Syllabus for LIT 3400 : Interdisciplinary Topics in Literature - "Paratexts"

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Syllabus for LIT 3400 : Interdisciplinary Topics in Literature - "Paratexts"
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English
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Harpold, Terry
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Terry Harpold
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Gainesville, FL
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Course syllabus. Course description: This course concerns paratextuality as a basic condition of reading. First comprehensively inventoried by literary theorist Gérard Genette, paratexts are verbal and material elements of a text which, while apparently ancillary to its primary aspects, orient and situate our reception of the text’s meaning. These include elements “inside” the text such as tables of content, prefaces, chapter titles, footnotes, and indexes, as well as others “outside” the text, such as jacket art, reader endorsements, advertising, and reviews. In more material terms, every expressive aspect of the text-as-object, including its typographic attributes, page size and design, paper weight and color, etc., or (especially) any unusual aspect of binding and pagination, may signify paratextually. Many of these attributes of print carry over to reading in digital environments such as WWW pages and e-readers, whose interfaces reproduce (with varying degrees of caricature) paratextual apparatus of print, as well as introduce their own, distinctive apparatus. (Another way to describe paratexts might be as aspects of the “interface” of reading in any environment. Like user interfaces of our computing devices, paratexts are a principal space of our transactions with the information they enframe.) We will read several long and short literary-theoretical and historical treatments of the varieties and importance of paratexts (including Genette’s landmark 1987 study, Paratexts: Thresholds of Interpretation), and survey changing conventions of paratextual expression, from early modern print texts through contemporary digital reading devices. Much of our discussions will be devoted to close readings and hands-on analysis of unusual and exemplary print and digital paratexts. We will also take two field trips to UF library special collections with particularly rich examples of historical paratexts (the Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature and the Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica), and a “virtual” field trip to explore anomalies of Google Books that reveal the mutability of the paratext in the late age of print. All graded written work for the course will be completed in a course wiki. Basic knowledge of WWW– and image-editing applications may be to students’ advantage for some assignments, but is not required. Written course requirements include two exams and two collaborative research projects.

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LIT 3400 : Interdi sciplinary Topics in Literature Paratexts Professor Terry Harpold Fall 2012 Section 09B D MWF, 10:40 11:30 AM (period 4 ) TUR 1315 office hours: M, 4:30 5:30 PM; W, 1 3 PM & by appt. (TUR 4105) voice: (352) 294 2808 email: < tharpold@ufl.edu> home page for Terry Harpold: < http://www.clas.ufl.edu/users/tharpold/ > home page for LIT 3400 : < http://www.clas.ufl.edu/users/tharpold/ courses/ fall12 / lit3400 /> e Learning site & course wiki for LIT 3400 ( registered students only ): < htt ps://lss.at.ufl.edu/ > The Book Fool. "If on this ship I'm number one For special reasons that was done, Yes, I'm the first one here you see Because I like my library. Of splendid books I own no end, But few that I can comprehend." Sebastian Brant, Das Narrenschiff ( The Ship of Fools ), Basel, 1494. Illus. by the Haintz Nar Meister 1 This course concerns paratextuality as a basic condition of reading. First comprehensively inventoried by literary theorist GŽrard Genette, paratexts are verbal and material elements of a text which, while apparently ancillary to its primary aspects, orient and situate our 1 Brant, Sebastian. The Ship of Fools. Translated into Rhyming Couplets with Introduction and Commentary Ed. and trans. Edwin H. Zeydel. New York: Columbia University Press, 1944.

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LIT 3400 Syllabus (Fall 2012) 2 of 12 reception of the text's meaning. These include elements "inside" the text such as tables of content, prefaces, chapter titles, footnotes, and indexes, as well as others "outside" the text, such as jacket art, reader endorsements, advertising, and reviews. In more material terms, every expressive aspect of the text as object, including its typographic attributes, page size and design, paper weight and color, etc., or (especially) any unusual aspect of binding and pagination, may signify paratextually. Many of these attribute s of print carry over to reading in digital environments such as WWW pages and e readers, whose interfaces reproduce (with varying degrees of caricature) paratextual apparatus of print, as well as introduce their own, distinctive apparatus. (Another way to describe paratexts might be as aspects of the "interface" of reading in any environment. Like user interfaces of our computing devices, paratexts are a principal space of our transactions with the information they enframe.) We will read several long and s hort literary theoretical and historical treatments of the varieties and importance of paratexts (including Genette's landmark 1987 study, Paratexts: Thresholds of Interpretation ), and survey changing conventions of paratextual expression, from early moder n print texts through contemporary digital reading devices. Much of our discussions will be devoted to close readings and hands on analysis of unusual and exemplary print and digital paratexts. We will also take two field trips to UF library special collec tions with particularly rich examples of historical paratexts ( t he Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature and t he Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica ), and a "virtual" field trip to explore anomalies of Google Books that reveal the mutability of the paratext in the late age of print. All graded written work for the course will be completed in a cour se wiki. Basic knowledge of WWW and image editing applications may be to students' advantage for some assignments, but is not required. Written course requirements include two exams and two collaborative research projects Required texts Required books for the course are available at bookstores in and around campus, including the UF Bookstore, and the usual online vendors. I encourage you whenever possible to buy from independent booksellers. If you choose to buy your texts online, I recommend sources s uch as Abebooks.com and Alibris.com that serve independent booksellers Defoe, Daniel. Robinson Crusoe Ed. John Richetti. New York: Penguin, 2003. Print. Genette, GŽrard. Paratexts: Thresholds of Interpretation Trans. Jane E. Lewin. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1997 Print.

