World hog and pork prospects

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Title:
World hog and pork prospects
Physical Description:
v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics. -- Division of Statistical and Historical Research
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, Division of Statistical and Historical Research
Place of Publication:
Washington
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Swine -- Statistics -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Pork industry and trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
- HP-83 (Oct. 1936).
General Note:
Reproduced from typewritten copy.
General Note:
Description based on: HP-8 (July 9, 1930).

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 026660448
oclc - 30588199
Classification:
lcc - HD9435.U5 A25
System ID:
AA00013004:00012

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Succeeded by:
Hog situation


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Full Text

|3,43:1)
UNITED STATES DEPARTi:E.T OF AGRICULTURE
r -... .. of Agri.cultural Economics
V'ashing ton

HP-19 Jun
WORLD HOG AITD PORi P?.OSPECTS


UNiV OF PL LIB
DOCUMENTS DEPT
** .


I DEPOSITORY
e 9, 1931


SI1


SU IPCARY

Ho- prices continued downward in both the United States and Europe

during lay. Hog-feed ratios in most countries were less favorable during

that month than in other recent months. In the United States corn prices

declined, but at a less rapid rate than the decline in hog prices. In

Germnany cnd other countries where tariff protection is granted to do .'stic

agriculture the prices of important foodstuffs stiffened in both April and .'ay.

Pork production is tending to ,b below last year's output in t.-

United States and Canada, but the trend is still upward in practically all

European producing countries except Denmark. The May inspected slaughter

in the United States was smaller than last year. In Denmark, slau-ihtcr and

bacon exports were larger in April than a year ago, but the rate of output

has been declining in recent months. In Germany jand ictherlands, however,

pork production shows no signs of declining. Slaughter in the United

States during the remainder of the c -ricnt marketing year is expected to be

somewhat s.nallcr than that of the corresponding period a year earlier.

The dcln.nd for American cured pork products in British markets con-

tinues to be restricted by record receipts from Denmark, supplemented by

increasin- quantities from other Europzan. countries. The European lard

markets weanencd further under pressure from Europea-- supplies. United

States exports of bacon and lard declined further in April.





HP-19


Unitoi States

Ti-h stcaJ' decline in hog prices which began in early April continued
during I~y, bringing the average at Chicago for the week ended Mey 30 to
$6.00 per hundred pounds. The average for the month was $6.53 compared with
$7.26 fir April and $10.00 for i.ay 1930, and it was the lowest monthly
over-i c sincc December 1915. Since r:arket supplies were smaller than those
of April, tn inc.rked price decline was the result of a continued weakening
in dm3in.d c.t home arnd abroad, and a further decline in the general price
level. Inspected slaughter for Mry amwounting to 3,408,000 head w-.s 2.3 per
cent sia.llcr then April ond 10.8 per cent smaller thano in Ma.y 1930. It
was the first month since December that slaughter supplies were smaller than
those of ;ccr earlier. Present indications point to a-continued reduction
in sl5.u2.tcr from that of a year earlier, during the four months period
June to Sc-tci.bcr. The average live weight of hogs slaughtered during hIey
was about tac smne as in April xand larger than n. 3ye..r earlier. The premium
paid for li.,,-t weight hogs was greater than that of a year ago, but it W.s
smaller t-.;io it has been for several months.

Corn prices advanced during the first half of the month but declined
during t.ic Ilast half, making. the Mny average of IHo. 3 Yellow at Chicago
56.2 cents po(r bushel as against 58.3 cents during April and 79 cents in
L'ay 1330. Although both corn and hogs made price declines, the greater
decline in hol prices resulted in a more unfavorable corn hog ratio then
that '7hich prevailed during April. Based on Chicago prices, the ratio for
May .vorr- Cd 11.6 es compared .vith 12.4 in April and 12.7 in May of last year.

