World hog and pork prospects

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Material Information

Title:
World hog and pork prospects
Physical Description:
v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics. -- Division of Statistical and Historical Research
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, Division of Statistical and Historical Research
Place of Publication:
Washington
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Swine -- Statistics -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Pork industry and trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
- HP-83 (Oct. 1936).
General Note:
Reproduced from typewritten copy.
General Note:
Description based on: HP-8 (July 9, 1930).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 026660448
oclc - 30588199
Classification:
lcc - HD9435.U5 A25
System ID:
AA00013004:00003

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Hog situation


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Full Text

A 36.43:/o


J":Tn D "... a -11 :.. 02 .L" 1C"UL -
Jaurea'. of Ariicult :a'al IOonoi.ics
aas.in.Ltoo,- U OEPOSITORY


HP-10 S3ete-.iber 20, 1':>0


\VORiLD rOL- AuIT '0..:I 2RiOiPECTS


I 2. '0 10.LD SI2UI"2101:

'T::o 1930-M1 :;.o outlook

T'.ib:.rs of hogs for slau-g.tor in tl.e United States during th'e lne:t

marketing year which begins October 1 are e:T;ecte(l to je soaueihat' s.~,aller

than dx.riiu thle present mar .etil- .year iand average wei hts will be li:;hter

than th.ey.:ave been for minyn,; years. ,Te sort corn crop of 1930 anC. the

present unfavorable corn-hog ratio is or:cctod to reduce both the fall Ai'

crowd of 190O and the sprirC cro2 of 1931. This will probably .ost-one for

at least a :rear t!he increase iln 1o0 'ro-L-ction that would 'ave started

this fall :,ad corn -2oc'uction b-en average or better. C-.;rrent storage

holdings of pork an'. lard are consiclerjbly sui.iller t;han those of last year.

Larger n.i.bers of hogs in Eurone indicate a continuation of the present

unfavorable foreign outlet for Aniericazn hog products during the ne3t 12

months. Do-nestic den;mani for_ )ork: is ezmjected to strength lon so.~mLChCt .tu'iaii

S the course of the ne::t cro-,. year. !!ar:et s-auilies of hogs in Soptember

and Octobza will _:_'obably be relativel- s.iall and the -roportion of the

1930 sLrin 'i ic cro that vill be ;.a;reted in ea-rl- i v:i;ter is e:-jected to

be larger t:-an usuLal. Su~lies in the late vrinter- anid Curing t:he -'e.mainder

of 1931 are e:-epected to be s.ialler, ...o'eve:, thiJa in the correspo-nding


f~~l~ilS~aii~ih








HP-10 2 -


period a year earlier. Although the average of hog prices in the 1930-31

marketing year is expected to be higher than that of the year ending

September 30, 1930, it will be accompanied by relatively high feed prices.

Conditions point to unusually small slaughter. supplies in the year ending

September 30, 1932, at which time consumer demand is likely to have im-

proved materially.

The relatively unfavorable foreign market now prevailing for American

pork products nay be expected to continue for at least a year and probably

longer. Since last April, reduced bacon exports have resulted in a some-

what smaller total e:;port of cured pork from. the United States for the

first ton months of the season ending September 30, 1930 as against the

corresponding months of the 1928-29 season. Prices in foreign markets this

season, however, have been materially lower than those of a year earlier.

Lard exports are also lovwr this season than last and the prices paid have

boon relatively lower as against those of last year.

The European hog production cycle appears to be near its peak, and

larger market supplies of hogs arc e:zpoctod to develop during the coming

winter. In general, the outlook is more unfavorable than that of any year

since 1927-28, the year of largest European pork supplies in the post-war

period. HToever, thoro is some fooling among European observers that while

pork supplies in those countries during the 1930-31 season will be consid-

erably larger than in 1929-30, they will be somewhat smaller than in 1927-

28.








Il- 10


T'.i .'...cli)-.) iu. t.o .- u -t...o..i.-y .-1 l'v ,. the. o ..Ltion

in colns-LU.icr .i:- ,o-.r ..'.: to r',l .c-. li.'..,t'i, activity ar: fi' th.r

do ro ssirn i:.'lu,:-c .c i:. t: j -,. ,o'c:.i ar'::"-t for A 'iLCa ,)OZ. can2 : 1- a'C..

In ac.d.itio la'r l o :.iust fiacL oro 'intcnsi-. cor.. ottition ifo. o'.icr

fats anC. oils. Despito t:... .cvilini ls 1;.d. prices, tlo Co. L^!.- for

othor fats a);j:Lcj'3rtly is inclre ci ru.tivto t 7o ti' c.l.i.c for ia'i2. In

both Gl:. anc'. Ci-r.t 7*ritCain tL j or ccLiita cor3s.Li-tion oa jiararino in

roccnt 0c.:'3 S 3as i-ncro'scd ..Lat.ri11y. In t:;os. t.o co...-.lrios thor as

boon a n ,-c.rr1. trench si--co th: ':a iln t.::o i..._)orts of ani:ial a.;nf. v.Jc ttalo

.roducts used in the;l ;Al.mnL'act...lr of co.l ioditios .:-iich coil oto wiiti la-rd.

This increasing a-s. of larc. s-:.stitut.s t.-r:.s to -ocTuco natoially tho

Eurocpan d.o~i;:.?. fo:r .L:rican lao...

In Groat .'l.it i-n, tho ll ...i- i o.i .. ... ,.:..C::ot fo:r ALirican .oi1:

?products, t:ho curr;cot ro.iuccO. '~c-la1. 2fo t ose _1 o.'-.cts, os_-pci11y curcL.

")or-;, ima7. o o::jctdC to -:.-ov,-il until sutmll: f-s :.i t'_o C-c_-tin:.1t :.-:'o

dofinitoly r'cdcC'Ld. with Dc:I.'..:a: r -oortin i- record .oj -n,.LoL: s last J-u1o,

British .Iaa'::o, s o- .liIs of 'a.:is.- cu'c.r:'. :or:: .c,' bo o.-: ctod to roach vi1-

usually -:ill liovel' :.uini tho- 1','-. 1 season. In tho cv::.t of i..Li ovod

British ind-.strial :c.vlol.-onts, tho "-'.321 I ncrc. o in zi..L..'o.oan orlz

sut-ylics d-rin:i t,?o co,.iint oear 'o,.l '1be suficirInt to ':oop Aegrican jroC;-

acts in a position : lOss favorable 3'n;:,v1 that of last year. Similar conri-

tions :jovlil in ;.iost of tl-o co:itilnotal o t. .ropao :.'l: :...a:'-ctc.

Lo-.r. fcd 'rics a-d :--o, -jricos in. 1920 a'-d 1929 c:'.tod tL.o

)rcsoTnt condition of hcuvy porZ:: s_.lios in .uro-o. .-)" IrCiccs ai-o nov,


-3-







HP-10


tondin: downwvard Vwilo food su ..lioS arLo suallor t:~an last yoar and pricos

fir:.aor than in recent monthss. A loss profitable rolatione;iz bot:;.'Con .og

adil food ipices is jrovaili-n; and. is o:.eoct3c to dovelo-_ further this fall

and during the wintor anC' spring of 1971. Indications are that farrouinGS

in the spring aid fall of 1931 v.ill b' :ojo-;--.at sla-llor than farrovrings in

thel siring annC. fall of 190. Ticcoforo, a uoro favorable European uarkeot

for A-.oa-ican -porl: --obab'ly : ill c-.ovolo-p d rii t-h 1931-52 mar:oting year.

il-oc C.dtailoe iiaor;iation on ti-c ho o outlooK- in tlIh United States,

than is contained in this rc-Doort, i ayi be secured by addressing the Division

of Econo:.:ic Inform-ation for comics of "The 190-51 Hog O.-tlool:'.

log :-r.'oi"ers

liiCd-zsU.nor osti.-iates fom; iL;ortant hoj pro.lucing countries of
Euxro)o indicate a halt in th-o docliio in ni.l'.ors which had boon rather
i:rcod fro -m the bo inni-i of 1928 to thie end of 1929.- Lost countries
show increased TnujJboZ s on hand this stl.u- 'I co-;.)arod with last, with indi-
cations of continued intoe'ost in brooding oejuations. Unusually favor-
able Eum oe:un food conditions for ixog prdduoorz. havo coltribut t d iagoly
to tbo trAjn-;ad. intorwst in .r.ing.

lHor numbers in 7 of the u.iost ia,)ortain; coun'iies 2 / are norw esti;.at-
ed at 29,764,000, a;n increase of 4 per centi over 1929 but 7 per cent under
1928 Twhen the pre-war level was e::ceed.ed. Including the United States,
where a considerable decrease was shown on January 1, 1930, the number- in
8 countries reporting so far for 19'J0 is estiiaated at 82,364,000 coimared
rith 85,405,000 in 1929 and 92,582,000 in 1928 vw'en the nimuber in: these
countries was above -Jre-:ar figures. These S countries support only about
one-third of the estimated vorld hog nu-iabers, but the United States,
Denuarki an.- Irish Fr-ee State alone suply over 80 :ier cent of the porlz
products entering international trade channels. V'alile no estimate of the
number- of hogs on hand is available for the fietherlands, the third most
important -orlk ezporting country, numbers there are reported to be on
the increase.


l/ Denmar:, Ehgiland ad and Vales, Scotland, iTorth I-eland= Irish Free State,
Delgsiua, G-eri-any.


...........chd


- 4 -





- 5 -


}Ios: 1. ,aoer in ;rinci..al )o2-.: o::-:' rt ini and. i .oti., cor.-it io s,
aveorae .oe-war, -:ears 1921-1930


: lir..ber inl .-rinc;i.al pork e:Jortin;; countries 1_/


Year


UniteoL
States
Juj. 1


le: 1et:er-.
SJuly : 1 s :
. :i,, -Jmie.


: uM.ou- : Thou- : Lou- :
: se:,ds : sa:7,.s a: ts :s
Avarae : : : :
,per-v7a; '5/...: 53,300 : 2,715: 1,505 :

1921...........: 53,602 1,30: 1,519:
1922..........: 59,559 : 1,899:
1925..........: 69,044 : 2,855:
1924...........: 66,361 : 2,668:
1925...........: 55,568: 2,517:
1926...........: 52,118: 5,122:
1927...........: 51,768 : 3,71:
1928...-........: 60,617 3, 6-::
1929..;........: 56,080: 3,616:
190O...........: 52,600 :6/1 ,900:

li,.ber' in iinc i al


Canada
J ule


.i2hou-
sa:.-s :

U,350 :

3,905 :
3,916 :
4,405-
5,069 :
,-1.426
4,360 :
",695
s-9
4,497 :
4,382 :


Ilish :
Fleo S-coen : To'al
State : June /
June :
To- : Tiou- : T.u-
sa_ -I : s:.:.S : sA: s

1,0-6: 1,023: 60,411


938:
1,186:
987:
732:
884:
1,17L :/ _

1,0163
1,044:


1,011:




1,100

1,'.J9:


64,828
66,312
77,490
75,2 '5
63,243
60,514
64,392
6'9,650
65,82'
9801.1
5 1


_.io_': i...'or'tir. co luntrihes


: United :.eany,: Frjnice :C-e o- :Austria: Itl-r : Total
: Kin,. .: Dec. : Dec. 7/:siova:ia:DAc. :Iar.-Ar
: Jule : D:Dc / .


Average re-var: 2,754 : 22,533:


1921............:
1922..........:
19253...... ...:
1924...........:
1925...........:
1926...........:
1927 ...........:
1926...........:
1929...........:
1930...........:


2,756
2,568
2,993
3,5:37
2,911

3,124
3,396
2,716


: 14,153:
:15,818
: 14,676:
L 7,308:
16,895:
: 16,200:
: 19,424:
22,899:
: 20,106:
:19,920:


7,529 : 2,516 : 1,932: 2,685:

4,941 : 2,201 : 1,326:&j 2,509
5,166
5,193 : :/1,-73:
5,406 : : :


5,602
5,793
5,777
6,019
6,017


: 2,539
:3

:


:1/2,S50
S.


:*
*
:*
:*
*


32,616

21,85@
23,552
22,867
26,281
25,308
24,497
28,325
52,314
28,839


Co:.r)iled i'ro:- official su.'rces.
./ Countries arran;e-l' in order of i:.) o-tance as e::jortin or i:.ior-tic co-.ui-
tries. 2/Total countries reporting each year, )re-war 1921-1`29. 3/.vera:o
for 5 years i;i.Ladiatel- .'recediin -;'ar ..eorever available. 0t.;et.-ise for ary
ears or year vitiin thi s a3riod, unless othlervise stated. In c oilt ies
having chuaned boudaries esti.iates are' for oeo year only, of n-n.bi'rs v.ith.i
resent bo.':idaries. 4/Cossus 1920. 5/3ote,.-oer. riin innar,' esti:.at;o
based on i.;com:ilcte returns. 7/Elsti..;ate for countries reportingg, as of LDceom-
be-r have been con.sic'.ercc as of Jarn.ary of the follo'mjnq 7:ear. _AZt.L:],ate for
-:resent bounll.axies for 1918. 2.1.1a1'h. l_./Ortobr. o esti U-,wd vryiilabhn for
locoi.foor 1925. 11/ unoffi ci-al.


iP- 10


- -- ~----







HP-10


6 -
-8-

.3rood so-'s: lTa,,bor in Q inciipal por ai :n ho" e::_ortinJ anid
i;-rorting co-'mtries rooriti:-., ira-ar ard 1925 to 1930


C o u. t r'y


o i.o:th;l
: of
* :esti.iate


:Pre-var': 1923 : 1926 : 1927 : 1928 : 1929 : 1930


T'aciu-
saC /LS
sa c's S


E,.:orting Countries: :
Unite-c States .......:
Den-1.3-r:, sao- s 4 :
io-nths a.C over .....
Canad-a. a............;
Irish: Free State....:
3Vw.den, boars L" sov/s:
Polaind .............
hingar. ..... ...... :
le-ew Zealand .........:
Rzumaania...... o... ..:
Yugoslavia..........:


I.l)0oti 3 c ontries: :
Englanc'. and \alcs...:
Scotl rand..........
North Irelan~l.......:


Jan. 1

July :
J..ime

J--me
June :


July
Jan.
Dec. 2/:
Jan.


June
June
U .cr. e


283 :

108 :
128 :


3'2
18


: T'hou--: Thou-: Thou-: Thou-: 'i'hou-: Thou-
: saniCs: sainds: sands: sar-_ls: sands: sands

:10,n88: :-c1,2e1860,855:10,587:10,000: 9,612
9 LL'. 9 .- 9I


290:
533 :
75 :


602:
60:
1,042:
685:



316:
16:
11:


391:
569:
93:


547:
64:
1,017:
692:



301:
18:
16:


396: 2 44
577: 551:
S124: 115:
: 135:
S:/761:
531: 579:
69: 82:
1,0C6: 1,C66:
694: 662:


393:
27:
25:


280:
22:
22:


434:
537:
96:


554:
75:
975:





307:
18:
17:


111
i

t


Total........... : June


Germ-.any
SiL:; months to 1 :
year... ........ :
1 ;ear an. over. ..:
Total.............



Dc iimL.i m.. ..
Face. ......... .... m
Delior a .... .. .. :

Finland, sous over :
u ..10ont:ls. ........ :


Dec. Z/


343: 'J5 445: 424: 342: 352



S462: 491: 625: 504 556:/ 665
: 81: 682: 1,126 1,21': 1,063:~ j1J78

: 1,275 1,37: 1,751 1,722: 1,6193/1L41
1275: 1785


Dec. 2/: /907
Dec. 2/:
June :


Se-)t :


fl -' -h


ou.lrJJlec. ;rO..i OZ 1Cal sources.
S/ Ten months anl over.
./ Esti..atos ro -orted as of Decemobcr
following 'vear.
3./ For cy.arterly esti-.-ates up to Ju:c
4/ .:cluctdin Alsa e-Lorraine.


have been considered as of January 1 of


e 1, 1930 soe Table )ago 19.


779:
124:
41:

39:


777:
129:
41:

40:


785:
130:


43:


776:
127:
59:

43:


790:
130:


* I


*


*


* :
*


, .....M







.HP-10 -', -


hoi slaughter: Ger.ia,', i.ar, ,-'.c. Ca2nda, '-T ..:.mtts, seasons
Octoobr Se .t,..lor 1/ 1927-28 'o 1923-'0


C-or..-any, at j6 : De.Lia-i:, i-.. e:ort : C ian'a
: -oi:.ts : :ou .cs : i-s:octed
i ion-th--
.19.27-28.1928-29. 1029-30 1927-26 192 -'-2) 1929-30 17-2 1928-2; 1929-30

: :.o.:- : Thou- : Thou- : Thou:- : Thou- : oou- : T.iou- : Thoi;- : 2.ho.-
: saC.s : sads : sa.-.s : s.inds : sa: -s : suriis : sa;-;.s : saiC1cs : sa:'..s

Oct....: 419 -45 :357 : 5 : 19 : 501 :208 200 : 207
I:ov....: 467 : 402 : 356 : -43 : 358 : 395 : 2-1 : 232 : 2-4
Dec....: 445 : 407 : 352 : 473 : 42 : 88 : 24 : 23 : 221
Jan ....: 452 : 388 : 351. : 494 : 402 : 438 : 271 : 249 :207
Feb....: 467 367 : 35 : 77 : 38 : 07 248 200 : 168
Mar....: 475 : 411 : 73 : 4-56 : 30 4 442 : 247 21 168
Ar.... : 4Z9 : 395 :374 : 464 : 429 : 2 : 222 : 208 :162
i:ay....: 437 : 91 371 : 497 : 45 : 432 :219 17 174
Juine...: 386 : J35 : --4 : 15 : T : 478 : 205 : 1 : 159
July...: 382 : 340 : 361 : : : : 164: 159 : 127
Aug....: 34 : "25 : : 27 : 99 : : 1C : 131
Se)pt...: 400 :33 : [9. :i 4i22 : 161 :142

i/ Seaso-n accopteC. as the iost rep.s'esbatttive o,.'or the UniteC. States.









1i-10


::ogs: Sla':ter in s lecific. countries, average _re-vrar aind amnnal,
1914--129


: : : :.unla :Scjtland: Ireland :
: United G..G...iaay.: ...ia:3.. :& iales :sole off:-lumchas-:
: States, inssoct-:.i e::.t.:sols. off: ar:s : e by
Uea-: .oc.o-al : edl sl.m;: : far- ; o : i1
S 0 C S ^ fo : I- s
:i.s C-:si,-...:.'.- : -* ..o I/ :slac-'- : bacon
: ed :ter :10o.ss :.,, -I.- r / : -'rnrs :
sln:trstr37: ues:


: '1-0-.:--



AvoraL' :o
iio-vca: 2'/: 1,' 59


1915......:
1916 ......:
1917...... :
1918.......:

1920......:
1921......:
19290......:
12'1......:
1922. ..... :
1923......:
1921-.... ..:
1925......:
1926.....'..:
1927 ......:
1928......:
1929......:


T'o:.on-
san..s :





2 .
13,4068 :






,02 :

6,625
5,3 92
53,860
10527
12090 :
13,072
17,279 :
19 ,'91
17,189 :


sa, ds


2,503 :

2,05 :
S2,594
-J

2,-12 :
2, 179 :
;24 :

9.30
1,41 :
2,J15

4-,021
-5,73 :
.,818 :
3,098 :
5,'.73 :
4,94 :


: Tiou- : Tho-,-
standOs : sa!LCs


3,487 :
--- :







2,700 :
' ,471 :
',229 :
3,691 :
4,500 :
.3,588 :
5,074 :
5,380 :
4,112 :


146
17)-
176
245
242


: Thou-
: sanlds



: 1,282







874
898
: 1,030
926
S955
:1,110
: 911
: 910
S1,050
: 1,264
: 1,142


:f ether-
S'land
:recei-)ts
0anadarat 21-

: -aiaos


:Thou- : Tiou-
:sa-ds : sands



: 4,280: 875

--- 1,085
--- 84
S- 850
S--- : 600
S-- 217
: 5,526: 422
: ,834: 648
5,297: 1,362
5,382: 865
6,056: 906
6,625: 1,068
:5,720: 1,045
:5,636 1,025
:5,965: 1,152
5,880: 1,068


Co:..iloed fro..- o-iicial soauL-cos ai.. cable. r'o or-ts fo0..i
abroaC..


a;;-ricult .u'al co:j i ssionor s


1./ or O.cars undedL. il'y 1 folloi-.,-.
2./ Avcw-aje fo' 5 :-cars ii..., l 2d.i.t'l recording ..ar ,oriod if available, otho!riso
for :r :; r o- hoc.-'es withi:' tiat c- io.: Anless oth--.-iSo stated. In
counitriis iQaving1 clhanjod jo.u.'.ndar'is, tL.t fiuiroQs aro ostiimatos for 1
yoar onll-. for :ncuL.-bors writhi-i r "csnt bo:.-'ndarios.
3/ Tot av&ila'blc ifo, )rosont 0bo -'.laries. For for'.ir boundcrics, the nurbors
sl_-,.'tur'od a- a3 follows; in t:hou.saijs 1914, 19,1-1; 1915, 13,293;
1916, 6,548; 1917, 5,795; 191S, 2,430.


.'2,3522

4',084
":,910
41,214
41,012
38,019
"S,982
4.; 114

32,873
1-2,04.5
40,6'.:6

49,795
18,445


- 6 "


"" '


I.;,-.


