U.S. waterborne foreign trade

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Material Information

Title:
U.S. waterborne foreign trade
Portion of title:
United States waterborne foreign trade
Issues for -Dec. 1970 have title:
U.S. waterborne foreign trade
Physical Description:
Book
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
United States -- Bureau of the Census. -- Foreign Trade Division
Publisher:
The Bureau
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly, including annual cumulation
monthly
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Shipping -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
July 1965-Dec. 1970.
Issuing Body:
Aug. 1965- prepared in the Bureau's Foreign Trade Division.
General Note:
"FT985."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 023139094
oclc - 01294512
lccn - sf 86092446
issn - 0565-1212
System ID:
AA00012998:00003

Related Items

Preceded by:
United States foreign trade. FT985, Water-borne foreign trade statistics


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Full Text





II,'


U.S. Waterborne


N '\


SUMMARY REPORT July 1965 \
FT 985 JuC

COVERAGE


rMENT OF COMMERCE
n T. Connor. Secretary

BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
A Rom Ecklel Dircioi


i i' l H I i' [i ..' -,l'-
er > : t ,h r J" i I ,


This report presents statistics on total U.S. water-
borne inbound and outbound shipments made in furvign
trade, with certain exseptionn as specified in the folli' ing
explanation. Separate data are presented for dry ..irgo
and tanker vessels. In the tables which contain informa-
tion on trade through individual U.S. customs districts,
data are given for all customs districts at which there
are vessel shipments. Data are also giv'..n for those
individual ports within each district which have a com-
bined export and import tonnage averjaing five million
pounds or more per month during the calendar year
1964. The customs district totals shown rLflc,' trade
through all ports in the district, including those ports
for which data are not shown separately. Totals shown
in this report for previous months include current
revisions.

The statistics on waterborne exports of domestic and
foreign merchandise and non-Department of Defense ship-
ments of Spec lal Category commodities exclude shipments
to Canada individually valued at less than $2,000 and
shipments to other countries individually valued at less
than $500.

Vessel export figures in this report, shown incolumns
4, 9, 13, and 16of table 1 and in table 3, represent exports
of domestic and foreign merchandise laden at the U.S.
Customs area for shipment to foreign countries and
include export shipments to U.S. civilian Government
agencies and non-Department of Defense controlled for-
eign aid program shipments as described below. Ex-
cluded from these figures are shipments to the U.S.
armed forces abroad of supplies and equipment for their
own use as well as the other types of shipments described
below for which information is shown in separate columns
in table 1.

Department of Defense controlled and Special Cat-
egory figures, shown in columns 6 and 11 of table 1
and in tables 5 and 6 of this report cover consolidated
data for the following types of shipments:

1. Vessel export shipments of Department of
Defense controlled cargo under special foreign
aid programs such as Department of Defernse
Military Assistance Program-Grant-Aid,
etc., shipped on commercial or military
vessels (vessels owned and operated by De-
partment of Defense).

2. Vessel export shipments of Special Category
commodities not controlled by the Depart-
ment of Defense for which detailed information
cannot be shown separately because of se-
curity reasons. For a list of Special category


commodities and an explanation of their pre-
sentation in foreign trade statistics, see the
January 1965 issue of Report FT 410.

Only shippingg "wUighr data in terms of U.S. port or
coastal district of lading and fur.. ign trade area of un-
hlding are shown for these classes of shipments since
information on the dollar value of exports of Department
of Defense controlled cargt. is not available at this level
of detail. Consequently, the total value ligur..'- shown in
columns 12 and 15 of table 1 for dry cargo and tanker
shipments in that order correspond to the shipping weightl
figures shown in columns 3 and 8, respectively, of the
same table.

Effective January 1965, some changes were made in
security restrictions, without a corresponding change in
restrictions applying to earlier periods. Therefore,
the shipping weight data for Department of Defense and
Special Category shipments presented in tables 1, 5,
and 6 for 1965 exclude some commodities which are no
longer classified as Special Category commodities begin-
ning with January 1965. However, for periods prior to
1965, such commodities are included in the data for
Department of Defense and Special Category shipments.
Because of this,' and also because of changes in the
content of Special Category commodities effective Jan-
uary 1965, in some cases the 1965 figures for Department
of Defense and Special Category shipments are not com-
parable with those for earlier periods. Likewise, in
some cases the 1965 figures for exports of domestic
and foreign merchandise (other than Department of
Defense and Special Category shipments) are not com-
parable with those for earlier periods since the 1965
figures include exports of those commodities which were
declassified effective January 1965, but which were not
included in the figures for exports of domestic and foreign
merchandise prior to 1965.

Vessel import figures, shown in columns 3, 6, 9 and
12 of table 2 and in table 4 of this report, are general
imports and represent the total of imports for immediate
consumption plus entries into customs bonded storage
and manufacturing warehouses made at the U.S. Customs
area from foreign countries. Vessel import figures
exclude American goods returned by the U.S. armed
forces for their own use and import shipments on Army
or Navy transports. Effective July 1965, the statistics
also exclude data on shipments valued $250 and under
reported on both formal and informal entries. (Informal
entries, by definition, are limited to items valued not
more than $250.) Prior to July 1965, the import statis-
tics excluded formal entry shipments valued at less than
$100 and informal entry shipments valued $250and under.


US C'm --tD


For sale by the Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C., 20233. Price 10 percopy.
Annual subscription (FT 900, 930, 950, 970, 975, 985, and 986 combined) $5.00.


.1/ .# -/ -'7










The following types of shipments are excluded from
both the vessel export and import data: (1) shipments
of household and personal effects, (2) shipments by mail
and parcel post, and k3) shipments of vessels under their
own power and afloat. United States trade with Puerto
Rico and with United States possessions is not reported
as U.S. exports and imports.

Merchandise shipped in bond through the United States
in transit from one foreign country to another without
having been entered as an import is not included in any
of the figures in the columns previously referred to
(imported merchandise cleared through Customs and
subsequently re-exported is included in both the import
and export statistics). Separate information for the
waterborne portion of the intransit trade in terms of
shipping weight and dollar value is presented in this
report in tables 1 and 2. Columns 5, 10, 14, and 17
of table 1 reflect intransit merchandise laden aboard
vessels at U.S. ports, while columns 4, 7, 10, and 13
of table 2 reflect such merchandise unladen from vessels.
The waterborne outbound and inbound intransit statistics
include (1) foreign merchandise transferred from one
vessel to another in the U.S. port of arrival and shipped
to a foreign country without being released from Customs
custody in the United States; and (2) foreign merchandise
arriving by vessel at one U.S. port, shipped through the
United States under Customs bond, and leaving the United
States by vessel from a port other than that at which it
arrived. In addition, the waterborne outbound intransit
statistics also include (1) foreign merchandise withdrawn
from a general order warehouse for immediate export
by vessel or for transportation and export by vessel (such
merchandise was not recorded as an import when it
entered the warehouse), and (2) foreign merchandise
shipped via vessel from a U.S. Foreign Trade Zone to a
foreign country (such merchandise is deposited in the
Foreign Trade Zone without being entered as an import).
Any inbound or outbound intransit merchandise moving by
methods of transportation other than vessel is excluded
from the intransit statistics. Thus, merchandise arriving
at the United States by vessel and leaving by some other
method of transportation is included in the inbound data
only. On the other hand, merchandise arriving by other
than waterborne transportation and laden aboard vessels
upon departure is included in the outbound statistics but
not in the inbound data. The inbound and outbound seg-
ments, therefore, do not counterbalance one another and
are complementary only insofar as they involve merchan-
dise carried by vessels to and from the United States.
For a more detailed discussion of the intransit trade
statistics and the types of shipments excluded from these
data see the February 1953 issue of the Foreign Trade
Statistics Notes.

All types of outbound vessel shipments in tables I and 5
are credited to the coastal districts, customs districts,
and ports at which the merchandise was laden. All types


of inbound vessel shipments in table 2 are credited to
the coastal districts, customs districts, and ports at which
merchandise was unladen. In the case of vessel general
imports this is not necessarily the same as the customs
district in which the goods were entered into warehouse
or entered for immediate consumption.