Freshi orl: prices declined sharply during iny ofter advaicin g luring
the last .-.lf of April. Light loin prices during the last week in April
advanced to 1S30 levels but at the end of M.y at New York they were from
$4.00 to $4.50 lower thou a rimonth earlier. Smaller declines were made in
heavy loins nd other fresh cuts. Prices of most cuts of cured pork during
May wure tc"a.dy to slightly lower in New York. 12-14 pounds regular smoked
hams rvorr..ed $19.75 per hundred pounds which was only 20 cents under the
April .vcrr.-e but $5.75 under the i'May 1930 aver-ge. Bacon prices relr-.ined
practically unchanged at 'ew York. Sweet picdde cured bacon 8-12 pounds
aver-ingi, $o10.50, was the e price as in both -rch and April but more
than $3.00 uid.cr the 1930 level. Lard prices declined steadily during the
month aftcr rei-.aining unchanged during March piln April. The iMoy average
at C.iic-,,u .y $9.50 was 50 cents under the April average and $2.00 under
the MI.y 1'30 rvergcc, but w-. 55 cents r.'ove the low point reached in February.

The reccut weal demand both at home and abro-.d is reflected in the
fact that in spite of the increase in pork nid lard production durinG April
of 3.5 per c-ent, dome.stic'consumption decreased 7.5 per cent, exports decreased
20 per cent .r-,d rtcrago holdings on the first of I.y showed a marked increc.se
over th'.se Anril 1. I:;cr rsc3d rnmrket supplies in several European
countries a.nd cnntinuea weak consumer demand in Europe was largely responsible
for rciL.ction- in cxp'.rts during April. All of the reductions were in bacon
and lard, thu two pork products which meet tie keenest competition in
iuropc.. i n.r:ccts.


-2-






HP-19


Total be.con exports in A,.-'il anounting to 2,917,CC'0 pounds were 25
per cent r.:.llier than in i.arc'h a-nd 64 r.er cent under those of a year earlier.
All of t.Le principal importing countries shared in the reduced movement.
Exports to Unitcd Kingdom ainountin.- to 1,609,000 pounds were 16 per cent
smaller t-.ren in arch and less than half as large as those of April 1.30.
Total bc.con exports for the first even months of the current marketing
year were 64 ..er cent smaller t.in during the corresponding period of a
year ec.irlier end those to the United Kingdom were 57 per cent smaller.

exports of hans and shoulders during April am;.ounted to 8,086,000 po-unds,
an ianrease of 16 .er cent from those of March and the largest for ani- month h
since 1-.st icove:i.ber, but 35 per cent under the April 1930 movement. T. :in.is
by tU j. United 'Kiicgdom were 24 per ceit larger than in March. Their movement
to Cuba wos .15 per cent smaller than the peak move-;neLt of the current year,
reached in '.-rch, but was twice as large as that of a year earlier. T.1e
April Ilovcicnt to Canada continued to be a negligible quantity.

April ~exports of lard amxounting to 45,605,000 pounds showed a seasonal
reduction iron those of l;arc.h and were 11 per cent smaller than in April
1930. Si.'~cllr quantities were tcJ.ken by all of the 'principal iiiportini;
countries. The. total export move.::cnt of lard for the first seven months of
the current i.:,-.r--tin., year was 25 per cent smaller than a year earlier and
18 per cent under the 5-year aveorf. although it still remains well above
the pre-w?.r lecis. Then weakened forei~i demand for American lard has been
brount C.bou.t by increased competition from both E :rop':.n lar d nd lard
substitutes, r:s well as by the unf.,vorable business situation in Ziropen
countries.

Contrary to the j.sual sc.sonal tendency and as a result of the unusual
weak orin,: r,.d domestic de.-and, stocks of pork !'ci lard in stor-,e continued
to incrc-.sc o-.rin, April. rork stocks on May 1 i'nounting to 868 million
pounds 'wire 3 per cent larger t.a- orn April 1 and 22 per cent above those of
'.y 1, 130. L..rd stocks on 1:4.- 1 cjou.'.td to 95 million pounds, which ?.as
an i.crcrza of 21 pe-r cent from those of April 1 'b"t was 10 per cent under
the stor?.,e holdings on ..,- I last .'cer -,d 28 per cent under the 5-yZ) r :..c;
1 av.Jr:a.c. "1rclimin-.ry i:-.lic- tions point to only a slight reduction in
store ;oldiin.s of pork products from ~.ay 1 to June 1.

C .n.da

T.. wecly oc.verage price for b-.con- hogs at Toronto for the four wcks
of ;:; ':'.-.s3 .3.25 per hundred pounds or 25 cents lower than in April. Last
yccr th... -.vr.'.g for the corresponding wheels of I.fny wC-a $12.08 per hundred
pounds.


