Syllabus for ENG 6016 : Literature & Psychology - "Supposing to Know, Desupposing Knowledge"

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Syllabus for ENG 6016 : Literature & Psychology - "Supposing to Know, Desupposing Knowledge"
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Syllabus
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English
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Harpold, Terry
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Terry Harpold
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Gainesville, FL

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Course syllabus. Course description: In this seminar we will interrogate relations of knowledge – knowledge of self, knowledge of others, institutional productions and transmissions of “objective” knowledge (such as those practiced in the classroom and laboratory) – in light of Freudian and Lacanian breaks with prior epistemologies. Psychoanalysis presents us with a subject of knowledge that is irreducibly divided between its allegiances to systems of positive truth and the insistent negativities that orient and sustain its desires. For such a subject, not knowing and routinized forms of stupidity are (at least) as constitutive of self-awareness as are reflection and mutual comprehension. What are the consequences of this model of knowledge for our individual and consensual habits of mind? For our practices of research and teaching? Course readings will include primary texts by Freud (portions of the Norton Freud Reader, Freud’s short biographical study of Leonardo da Vinci) and Lacan (portions of Ecrits, Seminar XVII: The Other Side of Psychoanalysis), and selected short and long texts by theorists and critics writing in their wakes (Henry Bond, Carlo Ginzburg, and Dany Nobus and Malcolm Quinn). Graded assignments include a critical commentary on one of the assigned readings, a response to another student’s critical commentary, and a final research essay. (A research prospectus for the final essay is also required; this assignment is not graded.) All written work for the course will be completed in a course wiki. Basic knowledge of WWW- and image–editing applications may be to students’ advantage for some assignments, but is not required.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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ENG 6016 : Literature and Psychology Supposing to Know, Desupposing Knowledge Professor Terry Harpold Fall 2012 Section 088G M, 12:50 3:50 PM ( periods 6 8 ) TUR 4 112 office hours: M, 4:30 5:30 PM; W, 1 3 PM & by appt. (TUR 4105) voice: (352) 294 2808 em ail: home page for Terry Harpold: < http://www.clas.ufl.edu/users/tharpold/ > home page for ENG 6016 : < http://www.clas.ufl.edu/users/tharpold/ courses/ fall12 / eng6016 /> e Learning site & course wiki for ENG 6016 ( registered students only ): < https://lss.at.ufl.edu/ > In this seminar we will interrogate relations of knowledge knowledge of self, knowledge of others, institutional productions and transmissions of "object ive" knowledge (such as those practiced in the classroom and laboratory) in light of Freudian and Lacanian breaks with prior epistemologies. Psychoanalysis presents us with a subject of knowledge that is irreducibly divided between its allegiances to sys tems of positive truth and the insistent negativities that orient and sustain its desires. For such a subject, not knowing and routinized forms of stupidity are (at least) as constitutive of self awareness as are reflection and mutual comprehension. What a re the consequences of this model of knowledge for our individual and consensual habits of mind? For our practices of research and teaching? Course readings will include primary texts by Freud (portions of the Norton Freud Reader Freud's short biographic al study of Leonardo da Vinci ) and Lacan (portions of Ecrits, Seminar XVII: The Other Side of Psychoanalysis ), and selected short and long texts by theorists and critics writing in their wakes (Henry Bond, Carlo Ginzburg, and Dany Nobus and Malcolm Quinn). The Virgin and Child with Saint Anne Leonardo da Vinci, c. 1508

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ENG 6016 Syllabus (Fall 2012) 2 of 10 Graded assignments include a critical commentary on one of the assigned readings, a response to another student's critical commentary and a final research essay. (A research prospectus for the final essay is also required; this assignment is not graded. ) All written work for the course will be completed in a course wiki. Basic knowledge of WWW and image editing applications may be to students' advantage for some assignments, but is not required Required texts Required books for the course are availab le at bookstores in and around campus, including the UF Bookstore, and the usual online vendors. I encourage you whenever possible to buy from independent booksellers. If you choose to buy your texts online, I recommend sources such as Abebooks.com and Ali bris.com that serve independent booksellers Bond, Henry. Lacan at the Scene Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2009 Print. Freud, Sigmund. Leonardo da Vinci and a Memory of His Childhood Ed. James Strachey. Trans. James Strachey. New York: Norton, 1989 Print. Freud, Sigmund. The Freud Reader Ed. Peter Gay. New York: W.W. Norton, 1995 Print. Lacan, Jacques. E crits: The First Complete Edition in English Trans. Bruce Fink. New York: W.W. Norton, 2006. Print. Lacan, Jacques. The Seminar of Jacques Lacan, Book XV II: The Other Side of Psychoanalysis (1969 70) Trans. Russell Grigg. New York: Norton, 2007. Print. Nobus, Dany and Malcolm Quinn. Knowing Nothing, Staying Stupid. Elements for a Psychoanalytic Epistemology New York: Routledge, 2005. Print. Other assigne d and recommended readings for the course will be m ade available in digital formats in the course wiki, via the WWW, or via the course's electronic reserves (Ares, < https://ares.uflib.ufl.edu/ >) : Ginzburg, Carlo. "Clues: Roots of an Evidential Paradigm." C lues, Myths, and the Historical Method. Trans. John Tedeschi and Anne C. Tedeschi. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1992. 96 125, 200 14. Print. Attendance, assignments, & grading Attendance & lateness. The texts we will analyze are complex and challenging. You cannot reasonably expect to master them if you do not keep up with required reading