---







HI-10


United a tatk ".

i.o,; prices in tohe .n.te .tatc. :.de a ubst'ztial recovery during
uu-U'.t from the lo,, poi::t rec.c.ed drit.,- t.o I.t ..Lf of JUly. Prics at
Chlicao adv-nced from aL ...8.Cl av.raJ ft.' ti-o ..ock c.ded au,-ui.t 2 to an
averi-,e of -10.07 foi t..o ,.e nded .-.L.,ust 23, inJ rc:.-ir.i clock to t..o
...10 level .-uri;', tLe list half of .u.:,ust ._:.d first L.lf o;: 2pthaor. TIhe
,AUeuat av-ia', waz .?.58 us co:.:.ed '..ith .8.73 b.or July and ..10.52 for
zua-st 1929. Fede-rlly inspected Lo, &la'.uhter durin.. j.,uUst, aL.zuntinc
to 2,724,000 head, r.s 14.2 per c."t m:allo;' than that of July ..- 13 per
cent arnaller than that of' .ugu-st 10'29. s1:.:,;:ter li;s d'-ri: _. the 11
months of th zar.:etinz year ended with ,.tut 6:.:'u 6.7 p-r czst smaller
than those of t.he --a.:e period a y;'ar o::lier. P..: 2spita conii.ution as
indicated by disappearances o0 t 2-dca.lly inspected lauzLtor decroaced
3.1 par cent duriz6 thue ist sevci. months of 193C from th.at of the camae
period in 1929, :.Lilu ho, prices declined 0.8 cznt. per pound or 7.7 per
cent, and correspontci.n; declines wer-o m a tde in retail ;ricos. The doclino
in both con.iumption and prices reflected the w.olc:uca dcm,.nd for .-zorican
pork products at home ani abroad, whicl was duD L ..lily to the ;.orld wido
business depression, lo)er prices for compu-tinG .ra,ts and vCtbl oils,
and larr raarLct fup-lies o ho.s in 2urop, durir.j r-c -.t monti-. Domes-
tic demand probably will not im.r.ovo nmter:ially 1oeorc somu time in 1931.

Wholcs1a, pric.l of fresh pork advsncod d.ri.n August, although most
cuts ':ere .2.00 to 23.00 lower than a yuar earlier. Loins ::ci1hing 10 to 12
pounds each avoragod .25.60 par 100 pound: at Chicano as compa'od .7ith "21.53
in July and Q.27.79 in August 1929. A rise of '.1.80 in hans brought tho
average to 1.20.30 os air.nst '.23.05 a ycu: ourlier. Thi price advance con-
tinued during. th'o first w7-ol- in Septomber.

Cured pork prices in ..nsral made little. chang- during -.u;ust from those
in July. Bacon dric.-s r..c only 50 cents to :.1.00 lowjr than those of
August 1929 but otL.jr cuts 3.ea ;2.00 to 14.00 under those of a year earlier.
Total exports of pork prc'-cts in July woc emmallc t.ar. t.oZo in Ju:.o. Bacon
o2Aports :-c ro'cucoi about 17 pe. aCr-t, l-.;july.c a re-ult ol the r.-'uc2- tak-
ings by United Kinrlom, tut t.c larger pur'chauos of hams -r.d should_-rs by United
Kingdom increased t.. export mov.-ent of thoso cuts 13 per cont. Bacon exports
during the first 10 months of the present marketing year, C.movntin,: to
97,611,000 pounds, decrcas.d ? per cent from thosU of the corrcpondin; period
in the crop yor:r 1928-29, while t*h o;.port movo.,.ont of hams -.nd shoulders,
amounting to 107,855,000, increased about 6.5 per cent.

Stocks of pork on :j;pt.-bor 1 continued -m-1ll, amount inj to 552 million
pounds, or 23 p-er cont cmellor then t- hold.inrs on S."ptomb'r 1, 1929 -.nd
18 per coat smaller than thu fivo-yjor Scptember 1 cvv..ra-e.

Lard prices z.ade a harD *vcco duinr August. PcfInod lo.rd at Chicap
advanced .'1.50 per 100 pounds, avcragin, .12.44 'C:z the month a... Cinst
.13.56 in August 1929. Stor.--.,u Loldings on SoptJm.bcr 1, "rmourting to 89
million pounds, :;o-e 50 pjr cent ,m. 1i.~ than the S,.;tenhvbr i, 1929 ..,l-.i:gs and
42- r .t s:-..ll.r.t!h.u the five-yeor Septonbor 1 average. E-.)crts during
July amounted to 51,070,000 pounds as compar;. with 50,6.e,YC ',unrs in Ju's,
and 64,274,000 in July 1929. The total export mcoveoent, Octibe:-1, 1929 to








July 31, 1930, inclusive, ..as 5 per ce.t -.taller than th-It of the same
period a year earlier. Larer ,::-..titics, .es-. t-.on b; Unit:ed indom cnd
Netherlands, while; takings by Co-r:..n :.c.-o .rply reducca. The market
for American lc.r d in Corz..a. y '.ill p.o..bly continue r:-a.. during theo mrket-
ing year bo.,i.zin.. October 1 uuo t- larerr marLo't supplies of hogs and low
prices o- l.rd substit-tes.

The widespread drcu.-At has .-atorially affected the food sit.-ation in
the United States. The 1930 corn crop :as estimTnt .c from condition on
SeptembJr 1 to be about 24 per coet smlor tl.cn t.:at of 1929. The pm-
duction of corn for ,r'-in will probably be roLucol more than 24 per coat
since t.;, acre:,ge harvested as forag.o &r.d silaLe bill be ;o;i.tly increased.
The :.cltivcly lor. pricc. of brluy and T.at .:1ll porlit tZ. flooding of
those raiins to an advantage, but it will only mn-ko up in part t;o shtctago
in the corn supply Corn prices wc hig'o:-, in A~ugust, No. 3 yellow at
Chicago avoragod 99 cents per busbol as against 82 cents in July. The corn-
hogs rtio in t.c NortL Contral States on August 15 cas 10.1 as compared
..it 12.0 an July 15 :.nd 11.5 in August 1929.

The short corn crop ._njd' the unfavorable corn-hog ratio is orpoctod to
rec'uce both the full pi, crop Sf 1930 and t..o spriIn crop of 1931, as well
as reduce the wcights at which hogs '"ill be marketed. The Junc Pig Survoy,
the locliue in the corn-log ratio since June, anl the poor 'cr- prospects
indicate that the inspected hog slcu.-htor 2-.urin- the 1930-31 markcting year
Sill probably be bot-:.on 4 and 6 pc' cent smaller than that of the crop
year ending Scptcmboe 30, 1930, Cd t.hat a sharp reduction r.ill also likely
occur in thu 1931 spring crop, the bulk of :.hich ill be mc.rkjtod during
thu '.inter of 1931-32. Present evidionco indicates that the upward trend
in the hor production cycle x.ill not .ot ..311 uni'or vry until the first
half of 1932.

United Str.toe: Total bacon o.:ports, by months,
1925-26 to 1929-30


Month 1925-26 : 1926-27 : 1927-28 1928-20 1929-50


Oct. . .
ovt ................
Dov ................
Dec................
JCn ................
FJ b...... ........ .


h'Jy . .
June...........*... .
July.. .............
cAug................
sept...............

Tot al


1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
:ojuns pounds purun.s poun, s pounds

S13,166 : 11,742 : 7709 : 4,973 : 9,858
13,562 : 8,507 : 6,C13 : 6,716 : 11,452
: 16,405 : 9,601 : 9,347 : 9,593 : 9868
21,142 : 10,015 : 11,b60 : 13,014 : 13,324
14,980 : 0,642 : 100921 : 11,286 : 12,184
S13,597 : 8,567 : 15,106 : 10,985 : 12,249
11i,570 : 7,417 : 1073 : 10,225 : 7,979
12,225 : 7,852 : 9,692 : 14,395 : 8,553
S9,472 : 10,301 : 9,620 : 12,761 : 6,413
S7,670 : 9,270 : 11,648 : 10,950 : 5,331
: 12,131 : 7,864 : 10,945 : 13,171
: 14,870 : 11620 : 6 881: 10,2 88 :
160,790 : 112,398 : 119,615 : 128,357


Compiled from the Morthly Suainry of Foreign Comm-ercc of the United States.


HP-10


- 10 -4






11 -

'init.d Jtr toc: 't.'t:.1 .xp.rt: .f }'.:J i .cJ houlC.2s, by
r.i-n.ths 125-26 t.. 13.-30


Ilcnith


Oct ...............
Nov ...............
Dec ...............
J: .r ...............
Fob................
Mcr................
Apr...............
Mry. ....... ... ....
Junc. ...............
July. ..............
Auc .......... ......
Sept ..............
"'nLt)al .. 6.....


: 1.25-26 : 1926


: 1,000
: pounds :

* 1-1,494
: 10,243 :
S1-i 827
: 21,000
: 19,105 :
: 18,117
: 18,059
: 16,63 :
: 1, 218
: 1:,512 :
: 15,972 :
: 1197,45 :
Z 197,65'. :


`-27 : 1927-20


1,000
__un,1 s
10,047
13,105
i-.,675
9,873
9,511
9,253
10,007
11, 092
12,471
13,158
E,215


16.-:,'-0 i;


1,000
7-r.c s
7,632
7,3741
9, 05
10,005
10,976
12,222
11,258
11,390
13,754
13,557
13, 02


S1928-20 : 1929-30

1,0CO : 1,0C0
: .ounds : pounds s
/,747 7,580
7,637 : 11C56
8,518 : 6,957
11,187 : 9,401
7,680 : 9,213
11,140 : 10,790
13,857 : 12,-16
11,2. 16 : 13,8415
12,571 : 12,158
12,621 : 13,779
10,849 :


: 6 681 : 8,478 :
: 128,156 : 120,51 :


Co, ..lo( 'ro..: tie :onthl:y S... .la;/ o: IFo:.':i n Co.. l.erce or t:.e Urnitecd States.


UnItc' Stats: T.'t-.l l rCL .oxots, _y ionthz,
1925-26 to 1929-30


Month


: 1925-26 : 1926-27 : 1927-28 : 1928-29 : 1929-30


Oct................
Nov .......... .
Dec ...............

Feb ...............
Mar...............
Apr................

June...,..........
July .............
.Au .. ....... .....
Sept. .............
To tr.l


: 1,000
: pounds
s- -

: 44,745
: 39,979
: 6,840
:76,670
:65,5156
: 64,259
: 63,160
: 58,154
: 56,.182
: 15,873
L 14,273
: 61,577

:699,368


1, 000
: ocun'Is

:16,988
: 3,1 88
:62 ,680
S59,8- 2
S49,880
: 53,0(0
67,3145
: 64, 118
: 6 ,.40-
:46 972
50,816
: 59,756

671,609


1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000


: pun1 s

50,355
: 49,63C6
62,855
70,660
: 79,372
* 79,929
: '5!,554
: 55 5-0
: 53,436
:52,94;0
50,658
: 46,158

S708,593


ConpilLd front the L.;onthl. Sur7-ryr" of Faruign CormJrce of the


p iun .l2

70,698
83,257
80,053
73,291
65,953
66,533
50,045
62,562
56,6:6
51,670


S59,865
67,716
: 6 ,358
: 89,932
:65,924
70,572
: 59,144
C4 192
67,252
: 64 ,274
55,487
58,329

:809,045


____ ---------Y----- --


H2-10


Unitcd States.







HP-10


Canada

Ho estimate of0 .og numbers for Cenada is as yet available for
1930. In 1929 the number was 4,382,000, or 3 per cent below 1928,
and 7 per cent below 1927. The number of brood sows in June 1930 was
537,000, a decrease of 3 per cent compared with 1929. The bulk of
the live hog imports into the United States came from Canada. In 1929,
however, only 2,000 were exported to the United States compared with
21,000 in 1928 and 195,000 in 1927, which constituted a record for
post-war years. In 1914, 215,000 were sent to this country. Canada
also exports bacon and pork to this country but in 1929 the imports of
bacon and pork from the United States exceeded the exports.


Canada: Hog movement first


seven months
sons


of 1930 with compari-


:: First seven months
Item : Unit : 1929 : 1930


Inspoct;-d slaughter ......... : Number :1,387,148 :1,164,751
Sales t stockyards .......... : : 621,768 : 546,060
Billed thru stockyards ...... : 138,275 : 343,347
Total .................. : : 760,043 : 889,407


Avcrago price Toronto July:::
Select bacon .............. :Dollars per 100 lbs.: 14.44 : 12.70
All grades ............... : 13.85 : 1215


Exports
Live hogs, total .......... : Number : 2,174 : 1,772
To United States ........... : .: 846 : 81

Bacon, total ............... : .1,000 pounds : 17,643 : 9,595
To United States ............ 1446 891
To Gr-.t Britain ........... : 15,844 : 8,443

Pork, total ................ : 6,12 : 3,915
To United States ........... : 2,188 : 878
To Great Britain .......... : 2,798 : 1,422

July Livestock Market and Meat Trade Review 1930.


-12-








HP-10 -1,

United Kingdom

T'hI irrc6jalarit;.- of curd po.:.: prices at Li'4...rpool during
August rcsult.d in some c.:!vance fr A:;iric.:al Grc-'n bc '.iL.: to an
r.var:ge of $18.36 per 100 npo.-nls, a.ccordinx to i.iomir.tion c:bled
by -gricultural Coimmission:r Fol.. -t Loi;ior. .L.cricrli short cut
grcon h.t;:s, nowover, went balo'1i Ju'. 1-vcls to av.rete $22.27.
Can.di-n green sides and Dalisai Wi'lts"irc sides also wore sli0 ,ltly
stronger thinc in July. 'uaot-tions on rll o0 t':i lines ini.ice.tcd
continue. below last ;' ?.r's levels by f''~rly, wide magins. In Aiirica
'green b-l!ios the marin i-. favor of i..st goer's price is narro'w-r
thian in ti: ot':or lines of cured pork.

Tot-.l iniports of brcon into Grc-t Brita.n durinL July were the
largest since ir.st Dccmnber, the fi,-are of 85,457,000 pounds bcii-. un-
usuall:- l1.r c for July imports. From October 1, 1929 to i.7arch 1, 1930,
total bacon imports wcre runiiing behind those of the corresponding
1928-29 months. With. increases over last season's ir.,orts since i.V:.rcn,
however, the total figure for t-.h current seLason to Jul; 31 was 2.1
per cent lar:,Or then for the first 10 months of tAc 1998-29 season.
Imports from Doclmark during July carried the bulkl of tie increase over
the corrcspondini m.ontis of recent ycers. T:h src.s on t totcl to July
31 from tiat source was 10.9 per cent larger than in 1928-29.

Receipts of bacon from the United States in July, whiile lar,;er
than in June, were unusually small for July -id brought the sorson's
cumulative total imports from tnc United St,.tcs below that of last season.
July imports from Canada also were somewhat l'rger than in June, but
continued the reduction of the current season's imports from that country
as against t'hoso of last season. Thec Jul;,- fi-,res on imports from the
Netherl ands continued the larger receipts of recent months as against
the earlier months of tnis season. So far, hIowever, the indicated ex-
pansion of ITet:lerlands pork production has not brought B1itish imports
from that source up to last scaso: 's lev_-ls.

Total -.;. imports into Great Britain, most of' which comi- from the
United. St-tos, continued during' July to exceed those of last season.
Total receipts from October 1 to Jul, 31, 11-22-30 wore 7.7 per cent
larger than for the srj.ie months of 1928-29. Cured pork stocks .t Liver-
pool on lab.-st 31 stood at 4,238,000 poun-ds, a somewhat seasonal decline
from stocks of motth earlier. The current figure, ow'Uvcr, is the
smallest for t.int d.te since .iuust 1S27 and rcpreseohts a sh-rp decline
from last year's stocks of the sr-.c period.







HP-10


The generally stronger tone in world lr.rd markets brought the Liver-
pool average for refined. lard up to $12.61 p.r 100 pounds for August.
Early September prices were running even higher than that figure, with
the r.vcraxc for the first week, at $13.14, the highest since late
Suptirmbcr 1929. Total imports into Great Britain during July were un-
usu-ally : .cvy, reo.ciing 31,801,000 pounds. That figure was larger than
for may July of recent years, mnd exceeded the imports of any month
since Janu.-.ry 1929. Lard imports for the first 9 months of the 1929-30
season wore under those of the preceding season, but the July figures
placed the total for 10 months ahead of the 1928-29 corresponding total.
Liverpool stocks, however, nlave continued unusually light all this
season, with August 1 figures in line with those of earlier months. The
current figure of 3,158,000 pounds was unusually light for that date
and only a.-out one-fourth as large as on .August 1, 1929.

With current domestic British market supplies of hogs continuing
below those of the two preceding seasons, total marketing to August
31 at certain markets were 15.8 per cent smaller than for the first 11
mo-nths of the 1928-29 season. The current total is smaller than the
aver go for the seasons 1924-25 to 1928-29. The reduction in iriarketings
is reflected in continued lover receipts of fresh British and Irish pork
at London Central Markets, the 11 months' total for that item in 1929-30
being 20 per cent under the corresponding 1928-29 figure. Figures on hog
slaugh-toring in Ireland for bacon production are still running behind
last ear' s levels, but with some tendency to increase over earlier months.

United Kingdom: Bacon imports from the United States, by
*months, 1925-26 to 1929-30


,!onth 1925- 26 : 1926-27 : 1927-28 1928-29 1929-30

: 1,000 : 1,000 :1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000
: pounds : pounds : pounds pounds : pounds

Oct............... : 11,947 : 10,032 : 5,970 : 2,780 : 3,463
Uov............... : 9,962 : 7,530 : 3,213 : 2,651 : 4,114
Dec.............. : 15,889 : 7,068 : 3,457 : 2,878 : 5,672
Jan-............. .. : 16,237 : 8,624 : 4,696 : 7,477 : 7,124
Feb.............. : 17,226 : 7,569 : 5,541 : 6,467 : 7,038
Mar............... : 15,427 : 7,896 : 7,489 : 6,084 : 9,341
Apr............... : 11,951 : 5,234 : 5,550 : 3,821 : 5,406
May............... : 10,758 : 4,122 : 6,564 : 10,480 : 4,536
June.............. : 7,995 : 5,037 : 4,650 : 7,043 : 3,754
July............. : 9,430 : 7,705 : 5,530 : 6,775 : 4,338
Aug............... : 7386 : 7,479 : 7,389 : 6,437 :
Sept.............. : 12,142 : 5,494 : 4,509 : 3,242 :
Total ...... : 146,350 : 83,790 : 64,558 : 66,136 :
Compiled from Trade and Navigation of the United Kingdom.


-1-1








-1 -

United Kir-do.i: Ba'-oi i.,:;-orts from Decn.- rk, by
mouthls, 1925-26 to 1929-30


1E25--26


1926-27


1927-28 :


1928-29 192-30


Oct.................
Nov................:
Dec. ...............:
Jan ................
Feb................:
Mar................:
Apr................:
May............... :
June ...............:
July............... :
Aug ................:
Sept...............:
Total ....... :


1,000
pounds :

31,690:
29,306:
40,377:
31,207 :
30,472:
36,205:
30,468:
30,474:
29,770:
*34,263:
36,712:
34,601:
395,548:


1, 00
poxids

34,557
38,931
40,194
41,803
42,436
417,526
42,093
44,205
51,795
50,710
46,941
48,143
530,234


1,000
pounds

50,090
50,257
52,244
54,975
:3,942
54,675
52,745
51,10$
51,636
44,562
48,924
42,633
509,792


1,000
pounds

50,703
48,0863
45,580 .
48,717 :
41,508
41,985
44,031
46,758 .:
41,886 :
46,570 :
48,121:
48,350 :
552,272 7


Compiled iron: Trade and. lavigation of the United KiEngdom.


United Kingdom: Total bacon inv-orts, by months,
1925-,26 to 1929-30 -


Month


1925-26


S1,000
: pounds

Oct............. ..: 66,983:
iov.................: 60,259:
Dec................: 81,951:
Jan. .. .............: 66,329:
Feb................: 65,935:
Mar......... ......: 71,126:
Apr......... ......: 64,527 :
May.................: 60,794:
June...............: 61,431:
July...............: .71,841:
Aug............... : 69,497:
Sept....... ........: 77,123:


1926-27


1,000
pounds

73,275
76,138
78,867
75,371
69,874
82,487
71,277
76,630
88,348
84,105
74,480
80,159


1927-23 1928-29 1929-30


1,000
pc'.lids

85,552
79,579
80,679
82,344
85,153
87,041
83,815
S8,759
86,387
79,212
86,86.3
71,796


i,000
pounds

82,378
79,297
76,771
88,092
68,612
68,923
73,126
87,645
71,394
80,360
82,290
73,505


1,000
pomuds

72,402
74,868
85,603
74,801
73,721
84,631
75,096
84,615
83,277
85,457


Total........; 817,796: 931,011 :


997,179 : 933,093 :


Compiled from Trade and aviationn of the United


HP-10


Moni th


1,000
ipx.v.undis

47,486
48,525
53,490
48,406
44,439
51,870
46,204
56,206
54,456
55,213


__


_ ___ C__~_~I~I__~


__


Kii ndom.


11,






HP-10


United Kingdom: Total hart
1925-26 to


T7


-16-


imports, by months,
1929-30


: 1925-26
q


1926-27 :


1927-28 :
*


1928-29 :


:1,000
: nounds


Oct......... ....
i.ov........... .
Dec...............

Feb..............
Mar..............
Apr ...............
May .......... ....
June...............
July...............
Aug...............
Sept; .............


Totel........ :


141,348 : 106,638 :


107,289


Compiled from Trade and IUavigation of the United


: 110,257

kingdom.,


United Kingdom: Total lard imports, by months,
1925-26 to 1929-30


Month : 1925-26 : 1925-27 : 1927-28 1928-29 : 1929-30
______ : :* :


Oct...............
iTov...............
Dec. ..............
Jan...............
Feb ...............

J lar..............
May ........... .. .
June............. .
July..............
eAupt..............
Sept..............


1,000
pounds

16,811
19,654
21,403
20,848
24,261
23,753
28,172
18,843
20,953
23,074
19,148
25,361


1,000
pounds

21,569
12,710
13,772
21,665
19,136
20,989
27,032
24,264
28,564
26,006
17,571
22,360


1,000
pounds

17,360
21,058
22,351
27,794
28,421
33,840
23,081
24,398
19,596
24,667
21,844
13,346


1,000 :
pounds :

18,079 :
21,51
.17,480..
35,923 :
29,752 :
22,234 :
21,612 :
26,479 :
20,498 :
25,977 :
21,204 :
16,899 :


262,281


: 255,638 :


277,756


: 277,688 :


Compiled from Trade and Navigation of the United Kingdom.