-3-






HP-19


During : the wck ended .:r.; 28, eastern hog markets were rather un-
settled sa- scmcwhat lower in price than the previous week, according to
the C. a-ndian G-,vcern,,ment Livestock ir.rket Report f)r M y 28. In Tarnito
the -,at .!ecline mounted to 25 cents. The average weekly price for ba.cons
at that .-.r:ct fluctuated during M.r, but the a.verae price for the l.st
week w.,s oly $8.00 compared with $8.55 for tie first week. Lontreal had
heavy cr.rry-overs f cm doj to dy last week and by, the end of the we kr
1,00.3 i s :.'cLre still unsold while prices drop-'gd about 25 cents. Western
markets w.. :ro steady to strong. Winnipeg paid $7.50 for bacons, Calgary
$7.00 to $ ?.25 rnd Ednonton $7.10.

Hog sup-lics, as represented by gradings at stock yards and packing
pl--its in C .nc.da. mounted to 174,000 for the four weeks of li-y, which was
about 10,0,O 'b dor the samen p::riod a year ago and also less than in April
of this .-F.r. For the twenty-one weeks from the beginning of the year
1931, 969,000 were gr-.ded in Canada, 340,000 or 35 per cent being grded
in Ontario. og gradin1s in Ce-ada during the corresponding period amounted
to 1,043,00O in 1930, 1,169,000 in 1929 and 1,283,000 in 1928. In June
1930 Oat-r-m hl,r.d r.p.roximiatcly 1,700,000 hogs or 42 per cent of the total
number in Ccnr-dc. which was small coi::pared with the six preceding years. It
is re.portc:d from some parts of Ontario that while spring farrowings of sows
have inrcrrscd considerc.bly over last year, unfavorable weather conditions
have led to a rather heavy mortality of young pi(;s.

United Kingdom

The snc-nowhat seasonal strengthening of cured pork prices '-t Liverpool
in recent ,nccks resulted in a iMy average for Amnrican grrcen bellies of $14.1;
per 100 roa-.ds. 'h1e current ?.vCraoe was above the April level, but $4.16
bel.o t.i: fi,.rc.s fr l1?y 1930, accirdinl to Agricultural Attache I A.
Foley .t L:..ds:.. Donish liltshire at Liverpool averaged somewhat hiicer in
'.I.-, t.z --a c. :.oith earlier, to rc-ch) $16.67, which was $4.76 below the levels
of a year a. r:. Aicricanz short cut green h-ms, however, weakened tduriu. Il.y,
the wv-r-.e .of $16.95 being slightly under April prices .nd $4.15 under
the aver- of : a- 1930. Bacon in.iorts during April rose to c. total or more
than 99 .illic1. pounds, continuing the series -f rec-rd imports of recent
months. T.i, -ril fi.are a-.s second only to those of Dccc.-.ber and Februnr-,
1930 .a:.v .1931 respectively. Total b-.con imports for the current se-so-
Octobe:r 1 April 30 wvcre 26 ecr cent larger the a year aeo.

Britih- i:.p.orts of b-.con from Denrn.rk duri:i.: -pril continued the
easier trilnd of recent months, the figur-e )f 63,224,000 pounds beinL the
smo.llst si..cc last November h-e A-oril ii:ports, however, wore the 1..rgcst
on rec;r.,1 fir t'.ht month. One of the important sources offsetting the dc-
cre:.s. 1.i :,cccipts from Dcnmnrk -w as the iDetherlmads. April imports froir.
th-t c)..-itr- r-sc to 11,834,000 pounds, the largest for any month since
nAu.ast 1.2 in the f nme.r sce.sn ,,f record laJr.ipoe-n production. A fi.aure
on i,-)rts frc all countries except Donriark, United States, C:nada n.nd







-5-


Irish Fri: St-to went to 31,-101,0('0 pounds for April, the rlorest recorded
for t.:it group. Slight iin~-ru.sos were reCistered in the "pril.imports
from. United States, Cani--. a-.d Irish Fre, State.- H-mr imports princin-.lly
from the ;Unit.d Statcs totaled 7,597,000 pounds, the lor ust sincj l.st
Deccor:b.r, U.t below tho)sz< -f'L1pril 19S0. The season's imports of h1-: to
April 30 wvrc 20 per cent behind those of last season. Liverpool stocks
of cari- pir-: jn June 1 incrocscd over those -f earlier months to reoch
4,742,'0)0 pounds. but t-hey were still below last year's stocks.