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ENG 6016 Syllabus (Fall 2012) 3 of 10 assignments and come to class prepared and on time. Moreover, our discussions in class will include review of materials not among the assigned readings For these reasons, your presence in class is essential and is required. After two absences, I reserve the right to lower your final course grade by five points for each additional class that you miss. I treat excused and unexcused absences alike in this regard. It is your responsibility to keep track of your absences and to make sure that you complete all required work. If you must miss class, make sure that you turn in any assignments due for that day, and that you are ready if another assignment is due on the day you return to class. In the event of a prolonged illness or other emergency you should notify me as soon as possible so that we may make provisions to insure that you do not fall behind. Lateness is disruptive to others in the classroom, and is strongly discouraged. If you are more than 30 minutes late to class, this will be considered an absence. If you have special classroom access, seating, or other needs because of disability, do not hesitate to bring those to my attention, so that I may make appropriate accommodations for them. If you are unable to attend any part of a class meeting or work on a course assignment because these coincide with the timing of religious observances, you must notify me of this conflict well in advance, so that we ma y make appropriate adjustments to relevant assignment deadlines. The use of computers and other electronic devices in class. You may use personal computers and other electronic devices in class for purposes related to class discussion and collaboration. Ca sual WWW browsing, emailing, chatting, texting, etc., unrelated to classroom activities will not be tolerated. In the event of a violation of this policy, I reserve the right to prohibit the use of all electronic devices in class by individual students. Ce ll phones, pagers, and other communication devices may not be used during class meetings, and must be turned off at the start of class Assignments & grading. All graded written assignments will be completed in the course wiki. Your final grade will be det ermined by the avera ge of three written assignments: Critical commentary : 15 % Commentary response (response to another student's commentary) : 15 % Final research paper: 70 % There are no other graded assignments in this cour se

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ENG 6016 Syllabus (Fall 2012) 4 of 10 Grades are calculated on a num eric scale, as below: A 90 100 A 87 89 B+ 84 86 B 80 83 B 77 79 C+ 74 76 C 70 73 If you feel that you've been unfairly graded on an assignment, you may make a case in writing for a better grade. I will consider no grade changes without this w ritten rationale. You may turn in an assignment late without penalty only if you have a written medical excuse from a doctor, a signed letter from a judge or law enforcement officer (if you are called for jury duty or to testify in court, for example), or if a death or serious illness or injury occurs in your family. You should contact me as soon as possible when you anticipate a delay in submission of graded work The course wiki T he written work of this course will take place in a wiki a WWW site that s upports collaborative editing of shared documents by a defined group of users. In this course, we will use a wiki hosted within the course's e Learning (Sakai) site, which you can access at this URL: < https://lss.at.ufl.edu/ > The wiki is not open to the g eneral public, i.e., visible on the open Internet. Only students registered in this course are able to access documents posted on it. You are probably familiar with large and complex wikis like Wikipedia. Wikis can also be used for smaller projects such as the collaborative reading and writing exercises of this course. Writing in a wiki is no more technically difficult than writing in a word processor, but learning how to collaborate with others in such an environment presents distinct challenges and opport unities. We will devot e several class meetings to effective uses of the wiki before the first graded writing assignments are due Format, topics, & due dates of writing assignments. All written assignments must follow guidelines regarding format and citati on methods that I will post on the wiki and discuss in class. The commentaries and commentary responses Six class meetings are scheduled for student critical commentaries and responses. The principal function of these commentaries and responses is to see d and guide our discussion s of assigned readings for that class meeting. On the days they are due commentaries and responses are required reading for all students in the course. An effective commentary will be an 1800 2000 word concise analysis of one or more of the assigned readings, outlining crucial points of the readings' argument s and engaging

