
Those in the industry> stated that they aro. satisfied since such Onbirts' .
h-nv prevented the dcr.1estic market from the over supplied and that local
prices. have boon high as a consequence of the record export trade of the
p?.st season. The favorable exchange rato.s to exporters, lover freight'
rates and decreased handling0 charges have enabled shipments to be mado this
season. The pork has been of good quality and able to compete with Dan-ish .
Products on the English markcts..
Enj~l o.. %rkc


-26-






HP-21


Hogs and pork products: Foreign and domestic average prices per 100
pounds for the month indicated, and stocks at the end of each month

: June : June : : ay June
Item : 1909-1913 : 1925-1929 : 1930 1931 : 1931
: average : average :::
: Dollars : Dollars : Dollars : Dollars : Dollars


Prices -
Hogs, Chicago,
basis packers':
and shippers'
quotations ...:
Corn, Chicago,
No. 3 Yellow .:
Hogs, heavy,
Berlin, live
weight .......:
Potatoes, Bres-:
lau feeding ..:
Barley, Leipzig:
Lard -


Chi.cago .... :
Liverpool ..:
Hambuzg .....
Cured pork -
Liverpool -
American
short cut :
green hams:
American
green bel-:
lies *....:
Danish Wilt'.:
shire sides"
Canadian


green sides


Stocks -
Liverpool -
Hams, bacon :
& shoulders :
Lard, refined:
United States -:


Processed
pork / ....*:
Lard in cold :
storage ...:


7.90 :

1.16 1

:
10.87

.37
1.73

10.77
11.86
14.05
.


a

15.40




15.84 :

15.01
1,000
pounds


11.22 :

1.70


15.17

.60
2.47

15.26
15.71
16.18




25.24


21.73

24.96

23.16 :a/
1,000
pounds


9.52

1.41


13.33

.22
1.79 :

11.00
11.25
11.53




21.94 :


18.57

21.94

20.72
1,000
pounds


6.53

1.00 :


9.36

.51
2.46

9.50
9.30
L0.34


16.95 .:


14.12

16.67 :

b/ ,
1,000
pounds


6,977 .5,170 4,742
8,758 1,900 : 1,649


788,481 :679,221 .: 828,143

165,588 : 120,322 103,456
I


a/ Three weeks only.


b/.No quotation.


D/ Dry salt cured nd in procQss of cure; pickled, cured; And in
cure, and frozen.


process of


3


6.36

1.04


9.59

.56
2.15

9.53
9.61
10.49




16.59


14.07

13.47

b/
1,000
pounds



4,540
3,718


776,140

115,673





hP-21 -28-
Hogs and Pork Products: Indices of foreign supplies and demand.

." "1s.-: l. .. -..-. : -. .J---une" .. ." '

S: :1909-10 ,:192A4-5. 7 .: :
Country and item : Unit :tol913-14:toi928-29:i927-8:1928-29:1929-30:1930-31
: :average. :'average' :


UNITED KINGDOM:
Production -
Fat )igs" certain:
markets .. :1000' s
Supplies, domestic: 1000
fresh pork, Lcndonpounds
Imports :
Bacon :
Denmark "
Irish Free State : "
United States "
Canada-. "
Others:. .... "
Total .
Ham, total :
Lard, total ... .:
DEALvRK: ; :
Exports -
Bacon .-. .. .:
CAINADA. : :

Slaughter- :
Hogs,inspected :1000'
GEZR-'iNY: :
Production-
Hog receipts :
14 cities "
Hog slaughter
36 centers .....:
Imports :1-,000
Bacon, total ... :pounds
Lard, total "
UNITED STATES:
Slaughter :
Hogs, inspected :1000's
Exports :
Bacon :1000
United Kingdom :pounds
Germany .
Cuba :
Total : "
Hams, shoulders
*United Kingdom "
Totl "
La-rd: -
Uni ted..Kingdom "
Germany .
Cuba "
Netherlands .. "
Total ... : "


0
0
0
*
*

: *
*
0
*
: T
0
: -

*
: .


*
*
6
*
6
:
: *

: *
:*
*.


-- ---- S


: :
477.: 497: .554: 471: 517
.: : : :
44,567: 66,278: 64,043: 49,966: 56,598
;: : ..
47. .: 49 : ,. : :

376,447:473,673:400,231:451,082:609,778
.40 28Q: 42,Q36: 46978.: 32,825: 21,174
81,579: 47,130: 49,681: 50,448: 20,025
57,200: 29,530: 17,071: 11,720: 2,650
:3121,150:167,340:173,977:162,941:245,791
676,656:759,309:696,938:709,014:900,376
.:.93,143: 74,786: 78,069:. 82,907: 67,177
204, 650:217,899:213,608:210,632:235,194
: : : : :


: : .: .. ; :
:. : :775,286:461, 896:404,228:446,267:593,648
: 6 : *

1,303: 2,078: 2,122: 1,899: 1,700: 1,473

: : : : ; : :
:. :. 7. : ., : : :
S: 2,448: 3,269: .2,68.7 2,523: 2,810
: : : : ..;, :
: 3,61: 3,047: 4,017: 53,5,2: 3,243: 3,746

. 2,002: 13,140: 6,.962: 7,904: 13,604: 18,111
: 153,.048: 167,28.5:149,413:160,637:163,909:139,950
*' 0 0 S S
a : : : : : .
: 25,445: 36,706: 39,333: 39,126: 36,858: 35,357


: 97,.094: 50,224: 30,635: 36,032: 4Q,862: 25,533
1,267: 9,163: 7,703: -.4,928: 5,356: 388
5,707: 15,802: 14,142: 11,643: 11,873: 7,887
: 132,490: 107,458: 90,141: 93,948: 91,880: 32,620
:104,711: 108,516: 76,916: 70,888: 75,565: 56,100
6 0 : .: .
:121,.737: 129,627: 94,516: 88,583: 94,076: 68,611

: 133;246: 176,592:186,880:185,492:190,873:209,150
: 108,850: 147,661:127,810a159,484:137,886. .81,465
: 27,801: 61,670: 60,850: 65,084: 60,724:. S4,196
28,209: 32,346: 28,450: 32,382: 37,388:. 20,692
S363,895: 561,145:558,837:630,955:609,058:447,277

:-----0 :-----
-"'-'-~ -. o


ji


471

*


183,450:

137, 69:
30,934:
.31,879:
383,532:
69,952:
165,$13:











HOG-FEED RATIOS AND HOG SLAUGHTER
UNITED STATES. GERMANY. AND DENMARK
UNITED STATES: HOG-CORN RATIOS AND HOG SLAUGHTER


RATIOS rlJ I"
PER CENT OF Pork barley
AVERAGE rto -
IO0'- --
100
80

NUMBER -- -
THOUSANDS I '

500 --


300
1924 1925
U S DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


"""""""" NUMBER OF
MILK COWS
AND HEIFERS
MILUONS
1.5

MOVING AVERAGE)
1.3
1931 1932
NLG 22 99 5 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMIC


RATIO
PER CENT OF
AVERAGE

140
120
100
o80
60
NUMBER
THOUSANDS

4.200
4,000
3,800
3,600
3.400
3.200




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
11111 III BII 11 1 II l ll118 IIILIIIIII I11111111111
3 1262 08865 0618




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