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LIT 3400 Syllabus (Fall 2012) 3 of 12 Jackson, Kevin. Invisible Forms: A Guide to Literary Curiosities New York: St. Martin's Press, 1999. Print. Other assigned and recommended readings for the course will be m ade available in digital formats in the course wiki, via the WWW, or via the course's electronic reserves (Ares, < https://ares.uflib.ufl.edu/ >). These include: Ballard, J.G. "The Index." War Fever. New York: Farrar, Straus, Giroux, 1990. 171 76 Print. (Ares) Grafton, Anthony. "Footnotes: The Origin of a Species." The Footnote: A Curious History. London: Faber and Faber, 1997. 1 33. Print. (Ares) Sherman, William H. "Dirty Books? Attitudes Toward Reader's Marks." Used Books: Marking Readers in Renaissance Engla nd. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008. 151 78, 216 22. Print. (Ares) Other texts may be added to the list of required and recommended reading as the semester progresses. I will notify you of these changes and will update the course sylla bus accordingly. Attendance, assignments, & grading Attendance & lateness. The texts we will analyze are complex and challenging. You cannot reasonably expect to master them if you do not keep up with required reading assignments and come to class prepared and on time. Moreover, our discussions in class will include review of materials not among the assig ned readings. For these reasons, your presence in class is essential and is required. After three absences, I reserve the right to lower your final course grade by five points for each additional class that you miss. I treat excused and unexcused absences alike in this regard. It is your responsibility to keep track of your absences and to make sure that you complete all required work. If you must miss class, make sure that you turn in any assignments due for that day, and that you are ready if another assi gnment is due on the day you return to class. In the event of a prolonged illness or other emergency you should notify me as soon as possible so that we may make provisions to insure that you do not fall behind. Lateness is disruptive to others in the clas sroom, and is strongly discouraged. If you are more than 15 minutes late to class, this will be considered an absence. If you have special classroom access, seating, or other needs because of disability, do not hesitate to bring those to my attention, so t hat I may make appropriate accommodations for them. If you are unable to attend any part of a class meeting or work on a course assignment because these coincide with the timing of religious observances, you must notify me of

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LIT 3400 Syllabus (Fall 2012) 4 of 12 this conflict well in advance, so that we may make appropriate adjustments to relevant assignment deadlines. The use of computers and other electronic devices in class. You may use personal computers and other electronic devices in class for purposes related to class discussion and col laboration. Casual WWW browsing, emailing, chatting, texting, etc., unrelated to classroom activities will not be tolerated. In the event of a violation of this policy, I reserve the right to prohibit the use of all electronic devices in class by individua l students. Cell phones, pagers, and other communication devices may not be used during class meetings, and must be turned off at the start of class In class case studies. A number of class meetings during the semester are scheduled as in class case studies. On these days I will bring in one or more print or electronic texts chiefly from my personal collection of such objects, which illustrate interesting paratextual apparatus or traditions W e will analyze these texts in open class discussion. In general, no assigned reading is due on these days though I may distribute recommended reading in advance to seed our discussions. You are obliged to attend these class meetings, which are in that regard no different from others during the semester. Field trips. Four class meetings this semester are scheduled field trips to The Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature and the Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica both of which are housed on the UF campus The curators of each of these superb co llections have kindly agreed to give our class tours of the ir facilities and to show us important objects from the collections which are relevant to our investigations. Because of the close confines of the collections and the size of our class, one half of the class will attend one of the tours for each collection. (I will notify you early in the semester to which tour dates you have been assigned.) E xcept in the event of a prolonged illness or other emergency, you must attend these field trips. Assignments & grading. All graded written assignments will be completed in the course wiki. Your final grade will be determined by the avera ge of four written assignments: Midterm exam: 30 % Final exam: 40 % Collaborative "Art of Google Books" project : 10% Collaborative Baldwin Library paratext project : 20 % Two of these assignments are completed individual ly by each student, two are collaborative endeavors of workgroup s of 5 7 students each I will notify you early in the semester to which workgroup you have been assigned. I strongly recommend that workgroups members meet and/or correspond with e ach other early in the semester to decide on divisions of labor for their collective assignments a nd that groups begin work on their projects as soon as possible after the requirements of each have been made clear