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ENG 6016 Syllabus (Fall 2012) 5 of 10 them in a productive way. Commenters should not shy from critical engagements with readings flagging infelicities or errors in method or conclusion if they co nclude that this will be productive. An effective commentary response will be a 1500 1800 word concise analysis of another student's critical commentary, outlining crucial points of the commentary's arguments and engaging them in a productive way Responde nts should not shy from critical engagements with a commentary flagging infelicities or errors in method or conclusion, if they conclude that this will be productive In other words, the critical commentaries and responses differ only in their objects and relative lengths They do not differe substantially in their methods or presentation. Soon after the first class meeting I will post a sign up sheet on my office door, on which you may indicate your ranked preferences with regard to three of the comment ary slots and three of the response slots, as noted in the course calendar below. I w ill then collate student preferences and make every effort to assign each student her or his first choice s from among the slots using students' second and third choice s as fallbacks in the event of conflicting preferences As many as two students may write commentaries on the same assigned reading but each response must be to only one commentary B arring emergencies or une xpected class cancellations, a commentary or resp onse assigned to you must be ready on that date. Late commentaries and responses will not be accepted; changes of date for a commentary or response may be difficult or impossible to arrange after the first several weeks of the semester. Fair drafts of crit ical commentaries must be posted to the wiki no later than one week before the due date of the assigned reading. This will give your respondent ample time during which to review your commentary and develop her or his response. I will also review your comme ntary and offer comments and suggestions before the due date of the assigned reading Fair drafts of commentary responses must be posted to the wiki no later than 48 hours before the due date of the assigned reading. This will give everyone in the course a chance to review commentaries and the responses prior to the class meeting during which they will be discussed. I will also review your response and offer comments and suggestions before the due date of the assigned reading. The two stages of commentarie s and responses In keeping with the collaborative and revisionary ethos of wiki practice, the submission process for written work in the course with the exception of the final research paper occurs in two stages Good drafts of your commentaries and r esponses must be posted to the wiki as discussed above. These drafts will remain editable and you are free to revise them for one week after the class meeting during which they are discussed. At that point, I will reset editing permissions of the pages

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ENG 6016 Syllabus (Fall 2012) 6 of 10 in the wiki, effectively locking them, and base my graded assessments on the locked versions. This two stage submission scheme, and how it is effectively realized in the wiki environment, are likel y to be new to most of you. We will review requirements and best practices of the scheme in detail prior to the first graded assignment Research paper prospectus Approximately one month prior to the end of the semester (see the course calendar below ), you must post a 1000 1500 word research paper prospectus to the wiki. (This stipulated word count does not include the prospectus's bibliography.) The prospectus will outline the primary foci and projected conclusions of your final paper. This assignment is not graded, but it is required. Posting it to the wiki at this point in the semester will enable other members of the course to offer timely feedback regarding your project. Reviewing their prospect s is likely also to be of benefit to you as you begin working on this intensive application of the course materials and concepts Research paper The subject of your fi nal research paper should be an application of the texts and concepts we have discussed in class to texts or problems which are of interest to you in other areas of your scholarly training, for example, an upcoming conference presentation, a chapter of your thesis or dissertation, or a paper you hope to publish. I am less interested in your repeating or reworking materials we have studied in the course than in your application of those materials to your wider research agenda A note on collaborative projects Productive collaborative work is seldom easy S tudents working under these conditions often wo rry that their individual grades may suffer as a result of breakdowns in communication or the failures of other students to complete quality work on a project. I have built mechanisms into this course to reduce the risk of this happening The most importan t thing s you can do to insure that your commentary and respons e are effective is to work closely with the student s with whom you have been paired, to make sure these collaborations do not fall behind schedule, and to use the wiki's editing and revision fea tures to improve the quality of your collaboration If for any reason you feel that you and your colleague s in this process are unable to work together efficiently or appropriately, I encourage you to alert me to such difficulties through private emails or conversation as soon as possible. Privacy of grades and other assessments of your performance The guiding principal of our uses of the wiki in this course is one of peer access : in brief others in the course will be able to review much of your written work and many of your exchanges with me regarding your work T hey will be able and encouraged to comment on your work and these exchanges, with the aim of enlarging our shared understanding of the texts and critical theoretical problems we will discuss