Vessel exports in tables 3 and 6 are credited to the
foreign trade areas at which the merchandise was unladen.
Vessel imports in table 4 are credited to the foreign
trade areas at which the merchandise was laden aboard
the vessels carrying the cargo to the United States. The
countries of destination or origin of merchandise arenot
necessarily located within the trade areas to which the
merchandise is shipped or from which it is received.
Detailed definitions of foreign trade areas in terms of the
countries and ports included in each are contained in
Schedule R, Code Classification and Definitionof Foreign
Trade Areas.


Shipping weight figures represent the gross weight of
shipments, including the weight of containers, wrappings,
crates and moisture content. Vessel export values
represent the values at time and place of export. They
are based on the selling price (or on the cost if not sold)
and include inland freight, insurance and other charges
to place of export. Transportation and other costs beyond
the United States portofexportation are excluded. Vessel
import values, as well as the values for intransit ship-
ments, are generally based on the market or selling
price and are in general f.o.b. the exporting country.
Since intransit merchandise is not subject to theimposi-
tion of import duties at the United States, the valuation
reported for such shipments is not verified by customs
to the extent applicable in the case of import entries
and may in some cases include transportation costs and
insurance to the United States as well as other cost
elements.

Vessel shipments in tables 1 and 2 are classified as
dry cargo or tanker shipments solely on the basis of
the type of vessel used without regard to the cargo
carried. Tanker vessels are those primarily designed
for the carriage of liquid cargoes in bulk, while all others
are classified as dry cargo vessels. A further segregation
of dry cargo vessel shipments is provided in tables 3-6
on the basis of type of service, i.e., liner (berth) or
irregular (tramp). Liner service is that type of service
offered by a regular line operator of dry cargo vessels
on berth. The itineraries and sailing schedules of such
vessels are predetermined and fixed. Irregularor tramp
service is that type of service afforded by dry cargo
vessels which are chartered or otherwise hired for the
carriage of goods on special voyages. Vessels in this
type of service are notion berth and their sailing schedules
are not predetermined or fixed.












Table 1.-U.S. EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE, OUTBOUND INTRANSIT MERCHANDISE AND SHIPMENTS OF DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO AND "SPECIAL CATEGORY" NON-
DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO, ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS, BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF LADING

(Totals represent the sums of unrounded figures, hence may vary sli(;t;.lj fron, hj uof '.. i r-idj Z.)


Customs district and port


Total all districts:
Monthly average 1904 .....
,uly- I. ..............
uly 19 ..............
Juifm' 1i9o' ..............
July 19 5. ..............


North Atlantic Coast
Districts...............

Maine and New Hampshire........
Portland, Maine..............
Bangor, Maine...............
East Port, Maine.............
Portsmouth, N.H.............
Belfast, Maine..............
Searsport, Maine............
Massachusetts ..................
Boston......................
Gloucester..................
New Bedford.................
Fall River.................
Salem......................
Rhode Island ..................
Providence.................
Connecticut....................
Bridgeport .................
New Haven.................
New London.................
New York......................
New York ...................
Albany.....................
Philadelphia..................
Philadelphia, Pa............
Chester, Pa.................
Wilmington, Del..............
Paulsboro, N.J.............
Camden, N.J.................
Gloucester City, N.J........
Marcus Hook, Pa.............
Maryland .....................
Baltimore...................
Virginia......................
Norfolk......................
Newport News................
Richmond ...................
Alexandria..................


28,730.8
2.X, 1.5
31,7.2.7
32,821.1



7,715.3

5.7
1.1

0.9
(2)

3.0
94.2
93.2
1.0



49.5

91.5
34.0
57.5

1,168.9
1,147.1
17.7
305.3
228.7

0.4
27.3
27.2

21.8
504.7
504.7
5,495.4
3,583.6
1,83C.6
22.1


Shipping weight (in millions of pounds)

Dry cargo


1 4 -


Domrr'-l" lafren and
nll~tr'i a l Cll1 'i

Domestic In
Total and
foreign transit

(3) (4) (5)


Dept. of
Defense
and
*Special
category*

(6)


Total


Tanker


Domestic, foreign ar:
intransit cargo

Domestic
Total and t
foreign


an
ansit


(7) (8) (9) (0) i l I t


Value in miios dollars.

Diy caign Tanre'
1 T T


II .,


category"


'?1


IF-- ~ ~ 4 4 + F 4 4 4 + + F


25,802.9
21,8 8.5





7,657.7

5.7
1.1

0.9
(2)

3.6
94.2
93.2
1.0



42.8
42.8
91.5
34.0
57.5

1,153.6
1,131.8
17.7
270.1
228.7

0.4
8.0
27.2

5.8
504.7
504.7
5,495.4
3,583.6
1,836.5
22.1


25,728.8
25,755.6
27,595.7




7,(49.0

5.7
1.1

0.9
(z)

3.0
94.2
93.2
1.0



42.8
42.8
91.5
34.0
57.5

1,147.8
1,126.0
17.7
269.3
227.8

0.4
8.0
27.2

5.8
503.4
503.4
5,494.7
3,582.8
1,836.5
22.1


25,614.0
25,658.3
27,480.9
28,394.1



7,612.8

5.7
1.1

0.9


3.6
94.2
93.2
1.0



42.8
42.8
91.5
34.0
57.5

1,116.2
1,094.8
17.7
208.1
226.6

0.4
8.0
27.2

5.8
499.8
499.8
5,494.5
3,582.8
1,836.5
22.1


114.8
97.3
116.6
103.1



3t,.3

(z)



(2)


(7)
(Z)
(2)









31.7
31.3

1.2
1.2



(Z)


3.6
3.6
0.2

0.2


2,927.8
3,073.0
4,067.1
4,287.0



57.2















6.7
6.7




15.3
15.3

35.3
0.1


19.2


16.0


3,037.
r, 07.1
4,287.0


2.2

0.2



0.7







0..







0.2


7..


See footnotes at end of table.


13 4 1i l 16) 17


.7 .










Table 1.-U.S. EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE, OUTBOUND INTRANSIT MERCHANDISE, AND SHIPMENTS OF DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO AND "SPECIAL CATEGORY" NON- *.
DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO, ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS, BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF LADING-Continued

Shipping weight (in millions of pounds) Value (in millions of dollars)

Dry cargo Tanker Dry cargo Tanker

Domestic, foreign and Domestic, foreign and
Customs district and port Grand intransit cargo Dept of intransit cargo Dept. of
Defense Defense Domestic Domestic
Total Domestic and Total Domestic and Total and In- Total and In-
Total and In- Special Total and In- "Special foreign ransitforeign transit
foreign transit cate "foreign transit category"

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17)


South Atlantic Coast
Districts...............

North Carolina..................
Wilmington .................
Beaufort-Morehead City......
South Carolina ...............
Charleston .................
Georgetown.................
Georgia .......................
Brunswick..................
Savannah....................
Florida....................
Jacksonville,...............
Miami.......................
West Palm Beach..............
Port Everglades.............
Port Canaveral................


Gulf Coast Districts.....

Florida ......................
Tampa......................
Key West...................
Pensacola..................
Bocagrande ..................
Panama City.................
Port St. Joe................
Mobile.........................
Mobile, Ala.................
Gulfport, Miss...............
Pascagoula, Miss.............
New Orleansi....................
New Orleans, La.............
Baton Rouge, La.............
Port Sulphur, La............
i A.l":'i ................... ...
Tennessee.....................
St. Louis......................
Sabine .........................
Port Arthur, Tex ............
Orange, Tex................
Beaumont, Tex.............
Lake Charles, La............
Galveston .....................
Galveston, Tex.,,..........,
Houston, Tex.,...............
Freeport, Te.............
CorpuE. Chrlisl, Tex.........
Texas City, Tex.............
Larado.........................
Brownsville, Tex............