Tnc ccntinuild wvrJic-ss in the British lard i maret brought the :I.r
avcr.r. e n'n to -. now low of S9.30 ocr 100. April ':.: rts of lard were
lighter thican in the two precedin.: months being little more than 25 million
pounds, r.iost of which com from the United State,. That fi;ure, however,
was I.rger t:..? for ~,- other April since 1927. Totl_ lard imports into the
United lIKindoo for the first seven months of the 1'30-31 season were 8.8
pL- cent Ir -r.r than f-r the corresponding period of last season. Liverpool
stocks of -'fined lard on Jun.e 1 stood at 1,649,000 pounds, *a decline below
stocks if recent months a.id a -;e:.r oi o.

T.,e tcnd.cncy toward incre-sed do-:ostic -up ;.lies of pork in the United
Kingdom '.i-, continued into April. Marketing of fat pigs at representative
mar-kts were larger in tnit ..'-.nth t^c-i in any April of the post-war period,
but s-a.ller t:r-.n those if several earlier months of the current season. H:-
purc: .-.-s b: Irish- curers ailso, i:ncrc-.sed duri,-.g April to levels hi ;1hlr then
for a-y ..'ont' si.c., last :-j!vem:.bar. Supplies of British and Irish fresh pork
at Londi Ccntrrl .-.rk-ts d-.rin- May, however, wore seasonally smaller at
3,537,000 pou.-ds., alt'hougi;. 1:ri;er than a year a,-o. The season's total of
that ituL:: .o -.cy 31 'iwas about 10 pr cent inrcr than the corresponding
1929-30 rttal.

CoIruinniL 1 c-. u ;rices sun-oi;-in iri ish rmarkets

Donne-rk

T ;L-.i I'c:n exports fro:. D'nma--:1 re-.c!---: 64,500,000 p)ur..s in Aoril,
accoii.i; t:. prclini-.r..ry. fig-ircs. That figure continued the downward trend
of r.c.;.t .:,nL:s in r'..nishl bac.-n c.;:oorts a:nd was the s~ac.llest total since
last Seotcbber. T,,tai exports t. Aoril 30 for the cur-eut ser.s.n, however,
were abyj.t 40 p-r cent lar.c:r tno.n for the corresp ..:1inlgf period of 1 :;9-30,
and tie 17r cct c; re? ird.

Ne thcrl -nds

I-: t-- 1c- t'.cracinds, t-. c-rant:;- :-ext to Denmark in import.-t;ce as a
sou-rcc :) 3ritish ba.')n inm'orts, incra-so1 production is definitely recor"ccd
in the 1c.r. r quantities -f b:o.con: scekin: an.outlet in both British a.:!.
Gemrn -i i.r.r:ts. T-hi season's i,,orts into the United. Tii-,do. fr)i tho
Jetherl,-._s b,.r April 30 were 19 per cent larger than up to the s-r'.: point of
the preceding secs,n.






HP-19 -6-

During the greater part of the current marketing 3ye:.r beginning
November 1, 1930 hog slaughter in the Netherlands averaged 20,000 to 25,000
head weekly, according to Consul Carol H. Foster at Rotterdam. For the last
few months, however, the rate .of slaughtering in the Netherlands has advanced
to 35,000 to 45,000 head weekly. This increase in slaughter has coincided with
a decline in the Danish 1Weekly slaughter rate, according to the Consul. The
increased Notherlands slaught3rings are T1ing reflected in heavier exports of
bacon to the British market.

An increase in the French import duty on fresh pork is causing some
concern to Netherlands pork packers, according to Consul General C. L. Hoover
at Amsterdmn. Since the increase amounts to only about 1-1/3 cents per pound,
however, many of the e:portors believe that the effect on the trade will not
be groat, especially since the cost to the consumer will still be loss tlan
i was a year ago, owing to the general decline of meat prices. A decroo
dated J'arch 26,1931 raised the French irmport duty on fresh pork from $3.11
per 100 pounds to '4.44 per 100 pounds, an increase of something more than
42.8 per cent. The import duty on live hojs was increased by the same decree
from $1.78 per 100 pounds to '`2.67, an increase of 50 per cent.

