Federal personnel manual system

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Federal personnel manual system
Portion of title:
FPM letter
Physical Description:
Book
Language:
English
Creator:
United States Civil Service Commission
United States -- Office of Personnel Management
Publisher:
United States Civil Service Commission
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Frequency:
irregular
completely irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Personnel management -- Handbooks, manuals, etc -- United States   ( nal )
Civil service -- Handbooks, manuals, etc -- United States   ( lcsh )
Personnel management -- Handbooks, manuals, etc -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Issuing Body:
Vols for 1979- issued by: Office of Personnel Management.
General Note:
Description based on: 410-19 (Aug. 22, 1977); title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consutled: 292-23 (No. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 021549616
oclc - 06727309
lccn - 2009238041
System ID:
AA00012996:00057


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
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13 FPM Letter 920- 13
rntnt,
tem
Mamal 5ys Published in advance
nj incorporation in FPM
Chapter 920 or FPM
Supplement 920
lopmnf:ofSePior Executives WAN UM SUKRSEMD

h
Washington, D. C. 20415

'44 November 13p 1981
dqpt stabhshtnents:

4,
QWO---'geheral guidance to help agencies establish and
-onti' ing development of senior-executives.
ell,

lish
*gje, Off ice of personnel Management sball estab:
a senior executives, or require agencies
meet criteria prescribed by the Office."
3,
t 'Overall planning and nwujeroent of the
rjoE9 develc lxcqr (s) shall, be provided by a
490ftcy executive resources boaLa or a canplex of
4 o V4 Mk6rdinate levels.w
t system for the coiatinu#ig development of
4

J *pj*rntatjM, ard* "plar updating of an
forleach S&9 me;6_6r, to be approved
A "Wtive reaourdes board., These plans shal
4'0 OC *aa le a0 :Ocus on the
apiprais cyc
cies as well as the correction
men
"k 'id
APPe6isd1se and on preparing for

,experiences, for SI5 members wh
chnil 0:6hork*t ,Opportxmities and periodic invol
5 IWW'r
jgt, q -iotional needs for, managerial nt
Y silo
,,t6 keep upto-date in professionally, techni
114,i,,*p'*,IIC9AcaI t economic and politioal, areas; and

(tit, needs of SES nm"rs, for growth and develop
h
V4
tialty and personally; and

Q1,
n ecutive sabbaticals or carefully, selected aeniDers
Y-Oiibie ion (c) of section 3396 of'title 5,, United States
as, ct
ke
code.



Development Divisjon, EPMD
y
0Aor* Jiw"Go elgranth (202) 632-4661
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a. The executive environment is highly complex and is becoming nore acaiplex.,:j
Increasing numbers of laws affect more than one Federal agency as well as state.
local governments and the private sector. Executives must understand and
the needs of different and often conflicting clientele groups;

b. All SES members face increasing pressure to manage better and to ioprofe*.
ductivity. 'his".calls for a continuing effort to keep management skills up to :.1

Sc. In the past,. It was possible for individuals to rise through professlanot:....
as a result of technical excellence and to be selected for executive positions' .
6f limited management experience. Through trial and error and through forualm.
nent efforts,ntfny of these individuals have become excellent executives. Ho.veii
bs ienbeubs have limited backgrounds in management;

d. .Many individuals serve as executives for 15 years or longer. A recent MI.,
established that 24 per cent of career executives received their initial execute*"
pointdient before they were 40 and nearly 52 per cent became executives before thll
45. We can expect many if not most of these executives to serve in the SES until t
are 55 or older. Developmental efforts should not stop long before these individ
reach the end of their careers;

e. Many SES members are professionals who must continually update their techni
highly specialized knowledge in order to exercise sound judgment on policy and
matters and to maintain the respect and support of professional peers and subordina

f. Much of the work executives do is inherently developmental, since executives*'
are forced to grow to keep up with their challenging jobs. However, this tnplannzxML.
growth often leaves gaps that is, competency areas which are important to optinaim
executive performance are frequently left undeveloped.

g. SES mobility options create new developmental needs. The significant inrdre6eMi
in executive mobility which are inherent in the aondcpt of a Senior Executive ServiceI
call for broader, more flexible executives and, thus, for systematic development to
prepare executives for their next assignments;


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FPM Latte 920-3 o(3



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for executives;

(4) Provides policy seminars and information services to ensure that SES 'atnieran.i
in Washington and in the field are informed regarding Administration policies

(5) Coordinates with the many deliverers of education and training (universitiesNI.
nonprofit institutions, private vendors, etc.) to ensure that the develoqpmmet
needs of Federal executives are understood;

(6) Operates a central clearinghouse of information on opportunities for SES ineSMj
development;

(7) Assists agencies in the design and installation of SES member development
programs;

(8) Assists in arranging permanent or temporary interagency assignments for SES
members; and












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!: /


(9) Conducts research on Federal executive competencies and how they are best
acquired and maintained.







Donald J. Devine
Director


Attachment


PPM Letter 920- 13


















































































































































ii.. il





Attachment 1 to FEM Letter 920-13



Po":ssible SES mber Dvelopnent activities

S: n- tinuitng development for SES members includes many things, large and small an 11-
lmonth sabbatical as well as an hour a week devoted to books and articles on management;
I attending a professional conference as well as switching assignments to be better
:;-prepared to take on the top job later. A partial list of activities which might be
: included in a program of continuing development for SES members follows:

a. Short-Term And Part-Tim Development
:: QOnittee, task force and special project assignments

Policy anit management luncheons

Agency SES conferences
-- Administration sponsored policy and management seminars

Management skill training

-- Interpersonal skill training

Federal Executive Institute 3-week and shorter programs

Iliversity, nonprofit and private sector short programs
for executives

congressional seminars

-- Part-time university degree and non-degree programs

-- Professional meetings and conferences.

-- Assessment centers and other assessment instruments

Coaching and modeling

-- Structured reading programs

S + Management subjects

+ Professional subjects

Executive team building

+ teams of executives

+ An executive and subordinate executives and managers

Civic activities

b. [ong-ermn Development

Permanent reassignment to another SES position for
developmental purposes

Detail to another SES position for several months or more





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