336.8

22.2
12.3
9.9
59.9
45.9
14.0
117.0
8.8
108.2
137.7
64.9
41.4
6.4
24.4



11,702.9

1,306.3
1,076.4
(z)
14.6
153.0
56.1
6.2
606.0
190.1
8,5
407.4
4,173.1
2,327.5
25..2




1,467.4
A4.4
16.8
792.1
144.2
3,908.1

,0 3.1
119.1
1,204.7
114.3
242.1
242.1


334.3

22.2
12.3
9.9
60.0
46.0
14.0
116.1
8.5
107.8
135.8
63.8
41.4
6.4
23.6



8,203.0

1,304.3
1,076.4
(2)
14.6
153.0
54.1
6.2
506.5
190.1
8.5
307.9
2,134.0
1,981.6
225.4
142.4



98 .4
321.2

522.3
118,1
2,263.3
377.7

32.1
703.8

208.4
208.4


332.7

21.1
11.2
9.9
59.6
45.6
14.0
116.3
8.5
107.8
135.8
63.8
41.4
6.4
23.6



8,197.3

1,304.3
1,076.4
(z)
14.6
153.0
54.1
6.2
503.8
187.4
8.5
307.9
2,931.8
1,979.4
225.4
142.4



985.
329.2
16.8
521.5
118.1
2,263.3
377.7
1,149.7
32.1
703.8

208.4
208.4


331.2

21.1
11.2
9.9
58.9
44.9
14.0
116.3
8.5
107.8
135.0
63.7
40.9
6.3
23.5



8,146.6

1,304.3
1,076.4
(z)
14.6
153.0
54.1
6.2
503.8
187.4
8.5
307.9
2,925.5
1,973.1
225.4
1.2.4



98 5.6
329.2
16.8
521.5
118.1

'377.2
1,146.3
32.1
703.7

168.1
168.1


1.5




0.7
0.7




0.8
0.1
0.5
0.1
0.1



50.7

(Z)
(z)





(Z)
(z)


6.3
6.3
(Z)









4.1
0.5
3.4

0.1

40,3
40.3


2.6







0.6
0.3
0.3
1.9
1.1


0.8



3,499.9

2.0
(2)



2.0

99.5


99.5
1,239.1
345.9
304.6
111.8



481.0
185.1

2()9.8
26.1
1,644.7
39.2
903.4
87.0
500.9
114.3
33.6
33.6


2.61 2.6


0.6
0.3
0.3
1.9
1.1


0.8



3,499.9

2.0
(z)



2.0

99.5


99.5
1,239.1
345.9
304.6
111.8



481.0
185.1

269.8
26 .1
1,644.7
39.2
903.4
87.0
500.9
114.3
33.6
33.6


0.6
0.3
0.3
1.9
1.1


0.8



3,499.9

2.0
(Z)



2.0

99.5


99.5
1,239.1
345.9
304.6
111.8



481.0
185.1

269.8
26.1

39.2
903.4
87,0
500.9
114.3
33.6
33.6


43.2

7.7
1.5
6.2
9.4
8.6
0.8
11.4
0.9
10.5
14.8
3.7
7.0
2.5
1.5



351.1

15.7
9.8
(z)
2.2
0.5
2.9
0.3
21.4
11.3
0.5
9.6
147.6
120.4
4.9
1.5



26.1
7.0
1.8
13.7
3.6
132.6
23.3
89.0
2.3
17.4

7.6
7.6


42.3

7.7
1.5
6.2
9.0
8.2
0.8
11.4
0.9
10.5
14.3
3.7
6.7
2.4
1.4



345.7

15.7
9.8
(Z)
2.2
0.5
2.9
0.3
21.4
11.3
0.5
9.6
146.5
119.3
4.9
1.5



23.1
7.0
1i.
13.7

131.5
22.8
89.0
2.3
17.4

4.5


0.9 I 0.2


0.4
0.4




0.5
(Z)
0.3
0.1
0.1



5.4

(Z)
(2)





(z)
(z)


1.1
1.1
(Z)









1.1
0.5
0.6

(z)

3.1


0.1
(z)
(z)
0.1
0.1


(z)



111.1

0.2
(Z)



0.2

2.6


2.6
38.9
11.9
7.3
1.2



12.5



0.
5(.l
1.2
28.1
5.5
11,6
9.8
0.7


4.51 3.1 1 0.7


0.2







0.1
(z)
(z)
0.1
0.1


(z)



111.1

0.2
(Z)



0.2

2.6


2.0
38.i
11.)

1.2



12.9


0. o
0."

1.2
28.1
5.5
11.(
9.8
0.7
0.7


(z)


See footnotes at end of table.












South Pacific
Coast Districts......... 2,148. 1,41.7 1,.31.2 1,o20.5 1.7 10.5 506.6 50., 50. l i. 90.1

San Diego ...................... 1 140. 140.2 140.2 14. 2.9
Los Angeles................... 1,024.9 L>. (55.2 4, .5 9.7 1.6 3. 3. 38.0 4C 47
Los Angeles, Calif.......... 481.8 278.8 i7 272.6, 1.i 0.1 202.' 2 2.9 2.' '.
Port San Luis, Calif ........ -
Long Beach, Calif............ 502.6 372.3 0. 7.1 3.7 1.' 130.3 3(. -
El Segundo, Calif........... 34.7 -. ,.7 -
San Francisco,................. 93.2 84. 8. 1.. 13 I
Eureka, Calif............ ... .0 30.0 -. 3.
San Francisco, Calif......... J(1O. 1 7.0 i.i8 2. ? 2 2.
Stockton, Calif.............. 24).7 12.' 12.5 2. (2) 67.2 72 7.2 -
Oakland, Calif .............. 117.4 117.4 113.4 113.2 0.. .0 4. -
Richmond, Calif............. 130.4 .1 .l 3. 2
Alameda, Calif.............. 24.4 1. 1 (.:)
Sacramento, Calif........... 23.3 2.. i
Martinez, Calif.............- -
Redwood City, Calif......... i.... I 13. s3 -
Selby, Calif................


North Pacific Coast
Districts............... 2,014..5 .1973. 1,9. 1,9.7 0. 7.9 1.1 31.1 31.1 .7

Oregon......................... > 1,213.7 1,213.7 1,213.7 (Z) (Z) 17.7 17.7 17.7 .
Astoria..................... 104.3 10. 3 1 v..3 104.3 -
Coos Bay..................... 137.0 137.0 137.0 137.0 -
Portland.................... 547.0 '. 4. 545.0 (Z) (Z) 2.0 .7
Longview, Wash.............. 266.8 266.8 26.8 266.8 (Z) 7.
Vancouver, Wash.............. 132.2 116. 11.5 1ll. 15.7 1.7 1.7 .
Washington ..................... 773.1 759.7 7'1.8 751.0 0.8 7.9 13.4 13.4 13.4 2 .7
Seattle..................... 88.4 88. 88.1 87. 0.5 .2 0.1 0.i .7
Tacoma...................... 206.1 199.7 19. 9.3 0.2 0..2 6.4 6.4 .4
Aberdeen-Hoquiam............ 1314.7 134.7 134.7 134.7 -
Bellingham .................. 23.8 2.8 23.8 23.8 -
Everett...................... 105.4 105..4 105. 4 7 1.7
Port Angeles................ 73.0 73.0 73.0 72.9 0.1 -
Port Townsend............... 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6 .
Anacortes ................... (n.9 64.9 6.9 64.9 -
Olympia...................... 18.3 18.3 18.3 18.3 -


Great Lakes Districts.... 8,074.7 8,577.3 8,574.7 8,574.0 0.7 2.6 97.4 97.4 97.4 1.7