Month


1929-30-


1,000
pounds

6,929
8,762
11,318
8,847
6,513
6,910
6,523
9,208
12,410
12,034
8,282
8,902


9,479
11,613
13,40-1
13,615
13,066
12,516
12,252
12,076
10,945
10,482
10,451
11,449


100liOOO
pounds

7,802
5,836
7,817
6,896
9,062
9,264
7,993
9,334
10,782
11,404
13,594
7,505


1,000
pounds

6,484
6,782
7,339
8,788
8,232
6,828
6,981
14,136
10,499
12',042
12,073
8,073


1,000
pounds

8,105
8,125
9,347
7,920
7,989"
8,601"
9,539
12,298"
10,983
14,391-


1,000
pounds

21,844
24,004
,7,160
27,559
25,187
24,810
16,218
20,772
21,078
31,801


Total...... :


I _


--








HP-10


Condiitions in C.cntinc.t 1.:L Eu:rope

From present info-.. ation. o-: Ev.-ropc- n hog- stoh:s, general econo:iic
conditions c.if'ctin.r ; the pric; level .-._.. p'..rcha 1si: : power, J.tin tc.dca:cies
in me.t and fat consu'1.:.pion, it a:'-.--'s th.t (rotinent:,l Jurropie \.ill -".ow
an important decline in te. o.o-t..:t of pork! products imported during the
year enlin, September .30, 1S31 coi v';,,4tr-i with the previous -'ear. Rocccnt
reports on hog numbers in sev=-ral E-.uroper- countries s'.ow\ tha.t ho npro-
duction as increased considerably axid now StcniJs at th. hi;ihecst level
since pre-vI:.r. T'.- increase has be 'n es,:cciall/ -e'v- in Gern.;r.', ITet~.cr-
lands -an6. Derni.-iar, and lest y;e:Cr a unusual nui.b of 'ogs were if?. in the
Danube Basin ;ind even in Itay,, according; to reports. The gei 9-,rally low
prices of sgrin .*.ve be.in an important factor in tu.rni.lg fi"r..iers toJward
hog production as a mor: profitable branch of fI.rrning.

The quite re-ulr swing in th- ho* cycle in important European
countries for a nuniber of years sees.is to i-..icat- t~ea.t the price of hojs
itself is t.ic _redominant f..ctor in uhe shifting; production %iith tie feed
situation acting as a secondary factor wl-ich affects the extent of the
swing without altering ..1atorially its direction. If the feel situation
were the d.olinant factor in the hog situation there evidently 6ould be no
such rc-gular swings in hog production as the past has shownv, because there
is no such regular cycle-in the price of feeds since they are determined
chiefly by supply, which is necessarily irrc~ul1.r due to weather conditions.

Greet declines in hog prices have recently toi-cn place, honover, in
conjunction wit', firmer feed prices which will chick further incrc.;.3es end
start a. downward movement in breeding next spring. Declines in ho; prices
in July i- different pprts of the continent coni:;arecrd vith a year c-co arc
as follows: Micin 27 pFr cent, Vienna 18 per cent, Danzig 31 per cent, Pr.ris
16 per cent, Berlin 30 ,xr cent, RottLrdc-. 29 per cent, and Copenh.!en 29
per cent. Ho, prices are falling partly due to increased production, but
consumpntive dem-nd for pork. and pork products does not appear to be giving
usual support to the i;~ariet, L.-.c_: of support for hog prices is attributed
partly to t c; elfect -?f the economic situation in reduci-A purchasing power
which results in some shiftirg to cheaper foods &-nd some -reduction in the
consuwmption of pork and pork products. The reduced price level for agricul-
tural products is a.lso a factor in depressing hoS prices.

Geerima;

iith all indications pointing to a io~.7nward novel.ient in Ger,.i-an hog
prices, a Berlin average of $13.78 ;r 100 )out-ds for early Supto1.ibor ap-
pears to be in Ikeepin:,i with expectations. The averages for July rnd
Auu-ast were somcw.:hat seasonally- hig-her at $14,29 and $14.05 respectively,
accordial to Assistant'Agricultural Co.iiis-ioner Dawson at Berlin. The
August evcrage was about $4.50 belo- th_-.t of A--.ust 129. Rece.it pig


,17-









HP-10 -10-


censuses hc.e shown c mLaterial increase over last ear in the available
number of slanghter hogs over 6 months old, which indicates probable in-
creases in hog ri-irketings during the early fall of 1930.

Larger numbers of 1930 spring pigs point definitely to. heavier
iai.rketin;s in the fall and winter of 1930-31. Present figures indicate
an increase of about 32 per cent in the number of sows expected to farrow
this fall as against a year ago. It appears, therefore, that the number
of pigs going to market in 9 to 12 months from now will be materially
larger t-ici at the same time last year. For the next few months, market-
ings at 35 points to Nove;nber 30 are ex:cected to e::ceed similar figures
for 1S29 b.- about 15 per cent. An increase of 17 per cent is anticipated
in t--e lacr.-etin s f-or Decenber to February inclusive. With indications
natural, : less certain for more distant months, t-ie total marketing for
the year e-.ded iay- 30, 1931 are tentatively placed 15 per cent'higher than
for the corresponding year ended May 31, 1930.

Thc development of both hog and feed prices is becoming unfavorable
to hogI proc'.uction in Germ.any, Mr. Dawson reports. It is anticipated, there-
fore, t. .t fe-er sows will be bred this fall than a year ago. The Sept-
emibsr 1930 ho.s census will sow nunibers of all hogs as being greater than
in Septa.-.bcr 1929, and the Dec riber census may be expected to show much
larger numbers th.-.n last year, but some reaction to the unfavorable turn
in t.ie price situation will be evident in the nainber of sows bred. Feed
grain crops in Gcermnian are poorer than a ycer a.o. That fact, coupled -
with higL. ii;rort duties, will raise feed .prices and further accentuate
the dovnwcrd tendency in hog production, which will be definitely under
way during 1931-32.
-t
The advances in domestic German pork production continue to be ac-
comp~niied by downward movement in imports of pork products. Mr. Darson
anticipates a decreased demand for foreign lard during the nort 12 months,
most of which is secured from the United States. Important factors in
the more unfavorable Geri.1i: market now- developing for American lard are
soen in t.-o generally depressed commodity price level end the reduced level
of industrial and commercial activity. There are indications also that
lard substitutes of both animal and vegetable origin, principally the
latter, ,-re ,ss-uning an increasing degree of competitive importance in the
e-erllan fats trade.

Latest cabled advices indicate some reflection in the German lard.
mcarlet of t,.e slight general advance during_ Auiust of lard prices in both
Americ.a ri~d Europc. Th,. H:m.burg average for the month va.s $12.72 -eor 100
pounds, the hiji t aver,.-., since last Niovember. As ?gc.inst earlier years,
however, t'ie current C.vorcto WC.s unusually low. L;.rd im .orts into GormnlTi
durin,,- uly continued the downward tendency in evidence since April. Tli






HP-10


tot'l i-.i orts from SIC c:..bIr 1 to Jui," 31, 1 32''-30 i r, only: sli-.-tly
larger t>.ni for t-c corr;s o.lin ; p riod oi 1028-.'9. In b.'.con, inot of
whichc h co..:. ir1. t'he I et.tcrln.-.cs, t1 decline in imports .i-.s bc-n i:i
program si:.co 1.xat :.:.rel. Tot.: ii.i orts for tice current U .son to
July 31, ..o::o-cr, wero still "i,.-.toric.ll, lar.-er t.--n in 1328-29.

GciTa.r': 1' rabr oI ynun.., pi s, brood sows .Ld total
o10:s on si ciiiud d.tcs, 1927-1930


S You', ..is : Brood soUs

D3t: of Uinder Ei: -.t : Six:
Tot-l
cc-su.s eight ::--cks to :Inonti-s to: Ov r Total :
Sweecks :i:: rnont.n 1 "car : y-c.r : : l
:Tho.Isad.s: T.-ousc .ds: T'.ous: cd.s T-hou nds: Thous.-.ds: Ti:o1.scn.ds

Jumo 2, 1914 .. : 14 25 : 714 : 1, 51 : 2,245 : 22,:10
Doc. 1, 137 ..: 1,379 9,910 : 504 1,218 : 1,722 :22,89.
Ju.. 1, 1923 ..: 4,936 9,557 707 1,150 :1,857 : 2 ,1'7
Dec. 1, 192 ..: ,OC3 8,4o7 : 556 : 1,063 : 1,619 : .23,106
Junc 1 192 ..: 4,10 : 8,099 : 671 : 1,145 : 1,816 : 15,94
Sopt.l, 1929 ..: 5,373 8,290 652 1,2CS : 1,830 : 19,604
Dec. 1, 1924 ..: 4,412 8,679 633 : 1,178 : 1,841 19,920
M:r. 1, 190 ..: 5,012 8,555 722 : 1,229 : 1,951 : 10,649
June 1, 1930 ..: 5,099 : 9,178 876 1,356 : 2,232 : 1i,004

Conriled from; Dcutscher Rciclisoizcigcr, Vicrtol J.'-h rsn.itc -,dI ca.bles
fro,. AGricult'.ra.i Co.,.ii.ssioncr at Berlin.


Gcrrnac,-: To' al bacon imports, by months, 1925-26 to 1929-30



o:--ti : 1925--25 : 1926-27 : 1927-28, : 1928-29 1929-30


: 1,000


Oct. ......
1-ov .......
Dec ..........
Jan. ..........
Fob. ...........
Mar. ..........
Apr. .......
Maoy .........
Junie ........
July .........
Aug. .........
Scpt ..........
Totl.. .


: 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000


pounds : 2po-ids

2,442 2,025
95 : 2,118
1,263 : 2,007
1,911 : 1,595
2,021 : 1,493
1,745 : 1,127
1,775 : 867
1,758 : 847
1,947 : 7776
1,452 : 306
1,877 : 474 :
1,999 : 912
21,151 : 14,49


pounds : pooulds : pounds

1,019 : 817 : 1,339
945 : 811 : 1,560
913 : 1,0b0 : 1,111
905 : 1,302 : 1,77
1,213 : 769 : 1,507
625 : 908 : 2,239
418 : 765 : 1,795
322 795 1,139
602 : 67 : 37
421 : 1,102 : 82
33 : 953
523 : 1,023 _
8,289 :10,982


Monatlic-- Tawcisc IoI
Monetlicile Iaclv'ice abcr den ,,us'.7artigo-n .L l"c'do1 Deutscnllands.


-1:-





KH.-10


19_27-28
Month : : United
:Totl : St-tos


1928-29


: : United
: Total : States


1929-30.


: United
Total : States


.1 1000 Ibs. ,000 lbs. :.1,000 lbs. 1,000 lbs..


Oct......
l.ov ......
Doc ......
J. II ... .
Fob ......
ir. .. ..

Apr......
L.ay......

July.....
Lug......
Lopt.....


20,533
14,437
12,192
16,159
16,375
22,305
18,5416
14,311
14.,555
13,711
13,829
14,760


17,614
12,282
10,040
13,336
13,353
19,329
16,497
11,701
11,539
11,117
11,696
12,145


13,240
15,793
19,373
24,841
13,685
17 686
22,8-18
19,610
13,528
14,233
13,080
153,065


10,698
13,949
17,517
22,300
11,435
16,157
20,369
17,905
11,423
11,391
10,791
11,083


1,000 Ibs..

20,480
18,831 :
21,081 :
24,367 :
15,686 :
17,364
17,886 :
14,545 :
13,69 :
13,591

*


1,000 Ibs

18,148
16,719
18,959
2 80,756
13,586
15,157
15,250
12,0532
11,154


Totc.l .: 191,713 : 160,649


: 201,015


: 175,018 :


Mon:tlicho Nr.ch.'e:iso ubor don aus:a-rtizcn H'.ndol Doutschlands.


Donr.ark

ling prices in. Donr.crk c.clin ;C during g Juno, July and August, Mr. Darson
reports, '.ith mid-.ugust lovals about 30 pD: cent lower than at the samo time
last year. The pr-ico outlook fo: tLeo intor of 1930-31 is unfavorable for
Dc.nish proCuce:s. The .prclininLry fiLjroz for the July 15, 1930 hog census
show a pronounced increase in nuribors over li.st yeor. In spite o: lower
prices, howvevcr, hog production is still one of the most profitable branches of
Danish agriculture cuiing to the rolrt ivoly I- 1 fool priccc, but reduced
Eurnop..n ftoe. crops hrvo beo-r. rofluctood in an upward novenont in Danish feed
prices. That novonent sual3sts loss profitable hoe operations during the
coming year. O'::in: t.: the Danish policy -. f:Ceo trado in g_'rins, however,
the price situation is o.:pocto to produce unfavorable con-itions more
slorly thrn in such ccuntrios as Grn=eny .-hlre exports are ilado to protect
ccic.1stic g.ra.ii ngoJiers.

Throughout thj current season bjginnin~, October 1, 1929, total bacon
oxp ,rts h-.vo boon lar.gor than in th; corresponding months .o the 1928-29
soas.-n. Since l.i.sItM ,, ho4over, the incrorsJ over a year U o has been
rotortr thr.n Curin2 the or.rlior months of thu current sEoson. The season's
cumulative total to July 31 was 10 poa- cent Ir-rg~r than for the same
period of 1928-29. It is hold that the current decline in b,-con prices
is Lroater thnn thi incroaxso in oxpcrts would' justify '.or'u it not for tho -
pressure exerted by incrorsod shipments to.the United Kingdon front other
continental producing countries.

J


I


_I ~__ __L __ I~__ ~ ~ I~


_ _~_ __


20 -


Gcrmany: Irports of lard, total from the United States, by
months, 1927-28 to 1929-30


* :







HP-10


Nc th :l'. nds

Thu offici'.l h r f'r, -'us :.s .:T .u'. 1I, 1.30 sh.:Tc str t up:: .rd yVcr.:nt
in IlJt..o l. : s L.m: prDt:ct.. i .n, '. .. :"-'j art.. 11' :.,o rr *"'.ir,.bt groups
in N ...o. -1,-.'L "s ".-, c 3. ..in I .... r." frr-
rc-istorud incrc'" ov-r tV ,- 2uLL- ..c ,2:'.:'. *n Jur.. 1, 19"-9. .'- "s in f- r-
rot; s..c-::d n incr'- .. A. f C 20 r c..t, ir..lic ti;n lar_ frll ni cr:r:: -1'
incronrsod nC.rkct su ..li-: ..:xt .-,'i, .'.uir..r, TT.; ,ri : -.-1 L.:n o-
stoedily; during. rc3...t .r t:s : ** u co :" ircrs '. 1 for''igs. The
official price indcx for p ;rk ..wcro: frm 103 in Jr.nu.r. 19ZO to 82 in
June. Food r'ico3 c )ntinu-d :.t 1 r, ICv.l*s rn-. J..lir::o .li,_..t.]., in r.c0:.nt
months. Th- fjodin- rzti.. hra bccn.- 1-,. 1'.': r-..:t.lo since ho,i prices o.incr.
more sLarrly thin Ci.'. f. -ricas. It '.,;; rs, h ...-r, tl?..t up to r.i'-
Ausuzt ho_ fi%-din- ;.:s still 'r..,fit:'., in tin lI1;lurl1rnds. T.xt spring,
horeov;, decrc".sor. broudin; is 5.:x,,;ct.di.

Nothorlinds: Estir.:ntud 2-c"c,"t 'us :o incfre.c. n.- Icrrc.so :f
hoCs cn spocifiod dctos coc.r.'l with prcccdix:c yu.-r
1928-1930

: Sow : 'rr-s :
Iato : in : FC.rr 7vs : otl. .r tlh.n : 'icn:: : F.t h n;s
: farrow : 8 :.ks : C3

: Per c.nt : P- c:t : Per er.t P: P. csnt : Par- cont

July 28, 1928 ...:- 20 : 20 :-15 to 20 -15 to 20 :- 25
Oct. 23, 1923 ...:- 15 : -15 to 20 :- 15 :-15 to 20 : 25
Feb. 1, 1929 ....:- 10 : -15 to 20 :- 10 :- 10 5
IMo; 1929.........: 5 : -10 t- 15 :- 10 10 : -0 to 15
Lug. 1, 1929.....:+ 0 tc 10 : 0 to 10 10 :-10 t 20 :-10 to 15
Oct. 28, 1929....:+10 to 15 :+10 to 15 +1 to 5 0 : 0 to 5
Mar. 1, 1930 /..: 30 :2/+1 t : :/+ 10 :4/ + 5. :5/s1- t
: : : : increase
Juno 1, 1930 ....:+ 20 :2/+15 t. 2P0 :/+.15 ':4/+10 to 15 :5/ + 5

B.sod :n ro .pts f...-nis-:,Il b. Li''.st :c. xt x i::si r. ._gocts rn,: f ..r...'.:c. bj;
h.ssist-.nt -'.,ric.ltu-" 1 C::r'ni.i .i-ln*; : C- L. D' -on. + in.. ice.t: incrcr.so,
creaseaso. 1/ In thV future the hc, r- prts .ill be iLs',i. iu.rtorly
i.e. Ikrch 1, Ju::; 1, Sptoi.br 1, '.d Dc-r.br 1. 2/ 2 rIi.r 6 rT'ks,
3/ 6 '.73ocl. to 152 p.unLds. /' 132 t 220 pounds. 5/ O!r 220 pouB1..

OtL-r Europe'n co':r:trius

In S':ouac thu h. Ir.c:rt rc.i,-..- otc-dily incrQasi.1 suiplios durin.Z the
p.st -.cu- or, *.cc.-rdinc t- I..r. '....'.. Prices h':-; dec i.:-x to !CV.-Il c n-
sideracbl, bolj; those 2 1' 1: st y-fr ur.lJr t.-o .rusuroe f c- Asid3rrbly ex-
panr-d.d 1oa. ,raducti: n a,"r:r., C r. u;..ct,_ to folloo th, ;-n.;r;l d?-t-.rd
t'rnd.rcr.- no-' re"v- l;::t in Eur:pu. TL..- s b._- :. f. ici:cl h census in
Swedon sincL 1927. In 'al._iuz.: : sor:..: t ir..... d.'-.rd for sor.o .n.tricrn
po:rk products is :tici ;. ct i. So to:e:b r, ..cc -i-i., t" C:.iul 1. S. Pzi:'ock
at LA.it.or). In cur x ;:'rk t-h.: btt.. c "r..1itic,..s cr ticip.tcr.l .re l:r-_'ly
suosonal since th.,; ot su': hs h i:-..~ro..' t!; s:.10o : ;i-.:.ics nd ft b.cks.
Stocks x. t... latter '.: r. .-t Ad r.. v :'y lI3. In In : r ,: 'r.v.t in.'ro:oE
outlook is sorn r.s rosuit o .:... ~l: tiona ;.:hibiti t: a of ot-r
cdibl- f.tsa on la.rd.


-- j].-






Hogs cd pork products: Indices of foreig-n supplies and demand
Hogs cad pork products: Indices of foreign supplies and. demand.


Country
and item


:Unit
*


: October July
:1909-10:1924-25: : :
:to 1913:tno928 :1926-27:1927-28:1928-29:1929-30
: -14 : -29 : : :
: '..-cr o: aver.go: : :


VINITED KIUGDOM:
Production -
Fat pigs, cer-
tain manrkcts ..
Supp-lios,
domestic fresh
pork, London ...
Imports -
Bacon -
Donmark .......
Irish F. State..
United States...
Canada..........
Others..........
Total .........
Ho-n, total.......
Lard, totctl....
DEEHAR:LPJ:
Exports -
Bacon............
CAJADA:
Slau7lhter -
Hogs, inspected..
GER. L lY :
Production -
Hog receipts
14 cities.......
Hog slaughter
36 centers......
Imports -
Bacon, totalt....
Lari, total......
UNITED STi.TES:
Slag'.:ter -
Hogs, insopcted..
Exports -
Bacon -
United Kin -dom..
Germany.........
Cuba ..........
Total .........
Hams, sho-iders..
United Kingdom..
Total..........
Lard -
United Kiaigdom..
Gorma.........
Cuba............
ITotl-orl nds.....
Total .........


:1 X00's

: 1000
pouno. s


a: 508: 511: 460: 533: 589:


46,787: 50,392: 68,962: 66,552:


:205,468: 119,006:435,150:518,235:455,801:
:44,188: 35,413: 46,670: 51,223:
:152,042: 89,794: 70,817: 52,660: 56,456:
:34,872: 64,236: 55,016: 33,834: 19,661:
:36,067:136,299:179,976:187,522:194,157:
428,449:753,523:776,372:838,521:777,298:
:79,475:106,307: 89,45-: 86,190: 90,111:
:183,256:229,527:215,707:242,566:239,585:


:416,987:441,783:508,576:418,085:
:


:1O0O's: 1,434: 2,239: 2,231: 2,286: 2,058:



: : : 2,692: 2,70O-: 3,569: 2,950:

3708: 3,354: 3,199: 4,399: 3,892:
: 1,000: : : : : :
:pou-nds: 2,212: 14,278: 13,,63: 7,383: 9,006:
: :167,473:185,285:198,3-44:163..124: 174,870:

: : .
:1000's: 27,789: 39,898: 37,506: 42,317: 42,723:

:1,000: :
:pounds:108,288: 55,371: 45,158: 35,768: -40,802:
": 1,308: 9,881: 6,303: 8,409: 5,824:
: : 6,356: 17,40.4: 18,346: 15,572: 13,2-1-4l
:146,866:117,793: 92,91.-:101,789:10-7, 898:
: :
:117,993:121,060: 97,838: 88,833: 80,497:
:137,170: 1-141, 320:114,992:108,073:101,2014:

:146,075:194,326:178,609:205,564:203,55.4:
: :117,373:159,656:145,497:141,121:170,416:
: 31,116: 367,74-: 67,173: 66,719: 69,863:
: 30,154: 35,595: 37,873: 29,231: 35,201:
:396,734:613,04-10:561,057:611,777:695,229:


496


52,452


506,295
36,407
54,836
13,196
183,737
794,471
97,298
242,433


492,883


1,869



2,784

3,604

14,486
177,500


*10,045


43,556
5,526
13,182
97,211

87t336
107,855

212,824
145,023
65,506
39,119
660,755


HP-10


*







HP- 10

Hos .,-..I pork products! Forcig:-. A.d doni-stic .-;jor-c prices p:r- 100
pou..ds or t.'.r, mont'". in'Licated, :. .toc]s -.t tn ,- '..d. of cac'.i moI .t.