Other Continental Europ-an Countries

Germany

Declining ho, pric-s in Germany brought the dMay average for heavy
hogs at Berlin down to %9.34 per 100 pounds, according : to Agricultural
Attache L. V. Stooro at Berlin. That figure was a foe cents below the April-
avorag'o and the low'ost level reached since July 1923. The April l average
at Berlin was 3'j.6 per cent below the April 1930 avors"go. Tho sharp upward,
rmovement in food prices, however, placed thel April avoragcs for potatoes at
Broslan and barley at Loipzig considerably abovo the corresponding averages
of last year. The hog-food situation, thoreforo, has become definitely
unfavorable for the greater part of German;y.

Receipts of hogs at 14 markets during D.1ay continued the high averages:
of recent months and were well in excess of a year ago. April slaughter at
36 centers, while not quite up to the April 1928 level, totaled 423,000 head
and was lar:gr than for the two preceding Aprils. The season's total
slaught-or at 36 German centers from October 1 to April 30 wcs 13.5 per cent
larger than for tce corrooponding period of 1ast season, but still 9.2 per
cent smaller than the comparable 1927-28 sla'ugItor. In spite of the increased.
domestic p'-rk production in Gcru.Lany, selling prossuro from nearby countries
has kopt Goerian bacon imports for most of the current season woll above that
of last season. April bacon imports, largely from the theherlands, however,.
wore sr.illcr than in ;k.rch and about the same as in April 1930. It has been
announced that the temporary tariff of 1.51 counts per pound on bazon is to
be removed in the near future and the old r.ito of 3.89 cents restored,
though no date has been set.






KIP-19 -7-

Easier prices of lard at I'.iurg 'ere evidunt throuout Hao,
with the average for the month standing at 10,33 per 100 pounds, a new low
average for the post-war months. April lard import figures were the
largest since January 1930, the total coning to 23,338,000 pounds. For the
past three months, lard imports have exceeded those of the corresponding
period of last season, but on Aprill 30 the total import for the season was
still 14.7 per cent below t'hrt of last season. Effective at a date to be
announced later, the German Government has given notice that the temporary
duty of 0.65 cents per pound on lard imports will be rescinded and the old
rate of 1.35 cents applied. The share of the .Americn product in the total
lard imports into Germany is being reduced by competition from European
sources, notably Denrark anil Netherlands.


Russia


There is little likelihood of Russian pork products becoming important
in international trade during the next two or three years, according to
Agricultural Attache Steere at Berlin. Although information on the subject
is unsatisfactory, it now appears that the number of hogs in Russia is
considerably below the level noc3ess..ry to meet domestic requirements
satisfactorily. Official Russian. fiu,-res for 19l0 show only 12.2 million
hogs in the country at th.,t time against 26.1 million hogs in 1928.

It appears, however, that Russia is definitely interested in develop-
ing its hog industry and a groator export tr-.de in pork products, MIr. Stoero
states. This policy is in eooping with the eoneral effort to develop every
industry which has c:cport possibilities. Eventually, therefore, porT:
products from Russia probably will appxi.r in Europuan markets but any large
volume of exports seems to be some years in the future, So;ne of the limiting
factors arc: (1) The number of hogs must be brought back to nor.:ial ani the
domestic moat situation improved. (2) Th, building of facilities for
slaughtering and processing. (3) An incrcrse in transportation equipment
suitable for handling pork exports. Nost reports indicted that transportation
is now the eaklcst link in the Russian economic chain Ind that the country is
hard pressed to handle the bulk products such as gr:..in without conziderin.g
more perishable products.

Tho plans of the Soviet Swine Trus', -ccordins to the Soiialistit-
choslko Sc.aliodlio of July 9, 1930, calls "or i:. production of only
7 million hoad of coirmorcial hogs in a j-ycear period ending in the autman
of 1933. Roughly 4 million of that number would be produced in the final
yeor. There is no v:ay of ostimatirig probable exports from the above
mentioned n:..-bers but it would appear that most of those hogs would be
needed to moot doeicstis requirements.






HP-19


Other countries


Uruguay


HOg killings in Uruguay totaled 10,529 head during the first
quarter of 1931 against 13,543 in the corresponding quarter in 1930,
according to Consul General Leslie E. Rood at I:ontovidoo. T:,; figures
indicated a decrease of 22 per cent for the 1931 period. Hogs are
slaughtered only at the ITrtion:.l Frigorifico, which has a monopoly of
this class of business under an official decree.