St. Lawrence................... 2.9 2 9 2.9 2.9 -
Ogdensburg, N.Y............. 2.9 2.9 2.9 2.9 _.
Massena, N.Y................
Waddington, N.Y............. -
Rochester...................... 338.9 338.9 338. 338.9 -
Oswego, N.Y................. 14.b 14.6 14.6 14.6 -
Rochester, N.Y............... 158.8 158.8 158.8 158.8 -
Sodus Point, N.Y............ 165.5. 5 1.5 165.5 165.5 -
Buffalo ........................ 12.1 12.1 12.1 12.1 -
Buffalo, N.Y................. 12.1 12.1 12.1 12.1 -
Duluth and Superior............ 3,011.9 2,979.9 2,979.9 2,979.9 31.9 31.9 31.9 2
Duluth, Minn............... 488.4 45.5 456.5 456.5 31.9 31.9 31.9 -
Ashland...................... l "I
International Falls-Ranier,
Minn......................
Superior, Wis............... 1,413.3 1,413.3 1,413.3 1,413.3 -
Wisconsin...................... 2.0.0 258.8 258.8 258.8 (Z) 7.1 7.1 7.1 ..
Milwaukee................... 234.0 230.0 230.0 230.0 (Z) 4.0 4.0 4.0 .:
Marinette............... ..... -
Green Bay................... 9.3 7.1 7.1 7.1 2.2 2.2 2.2 -
Racine....................... 22.6 21.7 21.7 21.7 0.9 0.9 0.9 9

See footnotes at end of table.














Table 1.-U.S. EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE, OUTBOUND INTRANSI T MERCHANDISE, AND SHIPMENTS OF DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO AND "SPECIAL CATEGORY" NON-
DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO, ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS, BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF LADING--Continued

Shipping weight (in millions of pounds) Value (in millions of dollars)

Dry cargo Tanker Dry cargo Tanker
Domestic, foreign and Domestic, foreign and
Customs district and port Grand intransit cargo Dept. of intransit cargo Dept. of
total Defense Defense Domestic Domestic
Total Domestic and Total Domestic and Total and Total and In
Total and "Special Totand Ind In- "Special foreign transit foreign
foreign transit category" orei transit category"
_(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17)
Great Lakes Districts--
Continued

Michigan ....................... 972.2 963.3 962.9 962.2 0.7 0.4 8.9 8.9 8.9 20.6 20.3 0.3 0.4 0.4
Detroit..................... 82.8 80.1 79.7 79.0 0.7 0.4 2.8 2.8 2.8 12.5 12.2 0.3 0.2 0.2 -
Port Huron .................. 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8 (z) (Z)
Saginaw-Bay City............ 80.4 74.3 74.3 74.3 6.1 6.1 6.1 4.9 4.9 0.2 0.2
Escanaba ..................... 105.7 105.7 105.7 105.7 0.6 0.6 -
Muskegon.................... 19.7 19.7 19.7 19.7 0.4 0.4
Calcite..................... 167.2 167.2 167.2 167.2 0.1 0.1
Presque Isle................ 307.6 307.6 307.6 307.6 1.9 1.9
Chicago......................... 799.0 757.1 756.8 756.8 (Z) 0.3 41.9 41.9 41.9 36.4 6.4 4.1 4.1
Chicago, Ill................ 799.0 757.1 756.8 756.8 (Z) 0.3 41.9 41.9 41.9 36.4 36.4 1 I 4.1 4.1
East Chl1:;aE, Ind...........
Gary, Ind....................
Ohio ........................... 3,271.8 3,264.3 3,262.4 3,262.4 (Z) 1.9 7.5 7.5 7.5 31.0 31.0 () 0.1 0.1
Cleveland ................... 21.4 20.8 19.0 19.0 1.8 0.7 0.7 0.7 -- 4.7 4.7 0. 0.1
Toledo...................... 1,684.8 1,678.0 1,677.9 1,677.9 (Z) 0.1 6.8 6.8 6.8 20.5 20.5 (Z) 0.1 0.1
Erie, Pa.................... 30.5 30.5 30.5 30.5 0.4 0.4 -
Sanduslly ................... 27.0 27.0 27.0 27.0 0.1 0.1 -
Ashtabula................... 496.3 496.3 496.3 496.3 () 2.1 2.1 (Z)
Conneaut.................... 884.7 884.7 887 847 884.7 3.0 3.0
Fairport....................- -
Huron.......................
Lorain...................... 70.4 70.4 70.4 70.4 0.3 0.3

Puerto Rico, Hawaii, and
Alaska Districts........ 238.9 146.7 146.7 144.3 2.4 92.3 92.3 91.7 0.6 9.2 9.0 0.2 1.2 1.2 (:)

Puerto Rico.................... 102.5 19.9 19.9 17.6 2.3 82.6 82.6 82.0 0.6 1.5 1.3 0.2 .0 0.
Guanica.....................
1r.4t., i,,i .............. .... 2.1 2.4 2.4 -
Ponce.................... ... (.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 .- -
an Juan..................... 12.0 11.4 11.4 9.1 2.3 0.6 0.6 0.6 1.3 1.1 0.2 (2) (:
Hawaii........................... 0.9 31.2 31.2 31.2 () 9.7 9.7 .7 3.7 3.7 (Z) 0.2 0.2
Honolulu .................... 33.7 24.0 24.0 24.0 (Z) 9.7 9.7 9.7 3.0 3.0 (Z) 0.2 0.2
Alaska .......................... 15.5 9.9 9',. .. .. 4.1 4.
Ketchikan ................... lO. 10.5 10.5 10.5 3 .3
Wrangell.................... 3..5 33.5 34.5 y.5 0- -
Sitka....................... 43,2 43.2 43.2 43.2 3.1 3.1 _

Represents zero.
Z Lees than 50,000 pounds; less than 50,000 dollars.
'Florida Atlantic Coast port totals should be added to Florida Gulf Coast port totals to obtain total export through the Customs District of Florida.













Table 2.-U 5 GENERAL IMPORTS AND INBOUND INTRANSIT MERCHANDISE ON DRY CARGO AND TANKEP VESSELS BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT
AND PORT OF UNL ADING



*'" i '", we l (ill million ns 1 pounIds) Value in m million of dolls)


Customs district and port Ga nd --- -- .-- -


Totaltotal ali a U
It iIt. .










Nor h Au u*i*




i or, Ma ine....... o. h I I 19. .
Eastp M in. ...... .. .. ~- j 3 _




B la ..........
Sea sport, 1 inc..... I ,,. } 1 -. 5 0.9 .9



New Bed'ord .......... .. i 7 i p 16.- i. 0. 1 '. 1
all Ri, r ...... .. 58. 3 O. 0.4
.Sale ............. .. C 5 .
hode Isla.d............ .. 1... .. ... 3.3.( .l'?. C.7 L.9 9.
Provide nc........... <:, 174.4 174.4 0 .0 6i. o
COn .ectieut ............. T< [ 325. Q 325o3 3." 1.9 1.9
New n................. 42 2 4.3 1.7 1.7
New Lndo n, ........... ,' 41. 41 o 00.0 02 0. -

Ne York .............. 1.. 32.- 3 1 9



P2 I. ,9 1 '.2 1,40',.9 1 ,415.90 2 .! 10. .
New Ydo D......... ... ..
alm N.r............. 2 7 54.7 1.
ar i .' .. ........... 9 .7 .5 .4





BRialt .i.re............ -.. .. 7. -1 3 7 5 '7 .'9 47. .31 3. 3.7
Vir nia ............. .. ..1 4.1 4.1
1 7 1 1 2 1 4 5 4 5 ( X ) 1 0 ." l 0. q






Nrfid~l............... 1. 2.3 2.
NeWprt ........1.... I .. 2 .4 214. 7. 1. 1.6 0
Ae xanr.. .......... .4 -
o .7 93.-b- 7.9? 1.9










South Atlaic 4
NorBh Caro ............ ".. 47 ... I 3.". 7 47.5 3 3.7 30.7 -
V ilr inoa............... -. ( :Z1 .1 5:5.1 9 32. (7) 1 .3 0.0 -
..1..(.............. 2 2 71 3 :.i 14. 14.9 (Z) 2.3 2.31






Soth Carolirt n ......... 7..2 2. 2. 2. .4 .2 7.2
Charleston............. 1- 0.4
ieorertoiwn............ .1 -.2




G org as... ..t... ..... i 2 173.4 .1. 31.0 Z 1.3 9.3 -9

NoBrunsh i 'k............ .4. 2. 2.9 0.1 L.1 -( 0.2 0.
S ao a n n a h ... ... .... 1 2... l 1 7 ) -, 1 1. 1 1 .3
.lorida............ .... 1. 14 14.3 1. 1 7. 7.