I tci l


Prices -
Hogs, C.dcC.o,
basis p-ck-crz'
and s.i )icrs'
quote.tions ........
Corn, C.:icago,
No. 3 ycllo'.......
Hogs, hea.v,
Berlin, live
weight............
Potatoes, Breslau
feedi.g'...........
Barley, Leipzig.....
Lard -
Chicc so ...........
Liverpool.........
Hamburg............
Cured pork -
Liverpool -
Amcric"-a ;short
cut grec-.i tLans..
America- greenr
bollies.........
Danish 'iltshire
sides...........
Canadian green
sides............

Stocks -
Liverpool -
Hams, bacon anid
shoulders.......
Lard, refined.....
United States -
ProcesseLd ork: 2/
L.rd in cold
storcge.........


Ju I,,-
i909-1913

S ol-rs.




: C.00


:
: 15-1 :120

or11.37rs





11.37


Ju 1.:


jC.f C'


: J J c j.,


1930


Do-1,.s : DJl.:3r :
: :
: :
: :


ilL,


1.16 1.76 : 177


11.71 : 16.03 : 18.25

.35 .67 .8
1.71 : 2.22 : 2.10

10.75 : 15.18 : 13.22
11.86 : 15.80 : 13.90
12.67 : 16.26 : 14.11
: :


15.80 : 26.01 : 26.13

21.64 19.99

16.56 : 25.01 : 27.50

15.43 : 23.09 25.98
1,C00 : 1,000 : 1,000
pounds : p rnds : nouids


6,205 8,310
:10,774 : 14,363

757,402 : 8-1,3 1

177,316 :203,010


9.52


1.-11


13.33

: .22
1.7

11.00
11.25
S 11.53



S 21.94:

18,57

21.9-1

:1/ 20.72
.1,000
: pou.d.


S 5,170
S 1,900

079,221

120,322


1930






8.73

1.-16


1-1.29


1.78

10.50
11.20
11.54



2.1.5 2

17.68

19.9-1



1,000
pou: ds


-1,963
3,591

652,051

118,923


Threc wOL-ks only.
Dry salt cured c-..d i:-
of cure, and frozen.


process of cu-'c; jick:led, cured, :-nd i:'. process


-----------0--------


__


_________ ___ ___




IlIIIVERSIIY OF FLORIDA

IIII li lll 111IIIII IIHIll| 1 IIII Ill|IIlIIIII11111
3 1262 08865 0345



























ii






S,.. m i .; 5; '
S ..

".F:':. ..








e :. .i



















', .. .




Full Text
0-61 -10-

The volume of takings of American cotton by continental spinners
remained unusually small through early July mach below any time since
1925-26. As takings in the last two months have apparently leveled out at
a figure somew'iat below actual cons miption, it appears that the low point
has about been reached. The present volume of takings clearly indicates
a considerably reduced continental demand for cotton when average seasonal
prices are considered, as with prices for August June 1926-27 averaging
only two cents below Aug-st June this year, continental spinner takings
in that period were 1, 700,000 bales above those for the corresponding
period this season.

Table 8 Continental spinners' takings: American Cotton during
specified periods, 1925-26 to 1929-30


Period :1925-26 : 1926-27 : 1927-28 : 1928-29 : 1929-30
:1,000 : 1,000 :1, 1,000 : 1,000
:bales j1 :bales / :bales j : bales / : bales I/
Four weeks ended : :
Nov. 29.......... : 461 473 : 443 424 :434
Dec. 27.......... : 497 : 544 457 : 436 :415
Jan. 24.......... : 408 : 449 465 : 454 : 406
Feb. 21.......... : 412 : 680 : 397 : 361 :380
Mdar. 21.......... : 377 539 : 412 : 477 :364
Apr. 18.......... : 284 : 463 : 376 : 332 : 304
May 16.......... : 308 : 524 : 404 : 337 : 256
June 13.......... : 283 : 443 : 377 : 417 : 245
July 11.......... 22 : 516 : 411 : 304 243
Aug. 1 Jly 11 .. : 4,220 : 5,755 : 5,135 : 4,734 : 4,014
1/ Bales of 478 pounds net.

TEXTILE SITUATION
United States
Textile activity in the United States during. both June and July prov-
ed to be very low. The cotton goods markets have been rather quiet with hand-
to-mouth purchases apparently continuing in spite of the low price level.
According to the Bureau of tile Census, mill consumption in the United
States during July amounted to 378,835 bales or 26,346 bales less than in
June and 168 330 bales less tnan July 1929. This was the lowest for any
month sitce Aagust 1924. Consumption for the season 1929-30 totaled 6,113,932
bales compared with 7,091,065 bales .daring the season 1928-29.
As :may be seen from the accompanying Table, the average weekly prodnc-
tion of cotton cloth for July as reported by the Association of Cotton Textile
Merchants of New York was the lowest since October 1927, Sales, however,
during July showed considerable improvement over June and were 8,6 per cent
above production which resulted in a decrease in stocks on July 31 of 2.3Zper
cent from the previous month. Unfilled orders increased 1.6 per cent from
the low level at the end of June.
According to trade reports considerable curtailment took place dAring
July and continues into the first part of August. Some mills which were
completely closed during the week end of July 4th and 5th extended their
holiday periods throughout the following week.


[. .






0-61 -- 22 -

Russia

July 10 infor.ni-tion fro'-. Soviet Russia states that a total of
4,386,257 acres had been planted to cotton- ,..s of June 25, in cor~mp.-rison
with 2,559,956 acres in 1929; this means an increase of 70 pur cent. The
hoeing of cotton, however, is reported influenced unfavorably by the
shortc.go of labor and press reports already show concern as to the coming
cotton picking campaign. It should be remembered that some of last year's
cotton crop re'-miained ui:-.rvested in co-.sequcnce of the shortage of l-.bor, so
tnat this problem. rrn- become important this yoor when a liuch- larger crop
will have to be dealt with. Exceptionally hot weath-er was reported from
i-.iddle Asic, .t tic bcgin-zing of July, but as yet no i-iolnartion is available
as to its influence on t.ic cotton plait. (Conmissie.a. r Steere).



According to the I-iter-:.';io;-..:-. Institute of .rilculture at Rome the
preliminary estii.i.to of t.:e area pleated to cotton in Ejypt for the 1930-31
seas'..n is 2,162,000 acrcs. T is is a 13 per ce-:t increase over the 1,912,000
acres plcj.into last year. Of this acreage for 1930-31, 859,000 acres are
planted i-n tihe S.tlellaridis varict: andl 1,292,000 -.cres in other varieties.
The con-di cion oj Sokellaridis ..t t-Lc beginning of August was estimated at 98
per cent a-~d other cotton at 108 p-r cent.' Last year tihe estimate was 99
and 103 per cent respectively. The averncge for the snae date during the past
ten years is equal tc 100 per cent.

World production

Theac comp:-'i.ngl Table qives cotton production by countries for the
last four -ears co:ipjar:d wit.i post war and pre war averages. Tie' production
of cotton in tna United States has varied considerably during the 21 years
period covered by this Table. T:'e trend, however; ..-as been somewhat upward.
The -vcrrje production during th3 first five years was 13.0 million bales where-
as th: average for the last five years beginning 1925-26 was 15.5 million bales
or on increase of 19.2 per cent. India .-as increased from 3.6 million bales
to 4.7 million bales or an increase of 30.5 per cent during this period when
the averages of the sojne five orecr periods are compared. EjCpt -the -next xim-
portent cotton producing county -..s increased frorL. 1.5 million bales to 1.6
million bales or a 6.7 per cent increase when measured on this snoe basis.

Br"zil .r.s increased its production about 158,000 bal-es or 40 per cent
during this period. Both Chosen and A4iglo-Egyptia. Sudan, though of less
importance, have steadily increased their production since 1909-10.

A co;.'"iJrison of simil..r averages for the estimated World total exclud-
ing China (using 24.4 million bales as a preliminary. estimate for the world
total excluding Chin. for the season 1929-30) shows that there has been an in-
crease from 20.1 million bales to 24.7 million boles or 22.9 per cent increase.

The trend of production in Russi. for eight years beginning 1914-15
was decidedly downward, but since that time there has been a stead- increase
until at present the production is well over the million bale'meark. This
puts Russia fifth in production.







SCJ 2A 2J.


1. Pr


2. St


*ic0S . . a a a
T:bleo 1 '.r..i3on pric-'z J.:'.~ i uLi) i- 'r c .'t
L ljricP. ... .. .:- 1 >. .
T-bl1: 2 Liv.rpool _"ri:: : o-. i,. 7tin upi.r-.-: i-: .- r ccnt
oZ A...rrican, ;..-..,e/J. I ,.b-JuLy l ,10, .
'ocks --nd '"ov .l.nits * *
Tableo worldl d vi'bl -.'pl;,' of cotton: L.. ricai a:'
oi;tn.or ;~rov'ths: on Ag..uj.t 1, ].-2'J, I.C \',ith-
c3..r1.ari ons * *
Tablo i L..rica-- cotton: S-.:_Iy ..n,. ca-rry-voer in UnitOL
t:.toes ?.. i' il:., 1. 1925-1J'0 . .
laolo f5 Unicd 2t-t.zcJ: Ej:-xort of io,.:ctim cotton, .::-
cludin-: lii., rz, J.:!-; and 12 .no,:ths :-nndi July
1929 ,) 1930 . .. .


T olo 6 I:.dia: Su-.l;- -'. nd distribution of do.,:1.-st;ic
cotl-tn fromin .';st 1 to Jun- 3J, ; 23-27 to
192U-30 . . .
Table 7 Fr-.nce: Lorts of cotton at thc ,oort of 1:.vro,
Junr anc Auj..Lt 1-Juno 3(0, 1929-19.0 .
Table 8 C.ntiinntal 'in.. r' t.aki.s: jiz.:.ric:. cot on
during spocifieo p-riodc, 1925-2C to 1923-30 .
3. T :.tilo situation . a *
cbilc 9 Cotton cloth: A.vr..r;c .'cc-kly p1ro..uction, salos
shlip)onts, l1..3 stocks ac.i'5. u:.fi'lo ordiors -t
Old ol month, 97-L5 to 1.29-0 .
Tarblo 10 G:rat Brit:.ir.: E::.or)'t of cotto:: picce goods, by,
i.ont'hs, 1919-20 t- 192'3'-0 . *
Table 11 Grco-t Britain: E-..prts of c3ttOs : yarn, by ;:.-o:Iths
1919-20 to 192:--3c . .
4. Production a ai.3 jcC a ".d cro, cc;-i;tion rcpo'rt .
Table 12 19:C0-.1 u.S. Ct-on croi : Auuot 1 cc:iditi:ns,
i- dic.td ;:i'l an. zosti:r:tod production .
Cable :" 'onpor.'uro :.m. r.im.-l Por t. Tour r.-ck-s c nd:'dcc.
L:is t _, 1S .. ... . .dC1.
Table 1.l Cotto::: Fr' a .ct :n Sf li'. in -)ccified ccun-
t'rios, i C-Ik to 192I-30 . .
Tablo 15 C.itton: Acrc.c :L. i :ocifiIcd coax-trics and co-
ti.atc.lto *-rl d tt:tal :.v :o-.. 1C09-10 to 1915-14--,
1"1-22 to 12U"-2G", ::*l.l 19L6-27 to 1929-30 .
5. Cotton )rcauctii5 cwjd :.iar'i-.-i:; i:l HI.iti .
T:.blC 13 HaLiti: Pr,1.vtion, ac'c:.Jo, yi ;li of cotton
avr:.rgo 100'-1 91., ",nn.l 1921--2 tc 1928-29
Table 17 t->iti: I.:,;ortr :' r-. c .tton r?.;. cottonsocd
c:eo, Octo.::' 1, 1:,28 tc Octbetr 1, 1929, by
co '::trio .... *
6/ Ilicllanoun c trl's . .
6/ ili-sccllaruouz nMs*
Table 18 Gcver.-nmit c.tto: ri-3.,rt z: Dates a.nd subject,
f.)r trc soasona 1930-31 . .


Pa-c
3 5





S- 10
-1.



7


8



8

9

10
10 18


11

13

1 .
18 23

20

21

Op. 22


23
241 23

2-1


26
27 28


C-81




r;'


Table 10. Groat Britain: Exports of cotton piece goods, by months, 1919-20 to 1929-30


Yoar Aug. Sopt. Oct. Nov, Doc. Jan. ob. Liar. Apr. May June July Total

(:I"il lion:.illion:illionillion millionn :..illion:Lillion:ilillion :illion:illion :Millio:illion: Liillion
: square square: squares square: square: square: square: square: squar): squro: squaLe: square: square
: yard s:yards yards yards yards :yards : yards : yards :yards : yards : yarC. : yards :yards

1919-20 : 331.2 : 277.0 393.2 : 373.6 : 392.9 : 411.C : 312.0 : 397.1 : 423.0 : L43.3 : 405.0 : 395.2 :4,563.7
1920-21 : 366.5 : 302.1 : 304.9 : 342.9 : 248.0 : 249.4 : 2,4.7 : 231.9 : 106.0 145.6 : 152.6 : 177.5 :3,032.9
1921-22 : 212.4 : 265.4 : 3-12. : 363.6 : 330.3 : 339.1 : 252.0 : 303.9 : 302,5 : 311.4 : 311.9 : 143.G :3,000.6
1922-23 : 370.0 : 395.0 : 353.7 : 390.7 : 360.5 : 100.0 : 31-2.u : 337. : 316.3 : -10.0 : 300.7 : 316.1 :,',309.0
1923-21 : 329.9 : 344.3 : 371.3 : 319.7 : 323.1 : 35..0 : 397.1 : 351.0 : 377.7 : 39,1.5 : 316.0 : 3,3.0 :.4,36.2
1921-25 : 373.6 : 360.0 : 36:.3 : 329.5 : 409.6 : -02. : 122.3 : 116.6 : 333.- : 371.0 : 3:3.0 : 370.0 : ,-91.9

1925-26 : 314.2 : 359.8 : 366.S : 325.9 : 3C2.2 : 356.1 : 36G.4 : 403.2 : 2C1.0 : 304.2 : 320.3 : 359.6 :1,17.0.3
1926-27 : 297.9 : 311.7 : 307.7 : 277.3 : 239.0 : 322.3 : 290.G : 393.9 : 316.9 : 113.6 : `30,1 : 335.2 :Z,C05.5
1927-20 : 062.9 : 339.0 : 312.1 : -02.2 : 290.6 : 337.4 : 316.2 : 397.4 : 31-1.C : 2C0.9 : 277.9 : 3C.6 :3,97,.0
1920-29 : 3:1.3 : 293.2 : 334.0 : 331.4 : 290.5 : 379.3 : 326.1 : 3310 : 3-19.. : 321.5 : 223.9 : 355.4, :3,C5.0
1929-30 : 321.3 : 237.5 : 265.3 : 230.0 : 273.6 : 313.2 : 299.5 : 261.3 : 217.0 : 210.0 : 150.7 : 197.4 :3,067.3
1930-31 : : : : : : : :

According to Board of Trade Roturns.











C-61


- ]I -


PThu c-rn in )icst o?' t1io Lu.lt is f. f:.; 4 :'.. .i rlic::" tl n 1-st
*your, did ccnsidjr-:hly i' rlir" tl. n in 1'.126. iruitlnl, i r nore dvrncod
then 1-st yo r in thu C rolin s, Gcor.,i T nncsso,, .nd Tex s, but. is
less :dv nc-d in oth -.- mujor :.t .tos.

In inturprotir;-: jmDditic.n ns n;1 inriic tior: o:' pro: hbl. yields,
the Bo rd hi s rm ic llo. nec for prcb:lY lo.s.5 duo to boll vcoevil on t o
b; sis of reports rocciv.d to d r* eonr'n:ni~n- wu vil prusonce nd activity.
Thes. :'.-oorts indic to t if usu-l vu tl,: ; prov ils during tCo r.:.n irdor
of th6 s.- son, wj'rilj d l n gp will i. less th n 1 st y'- r in .vcry St to
;'nd for th.. UnitAd St t.s u .;..ol, nd "ill b '.out ;-qu- 1 to the d r go
in 1924 nd 1D2C. In tboso y .rs r.ducti,:L in yiOld p.r cro ".ttributod
to w.Jovil d-in G r s 8.1 per cunt nd 7.1 p.r c .nt, rcso.ctivcly. ijuring
thu l1st tzn y, rs, in cnly on. y--:', 192E, vwh:n wF-vil 'J'.vg Twrs r;portcd
to h-v." b..-n 4.1 pjr c-rit, h. s t .., : pl from this c us- b-...n l-ss th-n in
th1 y. rs lu24 nd 12'j2, 'n1d 1.ss ti,;n th- indi t ;d prob'bl.: loss in 1930.
Low t r.p r- tur .s during th.- '"int.r months nd dr:. hot rv th .r during Juno
;d July m t -.i 11y r-ducd tY. numn r of wc',vils from Al.b'rn ::cst to
Oklr.hon- nd Djros)-.etiv d ni' in tLis ".r.: is nuch b-lo': 1: st y'-r nd
is sir.il r to 1924. I- th, LouthaQzstrrn St tos th; indices t.d loss from
wcLvils is slightly l,.zs th :i rYport.-d 1 st y-rr rnd simnil.-r to 1928.







C-61 -


Thou,-h the yield nt present is low it is the .?pinion of .or.c cotton
experts that under irrigation and :*rocr ;.run'.r : ~0ot'on n:y be c)',-srvi-
tively estimated to produce 500 pounds nor' acre.

There is r'el tively a small -.P nunt of definite inforr.nti.n Ovail-
able on the quality of lHaitirn cotton, but a conside:r.ble :roporticn,
possibly 0O o, .,C percr cent, is 1 3/16 ir.chea or nr.c-r in staple length
and p-ohabl;.' 75 per cent is 1 inch or loiter. There has been con-iderabJle
research done on lonS st,:ple cottons during the seo sons 19 "-2C, 192-2C,
and 1929-30.

Several strains of native Eaitian cotton are being developed b- the
Service Technique with fiber 1 3/4 inches or lon;:-r, very strong, silky
and of desirable color which is considered equal to S.~a Island. Py rext
year, it is expected thct from its stations and a few special rlontations
already planted theeo. will be a production of at least 2CO U-les of
certified long stn;ile cotton of the new type. To v.hrt extent the seed
distributed to othur for.is will actually result in certified cot on cannot
be predicted.

There is no definite information as to the amount of land th::t
could profitably be planted to cotton in Haiti, though so:oe agricultural
experts estimate th:t it coulrl probably be r.o'e th.n douti'ld. If, however,
the movement to increase the production of long stcple cotton continues
it is felt that there should be a consider-ble nir.bei- of plantati-ns through-
out the Island both to set an example end to furnish proper seed for the
peasants. ..n abundant supply of cheap conrion labor-wi.-es averaging 0.30
a d-y is a favorable factor in the development of these plantati~is,
though horse or tractor orerotors wucld have to be imported and paid a corn-
siderable higher rwage.

Insect Sests and p. nt diseases

TLe boll-weevil is unknown on the island. TLe pink boll worr is
widely distributed in Haiti, 'rit for causes undetermined as yet, does
little dr"mage. The cotton st'.Ainer (Dysdercus andreae) is the most
serious insect pest. The cotton loaf worm has been combated successfully
with calcium arsenate. Angul..r leaf spot, black arm, anthrocnose, Lnd
boll rot art found in Haiti though the latter two are nor2 common. These
diseases, how.;v-jr, do relatively little d .n:.r--. The intense sunlight,
the fact that the climate does not favor hib,'-*-nation and the cotton does
not bloom all the ye r, together with the fact that cotton blooms "in a
burst" arc all given as factors which cause the small araount of drnago done
by insect posts and plant diseases.

Ginning and baling

Most of the gins no-. established in Hiiti ore "s..v-gins", but
with the increased interest in the now long sttplc ty-p;s developed by the
Service Technique th-rc is nood for roller gir.s. Most of the gins in Haiti
.which number about 50 in all a o locotad at 3t. 1:or!, Gonaives, Port au
Prince, and J,:cmrcl. The general run of cotton tales vr:;sg3 around 450
pounds and m.usuro 57" x 45" ; 27". T';is comperos with the average Amar-
Sican bale of about 500 pounds, measuring 54" x 45" x 27". Native modo
Li.a




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA i

IIIIIIBjIY I IIH IB IIIIIIII 01IIIII0IIHI0 11111
3 1262 08863 1261



SNUNIV T




U.S. DEPOSITORY




I ..

















ii .
i













.:;: "" :

*... ii ":






1


- '4 -


0-61


Table 1.-Bremon prices of In.di-n cotton in p2- cent of moricr.n
Novmb'ur 1925 July 1930 1/
So.sor ; ; ; ; ; : : : :
Nov-July; Nov. ; Dec. ; Jn. ; Fob. ; Mar. : pr. Mry : June : July
:Percent:P:crcent:P:rcent:Percent:Pcrecnt:Percent:Percent:Percent:Percont

1925-26: 89: 84 80: 74: 77 78: 75: 81: 82
1926-27: 105: 108 86 : 93 : 91: 87 : 87: 90: 87
1927-28: 82: 84: 84 : 87: 87: 82: 81: 82: 78
1928-29: 79 : 78: 78: 76: 74: 73: 72 : 70: 68
1929-30 : 73 : 72: 72: 70: 72: 68 : 67: 70: 64

l/ Avcrnge of Bremen quot-tions for: Fine mgd. Scindh; fine mgd. Oomra No. 2,
f.st., Fine mgd. Bro-ch, .Am2ric n Soed No. 1 (Punjub).