...ustrali-


For the nine months cndod !:arch 31, 1931, 91,271 pig carcass
were submitted to Australian oxamincrs for o:xport, according to
Vice Consul 1 icFddon at Sydnoy. The corresponding figure to iarch 31,
1930 -ws only 17,436.


Hog-feed Ratios and Ho; Slaughter: United States, Gernany and Denmark


The relation of the price of hogs to the price of feed creates
cyclical changes in hog production in the United Statos and other important
hog producing countries a.s sho2rn in Figuro 1. A period of gTonter-than-
avcrago hog-fcod ratios is followed by -.n incroaso in hog marketing a year
or two later, rwhoeres .-. period of smallor-than-avoraGo ratios is follovod
by a decrease in rmarketings a y-er or two later,


There has boon a marked upward trend in hog production in Gormany
and Do1nmark since the world war. In Germ. ny, ho; production has been
.gradually getting back to the pro-war level, In Donmark, the expansion
of the ho g industry has boon associated with an upward trend in dairy
production. The two industries in that country are closely intorrolated
because of the widespread and economical nuse of sk:ir.icd milk in the hog
ration. In Gormany and Donmark, :hoi mirketings aro near the peak of a
cycle and the hog-food ratios which have been on a doi.'nward trend for
several months are near or below normal. The relatively stable hog-corn
ratio in United States since 1927 has resulted in less violent changes
in hog' ma.rkctin:s. Hog prices and corn prices in this country are at an
unusually lou level, but the ratio is about equal to the average of the
past thirty years. See ch?rt on next pagc.


-8-










HOG-FEED RATIOS AND HOG SLAUGHTER
UNITED STATES. GERMANY. AND DENMARK
UNITED STATES: HOG-CORN RATIOS AND HOG SLAUGHTER


RATIOS uLL-1 rF
PER CENT OF bPrk-borley
AVERAGE ra- o --

100 -
soo
lr^-, Pori

NUMBER
THOUSANDS \

500


300
1924 1925
U S DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


NUMBER OF
MILK COWS
AND HEIFERS
MILLIONS
1.5


1.3


NEG 22 g9 5 BUR[Eu IF AGRCUL1RuAt E'.'.Iheou '.:


HP-19


RATIO
PER CENT OF
AVERAGE

140
120
100
80
60
NUMBER
THOUSANDS

4.200
4.000
3,800
3,600
3,400
3.200

RATIOS
PER CENT OF
AVERAGE

160
140
120
100 -
80
60
40
20
NUMBER
THOUSANDS

1,600
1.400
1.200
1.000
800
600





-10-


HOGS AD PO.RK PROITC'.S: Indices of foreign mr--plies and demand


rmin-f-t r


: Oct. Apr.
:1909-10 :1924-25 :


Unit : to : to : 1 27-28 1928- 29: 1929-30 1930-31
and item nit :113-14:192 3- 29 ? 1-
: :*_ avera -e average -
UT~I TED 'INGDOL.: : : : : :
Production- : : : :
Fat pigs, cer- : :
tain markets. : 1000's: 382: 393: 411: 4C1: 400: 429
Supplies, : :
domestic fresh : 1000
pork, London, .: pounds: : 9,277: 58,749: 5 7,343: 4,370: 49,880
Imports -
Bacoh : : :


Denmark :
Irish Free State:
United States
Canada .
Others .
Total .
Hamw, total... :
Lard, total .

Exports -
Bacon .:
CNAIDA:
Slau-Citer -
Hogs, inspected:

Production -
Hog receipts
14 cities .
Hog slaughter
56 -centers.. :
Imports -
Bacon, total.. :
Lard, total .
UNITED STATESS :
Slaughter -
Hogs, inspected
Exports -
Bacon -
United Iinidom :
German; .
Cuba .
Total .
Hans, shoulders :
United Kingdom :
Total .
Lard-
United Kingdom
Germany .
Cuba :
Netherlands :
Total .:


S140,624:

:111,875:
23,571:
: 23,578:
S300,048:
52,215:
: 151,558:


1000's:



In

u u -*


1,010:






2,612:


pounds:. 1,369:
S 123,290:


1000's: 19,732:

1000
pounds: 78,385:
: 1,145:
: 4,406:
: 106,958:

:" : 80,219:
i 92,762:

: 102,520:
86,057:
G 065:
: 2,377:
: 285,333:


292,492:
33,417:
C6,2933:
45,5364:
89,129:
526,695:
70,379:
156,855:


291,558:


1,674:



1,916:

2,366:

11,146:
13'4,571:


29,303:


40,387:
6,632:
12,297:
85,390:

82,348:
99,490.