J aksonv lle a ......... 1. 373.9 7.7 7. 2.2 -2
or ia.. ..... ....... ... .3 .4 .2 2 -. 175.. 5.1. 1.3 1.3


iWest PahB Beah. 14. 1 *. ?.1 10.4. 1. 0. 12 0.2
F Port er ....... ........ .. .- '. L .3 .2 72. .3 0

oirmi 0 n........... ... 4 : C.. .. -.. -
Set a rea....... 4.2 it e o ab..2
..or e.F <....... 2 F.

Port Canaveral........... 3. '." 4"- -" 01. .1 .%4 .4

See 'ootnotes at end of table.












Table 2.-U.S. GENERAL IMPORTS AND INBOUND INTRANSIT MERCHANDISE, ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS, BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT
AND PORT OF UNLADING-Continued

Shipping weight (in millions of pounds) Value (in millions of Colars,

Dry cargo Tanker Dry cargo Tanker
Customs district and port Grand
total Total General In- Total General In Ttal General n- Tota General In-
imports transit imports transit imports transit( imports transit
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) 18i (9) (10) (11) '12) (13)

Gulf Coast
Districts......... 6,341.9 5,338.6 5,325.8 12.8 1,003.3 1,003.3 136. 134.3 2.3 .2 8.2

Florida................ 307.1 164.1 164.1 (Z) 143.0 143. .4 6.4 1.5 1.5
Tampa................ 248.6 146.8 146.8 (Z) 101.8 101.8 .3 5. () 1.1 1.1
Key West............. 0.1 0.1 0.1 (Z) (
Pensacola ........... 21.7 17.2 17.2 *4.5 4.5 1.1 1.1.1
Bocagrande........... 36.8 36.8 36.8 2 .2
Panama City..........
Port St. Joe.........
Mobile................. 1,363.0 1,264.8 1,264.5 0.3 98.2 98.2 13.3 13.3 .7 .
Mobile, Ala.......... 1,255.2 1,193.9 1,193.5 0.3 61.3 61.3 10.2 10.2 .4 0.4
Gulfport, Miss....... 42.9 42.9 42.9 1.9 1.9
Pascagoula, Miss..... 64.9 28.1 28.1 36.9 36.9 1.2 1.2 0.3 .3
New Orleans............ 2,494.5 2,312.3 2,307.2 5.1 182.2 182.2 65.5 67.4 1.9
New Orleans, La...... 608.1 518.1 513.2 5.1 89.8 89.8 52.0 5 1.1 1.2 1.2
Baton Rouge, La...... 1,386.8 1,359.0 1,359.0 27.7 27.7 10.6 1.6 .1 .1
Port Sulphur, La..... -
Kentucky...............
Tennessee............. -
St. Louis.............. -
Sabine................. 91.7 55.2 55.2 36.5 36.5 1.1 1.1 0.2 0.2
Port Arthur, Tex .... 36.5 36.5 36.5 0.2 0.2
Orange, Tex.............
Beaumont, Tex........ 2.0 2.0 2.0 .1 .1 -
Lake Charles, La..... 53.2 53.2 53.2 1.0 1. -
Galveston.............. 1,784.8 1,533.8 1,533.6 0.2 250.9 250.9 45.6 45.5 0.1 2.3 2.3
Galveston, Tex ...... 36.3 36.3 36.3 (Z) 2.8 2.8 ( -
Houston, Tex......... 805.4 557.0 556.8 0.2 248.3 248.3 36.8 36.7 .1 2.1 2.
Freeport, Tex...... 4.9 4.7 4.7 0.2 0.2 0.2 .2 2)
Corpus Christi, Tex.. 935.9 935.9 935.9 (Z) 5.8 5.8 (Z)
Texas City, Tex...... 2.4 2.4 2.4 0.2 ..2
Laredo ................. 300.8 8.3 1.1 7.2 292.5 292.5 1.7 0.7 1. 1.6 1.6
Brownsville, Tex..... 300.8 8.3 1.1 7.2 292.5 292.5 1.7 .7 1. 1. 1.6

South Pacific
Coast Districts... 2,676.9 1,017.9 1,013.5 4.4 1,659.0 1,659.0 145.5 143. 2.2 13.3 13.3

San Diego.............. 94.9 17.9 16.5 1.4 76.9 76.9 2.5 2.1 0.4 0.6 0.
Los Angeles ........... 1,714.9 687.9 686.4 1.5 1,027.0 1,027.0 84.3 83.7 0. 9. 9.1
Los Angeles, Calif... 891.5 237.6 236.4 1.2 653.9 653.9 43.6 43.1 .5
Port San Luis, Calif -
Long Beach, Calif,... 823.4 450.3 450.0 0.3 373.1 373.1 40.8 .6 0.2 3. 3.
El Segundo, Calif....
San Francisco.......... 867.1 312.0 310.5 1.5 555.1 555.1 8 57. 3.6 3.,
Eureka, Calif......- -
San Francisco, Calif. 150.7 150.6 149.4 1.2 44.6 43.C 1.
Stockton, Calif ..... 13.1 13.1 13.1 (Z) 3.0 3. (
Oakland, Calif....... 56.1 56.2 56.0 0.2 .
Richmond, Calif...... 247.7 44.5 44.5 203.2 203.2 1.4 1.4
Alameda, Calif....... 11.6 11.6 11.5 0.1 2. 2.4 -
Sacramento, Calif.... -
Martinez, Calif...... 289.9 289.9 289.9 1. 1.5
Redwood City, Calif.. -
Selby, Calif......... 0.3 0.3 0.3 (Z) 1.6 1. -

North Pacific
Coast Districts... 813.1 789.0 784.5 4.5 24.0 24.0 336. 6. C.3 0.2 0.2

Oregon................ 271.6 271.6 271.6 15 l.
Astoria.............. 2.9 2.9 2.9 5
Coos Bay............. 0.1 0.1 0.1 () )
Portland............. 165.8 165.8 165.8 14.4 14.
Longview, Wash........ 27.6 27.6 27.6 S
Vancouver, Wash....... 12.9 12.9 12. 07 C.7
Washington............. 541.5 517.4 512.9 4.5 24.0 24.0 1. I. .3 .2
Seattle............... 288.0 2862 281.8 4.4 1.8 1.8 113
Tacoma .............. 95.8 5.8 9. 0.2 3.
Abcrdecrn-HoquiamI..... 2.1 2.1 2.1 -
Bellingham........... 57.6 57.6 57.6 0. -
Everett.............. 2( 2 2..2 2.2 .2
Port Angeles......... 25.5 25.5 25. .
Port Townsend........ 12.6 12. 12. -
Anacortes............ 32.6 10.4 1.4 22.2 22. .1 1 .2
Olympia ...............

See footnotes at end of table.













Toble 2 -US. GENERAL IMPORTS AND INBOUND INTRANSIT MERCHANDISE ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS, BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT
AND PORT OF UNLADING-Coni'inu d

Shipping welght in million s ot pounds) Valu' Ii millions ol doll rrt)

Dry cario tinker Dry caigo Tanker
Cuslto s distnc l -(t.. po- G an --
total Ge lera In General In Inerl In- ol
Ti, Totl Total e l h t it iota
.I T _. ., i, .' .. import s Lrans.t ., o i.s tr...




O h i o ..!8 u .... 9. .I ti (. ( 11,
District ......... .. ., + '; .' '. I .