"Egyptian cotton, contrary to Indi n, h s risen in recent weeks in com-
pcrison ,.ith mJnric n st:cle, .nd in July hrs re- ched ". level higher thrn :.t
any correspo.:ding tim& in th; p:st five yo:rs, except for July 1927. Egyptian
Uppers :r-e no-. c.ctu.lly t.bout 10 per cent higher th:.n -. month rgo in relation
to Amoriccn st.plos, the ch:.ngc boing due p:rti-lly to :n increr.so in Egypticn
qluotrtions, but chiefly to thu decline in Lmoric:n prices. The rcl.:tive firmness
of the Egypti-:.n m-.rkut ccn be tr-:cod to a number of causes, considorr.ble im-
portr.nce boing c.ttr.ched, in trr.do opinion, to the reported interest of the
Russicn government for l. 1r.rg quantity of Egypti-n cotton, the taking of which
is s-.id to be dependent upon th, successful arrangement of r trrdo treaty betwe-:n
,ussia a.nd Egypt. ,Lt the sc.ic time, thoer hr;s boen frequent recent expression
of trrde belief th:.t present prices of Egyptian should be regarded v.s very low,
-nd that buyers should t-ke .Lv nt. go of those levels nd of the Egypti.n
xovernmcnt's r-rdiness to sell from its stocks of better Cgrdo cotton, of which
the supply in trade h nds is v-ry limited. Those developments h1rve led, to a
revivrl of interest :nd incr-: sod trr.de -:ctivity in Egyptirn cotton, Vhich hc.s
resulted in some rdvrncc in prices."

Table 2.-Liverpool prices of Egyptian Uppers in per cent of americ-.n.
___November 1925 July 1930 1/


Season : :
Nov-July: Hov. Decc Jan. Lob. Liar. i.? 1 1ay June July
:Percent:Percent :?orcnt:Percent:Percent:Porcent :Percnt:Porcent: Prcent

1925-26 : 12 : 127 : 117 : 108 : 109 : 105 : 113 : 112 : 107
1926-27 : 130 : 114 : 119 : 113 : 117 : 113 : 122 : 127 : 126
1927-28 : 120 : 115 : 117 : 115 : 119 : 124 : 120 : 114 : 108
1928-29 : 102 : 103 : 103 : 105 : 104 : 100 : 100 : 96 : 96
1929-30 : 98 98: 98 : 104: 104: 100: 103 : 101: 111.
1/ Bremon quotation for strict middling .'mnricrn, 1/16".

It mc.y be noted thrt up to the end of June the Egyptian Government h-d
purchased 2,867,250 contours (oquiv -lnt to 599,843 b-lcs of 478 pounds not
:which represents a tot 1 expenditure of 5C to 55 million doll ara. 'On Juno 25,
1930 thu government issued r, st: tomont th:t this cotton is now for s-l1u t the
best possible price, but not belo:. 28.00 cents -. pound for fully .ood f: ir
S koll ridis .:.-d 19.80 cents per pound for fully good f- ir Uppers.







C-61 20 -

Tvble 12- 1930-31 U. S. Cottor Crop: Augu.st 1 coun'ition, indicated
yield andr estif-%.tc'd production


: AX I1T
SCULTIV.-ITIC'
:J-UY 1,1930
STATE : LESS
:10-YE.\R AV.
:..:3A-l.DOii 1:T


: 1,000
: .cres


V a ......... :
N.C .......
S.C........:
G la. ....... :
Fla .. ......

.iso .........

Ala........ :
!Ciss. ....... :
La .........
Te .. ........


Ark........:
IT.::cx...... :
Ariz... .5 :
Calif......
All ot'-cr..:


8es
1,693
2, 1.45
3,681
100

365
1,200
3,590
4,202
2,013
16,835

3,803
3,920
119
209
268
18


__AU-. 1 C01DITIOUI : YIED PZ. ACE PRODUCTION (bt-il
:10-yr : : :10-r.: :ndi- :ings) 500 1b.grq
': v. : : av. : :c-ted :wt. bales
:1915- 129 : 1930 :1919- :1929: 1930 :1929 :1930 Cro;
:192 I: : :1928 2: :Crop :indicr.ted
S : : by Condi-
Stion Aug.

Por : Per: Per : :: 1,000: 1,000
Scent : ciet : ce;t : LL.:Lbs.: Lbs. :bals : bales

S 74 :77 :72 : 246 :258 : 230 : 48 : 42
73 : 8 :74 : 255 :190 : 220 :. 747: 782
62 :68 :74 : 175 :179 : 207 :830 : 930
S 61 : 69 : 71 : 134 :171 :174 :1,343 : 1,340
64 : 70 :72 : 106 :145 : 140 : 29' 29

73 81 64 249 :30 : 200 220: 153
S 72 :81 :61 : 182 :217 : 185 :515-: 464
S 65 : 71 62 : 146 :174 : 160 :1,342 : 1,201
S 68 : 76 :60 : 176 :220 : 185 :1,915 : 1,626
63 : 69 54 : 152 133 : 150 :809 : 632
65 64 :61 : 135 :108 : 128 :3,940 : 4,496

72 : 72 :60 : 153 :123 : 135 :1,143 : 1,072
72 : 73 : 46 : 167 :178 135 :1,435 : 1,106
:4/ 5 86 :89 :4/288 :333 : 390 90: 97
91 : 86 : 92 :291 :324 : 371 : 153: 162
93 :86 :92 : 293 :402 : 399 :260 : 224
81 : 70 :4/188 :227 : 170 : 9 : 6



U.S.TOT..L ::
Lower Calif:
(Old. :.ex.) :
6/ :


'44,252 : 67.2

101 :
*


:69.6

: 85
:*


:62.2
:
:*-
*


:155.1

:*-


:155.0:155.3:14,828:

:244 : : 75:


1/ Prior to1921 i-tcrpolatr.d from Jil;: 25: Md Au1gust 25 reports.
2/ Indic:..to6. i- o:ditioi- Am\-gast 1, on -c--. i:n cultivction J-uly 1, less 10-year
aver"?. ; 1i' :_,c'.oi :ca-t.
3/ Ail-r.nrcoL nt .-D for cross St-tc i-n;alins.
4/ L ns t, .. n 10- r .r t: -rc;o..
5/ Inclui.ij Pilu. Lrrpnti:r lo-., strlce cotton, 45,000 a-cras and 28,000 bc.ls.
o/ li7O i._clud..l i Cilifornir. figures 110 iin U:it..d States totacl.

'oathier re,)rt

The accompanying Table tivos the temperature anc rainfall in terms of
departures fror normal by weeks for the four weeks ended AugSust 5 at stations
throughout the cotton bolt. From this it may be seen that with the exception



:; :: :: 1-.


14,362

53


__


---~-







C-61 18 -

Peru

The prevailing economic depression appears to be increasing i n
severity by collections becoming slow.-er and mo:-e difficult. There is less
direct importing by small firms who instead are buying on a hand-to-mouth
basis from wholesalers stocks. In point of value, United States exports
to Peru during the first four months of 1930 we:-e 31 per cent below ship-
ments during the corresponding period of last year. Imports from Europe
were curtailed; for example, receipts of Great Britain piece goods were
off 40 pe- cent. Domestic textile mills are operating on a four-day week
schedule. (Cable from Commercial Attache, Charles H. Cunningham, Lima,
June 27.)

Philippine Islands

GenerAl conditions in the Philippine textile rmrkot remained un-
favorable from the standpoint of importers of American textiles and some
of the loading importers are said not to be very optimistic about the
immediate' future. In contrast dealers in Japanese textiles continue to
to a good business at a reported profit. At present American goods are
difficult to move. (Radiogram from Trade Comrissioner, E. D. Hester,
1Manila, J.:]- 17.)


PRODUCTION, ACREAGE .JD CROP CONDITION REPORTS

United States

Production ostimato

A United Sttecs cotton crop of 14,362,000 bales is indicated by
the August cotton report of the Department of Agriculture. Condition
is reported at 62.2 p-rcent of no-mal, as compared with 69.6 percent a
year ago and a 10-yeLr average of 67.2 percent. The indicated yiclf per
acre is 155,3 pounds, which is slightly above lust year and the 10-year
avorago. This indicated production of 14,362,000 bales compares with
a production of 14,826,0C0 ba.ls for the sJason 1929-30 and 14,478,000
bales for the season 1928-29.

During July, unusually hot, dry weather p-availod in most of the
bolt f-om Alabuma Qrest, amounting to scv..re drouth in many sections.
Curtailment of the crop from this cL.us wvcs particularly severe in
Arkansas .nd Louisincm whcre the forecasts crc cpproxinmatly 23 porcont
below lr.st yeor's production. Mississippi, Oklahomr, .lrbama, Tonnossoo,
and Missouri are other Stut:s effected by drouth with prospects below
1:.st y-r. Should the hot, dry wouth.r continue in thorc Statcs further
deterioration in crop prospects will result. On the oth.r hand, should
r: in corne, more thn cv .rage i.lprovoment is likely to result because of
the relativ-ly sm.ll number of weevils present. The foroc.st in Texas
is cpproximutely 550,OCO b:los abov, the short crop of 1929. The South
Atl-ntic St-:tos hrvo hrd rmple r'inf. 11 nd prosp-ctiva production is
1-.rgor th n the crop produced l:st y,:r, Boc-uso boll weevils rro
rcletively more nmn=rous in this section th--n elsnewhro, frequent rnins
hereafter r.r morg likely to be injurious than bn..ficial.





0-61


Imprts, t E-vro, Fr..rcc

"..o -.ccopj.;-ii. T.bl o:. i; .:.:rts t ,'L p,~n t .f -..vrc, Fr-r-:co
shows tl. .t w.1iil t., i..:: '. ts .t t..i- rt for t.:.. oelcve. n .i t ; s c:ied June
30, 1930 were 19.3 per c.,t *,'ov t. L coir ..r:on..11. period i:.st ..'. r ir-
ports 'i A, 'ric; w' re ,ni.1 11.3 per c .. L.VC y t.. prcviou. ,: ..r :.- in-
ports ,i 2 ptic" were 37.G ,-r cc:?t L..1ow l;.st c.-:r. H-{wcv r, E.;: pti n
imports duri., J'.u,. sowed. : vca r .r r.il:: i-.cro-.zc nd .ii.ports ) 1..iricrni
a c-x.siLder..blc decre.s fror,. JuL 1929. It is si'aific.-t to n-tc t.-.t
imports fir t... 3c .snn to Ju..c 30 fro.i 3Br.?il aid from "-.11 It.-'rs" vwere
759.4 -,ad 8-'0.3 cpr cc.it respectively .)1 t.. imports during t'.c s.';j period
a ycr- e:.rlicr. T..Cse, a Cvcr, c -stitutc ?. r-.t-.1r siill part of t:tO totol
imports :ul. since t.:c ir.:pnrts fromi- b t.. Er.,.zil :aC, ""1- ot.:crs" wcrie so
sn_.1. in 1948-29 sciso:n ar incrcsse or a, decrease of .. few thoasc:nd. b.-les
makes I. l.r;c ., )'rccutco.o incrccse or &ccr,-r.se.

Ta.bli 7 Fr-nce: Iimp-rts of cotton 't t.j.' port Jf :e:vrc,
Ju.a', %d .lujc'st 1 J'uJe 30, 1929-1930


____ urini Ji ___ Froi 1 JIl~c 30
: : Pcrccntt;e: : :Pcrccnt-ce
Country or origin : 1929 : 1930 :1930 is of:1923-29 :1929-30 :1i29-30 is e
: : 1929 : : :1928-29
1,000 : 1,000 : : 1,000 : 1,000
:b.-.lcs 1/:b:s 1/: Per co:-,t:b.-lcs 1/: b:los 1/: Per cent

United Strtcs .....: 20,150 : 10,668 : 52.9 : 767,57 : 854,670 : 111.3
Brazil............ : 42 208 : 495.2 1,711 12,651 : 739.4
Egypt.............. 277 1,416 : 511.2 7,831 : 4,8G4 : 62.4
French poscss:.ioG. : 5,276 : 3,851 : 73.0 : 19,602 : 3,605 : 176.5
India.............. : ,034 : 4,257 : 53.0 : 35,476 : -4,911 : 121.0
Turkey ............ 286 : 1,107 : 387.1 6,960 : 12,476 : 179.3
Others.............: 7.075 : 5,00-.- : 70.7 : 5,438 : 45,697 : 8-0.3
Tt : 41,1-10 : 26,511 : 64.4 : 84-1,592 :1007,894 : 119.3

1 Bales o:' -'.1-?8 po-nds net.
Spinnors' t2-i:n.-s in C.ntinecnt-.l 1-rope 1/

C:nti:le;.tel spin:icr de!im.nd for roaw cotton, ini spite of unfavora.ble
develo-mlo-nt of.r.ill s-lcs and activityy lis rctc-ined its recent improvement
throu,.h Ju.c c. d eoxrly Jul;/ in both te..c ce.-tr.--1 v.d western Europeo countries,
although It-.lr continued to b,'a v-':r:. reservedly. Tre bu:yirng of central o-nd
western hLaropc.-n spin-ners 'ha-s centered c..icfly in the neaLr r.ont.is, though in-
terest in ir.,re distc.-t slhircnts end deliveries )f new crap cotton ha.s been
developi:n1, th-ese tendencies applyin' both to acturlj purchases a.nd price fix-
ing. T.-. bettor tcione of spinner demn:.d for ra.w viaterial reflects low stocks in
spinners' hInds r-ld -rcwini, confidence in present price levels, but really
largc br-ia.n .r'-.s failed to develop. T'-.o tX.r-op" cotton trride c. i. f. buy'-
in. cyntin-es to be of ncoiur' size with business confined r~ostly to bparE.in
offers, anid gjot transactions have ro.'.iji-c4l small uir to hhr pres.ent..
1 Fro. A;ricult-ur.al Cor;n-.issioncr Stccre's report.


-C-

















Cotton: Production of lint In specified countries. 1909-10 to 1929-30 Continued


1191-0 1930-41 :19 1-88 I 1921e-5 : 195-24 :1936-85 : 195-86 : 19e6-27 192T-8 :I 9 i8-9 i 19w-s3

&Is&al/ t Balsa I/aleu/ J/ : Bl :: a lv I/ : .D alej/ &B I/ 1 3808/


11.41,000l,440,000: 7,9
II
S19.00025M I5,000: I
4- : 5,3.99:
-- : 3- :
Sv4,97 : 1,041: 1
1,4MA : 3,0731
40,415: 476,846 5
m91: 9,8:
"It M ,5:
1 ,4M: M,555:
5'/ ,t:/ 9.15 8:/
9M : 1,400:
4,865: 5,154:

: 1.05:
10,884: 6,840:
908: 1,818:


0: o:
390: 500:
6T:1/ 1,940:3/
960: m83:
196:t / 15:
98:/ B4:
4 ,cM : M16:
718TIB:/ 893:/


1,15B,000: 1,351,000: 9
10.51: 35,559:
/ 8.969:3/ 8,158:1/
1135:/ 179:/
55:3// 401//
1,664: 8,540:
84: 418:
15,586: 86,560: 1
3/ 904:3/ 1,889:3/
59,922: 81,998:
3/ S,418:3/ 8,408:
1,651: 2,849:

89: 84:
: 948:
1.688: 3,845:
4,553: ;387:

1,097: 3,084:


61,000t 58,000: 4

94.100 104,600: -


54,000 9,755,000:10,140,000:15,68B,000:16,104,000:17,979,0003ll,956,0 14,478,000h14,888,000 ( 1)


:
47,030:


86,109:
5,607:
04,0001
3,616:
16,189:
81,83S:
981:
3,118:

839:
5.387T:
1,181:
4897:


450:
1,874:9/
386:
178:
1,660:
510:


28,000: 1
10,145:
94:
199:

4,581:
460:
2,653:
3,456:
0,410:
6,132:
3,854:

67:
1,041:
1,768:
3,130:

1,918:
0,000:i/
1,400:
5,100:
50:


301,540:

11,5001:
19,8 95:
4,518:
535,000:
5,844:
85,994:
15,505:
1,046:
5,555:

859:
8,577:
964:
161:
818:

392:
1,448:4
914:
346:
2,07S:
5,555:4
831:

.591,000:
83.687:
1,196:
692:
1/ 77:5
6,964:
1,004:
14,088:

73,698:
6,004:
4,529:
a:
85:
1,504:
5,460:
5,538:

1,859:
30,000:
3,700:
55,500:
251:


4,085,000: 3,013,000 3,7528,000: 4,245
3,518,000: 1,883,000: 1,514,000: e,318
5,976: 4,784: 3,447: 2
88,168: 101,013: 83,172: 103
N 138,810:/ 15,134:3/ 11,814:t/ 12
-- : : 7,058: 6
5,696: 6,457: 3,648: 5
: ," :
40: 656: 2,795: 8
S5,6051 1,796: 1,590: 2



18,9M ,000:19 .817,000:15,886,000:16,982


,000:

,884:
,410:
,084:6
,995:
,005:

,796:
,812:



,000:1


I : I I I I
175,.30: 196,553: 800,476: 559,8 0: 179,88: 378,0001
47,3801 38,000: 38,0001 38,000: 33,000: 38,815:
]/ 11,300: 18,456: 15,913: 84,906: 11,0z :
318,140: 311,588: 804,508: 346,168: 346,615:1/ 810,0001
11,099:3/ 11,500:1/ 6,100:;/ 6,3402S/ 5,800:3/ 5,09T:
576,000: 605,154: 601,580: 51,3595: 505,049: 555,486:
16,8685 12,888: 11,481: 10,68: -- : :
56,846: 70,711: 135,844: 60,419: 101,467:/ 180,000:
/ 15,500:/ 16,630:/ a3,0355: a2,604: 0,419a: 1,929:
1,080: 1,900: 1,891: 1,373: 960: 1,5535:
5,329: 4,579: 4,39: 4,M81: 4,45:3./ 5,000:

803: 585: 580: 585: 190: 218:
11,155: 14,80: 14,609: 17,759: 18,571: 14,875:
1,530: 1,247: 8,068: 8,509: 3,457: 5,000:
100: 480: 655: 484: 887: 453:
314: 1,154: 1,108: 3,599: 8,555: 3,078:

793: 8,587: 5,585: 7,648: 4,086: 6,164:
1 1,486: ,943: 6,549: 4,718: 5,9I0 -- :
1,11: 3,7: 6,14: 6,743: 5,4: -- :
375: 404: 3,239: 8,515: 8,306: 1,845:
1,199: 1,845: 1,605: ,689: 8,306: 4,843:
S 389: 7,468: 6,065: 1,755: 3,920: :
4,612: 10,972: 12,683: 3,044: 4,059: 4,704:
-- : 3,740: 8,767: ,.767: 4.880: -- :
1,.553000: 1,507,000: 1,650,000: 1,586,000: 1,61,0001 1,673,000:
58,821: 40,665 106,460: 131,00: 110,573: 141,747:
1,750: 2,505: 2,537: 2,767: 35.B8: 7,054:
1,384: 2,767: 1,845: 2,767: 1,384: 1,45:
V 8:37:/ 1,250: --- :/ 84:3/ 84:q/ 196:
15,833: 13,836: 16,142: 32,539: 27,557: -- :
1,674:,/ 1,883:4/ 1,712:/ 1,031t/ 544:P/ 600:
21,.36: 32,750: 40,091: e,.988: 17,498: 38,458:
-- : 5,067: 2,758: 3,776: 8,012: 1,998:
107,619: 164,046: 151,544: 110,251: 116,000: 164,000:
9,568: 15,786: 18,179: 30,318: 18,469: 82,931:
3,577: 5,538: 6,459: 4 5: 2,556: 3,740:
1,179: 4,010: 5,1601 461: 72: 300:
397: 409: 414: 80: 44: :
5,955: 2,496: 2,230: 11,952: 14,732: 5,650:
7,300: 14,172: 17,055: 8,571: 9,816: 10,230:
4,598: 7,388: 5,677: 7,661: --- : -- :

1,680: 2,557: 2,556: 3,598: 1,766: 1,796:
57,000: 78,400: 105,172: 97,000: 179,418: -- :
8,300: 9,685: 13,481: 7,760: 10,.00: 4,174:
196,400: 453,881: 781,757: 773,916: 993,915: 1,157,000:
837: 2,092: 2,125: 2,929: 1,500: 4,287:
:4 59,171:4/ 83,632:4/ 84,610: 75,007: 120,503:
4,320,000: 5,095,000: 5,201,000: 4,205,000: 4,990,000: 4,865,000:
1,993,000: 2,178,000: 3,102,000: 1,742,000: 1,875,000: 1,844,000:
2,316: 2,985: 1,561: 1,1: 1,100: -- :
111,542: 122,562: 183,214: 142,694: 133,000: 150,000:
/ 9,06:/ 7,746:/ 5,667:V 5,285:/ 4,536:3/ 2,988:
7,321: 6,481: 5,469: 4,388: 5,500: 4,261:
3,068: 4,336: 4,624: 2,747: 2,8z5: --

10,042: 12,279: 5,692: 4,431: 8,591: 8,.4Q:
1,828:4/ 3,131: 3,821: 8,348: 8,582: -- :



9,707,000832,622,000:15,79,000 186,658,000I 2,125,000: 4,856 ,p0:


05.000











545

4,400



8,000







1,725,000
137,359
8,000




55,09

100,413
38,673




/ 14,000




7,000
1,351,000
6,69 I

4,40,000 I


138,000




5,0-
-- I
50
-
-







-


4,00

-





--
-


I1,00,000: 100,000loo :15.400,000:19,500,000:19,700,000: 84800,000:7 ,900,000:E8,400,000:4,000 .o00:6.100,000:36,00,000W

/ BIl.a of 478 pounds net. I/ Inoludea'Lagna District and Lower California only. 3/ rom an unofficial source. 3/ tporta.
a/ ligarea are from the Chinee eoonole Bulletin quoting the Chinese Mill Oraer' aaioeiation. The figures represent the
rp in tohe mot important provinees where the eooauoreial crop I grown. / Annae and OCabodia only. / Annam, Cibodla
and Coehtnehine. 8/ Annem, Cocbtnchlne and Laos.