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ENG 6016 Syllabus (Fall 2012) 7 of 10 This public aspect of your contributions to the wiki does not include my grading of your individual performance in the course I have designed the course and grading methods to insure that such evaluations of your work a re known only to the two of us, a nd will be communicated only by channels that will guarantee your privacy in this regard Our uses of online resources in this course will adhere to the University's posted policies on student data security, confidentiality, and privacy. As a student, you have defined obligations under these policies with regard to your online conduct. See < https://lss.at.ufl.edu/home/privacy/ > for a complete description of these policies. Resolving date conflicts for assignments. It is essential that you notify me as soon as possible when any assigned reading or writing conflict s with other commitments you may have (For example, if the due date falls on a religious holiday ) If you wait to notify me of such conflicts I may not be able to change your assignments and your p erformance in the course may be adversely affected as a result. Policy on academic honesty The University community's policies and methods regarding academic honesty, your obligations to me and mine to you with regard to academic honesty, are clearly spell ed out in the UF Student Honor Code, which is available online at < http://www.dso.ufl.edu/sccr/honorcodes/honorcode.php > Academic dishonesty in any form will not be tolerated in this course. Examples of academic dishonesty include but are not limited to: Possessing, using, or exchanging improperly acquired written or oral information in the preparation of graded assignments submitted for this course. Substitution of material that is wholly or substantially identical to that created or published by anot her individual or individuals. False claims of performance or work submitted by a student for requirements of this course. Collaborative work that is required for this course does not fall within any of the forbidden categories listed above. H onest compl etion of collaborative work does require that you adhere to well defined practices that acknowledge the contributions of others in a forthright and precisely documented manner I will review these practices in class before the first graded assignment. I am obliged to act on any suspected act of academic misconduct. This may include a reduced or failing grade for the course as a whole or other disciplinary proceedings, as per the recommendation of the Dean of Students. If you have any concern that you may no t have made appropriate use of the work of others in your research or writing for this

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ENG 6016 Syllabus (Fall 2012) 8 of 10 course, please confer with me before you submit the assignment. You should retain all graded materials that you receive from me until you receive your final course grade Course calendar (M) 27 Aug Course introduction Introduction to course wiki Ginzburg, Clues: Roots of an Evidential Paradigm ( Ares ) (M) 3 Sept No class meeting (Labor Day) (M) 10 Sept Freud, excerpts from The Interpretation of Dreams "Repression & "The Unconscious" ( The Freud Reader ) Lacan, "The Function and Field of Speech and Language in Psychoanalysis" (M) 17 Sept Lacan, "The Instance of the Letter in the Unconscious, or Reason Since Freud" (M) 24 Sept Draft of critical commentary 1 posted to w iki Freud, "Negation" ( The Freud Reader ) Lacan, "Introduction to Jean Hyppolite's Commentary on Freud's Verneinung'" Hyppolite, "A Spoken Commentary on Freud's Verneinung'" Lacan, "Response to Jean Hyppolite's Commentary on Freud's Verneinung'" (M) 1 Oc t Draft of critical commentary 2 posted to wiki Critical commentary & response 1 Freud, excerpts from "On Beginning the Treatment," "Observations on Transference Love & "Fragment of an Analysis of a Case of Hysteria" ( The Freud Reader ) Lacan, "The Direct ion of the Treatment and the Principles of Its Power" (M) 8 Oct Draft of critical commentary 3 posted to wiki Critical commentary & response 2 Critical commentary & response 1 pages in the wiki are locked Freud, excerpts from "Notes Upon a Case of O bsessi onal Neurosis (Rat

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ENG 6016 Syllabus (Fall 2012) 9 of 10 Man') & "From the History of an Infantile Neurosis (Wolf Man')" ( The Freud Reader ) (M) 15 Oct Draft of critical commentary 4 posted to wiki Critical commentary & response 3 Critical commentary & response 2 pages in the wiki are locke d Freud, excerpt from "Creative Writers and Daydreaming," & The Moses of Michelangelo ( The Freud Reader ); Leonardo da Vinci and a Memory of His Childhood (M) 22 Oct Critical commentary & response 4 Critical commentary & response 3 pages in the wiki are loc ked Lacan, "Logical Time and the Assertion of Anticipated Certainty" & "The Subversion of the Subject and the Dialectic of Desire in the Freudian Unconscious (M) 29 Oct Critical commentary & response 4 pages in the wiki are locked Freud, excerpt from The Question of Lay Analysis Lacan, The Other Side of Psychoanalysis (M) 5 Nov Lacan, The Other Side of Psychoanalysis (M) 12 Nov No class meeting (Veterans Day) (Tu ) 13 Nov Research paper prospect s posted to wiki Draft of critical commentary 5 posted to wik i (M) 19 Nov Critical commentary & response 5 Draft of critical commentary 6 posted to wiki Freud, "Some Psychical Consequences of the Anatomical Distinction Between the Sexes" ( The Freud Reader ) Lacan, "The Signification of the Phallus" Bond, Lacan at t he Scene (M) 26 Nov Critical commentary & response 6 Critical commentary & response 5 pages in the wiki are locked Lacan, "Science and Truth" Nobus & Quinn, Knowing Nothing Staying Stupid

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ENG 6016 Syllabus (Fall 2012) 10 of 10 (M) 3 Dec Final class meeting Critical commentary & response 6 pages in the wiki are locked Course debriefing (M ) 10 Dec Research paper pages posted to wiki They will be locked 5 PM 11 Dec.