St. Lavrrncr ......... .. I. .' -. '. 14











A d ..............
Ogdensbg, N......... -
a .s.na Nds ,Y........... .. 5. ." .i
Wadding ~ii, N.Y.... *. ... I *. --
R.het t, r............. .
swego, N Y............. + + ~ I + .
Re hester, N.i....... -
Scodus FPoint, N. ..... -
Buffalo,................ ;... -
Bufflo, N............ -
Duluth and Superior.... 1 ) +
Duluth, iLu ......... ( -
Ashlad............... -

.anier, i,. -
Suaerilori -
Uis oni......t......... -












Milgenwz~............
MilPaukee............ '*"' -
Marinette......... l.i. 1.^



Miehga.. ............ .. .. '' ) -
Port huran......... -
Saginaw-Bay City ..... 7.' .4 3 C .. 3
Escanaba ..... ,..... .
anskego .............
Caliite................ ...- -
resque Isle........ -
Chicago .. ..... .: -
Chicago .. ........... ., (T 3. 17 .7:) .
East Chicago, Ind.... \_S aai+a a:a+ 4.5 4.3 -
ar, Ind............- -
Ohio. ........................... 4 7 .7 ) i. 1.
Cleveland............ I 4 ( I 14. 4. () 0.
Toledo.............. 1 ; .. 4.* -. 7.4 7.4
Erie, Pa............. O -
Sandusky ............. :.o () ) 3- -
Ashtabula.............. '. .4. 4. -
Conneaut............. 17 ." -
Fairport............. I...,,... I-.. I -. -
Huron. ................ -.1 -
Lorain .............. .. .. O.0 I .i -

Puerto Rico,
Hawaii, axnd Alaskai


Puerto Rico............ .. .. ... ... .4 .., ;.. !.. 1 11.7 ..0 "
Cuanica.............. .. 0 -.
Mayaguez............. I',. I.. (L) 1. l 1 () -
Ponce............... ., .
San Juan............. .... ... I 0 .. .. 4. l.e t. .... 3 2. .0 (s)
Hawaii.... .............. 2.. :, .7 (0) 3> 4 .. 4.1 1 ;I 3.2 3.2
Honolulu............. .. ...' 7 ,>. Z.+ 4 .4 43'>.. 3. 3." (2) 3.2 3.2
Alaska ................. -. 4.0 1,4. 5 .2 0.2
Ketchioan ............ *' ... ;. -. .1 I
Wrangell............
Sitka ................ 2 2. I .z) (2)

Represents zero.
Z Less than 50,00 pounds; less than 50,000 dollars.
'Florida Atlantic Coast port totals should be added to Florida Gulf Coast port totals to obtain total imports through the Customs
District of Florida.










10 :.njY 1965

Table 3.-U.S. EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS, BY TRADE AREA, TYPE OF VESSEL SERVICE,
AND AMOUNT CARRIED ON U.S. FLAG VESSELS


(Shipping weight in millions of pounds.


Totals represent the sums of unrounded figures, hence may vary
amounts)


slightly from the sums of the rounded


Total all vessels Dry cargo vessels1 Tanker vessels

Total dry cargo Liner Irregular
Total
Trade area Total U.S. U.S.
Tradearea shipping UU.S U.S. U.S. Total ..
weight flag Total Toal ag Tota flag flag

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) : 10

Total all trade areas:
Monthly average 1964............ 28,509.0 3,979.8 25,614.0 3,381.2 5,845.0 1,766.0 19,769.0 -~.'. .. 2,895.0 598.6
July 1964 ..................... 28,692.5 3,975.0 25,698.3 3,398.4 5,857. 1,625.7 19,83.3 -,772.7 :.:.. 57.
June 1965..................... 31,505.6 3,518.7 27,480.9 2,772.9 5,536.7 1,251.9 21,9..2 1,52.8 .. .. 74.
July 1965..................... 32,680.5 3,318.8 28,394.1 2, .. l 5,278.4 872. 23,1 5.7 1,69 .7 4,2 .4 755.5


Foreign trade areas except
Canadian ....................... 24,975.8 2,530.5 20,930.3 1,845.2 5,276.6 872.3 15,653.7 972.9 4,045.5 685.3

Caribbean ............................. 716.2 83.3 614.4 80.5 392.0 59.2 222.4 21.3 101.8 2.8
East Coast South America.............. 505.6 37.5 476.3 37.5 155.2 37.5 321.2 29.3
West Coast South America.............. 319.8 34.2 307.5 34.2 177.7 34.2 129.8 12.3
West Coast Central American and Mexico 131.7 53.6 86.8 10.3 46.9 10.1 39.9 0.2 44.9 43.3
Gulf Coast Mexico ..................... 118.3 6.3 118.3 6.3 27.1 91.3 3 (.2

United Kingdom and Eire............... 984.7 2.9 816.0 2.9 343.5 2.9 472.4 18.7
Baltic, Scandinavia, Iceland and
Greenland........................... 581.5 1.0 548.5 1.0 211.6 1.0 337. 33.0
Bayonne-Hamburg Range................. 6,502.7 67.5 5,125.9 67.5 907.4 18.0 4,218.5 49.5 1,376.8
Portugal and Spanish Atlantic......... 439.5 34.7 438.9 34.7 52.6 11.1 3F6.3 23.5 .6
Azores, Mediterranean and Black Sea... 4,065.6 407.9 3,684.6 335.3 560.4 83.2 3,124.2 252.1 331. 72.6

West Coast Africa..................... 202.7 53.7 198.2 53.7 121.0 53.7 77.3 4.4
South and East Africa ................. 127.7 1.9 125.9 1.9 81.6 1.9 44.3 1.
Australasia .......................... 606.1 13.5 521.6 3.8 185.4 3.8 336.2 9.7
India, Persian Gulf and Red Sea....... 2,791.5 1,381.2 1,750.6 824.4 541.9 265.2 1,208.7 559.2 1,040.9 556.8
Malaysia and Indonesia ................ 45.8 2.2 45.5 2.2 45.5 2.2 .3
Far East-Southern Area, including
Taiwan and Philippines............... 658.9 104.3 637.9 104.3 335.6 103.7 302.2 0.6 21.0
Far East-Northern Area, including
Japan............................... 6,177.4 244.9 5,433.2 244.8 1,091.2 184.6 4,342.0 60.2 7.2 0.1

Canadian trade areas............. 7,704.8 788.2 7,463.8 718.1 1.8 0.3 7,42.1 717. 21.0 70.1

Pacific Canada........................ 407.5 199.7 268.8 129.6 0.4 0.3 2S.4 129. 135.7 70.1
Great Lakes Canada.................... 5,719.4 461.3 5,704.2 461.3 0.6 5,03. 4,1.3 15.2
Atlantic Canada ....................... 1,578.0 327.2 1,490.9 127.2 0.8 1,4.1 127.2 87.1

Represents zero.
Z Less than 50,000 pounds.
1Classification of dry cargo vessels as "liner" or "irregular or tramp" is based on characteristics of each voyage (whether the voyage is
part of a scheduled berth operation, etc.) using the classification criteria of the Maritime Administration.













Toble 4-U S GENERAL IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS, BY TRADE AREA, TYPE OF VESSEL '.I ',i I AND AMOUNT
CARRIED ON U S FLAG VESSELS


Tota a.ll vessels


Tolai
Trade aea sh.......... ppg
weight


Cari ibb ............................
Ea;:t :Co .t South Aeri .'..............
West Coa:t Sou'th Ai: ia ... .......
Wet =Couat CentrM, i r ric :nd I'-xico.
iilf Coast Mexio .................... .

United iKind. .nid .ir. ..............
Baltic, Scaindinavi leleiud and
.reen' l rd.. .......... ................
B a oLiu -1islbu r R. Ic.................
Portugal and Spji.h A tl. ti .........
A.ore', ..di ierra. r. i.. d l. ii. k ea...