1 5)
( 4)
( 5)
( 6)
1 7)
( 8)
( 9)
(10)
(11)
(18)

(15)
(14)
(15)
(16)
(17)

(18)
(19)
(i0)
(81)

(14)
(85)
(26)
(37)
(48)
(39)
(50)
(51)
(32)
(53)
(84)
(55)
(36)
(37)
(s8)
(39)
(40)
(41)
(42)

(45)
(44)
(45)
(46)
(47)
(4I)
(49)
(50)
(51)

(53)
(54)
(55)

(58)
157)






C-61 13 -

Continental Europe j/

Mid-July has br.ou-ht pract ically no c.:.nrie in the uns tisfactory con-
ditions that exist in the cotton textile indrutry in :ost parts of Continental
Europe. .11ill consur.ption of r:iw cotton rc .ins very much restricted, taking
the Continent .s a hole, with the tendency still continuing slowly downward,
and orders apparently are still low.

The voluio of new bus i!ess lookedd by spinners and wenvers in recent
weeks has continued mucli restricted in both Centrrl Europe and Italy, rind
the western '"uropoen c.-untries also report a materially reduced flow of new
bookings, though unfilled orJders on h: nd rermin quite satisfactory in France,
where cloth mills have been able to mnintnin relatively better salis than
spinning establislhmonts. Textile pl.-ints in the Danube-Balkan St tes continue
to do good business.

Activity in cotton spinning and weaving establishments has shown a
further decline in recent Weocl:s, considering the Continent as a whole, as a
result of the slov'- but steady reduction in orders booked by mills. The
drop in activity has been relatively greater in ContrRl Europe thnn elsewhere,
but It.ly has also reduced working hours, -nd a slight decline in occupation
is reported froni France.

Germany

Unfavorable conditions still prevailed in the Germcn cotton textile
industry as of the end of July. Spinning mills have had slightly better
sales in recent wc:}ks following reductions in prices, but this now busi-
ness is not large. ',.or.viig ost.blishnlnts have experienced r, further
decline in the amount of now orders placed, though sonm spotted improve-
mont of business in light surn .r goods has occurred.

As a result of th: continuation of th.osc unfavorable conditions, the
central organization of Gorm.'n cotton spinners has racormmrnded a uniform
reduction of spinning activity to *, ievel of tw:o thirds of single shift
capacity ( 9-hour di.y ) offectivo August 1. As pr2sont occupation of
Gcerr.n mills on th hole appears to bc :.round 70 per cent of single shift
capacity on the basis of a 9-hour d,-y, the avOrr.go roductio:- would not be
particularly signific:.nt. On .-n 8-hour d.y bL.sis, the recomrendation
m ns a reduction to lyv.l uquiv'l;nt to 75 pr cent of single shift
ccapcity, '"ith pr.sont activity of the industry figuring at about EO pr
cent. It is thought possiolo thLt some spinning mills will follow: ths o
rccormnend.tions in vic\: of present conditions. G-rma n weaving establish-
monts have also curtailed activity slightly in recent wo-:ks.

Spinner buying of r.: cotton in Germ:.ny, ".s in most other parts
of the Continent, picked up during June -"nd most of July. It continues
to cppc- r th t a good drn-nd would spring up in th',- event gro-ter firm-
ncss in ra. mn:toriol should develop. Among the rcc:nt dev.lopmonts in
the cotton industry in GCs-e. ny is :. tendency towva.rd rnr.lgr:ti tion which
h-s become appvrrent in rjcont months. .L nurmbr of consolidations nd
ruorg niz::tions haveo occurred, of -hich 't lur-st one hl.s bcon rol -tivoly
import-.nt. The difficult conditions fCc-d by the industry for mrny
months p'.st rro doubtless r-.sponsible for this tendency.
jI Based on report d ted July 17, 1930 from Agricultural Commissioner
L. V. StecrOe t B3rlin.







UNITED STATES DEPARTICETT OF AGRICULTURE
Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Washin ton

C-61 WORLD COTTON PROSPECTS August 21, 1930



SUJ :. L'. Y

Cotton prices both in America and abroad mov.d irregularly during

July and early August though the trend was somewh-at downward. From July

1 to August 9 there was a net decline of about three-fourth cent in spot

prices of American middling seven-eighth inch and about the same in futures.

Indian cotton declined somewhat more than American and Egyptian, both

Sakellaridis and uppers, declined less than American.

The carryover of American cotton in the United States on July 31, 1930

of 4.3 million bales is 2.2 million bales larger than in 1929, 1.9 million

bales larger than on July 31, 1928, and is the largest since 1921. An un-

official estimate gives the carryover of American cotton outside of the

United States as 593,000 bales below last year and 946,000 bales below 1928.

The indicated World supply of American cotton for tne season 1930-31 of

20.4 million bales while above the supply for the two previous seasons is

3.1 and 0.3 million bales below the 1926-27 and thb 1927-28 seasons.

The world visible supply continued to decrease at a slow rate with

the decrease from June 27 to August 1 this ,car 103,027 bales less than

the decrease during this period last year. This leaves the total visible

supply as of August 1 at 5,229,606 bales as compared with 3,651,078 bales

in 1929 and is larger than any corresponding date since 1921. Of tris

total America~ cotton accounted for 2,916,606 bales or 55.7 per cent of

the total compared with 46.3 per cent American last year. Total exports

of American for the eleven mornts ended June 30 were 1,291,706 bales below











ACTUAL
PRICE
CENTS
PER
POUND


SPOT COTTON: COMPARATIVE PRICES AT LIVERPOOL. 1930

PREMIUM OR DISCOUNT FROM AMERICAN MIDDLING
CENTS
SActuol prices 1 PI
m Ponrs Obove or boeow American Mddlng POUND


26




24
UPPERS,GOO









20


AMERICAN MIDI


18 i




16





14 -OOMRA NO.I. FULL



% I'
12 *-------
me




10





8
3 10 17 24 31 7 14 21 28 7 14 21 28 4 II IB 25
JAN FEB. MAR. APR.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


9 16 23 30 6 13 20 27 41 11 25 I 8 15 22 29
MAY JUNE JULY AUG.
BUREAU OF AG&ICULTUMAL ECC HOW







C-61


Futures

Th, prices of future contracts for Am~nrion cotton wore l1so
irrogul.r during July :nd oerly Auust, r.ovir. up'. urd for C f.-:V d ys rnd
then turning in the opposite direction only to reverse the direction a
short time later. There was a nit decline, however, from July 1 to
August 9 of 0.68 to 0.75 cents per pound.

Now York October (new) contracts which on July 1 closed at 13.09.
cents p-r pound w.: r dor.n to 12.68 cents on July 14, up to 13.31 cents
on July 19, down Rgsin to 12.33 cents on July 31, up to 12.96 cents on
August 7 and on August 9 closed at 12.36 cents per pound or a net decline
of 0.73 cents. The NYow 0-leans October contracts moved similarly with a
net decline of 0.7-. cents. Other contract months were also irregular,
fluctuating very much the same as did Octorer with net declines of 0.68 to
0.7? cents in lie" York contracts and 0.69 to 0.74 cents in HIew Orleans.
The near month contracts tended to show slightly greater fluctuations.

The July contracts which wor. considerably stronger than other months
during April and r.:uy:, but which dropped to a more normal relationship dur-
ing June continued this normal relationship to the expiration of this con-
tract month the letter part of July.


STOCKS AND IOVEJ.IITS

World visible supply

The total visible supply of all growths of cotton on August 1,
according to the Cornmrcial and Financial Chronicle was 5,229,606 bales
cor.parod with 3,651,078 bales in 1920, 4,056,219 in 1928, and 4,739,933
in 1927. This is larger then any corresponding date since 1921. Of
this total visil1i supply 2,916,606 balos or 55.7 per cent wore American
whereas 46.3 per c..nt of the total in 1929 was American.

The visible suppl.- continues to decrease at a slow rate. The de-
crease in the total from June 27 to August 1 this year amounted to
721,616 bal-)s a3 conpoared with a decrease of 824,643 bales last year.
The docrcase in Amr rican during this period was 435,616 bales or 60.4
per cent of the total docreaso compared with 705,643 or 85.9 per cent of
the total dccro~.s last yc.r. This in-icatos that compared with lost year
the decline in t,-klngs of Arnriicn cotton is proportionally gr.at-,tr than
in other grovths.


-. 5 -










World '..cr --


exce- .tion t..o '...'. ,t St. t_ '..cu ,. e i .- ,. c-r L r o.- b: i.... 1' I-2 .
i.ost .if t. t..cr c.)u .tri -s v. i. r'-:.-'i t:. ir -c'..- oe c ..::i ..rr.b now-
ever, cs' .oci- 1i : r', ; ,. -v-r:- : ., .. 'iv :- ..r ....T ri.-, i be .1... i 0 O-10
to t.~c- c.v.v r- ;N t..: i :iv cor .-. ri ,- L .'. i.. 14..i-1- J. "... i-\ ...cC
bo tocu t. .c.. tz.:.
betw c t.... .iv.:"' ;-Lar v..r .... ..:.* t...... .' -t...... t to. t l ... ...:... i., i.....
rnou:n'teJ to 6.r '.ji In- '- : t
rjnou t'.i L to 6. '.iil''l3.- :.'..,..eruo- tr.c i.'i+ rc-- ar. '.cru .,e .1" t.: ,. U'.,it:,i
St::t s --;'.:t.. or o-.'. 5.4 rO i_ i .c're i.;i-. ar.:.r.T ~ bout .8
million :c. '.-'s *.:C .L.-K;. t>.i.. :. i.... -...- _i .1" i.. :-" .;_.. 1.3 r'ii LI.o.-: r.crcn .
Br "2il i c .e- o l ._ r.c ;.c .^ ..t .' r .il i .r c s bctw,:-i t.-..- ..CLri:,.t..
This le-vCs -buc t 5.3 ;tilLiot -.t ',c ; .ic: l '-- c -:.tt. rZd t.-rjou:..3;.t r. ,-rrc
mnribcr cl' t... c:;m.11 eL' c.jtliri..u. T..eo r, ..ll r co-.ri-s .io not o "- :.Z im-
port-it -.art i.- t..o ic e-.c ic :.cr-jo stl c too l ivej ;, Or c.v r:jc b -;i:.:.iing
1921-23.

T-.bic 15- C ttton:.: Ar -.j, c i.: .7 ...2cific! c.:-,u-tries --..'td csti;'-.-tcd
.7L-'"lr totbl .-.or-..:. 1?D,-10 to i.%1-14-, 1391-32 to
i'25-26, : ;.1. I ';36-27 to 1929-30


C u ::tr;.


Acrc c- ;c

United St.--Ucs........
Indir................
E~;'pt................
C:lin .. ......... ..
Brazil...............
Russic. (-1si':tic).....
i'exico...............
Chosen (I:crec )......
U o3 &clt ................
Peru.. ........... .
Anl. lo-0~ lpti 7.1 S.., .
Ar,g ctini............ .
Turkey i:- Asia .......


: av .'.r 0 : A-;,r,-'2

: to to
: 1ii3-14 : 1925-23
: 1,3J0 : 1,50'
: -.cr'sG : .cr
: 34,152: 37,016

: I, 3J: I 1,Y7'
: :- ,4i3
:*./ r-: 1, 475
S ,539: 741
: 263: 330
: 146. 40. 5
: : 43
:3/ 1.03: 213
44: 154
: 5: 156
:- 4.51: 5/ 39-4


:1923-27 :1927-2 :


1,C0'2 :
:-cres
47,017 :

," l
4,1 C2.
-r-c.

1, .320:
613:
529:

313:
.-' -I
774:


zcrcE
40,138
2-4,761 :
S1, 5 :
4,192 :
1,297
1,358
32.
303
533
315 :
239
210
223


192C-29 :1029-30
: _-'rclim-
..:. i.l.0
1 )3 : 1,000
T.cri s : ..ros
4<,311 : 45,?93
27,0.3 : 235,c92
1,805 : 1,912
4,2:5 :
1,234
2, 31 : 2,560
502 475
503 : -159
6F- : 684
284
284 : 368
256 : 332


Esti;n-.t c '.'-. rl. t:'be. :


: 62,500: 69, 00


: 81,010: 73,8" : 32,4C0 : 81,970


0.ffici-.l su cC:'c s ":'.i I: z ..r.:-.tic: ..tit:t, :.::1.ss ot.:CA'wiZ stj.tdi.
Dfat.. for rc-: .r as jiv-r. ot v... -t .i, f t.:.- T:.ble .-o for crops .:,-.rvcstcd
between -Aug. 1 r-. J i; 51 of t...: I.ll:i::. --.r. zis r.3plis tc "
Nortncrn 7-n. -ut .;r .. _is.?.o rces. For t.; J:-.it.-l St--tos prier to 1914 t.-e
fiu ros tc.-. to .ir vcbt .-.' :i 1i.-:it; S.pt. 1.
I/ FPra t -.,: -..i..s Zco:cnir 3u-..i~tin qucti.t. t.: C..i:,czo .i1l Owncrs
-ssoci-tio::. 1 "" t. -
As. t.-c crGo i:: t.. ,. L 2t in r-ortr,.t ?Povi.:ccn
whore t:h col;..ierci?. rl r, is grown. 2/ Avcr:. for 3 '-crs.
: / .i-rcr eg 1i14-15 to 1918-19. 4/ Se:s,;- 1910-11. 5/ A:,crr.;c 1924-25 nd. 1925-
S26.


- 25 -


C3Cllrli:?c; C. i:__







'i-


.season tnd 82.'4, .'0 l :e s .* b.r 1l': .-2'' i 0- .,,'C. t- ..; b.-lo -' 1 for 1.L27- :8
and 2',045, C'O b- -. ','lo:.; i 1- t ,r in :. ...... 1i'" -l ..


Ta-blc .-iL.r ic. n rotI tn: Sup:.y r.; e rr Yov.r 1in UTni t'i .r".tos
..d in .orld, i .:..-i.,0


Iti.I- : 1.: irL'6 : 1 j i s8 :: 1230




World ccrryovor, JuTLy' 31. : 3,1: ,5C2: 7,75: ,12": 4,473 6,072

Stoc i. L'.jitA St to. -
J. 1. 3/ 1,04: 3114: 3,66: 2,420: ,1O: 4,322
Productionr for ._'.sssn bcgi.n-:
ning Aug. : 1, 1C4: 1,97" ,.- 1l,47. 14,3 ,14, ".2
Supply or prospct-iv :
supply/ in linitd St tLcs : 17,c8: 21,3'1 : 1 ,'18: 16, 04: 16,"5 18,84
Stocks vbro.d Ju'y L31. 4/ _1,97: 2,Cb. 4, 13: 2,C.: 8,343: 1,750
Wor ld su-p ly or pro:32:t:ve :
slup- _____: 1 ,4E5: 23,4-': 20, "40C: 10, C: 19,301: 20,434
2 Runrniinr b l.s 3;:c(pt %.rd tLon ihich is i n Ur .3 of 4-"0 yjrAts not.
L/ Stocks in the,. Unite td Stt- :. s rort-d b, th-e urCoru cf th Census plus
stocks chrord :.i r*ort;d thlie :: York Cotonr Exch".nr..
3/ Front the BEur; u of' the- C--nu.
/ rro-m the ;:'7 YD-k*';: ,otton rx-ch' o .

Excnrts of Amnric rn cotto!.

Ejrortz du ri! .T uly r4 -C -c cor to thi: .i.I of tic 1n.; us wore
114.,083 br. cs bclo J u:.- l'22: nr.d J xprt.3 frc t h se so n 1:2C-30 cro 1,J52,879
b-.los b:.lo-- the .:-r,. p ,.-rird r r r ror.n Tbli 5 it mr.y be soen
thct exports to ir:c2 w7r o:- o 1 Ct yc r -nrd th-t exports to GCrrr-rry and
IW ly --hly et.: lly lo.vecr th'e.n y .r con-titut -. 1-rgr :rjnt- of
the tor-l thrn th:y cid y--r c-g, whicL no..ns th. d.:-'lins in czp.rts to those
two countries e.r': p roortinrll: 1.;s ti or. to tCh other countries. The great-
Ost dcclin-: vwr-s in the exoorts To -us't Britr.in.




-7



C-61 -.24 -

Cotton production an-i .'!.-.rk3tinL in HEiti !/

Cotto-n has prob-bl; been cultiv:.ted in H.iti for two hundred ycers,
cand r.ccordi-i. to s,.e _r...ut orities t.ei-e -.re fou-r species long Active to
the island. Throe cf these four principal specieJs c.r pcronnial. Instances
are knmwva w:hre these pcere.:niels, l'rich :.rce al..ost like trees, .-cve borne
cor,~lnercially: for v.s r:... n.s teni ;-O-s \litout rclpnting. Since the French
colonists left tneir estates wher.H H'iiti ainicd. its independence in 1804,
cotton h,.s bccon 'grown Cl.:i.st entirely as a semi-wild crop by pac.sants.

Cultivr.tion

Except to gbatr-.r the cotton c-,d cut t"e pie:.ts bachk, little attention
is given the Ile~:ts even -.t th: prese:.t time. A lrxe proportion of the
l n-d C.t presce-t plE-.ted i: c)ttion is not :and prjb!ably could not be irrigated,
but in r.*aly r,.ions irrixa:tion water ir be n-.d either froni p umpi:n wells,
artesian wolls, or -by pLuiping from rivers. The Service Technique states
that on the basis of its experinicnlts s-).ppleinont'xy irrig-tion is advisable.
Irrigation should be do..e once before flowering, once after flowering, uand
once w;hic the bolls arc na.lf rown.

Production .n.ii :.creare, *)rese,-'t rnd potential

Estiu-tes of both -oroduction and acreoae in Haiti are based principal-
ly upon exports. T"'e piodu tion figures are usu-clly the ser.ie as the export
figures since it is believed t..at te'-- two are alr:.ost identical, as little
cotton is utilized in H:.iti. The acreoge figures a.rc determined from estimat-
ed yields per acre.

The following Table gives thc e:;ti:t.ited. production for i nuz.iber of
Vyc.rs tooetlher with- tre r.creae an.d yi-ld for four recent years.

1/ Based Drii'arily cn 2 report by Consul Dc.nald P.. rcth located at Port wa
Prince, E.aiti prepared during Juno, 1930

Tarblkc 1 Haiti: Production, acreage, rcad ield of cotton, -average
1909-1913, annual 1921-22 to 1926-29

: : lYield of lint
Season Production i/ Acreage :
: : per a.cre
S Bales 2/ : Acrs Founds
Averagc 1909-1913 : 9.300
1921-22............ : 21.533
1922-23............ : 15.505
1923-24........... : 15.500
1924-25........... : 16.630
1925-2............ 23.035 73.250 : 150.3
1926-27............ : 22.604 : 74.997 : 144.1
1927-23............ : 20.419 : 130.000 : 75.1
128-29............ 21.929 :170.000 : 51.7

I/ Exports, w:lich arc believed to be almost identical witl- production.
2/ 478 p.;un.'s net.







C-61 26 -


ropa. is used for tying. :i-o;.':v ., :_t ? vL r-u Princ- on: of th. im.parta..nt
-xportors has a high densityy conpr-ss. r'hc, weight of th. b:.ls of this
exporter ;.rc about 550 pounds, n.asur; 55" x 22" x 26" ca-d cra tied with
stcjl tics.

Marketing

Luring the growing season the cotton farmers obtain advances
principally front merchants, usunll'r in the form of merchandise. T ure
are, however, a number of r.iddler.en end ginners who pay cash for cotton
when delivered. S(me ginner-s export the cotton direct to E -ope. S:-all
ginners usually resell to E ropecn representatives, who export to their
respective firms. In such c:.ses confirmed banker'.: credits a.-e opened and
drafts t-ith documents attached, are discounted in order to finance purchase s.
There are a few cotton exporters who enter the r.erk:et locally and purcahse
the cotton and sell under firm offers and accentances to E.:ropean import-
ers. T ese trc.nsacti.ns cre also against b-.nker's confirmed credits. A
very snr1l p.,rt of thu cotton leaves I,,iti unsold, tt-Et is, consigned to
firms abroad. T ere are nine private concerns or conpcnies in H;.iti which
export ran cotton, five of which are located ?t ?:-rt -u ?;-ince End four
at J:-cmel.

T'o following T. bls shows th.'t F "r.nc., G:-c t _-itain and G-'rmany
take most of the raw cotton :nd that G oo t B it-.in and I ,ma ny get
practically all of the cottons-ed cLke.

Table 17.-H.' .61: ,:..orts of rCa cotton Lnd cottonseed cakc,
_Octob>r 1, 1l28 to Octobur 1, 1929., by countries
Country Ra; cotton Cottonseed cake

: Belos / : Tons

France..........................: 12,268
United Kingdom ................: 5,686 6,265
Go-rmany........ .................: 2,845 1,584
United States...................; 56
Netherlacnds..................... 54 -
Cur cao .........................: --- 23
Total .................... 21,929 7,872

1/ 478 pounds not.








C-61 2-


tho sano period 1-st yoc.r though thu exports to Fr'.nco ;:wro .bov-o c. yorr

.-go. The exports :nd don.stic consumption of Indi: n cotton for the oloven

months onded Juno 30 t:,ro above Irst yor-r lo ving -. sm lo1r supply th.n

in oithur of thu t7o previous sr' sons .t this drto. Tot-l airports at

HTvro, Frrnce during th; first cloven months of the 1929-30 szc-son woro

19.3 per cent rbcve the previous sor.son, but iripcrts fron Egypt nore bo-

low rl st yovr.

Textile activity during Juno :nd July both in the United States

and abroad continued to reflect the low level of business. The con-

sumption of raw cotton in the United States during July of 378,835 bales

was 26,346 bales below June and lower than for any month since August

1924. Exports of piece goods and yarns from Great Britain during July,

however, were above June though still relatively low. The disturbed con-

ditions in China and India continue as an unfavorable factor in the

economic conditions in the cotton textile industry in these countries

and in Japan and Great Pritain. Production of raw cotton in the Urited

St tes for the season 1930-31 is estimated at 14,362,000 bales, 466,000

bales below last year and 116,000 bales below the 1928-29 production.

Soviet Russia reports its planted acreage to be 70 per cent

above last year though possible labor shortage is causing some alarm.

The acreage in Egypt for the season 1930-31 is up 13 per cent over last

year.