136,501:
112,673:
48,198:
23,510:
437,782:


329,577:
40,348:
52,158:
11,941:
152,165:
537,199:
53,434:
166,651:


513,2 95


1,551:



3,151:

2,83 ,6:

6,422:
127,491:


31,572:


* 25;426:
3,181
8,615:
66,792:


340,420:476,427
27,092: 17,370
42,158: 16,437
,712: 2,043
12., 740:169,903
541,122:682,160
59,626: 48,200
165,782:183,837


338,063:473,283


1,367:


172


368,928:
34,357:
35,916:
23, 22:
121,940:
584,163:
54,670:
173,905:


359,555:


1,58:



2,591:

3,164:

6,038:
120,547:


31,371:


23,309:
6,4083:
11,106:
70,82 9

55,258:
69,372:

150,179:
102,781:
49,409:
24,9861:
449,861:


51,291: 54,113: 39,110
64,766: 68,075: 48,921

148,880: 146,557:164,173
127,269: 118,639: 71,803
49,640: 45,895: 26,283
25,700: 30,699: 18,850
499,511: 489,830:369,868


__ ___


HP-19


1,975: 2,165

2,528: 2,870

11,528: 14,121
135,695:116,300


29,346: 28,678


33,778: 14,430
4,739: 319
9,443; 6,548
76,914: 28,094







HP-19 -11-


HOGS T-iD 1'ORK PRODUCTS: Foreign and domestic average


SpounC.s 'for the month indicated, and stocks at


: A
Itmc :1909
: ave
:Do


Prices -
Hogs, Ch:ic,.o,
bisis packers'
and shi-pers'
quotations ........:
Corn, Chic.o :o
No. 3 Yellow......:
Hogs, heavy, : .
Berlin, live
weight.......... ..:
'otatoes, Breslau
fading ..... .....
Barley, Leipzig......:
Lard -
Chicago ............:
Liverpool.........:
Ha.rbur ........
Cured pork -
Liverpo-l -
.sL.;criccn sort :
cut ,rccj; a".ns..:
.L:ericrn green
bellies.........:
Danish Wiltshire :
sides ...........:
CaCndivr n reen s
sides............:

Stocks -
LivzrpAol -
Hojns, b.co:2 and
shoulders........
Lrl, refined.....:
United States -
IPrcesscC. porlk c/:
L-rrl in cold
store e.........:


pr. : Apr.
)-1913 :1925-1929
rage average
llars : Dollars





8.04 : 12.05.

1.11 : 1.65
:

11.18 : 13.78

.39 : .53
1.77 : 2.37

10.33 : 14.78
11.70 : 15.02
12.90 : 15.43



14.10.: 23.72

.20.56

15.00 : 24.55

14.16 :a/ 21.55
,000 : 1,000
funds : pounds


I
PC


9,074
5,076


:814,486

'141,462


the er


:Apr. 1930 :Mar.
: S :


: D


'oiiars




10.00

1.46 :


14.15

.26
1.90 .:

11.50
11.83:
11.95 :



22.24

17.87 :

23.90

22.46


1,000
pounds


6,703
3,259

711,700

104,905


UDo





7

1


10


2

10
10
11


SIIIIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

IllI W11 0lllllll il H IIII01U III
3 1262 08865 0311
; ',ii *

prices per 100
Ld of eac' month

..


Liars : Dllare





.46 : 7.26

.07 : 1.04


.18 : 9.39
.45.
.28 : .45
.22 : 2.36
:.
.00 : 10.00
.49 : 10.22
.10 : 10.91


16.42

13.01

13,85

b/


1,000
pounds


3,952
2,415

843,671

78,249


S

S


17.03


13.99

S16.34
:
:b/
1,000
poundss


: 4,504
:2,063

:867,555

S94,897
S


a/ Four-year avera4o only. h/ 1o quotation.
c/ Dry salt cured and in process of cure; pickled, cured, and in
of cure, ind frozen.

-- -0---


process


-Ak


'"'


i W w


W




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