West Coa0t Ar I.. ......................
South aud E 't A fria. ...............
Austri la ia .......... ..............
India, Persiau Gulf :ad Red S< a......
la'jsia a nnd In.one..:i ................
Far Ea t-outh..'n. Area, i.u.luini:.
.aiWOaj nand Philippines...............
Far East-Northern Ar,:a, including
Japan..........................,....

Canadian trad are1............

Ia.ifir Ca.:.da........................
Great Lake Cnada..................
Atlauntic Cnada .......................

-Represents :rQo.
L' Less than 50,00( po2uns.
S"lassifi'iatin of derth cargo vessels
part of a scheduled berth operation, et(


a ,i~i )t(


Toldl d(y caigo


Dry cargo vev'els1




Total US

(51 (6I


Irregular

US
Total flag

(7) (8)


l, lk.'i,.4


500.4

(7.7
18 1
252. c


Tanker vessels


20 ,11


i /:


3ii0.0



31.1



Fi.7


as "liner" or "irrejrlar or tramp" is based on characteristics of each voyage (whether the voyage is
.) using the classification criteria of the Maritime Administration.


Toble S.-U.S EXPORTS OF DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO UNDER THE U.S. FOREIGN AID PROGRAMS, AND "SPECIAL CATEGORY" NON-
DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO-COASTAL DISTRICT OF LADING BY TYPE OF VESSEL SERVICE AND AMOUNTS CARRIED ON U.S. FLAG AND
FOREIGN FLAG VESSELS

(Shipping weight in thousands of pounds. Totals represent the sums of unrounded figures, hence may vary slightly from the sums of the rounded
amounts)

Total all vessels U.S. flag vessels Foreign flag vessels


U.S. Coastal district of lading Grand Liner Irregula Tanker Liner regular Tanker Liner Irregular Tanker
or tramp vnes e or trp L or tramp
total service service vessel service serviceamp vessel service service vessel

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)

Total all coastal districts:
Monthly average 1b96............... 104,884 62,349 11,728 30,807 45,092 9,521 1,002 17,257 2,207 29,805
Jsln 1964. ... ... ......... ... I,5 ,4 1
June 195. ................... .... 38,O." 54 ,7' 377 47,4o3 *', .:]'' 7',:-"'-' > 2'S
J3"ly 19(.5. .................. ...... 3t,13- ,?7 23, '" L,'"7 !', 7 7 5-


North Atlantic ports..................... 79 3 ,4,i2 50
South Atlantic ports....................... i
Gulf Coast ports.......................... ..i 4, L, -
South Pacific ports...................... ", ,. ,45 3, 1. -
North Pacific ports...................... -
Great Lakes ports......................... -
Puerto Rico, Hawaii and Alaska ports.....- -

Represents zero.
2 Less than 500 pounds.


~

















Table 6.-U.S. EXPORTS OF DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO UNDER U.S. FOREIGN AID PROGRAMS, AND "SPECIAL CATEGORY" NON-DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO-TRADE
AREA BY TYPE OF VESSEL SERVICE AND AMOUNT CARRIED ON U.S. FLAG VESSELS ND

(Shipping weight in thousands of pounds. Totals represent the sums of unrounded figures, hence may vary slightly from the sums of the rounded amounts)

Total all vessels Dry cargo vessels1 Tanker vessels

Total dry cargo Liner Irregular
Total
Trade area shipping U.S. U.S.
fla flag U.S. U.S. U.S. Total flag
weight Total flag Total flag Total flag

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)

Total all trade areas:
Monthly average 1964....................................... 104,884 55,615 74,077 54,613 62,349 45,092 11,728 9,521 30,807 1,002
Jl;' 19 4................... ............... ......... .. 108,131 57,012 72,902 57,012 61,570 46,497 11,332 10,515 35,229
ne 1965............................................... 88,067 80,502 88,067 80,502 54,790 47,493 33,277 33,009 -
Jly 1965................................................ 36,139 25,378 36,139 25,378 33,927 23,870 2,212 1,507



Foreign trade areas except Canadian.......................... 36,139 25,378 36,139 25,378 33,927 23,870 2,212 1,507

Caribbean.......................................................... 599 345 599 345 559 313 40 33
East Coast South America............................. ........... ..... 530 448 530 448 508 426 22 22
West Coast South America........................................... 803 786 803 786 315 299 488 488
West Coast Central America and Mexico .............................. 37 30 37 30 9 2 28 28
Gulf Coast Mexico................................................. (Z) (Z) (Z) -

United Kingdom and Eire............................................ 593 206 593 206 593 206
Baltic, Scandinavia, Iceland and Greenland......................... 108 8 108 8 108 8
Bayonne-Hamburg Range.............................................. 6,754 143 6,754 143 6,421 5 333 138
Portugal and Spanish Atlantic.................................... 71 69 71 69 71 69 -
Unidentified countries in Western Europe ........................... -
Azores, Mediterranean and Black Sea................................. 3,614 2,910 3,614 2,910 3,281 2,577 333 333

West Coast Africa............................................................ .. 303 287 303 287 303 287 -
South and East Africa.............................................. 5 5 2 4 2 1
Australasia........................................................ 265 1 265 1 265 1 -
India, Persian Gulf and Red Sea ................................... 3,516 1,401 3,516 1,4101 13, (Z)
Malaysia and Indonesia............................................. 44 2 44 2 44 2
Far East-Southern Area, including Taiwan and F-Ph I Llr.;............. 1,299 15,268 15,289 15,268 14,987 14,96 X 302
Far East-Northern Area, including Japan ........................... 3, U:7 3,472 3,607 3,472 3,444 3,308 1l4 -

Canadian trade areas .........................................- -

Pacific Canada.................................................... -
Great Lakes Canada................................................. -
Atlantic Canada................................................... --

i' tr.rr LI.ts zero. -


part of a scheduled berth operation, etc.)


Z Less than 500 pounds.
Claslsiafation of dry cargo vessels as "liner" or "irregular or tramp" is based on characteristics of each voyage
using the classification criteria of the Maritime Addmintretion.


(whether the voyage is








SPECIAL ANNOI INt 111 N ',


SPECIAL L, REPORT S ARRANGED FOR ON A COS[- 1IO -S LlSCRI hER BASIS

Special repot::-: contact ed f: r on a con :': i.-is are lii.'U-1: rin :mrrt imbe caliuns ;:o that ( hll u tn-;: u rc;
statsttic m be iom e :o report. u 1ein 1c earel (u" the uzs t i involve. heee pee u la rc-li it vrit
S tralie data in i'rea ter tail oi it if'f r. ent Iarran:emnt, than that available nle fr the rtl publs. ly foreign t
statistic ;, or supply it a earcl date iformatl on whir, will le iull lihed later Tie entir~y coat o the ecilre
work rquirei to c0 pil:e or d a lic ate t itfourmation frm thn e ia: I datia tvalabe iB thie policy with1 cari' to
subscriber.

The reports listed bltiow ae tho 'Se which hIav beeni ititiatcd sitice ti'e lat t published li;;t oveu. trin: ti::t.c- re-
lated to inorts ai exports by v essel Se:'ial repot r cverting statited "Policla to other to Rype:as of foreign trad
data are listed in te clu'ent foreit tIrade re ort covrint such d ata. Report previously con trcted or ar i
listed in issue: of previoui: is:tue: of thin report. Additional subscriber1c may pi'u'chase any :lecIal report; lied
in any is ue. The nximusl payment req~( 'crid in eact cae will be at the rate phown in the li t. Unless otheradie
indicated, the rice a listed ccve'r o ubxi cript scial hrouh ert end aof the calendar years Wtre the period ivered in.
ls tan a full calendar year, the actual pesrio overed is indicated. When moret tOha one transit; ubenerib to orte
of these report. ntr t the beginning of a alendar year, tie c/t is proS-rated among all sub y i strict. If a new adn-
scriber requests the report riag the 'Malen ar year, reaot to him in motrt ca se: is the sames as the cost ta eaca
original sub ib

Cost-sharing arran e Ients with the original sdubescribers are sometime, suggested in such cLaes when the reort i a
costly one. Information furnaished on a cost baSi u:Vually will not be publicly released by the Bureau w Pithout
charge or at a reduced rate until after S months, but exceptions are made in the case of data which the Bureau re-
gards as of general interest.