C-61 6 -


Table 3.-W'orld visible supply of cotton: Ak,-ric.n -nd oth;r growths
on -.ugust 1, 1i29, 1930 -tith comparisons



1929 1930
Location of stocks : :Prent: : Prc -nt-
:Tot:.l :.gc of : Total : ago of
__: : total : : total
: Running : : Hunning
:bal.s :e-'ccnt : tclLs : Por cent

Grar t Britain........................: 420,000 : 11.5 : 294,000 : 5.6
Contin.ntal.....................:. 411,COG : 11.2 : 407,000 : 7.8
Afloat for Euroc....................: 149,000 : 4.1 : 116,000 : 2.2
United. States:
Port stocks.........................: 515, 36 : 14.1 :1,538,383 29.4
Interior stocks.....................: 197,2 : 5.4 560,254 10.7
Exports today (Aug. 1)..............: -- -- 999 : .0

Total Aorican :1,'5,078 : 4.3 :2,916,606 : 55.7

zest Indian, ?razilian, ,tc.


Grcr.t Eritain..........................: 419,000 : 11.5: 527,000 : 10.1
Continental .................... ......: 79,000 : 2.2 124,000 : 2.4
Indirn float for Zu2ro.o..............: 123,000 : 3.4 :142,000 : 2.7
Zgyotian, Frazilian, .tc, afloet......: 120,000 : 3.5 : 86,000 : 1.7
Aljxandria, E;-ypt.....................: 215,000 : 5.9 : 476,000 : 9.1
Bombay, India ........................: 993,000 : 27.2 : 958,000 : 18.3

Total uAst Indis.n, ?razili-in, tc...:1,058,000 : 53.7 :2,313,000 : 44.3

Total visible supply .............. :3,651,078 : 100.0 :5,229,606 : 100.0
Coripilod from thj. Corrnrrclial e.nd F:nanciul Chronicle.

Carryover of aLm:rictn cotton

Th, c..rryovor of .icrican cotton in tl: United Stt.tcs on July 31, 1930
as reported b,- th`: ur;.au of th- C.nsus -:hich '-iount.d to 4,321,747 running
balos is th~ largest since 1-'21 and cor p'r..s ;ith 2,130,000 bcles last year,
2,426,000 bcles or July 31, 192b and 3, -.3,0CC bcless in 1927. This carryovor
togth.r w-ith th jstii.It.,d production indic: tos c prosp:.ctivo sup'y in
the Unitol StL ts for th.: s,.:son 19C0-1 cf 18,084,000 b,-los corpuroad ith
a supply of 16,958,000 bl-s lEst y:ur, 1' ,90C4,000 bnl.. s in 1928-29,
16,618,000 b:ul.s in 1927-26 'nd 21,'91,000 bal-s in 1926-27.

The c::rryov :r of -..Lirican cotton outside :,f th* United St,.tos on
July 31 as ostin,,tjd by tn: I!c:; York C tton Zxch-angc -:as 1,750,C00 balos
or 593,000 b-lls tb lo- lIst yu r, 9416,000 bll-s b.lo-: 1928 :.n. 2,382,000
bel s below the 1927 cr.r:'ov..r. Th-,s; c rryovjr fiuur,'s for American cotton
outside thu United Statzs r.:cJr uscd to ostimr.t. th*: tot-l World supply
(soo Tabl'j 4). 'Th2 indic-.t d -.orld supply of Amiricr.h cotton for tho season
1930-31 of 20,454,0C0 bl.;s .-il: 1,133,000 brlos -bovo tho supply Irst


- _..







- 11 -


Table 9.C..ton clctnj: A-.oa;o wek:ly prolictic:., sales, shi.mi-:t, also
stocks a..- ..11.iloi orJors at .*i o .~o0ath, 19:7/-o6 to l1,9-3u


: ::*: :
of S. -i- 0 Jt3C.;s U:lillc.d C :.no
Yeair ,;: oc- Glas ...dp- C.0aion
sl ..Year c- : s :.d orders in
and :tioi, er i:r to ..:ts end of iln :rfilld.
zonth : uoe: v;eo: to :oth : st ci;s ccrs
ti. .- :-o uc*
: : : : tion :c:


1927-28:
Oct. ./:
iov...
DecOV....

Jan.. *
Fob....:
iJar... *
Apr...*
Iy. .. .
Juno.. .:
July..*:
1928-29:
Aug.... :

Oct... *
Nov. .:
Doc....:
Jan...
Fob... :
Liar...
Apr....:
May....

July...:


Sopt...:
Oct....:
.ov....
Doe...:
Jan....:
Feb....
Mar...
Apr....
May....
Juno...:
July...:


1,(.00
vards :


82,934:
80,405:
74,405:
74,417:
75,081:
71,605:
71,501:
69,665:
71,951:
55,45:5

60,494:
63,42


C-'
] ,O C :
-37
:,. ::90
*L5, 63
74,916:

34,082:
69,971:
83,779:
;5, ?69

4.6,237:

60,162:
96,708:


71,2;5: 122,b':. 6
68,36-: 75,J3:
69,802 56,297:
68,561: 63,-16:
73,216: 65,177:
74,490: 9,523:
70,970: 50,630:
06,271-: 55,67
71,402: 57,061:
9,6C10: 6:,722:

61,500: -L2,27:
71,653: '2,'71:
70,766:.55 3,J.-9:
69,02J: r.b,.'1::
60,931: 75 ,7T.
61.,657: 5' ,.C,7:
66,712: 30 ,9L:,
65,351 7:,.2:
U- ,CII: 55, ('6:
53,150: .G,.. 5:
G9,G35: 32,-7:
1.-1,-1-2: -5,037;:


Per
: _t :



6S .0:
60.3:
100.7:
65.2:
5.-
97.7:
117.2:
77.2:
92.8:
84.5:

112.7:
152.6:
17t.7 .
109.7:
0.7:
92.5:
116.:
120..:
71. '3:
31.*3:

112.1:

101 7:
121. : *3
" '-






v. :


6--.6:
..0 3:
12-,.3:



91. *:I
111.:


31.5:
10.. 3:


1.,0 o




7j:,53:
71,524:
65,31l :
53,727:
71,351:
67,515:
67,543:
6 1 ,59- :
60,.849:
67,566:
5-,385:

61,615:
6:;,528:
76,850:
69,590:
69,024:
69,071:






6",195:

5,,20:
71,Ju7:

L,,275:
5.:,57:
53.,275:
33, .L'- :
6O, 2, J:


5_,011:
,53:

*- 332:
,172:
'xz 513 Ifc


P.ur : l,00 :



80.4:227,011:
,u.' :292,5 :
f5.2:L'36,501:
5'..7: 37,23:
35.0:332,142:
94.3: 402,594:
94.5:41,427 :
93.-'-: 4-1i ,5uS:
9J.9:458,98-:
95.1:463,270:

107.1:441, 667
107.6:9317,215:
107.9:392,742:
1'01.8:353,63.-:
ob.9:391,79-43
100.7: 3:,15:
105.5 :72,950:
10 '.3: 34J,311:
97.G:':52 1l:
9b.5: 557,3.--0
CJ.l: 01,260:
107.0 : 202 ,920:

106.1 ';35-1, 03C'

93.C : 62,65" :
C:.l: ..11,-2.:
C7.9: 951,013:
1C2.5: 22,: 19:
102.9:_ -5,125:
1C.1.6:1-1-0,5D:
1 C.5: 5 733:
07.9: .50,L,1:

103C.5: 55,529:


.1-32,4 17:
340,221:
:90,726:
213,S93:
284,817:
297,099:
362,044:
305,645:
302,328:
272,227:

28800,93.:
393,005:
492,556:
519,770:
-46o,6 61:
.140,55:
472,176:
50 ,C76:
4-30,2 9:

55..,7-1 : 7
S582,51:

365 ,5: :


353,035:
:-32,952:

:-1::2,2 32:
211,CIS:
31,.71:
"i60, 9:9
3' 7, 63:
557,32 :
271,715:
219,C' ,I)
22A,:.9;:


Ro'orts 3o' ~Co Association: of Cotton T. rile
1/ No co:.;arablc iata -:rioc to Octcjo3r ..2 7.


.ar&::ants of I.cu York.


Pur
c-j t




13.8
15.0
9.1
4.1

3.9
5.5
4.0
.9


4.7
5.5
5.4
l.b
1.5
.8
.7
*-.2
7..

*1-.3
2.2


4.6
1.9



5.2
5.1
12.0
6.9

1.7
1.0
.9
1.3
3.5
2.3


; r
C at

z-t


- 21.3
13.7
- 17.8
- 9.3
4.3
21.9
- 15.6
- 1.1
- 10.0

6.1
37.7
23.8
5.5
- 9.8
- 6.0
7.2
6.9
- 14.u
- 11.1
- 6.2
2.C

- 3.7
23.6
- 9.9
- 13.5
25.9
- 9.2
- 7.0
7.4
- 7.C
-o 21-.0
- 19.4
1.6


C-61
















tIal 14.,cotton: Production of lint in specified countries, 1909-10 to 1929-40


Country


1 United States


1909-10 1910-11 191-12 1912 1913-14 1914-15 1915-16 1916- 917-
* 1909-10 1910-11 1 1911-12 1912-13 1 1911-14 1914-15 1915-16 1916-17 1917-16 19i6l1


SBalen ]/ 1saI i/ ame I/ ale. 1/ Bales 1/ Bales I/ a Bales I/ ma I / ala / aj ;/
S..I I I,0 0 l0
....... 100500:,,1609,000:15,693001. 70,0014,15600 169,519 0 1,450 1e8.00W e


2 Mexico .............
3 venesuela ..........
4 Colombia ...........
5 Peru ..............


127.9411


20.-000


I
200,455,

88,9--
88,000,


iMmur ........... -- --- I
7 irasil ........... 324,2881 356,717,
8 Paraguay .......*.... --- I --
9 Argentina .......... 1,9283 2,099,
10 Haiti ....... ...... / 7,37914/ 9,681,
11 Porto Bloo .........s 1,319. -- s
12 aritish West Indies 4,269, 6,1241
I 2
13 Tugpalavla ........., --- a --
S14 ureooe .............I -- -
15 Bulgaria ........... 783s 1,1371
16 NMlta ............. 379, 4112
27 spain ............... --- ---

18 Algeria ........... 517, -
19 ahomey ............ 4/ 5584/ 71814/
20 Ivory Coast 4/...... -- ---
21 french Guinea ...... --- --
22 Senegal ............: --- -
23 French sudan ....... --- -
24 Upper Volta ........ --- ---
25 Niger Territory .... --- --
26 Jgypt .............. 1,036,000, 1,555,000: 1,
2S Anglo-Bgyptian dudan3/ 12,s552:/ 17,573-5
28 Italian Somaliland I 761,4/ 194,4
29 kritrea ............4/ 860,j/ 1,316W/
50 Gold Coast ......... / 166,J/ 83,3
51 belgian uongo ...... -
32 Kea ............. 335, 4188
33 Nigeria ............ 10,529, 5.184,
34 Angola ............i4/ 665W/ 569V/
3 Uganda ............ 11.588, 17,456s
36 anganyika ..........4/ 2,866,4/ 10,240s/
37 Isasaland ........... 2,845, 4,921,
38 lhodesia, southern --- -
89 northern / 71,/ 5:4
40 Mosambique ......... 4/ 91,4/ 21,i/
41 Union of a. Africa 1 651 291
42 0rench Togo ........ 2,12 242 2389,
2 3
43 Uyprus ........*..... '1,031, 1,551,
44 turkey, Asiatic ...., 126,536s 102.116,
45 Syria and Lebanon ..s --- --
46 asmia, Asiatic ...., -- --


47
48
49
so
51
52
53
B4


56
57


I I
160,281: 240,033,
--- 5 *-a 3
3 .--- I
96,000, 112,000s
---
360,2201 417,9711
-- I I
1,997t 3,099,
8,7501 9,048s
-- I -- a
5,159, 5,279,
I
-a- -a- 3
12,6141 ---
917, 646s
3921 5128
--- -- I
I
-- 1,8286
569s4/ 848,14/
-- 84
a-- -/ 3 /


5-- I s




--- s --,4148
530,000, 1,554,000, 1,
12,552/ 11,715s3/
4854/ 556s/
1,5751 5,500W/
83,5/ 101,3/
-- s -- s
7532 8537
5,607, 9,849w
402,4/ 149V/
22,004, 23,414s
4,973s4/ 13,807s
4,9395 3.864,
--- I -- I
335, 251,
139k4/ 6535L/
69, 68,
2,557,4/ 2,177,
I 9
2,169, 2,290,

-- 2 --- s
-- s --- s


205,395s --
--'- | "-- s
-- I 5.297.
111,755, 128,834,
I -- I
476,823, 464,813I
-- 2 I
2,4541 3,653,
8,93614/ 5,749.
-- i4/ 5691,
5,032, 4,876,
3 2
I |--
-- 15.265,
728T 562,
473g 411,
--- s -- 2
t I
1,766, 172n
624A4/ 316,
3395 437,
1671 --
-- 2 --- 2
--- |


588,000: 1,337,000,
8.368.3/ 20,0o84
554W4/ 469
257.4/ 229,j
83i/ s83
-- .4/ 13,4
418, 251s
12,3413 6,276,
764,/ 297
27.226, 21,948g
I -- a
6,444s 6,460s
-- 2 --- 2
3355, 335,
l,0358 6135
150, 452o
-- 1,176,
I 3
2,896, 2,849
144,600, --
-- 1,270,000
--- s 1,270,000,


Iraq ............... s -- I I -- s -- 3
Persia ............ --- I -- 118.200 142,300, 148,500s 145,400,
India ............., 3,998,000w 3,254,000, 2,730,000, 3,702,000, 4,239,000. 4,359,000,
China / ........... -- I- -- --- I
Japan .............. 5,630, 4,158, 4,215, 5,057, 4,462, 4,737,
Chosen (Korea) ...... 14,828, 13,633s 18,405. 25,055s 30,043. 31,156,
renah Indo Uhina ..4/ 9.451I,4 10,217|4/ 14,459,4/ 25.766,/ 11,790s 14,079,
Duteh uast Indiem 4 -- -- -- --- I -- -
lB .............. 2,701,4/ 2,4854/ 3,021i 3.699/ 6,358, 6,69614

Atitralia .......... 90, 130, 105. 24: 14, 86
sew Hebrides ....... / 3S8/ 303, -- 1,3014/ 1,673W/ 2,4312

Ustlimted world i
total, excluding i
China o .......... G ,16,900,000 18400,000s21,900,000,21.100,000,22,200,000 28,280,000.

atlimated world


total, including
China ...** ........


I
S** I


I
--- 3


SI 5
95,391, 84, 864 6,S698g .Mo7::
-- a 3 -p
5.561, 6.2768 5.7155, ,5 !
113,460, 127,309s 125.104, MUMSi'
-- A a 2 s
338,660s 336,6863 4152117| i,4I!
92, 92, 175s mOi
4,0661 3,178,s 1,169. o" i :
4/ 6,680, 7,1491 6,005% 9:3
V 653LW/ 7384W/ 579s MIS
3,007, 2,642. 3,8217* 4,2M9
I I 1
-- -- :::
8,595 ^ .5896s 6,- 8 -a0D6B
994, 893,s 761| s5
384,s 31, 269 23i
-- s -- U --- S -




/ ": !
4/ 651t4/ 126: 0S64| m2a



-- t -- -- d/..".. :,,. j

--- s --- S --- ii
--. : -- -- t .a I

989,000, 1,048,000s 1,504.000, SB(000
/ 13.556, 19,456, 9.6a2, 106M
S 458s/ 262W/ 41t2i
S 83, -- W/ 196 -.
S 83/ 8351/ 8S,3/
I 52,4/ 105l, o, a
167, 167, 167, I
16,904, 9,874, 5.105 2 ..t
/ 692W4/ 506t1/ &66l -m
16.274S 23,310, 23,006 $8511,
-- -- I .
7,3978 6,822s 5.128,

251, 16Ts Mr .
k 1 .337 / 2.59864/ 2.430W' a
476 477t8 00 :
1.776 2,057s 719, ,

1.686 1295 1,29 .
T -

1,512,0003 1,99.000, 634.000a 11,01

139.100l 99,200, 85,00 ms *.
3,128,000, 3,759,000s 5,395,000. D,804
-- 1.535,000, 2.092.000s ,, .0
,4,40 4,360 4.1sB i
39.806, 40.402 60,I86e. : .....
6.434, 9,991s4/ 7.~ 3sI So.








7,800,001,66,000& 16I0017.6080i0o tI8U
S*e ,

2 1: 1:!


2 2
-- --- ,l9 .900,000,19.Y10G,05.U0l~60,


Division of Statistlcal and Historical sesearoh. uffiolal sources ad international Institute of Agrioulture sept a oat
stated. mta me for crope harvested between august 1 aMd July 1 of the following year. oar the united atatema prLt U
the figure apply to the year beginning mnptember 1. In order to innluda figure for the smaller oountries, aamt av1i
baleI were used.


--- I


---------


CI-


-- I







- 27 -


i. c,.ll' noous ;n73

Government reports for ste-son 1'LC-31


Th, following Tabl; riv.s th.c d..tos Lnd subject of future; rgov';rn-
mont reports on cotton for thli 1:'3C-31 s^; son -vhic! will be of inter -st
to r.: l. 'h :.cl' '*orts .: ti.2 .. u of' thl.; C nsu1 nd the
Doportcnton oi Agricultlur.

Table 18.-Coverinment cot'or r-ports: Latcs tnd subject, for


thu s:-:..on


1CO0-31


DAtc Day

1930 :


Sub J c t


: T-port mado
S up to


Aug. 23:
Sept. 8:

Sept. 23:
Oct. 8:

Oct. 25:
Oct. 31:

Nov. 8:
Nov. 21:
Nov. 28:
Doc. 8:

Doc. 20:

1931
Jan. 2:
Jan. 23:
Feb. 13:
M.r. 20:
Apr. 17:


Sr.turd- y
i:ond-.y

Tu sdr y
'1Vcdnesdc.y

S..turd; .
Friday

Sr. turd-y
Frid-y
Frid-ry
1.-londr y

Sa turd-y


Friday
Frid- y
Fri d ay
Frid' y
Friday


Innings
Cinninr-s, condition :nd probable
production -*r.d rcr..:go Eb.nidonr:d
Cinni ngs
Innings, condition id probr.ble
production
innings
Grrcd r nd st-.ple of the cotton
ginned
Cinrings nd prob,'l; production
Ci rui ings
rr-d: :.nd st.pl: of !otton ginned
Ginnii.-s, prob- blh prodi'ctin rnd
rc r.. I b ndo.n.d
Innings


Grr.de -nd st-l c of cotton ginned
Ginn i gs
Grd' -nd st pl2 of cotton rinncd
C innings
Cr.od3 r.nd st'pl, of cotton ginned


Aug.

3;pt.
S.-pt.

Oct.
Oct.

Oct.
IIov.
Nov.
I ov.

Doc.
Dec.


15

1
15

-1
17

1
1
13
1

1
13


: Dc. 1
SJr.. 16
J n. 16
:Fin.l Report
:Final RPport
:for total crop


Fodor:.1 F-rn Bo rd nd the Arniric. n Cott.on Coc -r-.tivo Associ-tion

In r- communication to Repr-sont' tiv Pruch'~nrn of Ta.x .s on July 23, CIrl
Willicms strtcd th-t the :pproximr tcly 1,250,00C br.l1.s of cotton -Thich the Cotton
Stabilization Corporation tbckd by th, Fcd,.r:1 F- rm ,-ord is t-king over from
the cooperrtives will not be disposed of in ny m"nn-r th-it would adversely
influence prices of ths nwcv crop. (D-il:.- I;ws Record)

On July 21st Mr. lilli-mns issued the follow .;ng st. ter.ont: "My attention
has boon c-llod to st-.tonmots -.pp3 ring in s-uthern newspapers rnd cotton
trade journ:..ls to the effect thrt t.h cotton coopor"tives will be r.blo to "d-
vance not more th.n six cents -. pound to th-ir r,;mb-rs this frll. The state-
ments doubtless harvo bc-n innocently r.-.dj, but if :.llor:od to st-nd their off3 t
would be to discouraged p-rticip..ti.n by cotton f'rrm.rs in the cooperative
movement.


I I-






8 -
-8-

Table 5.- United States: Exports of domestic cotton, excluding linters,
July and 12 months ended July, 1929 and 1930


July


Exported to


United Kingdom......:
France. ..............:
Italy ............... :
Germany............. :
Other Europe........:
Japan ............... :
All other ...........:
Total............ :


1929


Running
bales :

21,00 :
9,421
29,555
43,569
82,648
31,617
19,61-7
237.507


1930
:*


: 12 months ended July 31


1929 : 1930
:Percent-: : Percent-
Total : age of : Total : age nf


: : total : : total
Running : RUnning : Running :
bales : bales : Per cent: bales : Per fent

20,667:1,830,846: 22.8 :1,256,042: 18.8
13,148: 774,574: 9.6 :811,520: 12.1
12,893: 716,802: 8.9 : 652,430: 9.8
49, 25:1,796,798: 22.3 :1,687,366: 25.2
49, 97 :1,092,588: 13.6 :. o32,688: 12.5
15,725:1,309,183: 16.3 :1,020,016: 15.2
14,800: 522,797: u.5 : 430,647: 6.4
176,435:8,043,588: 100.0 :6,690,709: 100.0


Compiled from reports of the Buroau of the Consus. Cotton in running bales,
counting round bales as half bales.

Supply and distribution of Indian cotton

Consumption in India during the eleven months ended June 30 was greater
than in any cf the previous three years. This, together with large exports,
which have been practically up to last ye:r's high level, has lowered the supply
of 7,727,000 bnles which was larger than any of the previous three years, to
the extent that on June 30 the stocks remaining in India amounted to 1,941,000
bales. This is less than in either of the two previous years and only 442,000
bales above the 1926-27 fiCure.