Subscribers who an r interested in iTnformatiof whiee is not obtainable from the r L ,'1.irli~ published foreign trade
statistics reports, and not listed as a special report, may inquire as to the r-g in s iity of obtaining the desired
information and requesto-Po t estimate for initiating a new special report. The Bureau's policy with regard to
services furnished at cost is described more fully in an article entitled "Policy in i'"-:"'rd to Release of Foreign
Trade and Shipping Statistics -e s. i. for Private $,.0i 0i ..r.: on a Cost Basi" in the November 1962 issue
of Report FT 110 and FT 410. :-.": r describing these policies are available upon request to the _.r._i,. Trade
Division, Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233. Inquiries regarding the .* .iLty of obtaining unpublished
data, or requests for copies of existing special reports, should also be addressed to the 7: r.i.- Trade Division.


SPECIAL MONTHLY REPORTS FOR 1965

FT 1010 '-: Pre ti : of Monthly Magnetic Tapes Covering U.S. Waterborne :..'.Is;: Outbound Intransit; General Import;
and Inbound Intransit Foreign Trade, Country of Destination/Origin by Schedule W Commodi'ty by District of Lading/
Unlading Arrangement. (Includes Photocopies of Report FT 985 Prior to Publication and Control Totals on U.S.
Waterborne Export and Import Trade Moving Between U.S. Great Lakes Districts and Great Lakes Districts in Canada.
Also Includes a '.- of the 1964 Andual Waterborne Tabulations SA 705, hipns Min -: SA 705-IT, Outbound Intransit;
SA 705, Supplement; SA 305, imports; and SA 305-IT, Inbound Intransit.) Price per year per subscriber $2,571

FT 1012 Preparation of Punchcards :.'.: a.i-..' Summary Data on U.S. Waterborne Export, Outbound Intransit, General
and Inbound Intransit Foreign Trade Between (E) U.S. Atlantic, Gulf, and Great Lakes Ports and Ports in
South America, Scandinavia, Baltic '-i :-_, and South and East Africa and (2) U.S. Pacific Coast Ports and Ports in
Mexico, Central America, Caribbean seres South America, Scandinavia, Baltic Regions, and South and East Africa.
(Includes Confo70 ante Listings in Type of Vessel Service by U.S. Port of Lading/.Ird siirl biy Foreign Port of
Ur.lig .. (Ladin) by Schedule W Commodity by Country of Destination/Origin. Includes -'r- at l.n of Summary Puncheards
Showing on a Port-to-Port Basis, Value and Shipping Weight Totals for Cargo Carried on (1) All Vessels and (2) U.S.
Flag Vessels.) Price per year per subscriber $6,600.

FT 1034 Preparation of Monthly Punch Cards of U.S. Waterborne General Imports; Inbound Intransit Shipments; b U.S.
of Domestic and Foreign Merchandise; and Outbound Intransit Shipments Moving Through the Port of Baltimore. Price
per year per subscriber $1,330.


MONTHLY TABULATIONS (MACHINE RUNS) AVAILABLE ON A COST-TO-SUBSCRIBER BASIS FOR 1965

(Price per subscriber for complete series $1,550. i-:; 'ro:u copies of extracts from these tabulations are avail-
able upon request for a nominal fee.)

SM 305 SM 705 U.S. Waterborne General Imports (Exports) of Merchandise by Tye of VMesel Service by U.S. Port of Un-
blading (Ladi-g) by :-: Port of Lading (Unlading) by Schedule W Commodity by Country of Origin (Destinatiun).

SM 305-IT SM 705-IT-Inbound ( :;. .i .'i Vessel -: of In-transit Merchandise by Type of Vessel Service by
U.S. Port of r'.... (Lading) by Foreign Port of Lading (Unlading) by Schedule W Commodity by Country of r',it,
(Destination).

SM 705 2 .- ..: -Department of Defense Controlled Cargo Exported by Vessel Under the U.S. Foreign Aid i: .-: -T, and
.... _a_ ( Non-Department of Defense Controlled Cargo .. by Vessel in of Vessel Service by U.S.
Port of Lading by Country/Area of .:.i .'_:..

(Price per subscriber for complete series $150. Reproduced copies of extracts from these tabulations are available
upon request for a nominal fee contingent upon the number of trade routes requested.)

SM 317 SM 717 U.S. Water orne General Imports and Exports of Domrestic and ..- ;-. Merchandise, Maritime Trade Route
by 7:'.-- of Vessel Servi:e by :i'-. 1i i (25) Schedule W Commodities.








SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS-Continued


REPORTS FOR SPECIFIED PERIODS

U.S. Waterborne Export (Import) Dry Casr. Trade (Liner and :rr.- i., Cw.:"-.'-._ with Latin American Ports 'z:.le
K Codes 201 through 357) Type of Vessel Service by U.S. Coastal District (Atlantic, Gulf, Pacific, and Great Laes)
by Country of UJrladi.lj/Lading by Foreign Port of Unlading/Lading by U.S. Port of Ladirg/Unlading Arrangeent. Also
Includes Summaries in Type of Vessel Service by U.S. Coastal District by Country of ..:-r. L-: by U.S. Port of
Lading/Unlading Arrangement. Tabulations Show Total Shipping Weight in Pounds, U.S. Flag .; :r. Weight in Pounds
and Percent American Flag Participation. Calendar year 1964. Price per subscriber 2,_40.

U.S. Waterborne Export of Domestic and Foreign Merchandise and Outbound Intransit Shipments on Trade Route 10 northh
Atlantic/Mediterranean; Black Sea, Portu ~i.l, Spain i(ouit! of PF*-: .-sal, Morocco and Azores). Vessel Service
(Liner, Tanker, Irregular) by Schedule S Commodity. Calendar year 1963. Price per subscriber :.',-5.

Preparation of Magnetic Tapes on U.S. Exports, Outbound Intransit, General .n.r. :: and Inbound Intransit Merchandise
Showing

(a) Summary Type of vessel service, U.S. district-and port of lIVJsi/l, I- i:.;_-, foreign port of unlading/1a3r. .,
Schedules S/T commodity, country of destination/origin, value and shipping weight

(b) Port by Port Summary Type of vessel service, U.S. district and port of lading/ ,-l.-. '., :re port of
unlading/lading, total and U.S. flag value and shipping weight

Calendar year 1964. Price per subscriber $430.


ANNUAL TABULATIONS AVAILABLE ON A COST-TO-SUBSCRIBER BASIS FOR 1964 ANNUAL DATA

(Price per subscriber for complete series $510. Reproduced copies of extracts from these tabulations are available
for a nominal fee upon request.)

SA 305-SA 705 U.S. Waterborne General Imports (Exports) of Merchandise by Type of Vessel Service by U.S. Port of
Unlading (Lading) by Foreign Port of Lading (Unlading) by Schedules T (S) Commodity by Country of r'
(Destination).

SA 305-IT SA 705-IT-Inbound (Outbound) Vessel Shipments of In-transit Merchandise in Type of Vessel Service by
U.S. Port of Unlading (Lading) by Foreign Port of Lading (Unlading) by Schedules T (S) Cn--:li: by Country of
Origin (Destination).

SA 705 Supplement Department of Defense Controlled Cargo Exported by Vessel under the U.S. F-rei- Aid F'r-.ra-'
and "Special Category" Non-Department of Defense Controlled Cargo Exported by Vessel in Type of Vessel Service by
U.S. Port of Lading by Country/Area of Unlading.
USCOMM--DC










Now Available

.;.. .... ..,...............






1S. INDUSTRIAL


66

^^^.i'ds in key U united States industries.. exports, imports, production,
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on ustn s


Superintendent of Documents
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