Table 6.- India: Supply anc distribution of domestic cotton from
August 1 to June 30, 1926-27 to 1929-30


.Itemn
Iton: 1926-27

: 1,000
:bales 1/ :


August 1 June 30
1927-28 : 1928-29 :
1,000 : 1,000 :
bales i/: bales 1/:


1929-30
1,000
bales 1/


Car.'yover in India Aug. 1...............: 1,047 : 1,150 : 1,816 : 1,877
Crop ................................... : 5,128 : 5,632 : 5,858 :Z/ 5,850
Total supply............................: 6,175 6 782 7,674 7,727
Consumption by India Aug. 1 to June 30..: 2,019 : 1,720 : 1,714 : 2,197
Exports from India Aug. 1 to June 30....: 2,657 : 2,840 : 3,598 : 3,589
Total distribution.....................: 4,676 : 4,560 : 5,312 : 5,786
Stocks in India June 30.................: 1499 : 2,222 : 2,362 : 1,941
From the New York Cotton Exchange Service Weekly Trade Report.
I/ Bales of about 400 pounds each.
2/ Preliminary.


0-61


E


m m f


--











Prices

Spots

The prices of American middling 7/8 inch cotton moved irregularly
during July and early August thou.!h the trend was sonewhr-t dorwnwrd. The
average of the ton mu-kets on July 1 w:s 12..C cents p.r pound c.n' on
July 31 was down to 11.73 cents per pound which was the lowest price of
the 1929-30 season .nd was 7.C7 cents belov the lhihest price of the
season made on -ugust 1, 1290. The. fact thrt the high 'ud low prices for
the 1929-30 s.-ason camc. or th.; first :nd lost dL.ys rJspectively, makes
clear the downward trend of cotton prices that existed throughout the
season. F.om Jly 31 to Au-ust 7 there was an r.dv.nco of u little over
1/2 cent per pound, but on .ugust 8 the p -ice brok,. to 11.73 ccnts which
is lower than at any time since bL:ccnmb .h. 1926. Th: lo-: for the 1926-27
season was on D.ceubcr 3 r:h.n th.; t.n ni--'kets avraged 11.40 cents per
pound. Prices of ',:orican cotton at othur spat mirk.ts during July and
early August moved about the son. Ls did the avorage of the ton markets.

The spot prices in Liverpool during Jlly :nd ca..rly :'.uust for
Ak-oric:.n :..nd SEyption, both S..k.llaridis LnLd U-).rs hv.o bo-n irregular
vith .-.orican and ,:-ypti:n Uppers dropping to lor~'r levAls nd E ypti.n
S. 'ollaridis workinC to high r luvols ;:'hn cor.- ring the July 3 quotation
to thoso on August 8. (,oj acco::prnying figuto Oomra IJc. 1 declined rAthor
steadily to August 1, but from "':-ust 1 to Au:..t 8 grinod bout 4 cents per
pound. The price relationship of thcse thrje important foreign giroths with
Am;i'icon cotton in th.; Liv_.-rpool n, rk.ot in y be seon in th.: ccoimp ying figisCo
by noting thL moverimnt of the brlokn lin.s "points above or below American
Middling". Although th. tr-.:d of this lino for 00oma No. 1 (Indicn cotton)
from the l st of -'pril until th.. l.-st of June .::s slightly up;:ord, m.-;cn-
ing thr t the Indir.n p-ic :s '.7. r':l tively higher than meric:-n it mry be
soon that since the last of Jun, thl tr-nd of the line h. s b:.on in the
opposite direction. T-,,. rcl: tively ;:ok-r prices of Indirn cotton as com-
prrod with Amiric.n of course oncour,' is the use of Indicn cotton by foreign
spinners. The opposite situtti-n exists in the comparison of S-k.ll'ridis
and Uppers, their conp"r-tive strength b..ing favorcblo to the consumption of
Americrn cotton.

"In spite of the recent decline in prices of Indi:.n cotton, .'ncricc.n
cotton has continued till no- to jnjoy t?- crater f"vor shorn by Contincntrl
spinners during thj period of better spinner dun-nd pcv- iling in rcc.nt
weoks. Th.e drop in Indirn pric.-s h-s boon consid.or.bly nore.. significant
in the futures merkut t Bomb-.y th- n for cturl -Indi n st- pl.s in Contin:ntrl mrr-
b.-.t,bet the rctu'l cotton in Europe is no: c.t the lo'o:-st levol yet renchcd
in comparison ..ith ..m ric'n growths. If prolonged, this relationship -'ill
doubtless result in reinjued interest in Indirn cotton by Contin-ntrl spinners,
the f-iluJe of inquiry to be stimul t.d sooner being due to tho recency of
the now price rl.: tionship nd further bearrish reports from Indi"..






C-61 16 -

Austria and Czechoslovakia

Reports from Austria and Czechoslovakia indicate no change in
the unsatisiector; situation in ti-e cotton textile industry, and occupa-
tion in tlh mills is still receding. According to reports from
Czechoslovakia, efforts are being nmae to re-establish the spinners'
syndicate a.d to carry out a uniform reduction of 25 per cent in spinn-
ing activity. Czechoslovalian textile mills hope to benefit from a
prospective reduction of import duties on cotton goods in Rumania through
a new comir~ercial treat;, but this is a favorable factor of no great
weight when conditions are as poor as at present.

Hungary and Yugoslavia

,Hwr- c.rian and Yugoslavian textile mills, with their advantages
of good tariff protection and a market whose demands cannot be supplied by
home production, are maintaining very satisfactory sales of textile goods
and favorable levels of mill occupation, though yarn business is reported
somew-:at quieter in recent weeks.

France

France reports well sustained levels of activity in both spinning
and weaving branches of the cotton industry, though a slight tendency to
reduce out -ut seems to be indicated. June occupation in t.-e mills was
apparently slightly lower thcn in the mo:-t.is immediately preceding. Spinners
cre reported a.s attempting to reach some agreement on the reduction of
working hours because of the tendency of yarn stocks to increase. S.les
of yarn ncvc be' n growing slower end for some weeks 2re indicated to have
been below current levels of production.

As often pointed out previously, however, the French cotton in-
dustry faces an important problem in the retention of its skilled labor
whenever unomploymncnt occurs because t.o relative shorter of labor in
France in recent ears mak'os transfers to other work easy. Spia-ncrs are
forced, therefore, to go to unusual lengths to supply c-.ploymont, as is
indicated by the industry's policy of producing for stock when actual
sales prospects often do not warrant. T-is problem of retaining labor
has been becoming u.ore acute in the past year as the reduction in young
workers as a result of t1h sharp drop in the birth rate during the war has
begun to mrzk itself apparent on the l labor market. The French spinners'
syndicate iz: c. recent statement :Aas attributed a change in the number of
spindles idle in France from 3 per cent in Jrnuary 1929 to 6 per cent in
April 1930, -nd t-ie numnber of looms idle from 10 per cent to 13 per cent
for the sein. months to t-:is decline in the labor supply.

Italy

Itclin.i cotton reports indicrto no change in tendencies previously
reported; sales of yarn ind goods are unsatisfactory, stocks of both
products rising slightly, and mill activity tending downward, present
occupation stnidin,; at about 10 per cent below a. year a-o at this time.







C-61 -12-



The outstanxding finrs interested in the export of cotton
to:tiles were reported on Jul. 15 to have launched ano associa-
tion m-cicr the lobb-Pomerene Act to be I:sonr1 as the Textile Export
Association of the United States. Eleven houses have already
signed for mc-rbcrship and tch first i: tin; was to be held August 5.
The-i -ctivitics of the association will probably be co-.--fined, at pro-
so.It, to securing -iformnit i- terns of p0y.ionts on Cxports, so
t-i r.;jort st".tus.


Gro-.t 3rit.ain


Cables during most of Jul, indicate ti'.t tfl conditions in
Grc.,t Britai;in co-tiL:ueQd ulseatisf'actor-. Y..r-- cr..-id cloth business Was
reported poor with the curtailed production not being sold and
additic;:'c.l mach.ie-ry was bcin- stopped. :"uch dcpends upon the politi-
c.l situa.tioi in I.idia a.s to the future prospects. Yarn and. cloth
deC:mla.nds i-creased. as.d prosp ects were reported better during the week
cn.ded J..:i 25 withi GaI.cs to Chin., larger. This improvement is also
reported, to .,c.ve continued throuachou,'.t the, wek ended Augu&st 1.
;ports of cotton. piece goods for Jun0 of 153.7 millions of square
:y.rds were low:r thln for rl.7:,o--th sinceO Juec 1921, -;-d t.it exports
of cotto-. yar.s duri-, June which jamou-.-od t 9.7 million pounds were
locr t-r.n c.n; ,onth- since July 1933. July exports of bjth piece
goJds ..d y-'.rns were considerabl,.- ab ,ve Jun but are still at rthcer
lov lvcls.






















*4












Tablo 11. Great Britain: Exports of cotton yarn, by months, 1919-20 to 1929-30


Year Aug. e Sept. Oct. : Iov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Ear. Apr. May June July Total

million : Hillion:"li llion:1iilli on:Million:illi illion:illion: Liillion:iill ion :LIillion: Iillion :Lillion
: pounds: ounds: pounds: ouns: pouds: pounds: pounds: oudounds: pounds: pounds: pounds: pounds: pounds

1919-20 15.6 : 12.6 : 14.3 : 13.5 : 14.9 : 16.5 : 11.9 : 10.1 11.1 : 14.3 : 14.8 : 15.3 : 164.9
1920-21 : 12.9 : 11.6 : 10.4 : 11.0 : 7.7 : 7.2 : 8.5 : 8.8 : 8,9 : 8.6 : 8.7 : 9.0 : 113.3
1921-22 : 15.3 : 15.7 : 18.6 : 20.6 : 16.0 : 14.8 : 14.9 : 18.8 21.3 20.8 : 15.7 : 199 : 212.4
1922-23 : 15.4 : 16.8 16.0 : 15.1 : 11.7 : 12.8 : 10.9 : 13.0 10.9 12.6 : 1 .0 9.5 : 154.7
1923-24 : 12.8 : 12.0 14.7 : 14.6 : 11.1 : ll0 : 14.1 : 13.2 : 16.1.: 18.0 : 15.1 .7 : 65.4
1924-25 : 11.9 11.3 13.5 12.8 : 13.5 15.9 : 16.0 : 17.9 : 16.6 : 17.2 : 1.3 : 14. : 173.9

1925-26 15.0 13.9 17.9 : 13.9 : 17.9 16.8 : 15.7 : 16.0 : 14.4 : 10.6 :14.4 12. : 1789:
1926-27 : 12.5 12.1 13.5 : 15.3 : 14.8 15.9 : 14.3 19.3 173 22.8 : 17.2 : 14.0 : 189.0
1927-28 : 16.6 : 15.8 : 15.3 : 17.4 : 14.5 : 14.9 : 14.5 : 15.5 : 13.8 : 14.1 : 14.4 11.4 : 178.2
1928-29 15.8 : 11.2 : 15.1 : 15.4 : 13.2 16.9 : 137 13.5 : 13.1 : 16.0 : 12.3 :. 15.0 : 171.2
1929-30 : 15.3 10.2 13.5 12.5 : 13.5 : 13.2 : 12.2 12.7 : 11.5 1.4 9.7 1.4 : 7.1
1930-31 : : : : : : .

According to Board of Trade Returns.







0-61


- 21 -


of the week ended ,uly 22 the tcmpurature ran uniformly .bove normal for prac-
tically ovury station reporting and rainfal.l was "'ll rL]ly bclow. normal in
most districts.

Tablu 1o.- Tumptl rature and rainf:.ll ifor thv four VJick:s rin. d August 5, 1930
-__ ___ '(parturs f'ror. normal) 1/
: July 15 ; _JuL 22 : July 29 ; Augl. 5
Stations :,T raptr-: ain-:?...mp -: .;ain-::..apr-: [ain-:TrjrnpIr-: lain-
; L.tur-. ; f..ll: tu -. ; fl : ll ..tur ; .11 : aturc : fall
:liLe,rucs: Inch nchc : s :LE:gri' s :Inches : 'I 2gI ,cs : I ncIles


N.C.
Ch..rlottu .....
Rale LigLh .......
S.C.
ClOarl,;ston ....
Groonvillu ....
Columbia ......
Ga.
Augusta .......
Atl.nta .......
I.:acon .........
Savannah.....
T.homasvillo ...
Ala.
I:obilu ........
T:ontgomt ry ....
An.nistch ......
Birmingham ....
Miss.
mleridian ......
Vicksburg .....
La.
NTow\ Orleans ...
Shrcvoport ..
Ark.
Little Rock ...
Fort Smith ....
Bentonville ..
Okla.
Oklahoma City .
Tox.
Abilon .......
Fort Worth ....
Dallas ........
Palestine .....
Taylor ........
Houston .......
Corpus Christi.
San Antonio ...
Brownsville ...
Tonn.
Momphis ......
ashville ....
Ch.ttanooga ...


+ 6
+ 1

+ u
+ C
+ 5 :

+ 7
+ C :
+ 6
+ 4
+ 4

+ b
+ 7
+10
+ 8 :

+ 8
+ 6

+ 3
+ 6 :
- s-
+ 8
+ 6
+ 1 :
+

+ 3

+ 1
+ 2

+ 3
+ 1
0
- 1
- 2 :
- 2

+
+ 6


0.2:


- O.4:
* 0.4:
+ 0.2:

- 0.8:
- 0.7:
+ 0.9:
- 1.0:



- 1.1:
- 0.6:
- 0.8:
- 0.2:


0.J:
- 1.0:

- 0.4:



- 0.7:
- 0.9:
- 0.9:

- 0.7:

- 0.5:
- 0.6:
- 0.7:
- 0.4:
- 0.4:
- 1.0
- 0.2:




- 0.6:
+ 0.1:


0
- 3 :
- 4

- 3
- 2
- ha
0
- 1

+ 2
+ 1

+ 2

1
0

+ 1
+ 2

+ 3
3







+ 2
+- 1 :








0 :
1 :


0
+- 2
+ 2 :



-+ 1


-t .1 a


+ 5 : 0.9-


+ 0.9:
- 0.1:

+ U.6:
- D. :
+ 0.7:

- 0.1:
- 0.3:
+ 0.9:
+ 3.2:
+ 1.':

- 1.0,
- 1.1:
- 0.9
- 1.2:

- 1.1:
- 1.2:

- 1.5:
- 1.0:

- 0.9:
- 0.7:
- 1.0:

- 0.7:

- 0.5:
- 0.7:
- 0.6:
- 0.6:
- 0.5:
+ 0.5:
+ 0.4:
- 0.5:
- 0.3:

- 0.6:
- 0.8:
- 0.8!


+
+ 5

+4
+ 7
+ 4 :

+ 4
+ 5
+ 2
+ 3
0

+ 3

+3
+ 5 :
+ 5

+ 3
- 3

+ 2
+ 6

+ 8
+ 8
+ 6 :


+ 6

+4
-r 4

+ 3
+ 2
+ 2
0
+ 1 :
- 1 :

+ 7
+ 8
. 6


- 1.2:
+ 0.3

- 0.2:
- 0.7
- 0.3:

- 0.1:
- 0.7:
+ 3.8:
- 1.6
+ 0.8:

- 1.1:
+ 0.8:
- 1.4:
+ 0.6:

+ 0.5:
- 0.9:

0.0:
- 0.9:

- 0.8:
- 0.7:
+ 0.8:

- 0.6

- 0.4:
- 0.5:
- 0.6:
- 0.6:
- 0.5:
- 0.4:
- 0.2:
- 0.5:
- 0.4:

- 0.6:
- 0.5:
- 0.1.


+ 3
1


0
+ 3
0

0
+ 4
-1
0
- 2

3
+ 2
+ 4
+ 5

+ 4
+ 5

+ 2
+ 5

+ 6
+ 6 :
+ 1

+ 5


- 1.3
- 0.3

0.0
- 0.6
- 0.4


0.2
1.2
0.9
0.4
0.8


- 1.3
- 0.9
- 1.1
- 1.0

- 1.1
- 0.9

+ 0.9
- 0.7

- 0.8
- 0.4
0 .:

+ 0.1

- 0.4
- 0.5
- 0.5
- 0.5
- 0.4
- 0.6
- 0.4
- 0.1
- 0.2


0.0
0.9
1.0


1/ Bolow normal. + Above normal.


---I I I


W




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- )' -


C-61


"Finr-1 dturn:in. tion of ti'; -mount of dvr nco rt tine of dDliv.ry
through-out the cotton bolt '.: s rot b .n r d2. Curt inly, ho-:..v-r, it will be
not loss th n 65 p r: cent of th.e -1' rkl.t v lu2 of the cotton. It nry b'e more.
The Texas cooperati-ve, v.hich is now rec'iv-i, c--ttcn in greo't volume from the
southern end of that state, is ndvnnci:rf nine cents on unclassed cotton at
time of delivery by the mcmb, All cooY)er..tives 'ry -3 expected to Edvance to
their members th,; 1-rgupst poszi.:le a mount tLZrt is consistent with safety.

"The Federcl Frrm botrd will w:ork:"ith the cotton cooperatives to tat
end."

Switzerland loviwers inmort dut,; .n ra:7 cotton

The import duty on raT; cotton into Switzerland has be n reduced from
about ';4.38 a b:.1- to about 8E cents a b;.le, gross, by order of the Swiss
Federal Council, according to advice r:coived by the, Dopr.rtrmont of Conmmrce
from Commnnrci:.l .-ttacho Stbb-ins at B:rnc. The av.rageo consumption of Amer-
ican cotton in S-Titzrland' during. the rivo yeu:- p-ri-d 192-4-25 to 1928-29
amounted to t ,2CO run:Linc b. l-s.

Exp-erimontal cotton gin

The cxprriniMntal cotton "-in r.nd l:.boratory authorized at tie lcst
session of Congr-.ss will be oructod by t-he U. 3. Dcrprtmont of Ag--iculturo
on a site miadu nvailr-ble by th- Miisissippi Delt. 7r,.nch r.xpcrinmnt Stntion,
according to rrn nnojuncor urt by Sccratrry of Agriculturo hydc. Construction
and equipment of tihe lbtorrtory ill begin -.t no-rly d to in order th t
the oxperimentzl v:orkl n. y b stt'rted 's soon 's possible in thc present season.

St-.plc length of T:.-r.s cotton

From n. preliminary rporT, on th.: str cla luenth of Texr.s cotton which
h..s recently be-n issucod by this 3ur-; it m y be s .n thr t th- st-ple
length of thz 19 ?9 Tcx-:s c:'oo '.s slil.tly sl-ortcr th n th- t of 1928. The
Northern and !!orth,'wst rn ports of th- St-.to ": c 1 rgoly r-sponsibl for
this incrcr.sc in short r lenths h'ilj ti.he Soi;thrn nd Southowsto-n p.rts
of the St-.tu sho:.od slight ii:prov-nmnt in thu 1ingth of th- strnle.

T x-s r- nks sixth *-rong thj principal cotton growing St-tos in
length oi st-..l gror.n. Tho ; vr' stunl- length of in 1932 :: s 14.49
sixtoonths of .n inch co;]TlL.r.d ith 14.68 sixteenths of cr. inch for the
Cotton Bolt as -whui-. .'or- th- n bO p._- cnt of tLh crop both in 1928
nd 1929 wJ..s 7/8 of :.n inch or shorter.

Futures trading in st.rol. cotton

Thj nrnmbcrs of the I.onmphis Cotton Exchl: ngc :-.r contcorplrLting estcb-
lishing futures trading in st. pl cotton :.ith th.: basis of the contracts
middling 1 1/8 inch-s. (Cotton Tr".do Journ: ).

---------------0----------------








0-61 17 -

Unfilled orders for yrrn held by,; sinners are considerably below those of
last ye-r, -.nd tho volumn- of rnow; L ru.; rorains sornowhrtt 1 elow '.uraont
production

Poland

The cotton situation in Pol-nd shows further indications of consolida-
tion, according to latest ovaila-le reports., TI.e cutput of :, 'rn and cloih
has been kept restricted, and orders have apparently increased to a level high
enough to absorb current production. The present level of :-ill'activity "nd
textile sales is, of course, unsatisfactory from the standpoint of a raw
cotton consumption, but tLe curtailmxwnt of output rnm the reduction of burden-
some goods stocks has undoubtedly contributed noteriolly to'.ard the improve-
ment of future prospects.

Japan

The severe depressicn in the J'.p nose cotton industry continues, says
Consul Dickover at Kobe. Yarn production lurinF June d-oppcd to 213,000 bales,
a decrease of 1,C000 bales cor.ipcred with 1.ay. July yarn production is estim-
ated at 108,C0O bales. The -rice of Jopnneso 20s vws around 151, cents on
July 22 as corparcd with 15 cents on June 20. This price is said to represent
a loss of about two dollars per bale to the mills. G:.nrr.l opinion yarn pro-
duction will decline further. Cloth exports during June mounted to 95,000,000
square yards as con:-ar-d with 126,000,C00 in May. This volume of exports, how.*
ever, is fu." considerin,- the unfa.vorr.ble conditions in China .nd India.

Chinr

According to Agriculturrl Commission;r Nyhus at Sha.ngri, tho accumulation
of yarn stocks -.nd a slow market has caused c number of r.ills in Shr.ngvi to
-bcndon night work ::nd to curt-.il spinning operations. Deliveries of y: rn "ro
quite subst:.nti 1, however, .nd th'ro is firm belief in a quick recovery in the
outlet for y rn at the present relatively low prices upon an improvement in
political condition in the interior.

The Jrpr.nese section of tha industry continues to be sold out well for-
ward "nd have recently :nde sone purchr sos of lowv gr'do Amnricrn cotton.

Selling prices or volume of s-les in the piece goods m rkot hrvo not
mr.do substantial improvement. Prices during July in mny lines were so much
below replacoment cost :t priusnt orchr nLo rates th.t holders of stocks have
boon insisting on higher v: lues. Jrpanf-se nills h-ivt sold groys r:nd whites
ct those prico levels, but the disparity is great bctr.ooin loc-l rnd Manchester
prices.

On July 21 H nkou. Strndard cotton August delivery sold ft 9.92 cents per
pound, r.nd American middling seven eighths inch August shiprn.nt c.i.f., 15.37
cents p4r pound.

India

The political crisis 'nd unfrvor-ble iconoiic conditions hr.vo cnusbd the
Indian piece goods m rkots to be unusu-lly quit end stmo cotton mills cro
closing down.