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LIT 3400 Syllabus (Fall 2012) 5 of 12 There are no other graded assignments in this course. I do not give make up or extra credit assignments. Grades are calculated on a numeric scale, as below: A 90 100 A 87 89 B+ 84 86 B 80 83 B 77 79 C+ 74 76 C 70 73 C 67 69 D+ 64 66 D 60 63 D 57 59 A grade of 56 or below is a failing grade (E). If you do not complete an assignment, you will receive a grade of 0. If you feel that you've been unfairly graded on an assignment, you may make a case in writing for a better grade. I will consider no grade changes without this written rationale. You may turn in an assignment late without penalty only if you have a written medical ex cuse from a doctor, a signed letter from a judge or law enforcement officer (if you are called for jury duty or to testify in court, for example), or if a death or serious illness or injury occurs in your family. You should contact me as soon as possible w hen you anticipate a delay in submission of graded work The course wiki T he written work of this course will take place in a wiki a WWW site that supports collaborative editing of shared documents by a defined group of users. In this course, we will use a wiki hosted within the course's e Learning (Sakai) site, which you can access at this URL: < https://lss.at.ufl.edu/ > The wiki is not open to the general public, i.e., visible on the open Internet. Only students registered in this course are able to access documents posted on it. You are probably familiar with large and complex wikis like Wikipedia. Wikis can also be used for smaller projects such as the collaborative reading and writing exercises of this course. Writing in a wiki is no more technically difficult than writing in a word processor, but learning how to collaborate with others in such an environment presents distinct challenges and opportunities. We will devot e several class meetings to effective uses of the wiki before the first graded writing assignments are due Format, topics, & due dates of writing assignments. All written assignments must follow guidelines regarding format and citation methods that I will post on the wiki and discuss in class. The midterm and final exams are open book and cumulative to the date each is posted to the wiki. You may not collaborate with any other person when working on the exams.

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LIT 3400 Syllabus (Fall 2012) 6 of 12 Because the exams are intended to be time limited reviews of your understanding of course readings and discussion s, the penalty for an exam completed after the deadline is severe: for each day that your completed exam is late, ten points will be deducted from the grade for that exam. I will not accept any exam that is turned in later than three days after its due dat e, in which case a grade of 0 will be given for the exam. The exams will require that you respond to one of two essay questions pr oducing essays of between 900 15 00 words in length The essay questions will be posted to wiki and are due on these dates: posted due date (close date) M idterm exam 28 Sept 5 Oct ( 12 Oct ) F inal exam 26 Nov 5 Dec ( 12 Dec ) In keeping with the collaborative and revisionary ethos of wiki practice, the submission process for your written exams is in two phases. An initial draft of your completed exams must be posted to the course wiki before the beginning of class on the due da te shown above. Your exam wiki page(s) will remain editable by you up until the beginning of the class on the close date shown above What this means in practice is that you can continue to revise your essay up until the close date. As you will during this time also be able to read other students' draft essays, you can see how others have responded to exam questions and to draw upon their work to inform and improve your own. I will in fact encourage you to acknowledge and cite other students' work in yo ur completed essay, and to comment constructively on their contributions to our conversations around the exams. When citing other students' writing, you will be required to adhere scrupulously to correct citation practices. On the close date, I will reset editing permissions of your exam pages in the wiki, preventing you from revising them further. Your grade on the assignment will be based on the version of the exam posted to the wiki as of the close date. This two stage submission scheme, and how it is ef fectively realized in the wiki environment, are likely to be new to most of you. We will review requirements and best practices of the scheme in detail prior to the first graded assignment Collaborative "Art of Google Books" project. This workgroup project will draw on readings from Krissy Wilson's curatorial blog and her online collaboration with the class Complete instructions regarding the methods and requirements of the project will be given later in the semester. For the time being, take note of the due and close dates of this project in the course calendar, below

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LIT 3400 Syllabus (Fall 2012) 7 of 12 Collaborative bibliographic/paratextual project The final w orkgroup project of the semester is based on the more than 300 editions of Daniel Defoe's novel Robinson Crusoe (originally published in 1719) held in the Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature. Robinson Crusoe is not only among the most influential text s of the modern Western tradition, it is also one of the most often illustrated work s of long fiction in that tradition T he Baldwin's unparalleled collection of English language editions of the nov el is an abund ant resource for analysis of paratexts. We will read and discuss a contemporary unillustrated edition of Defoe's novel to familiarize ourselves with the story and history of its reception. Then, each workgroup will be assigned between five and ten differen t historical editions of the novel from the Baldwin, and group members will work together to document and analyze in a written report paratextual elements of the editions, including but not limited to formal and structural aspects of the text, illustrations, indications of provenance, and adversaria (marginalia and other marks of the hand.) Some data collected by the workgroups will be added to UF's perman e nt bibliographic records of the editions, so that this information will be available to researchers working in the collection in the future. Complete instructions regarding the methods and requirements of the project will be given later in the semester. Fo r the time being, take note of the due and close dates of this project in the course calendar, below. A note on collaborative assignments. Productive collaborative work is seldom easy S tudents often worry that their individual final grades may suffer as a result of breakdowns in communication within groups or the failures of some group members to complete quality work on a project. I have built mechanisms into this course to reduce the risk of this happening Moreover, t he openness of the wiki everyone i n the course can be aware of your contributions to your group 's projects or lack thereof tends, in my experience, to promote students' good faith efforts within their groups The most important thing s you can do to insure that your workgroup's performance is effective is to define any assigned tasks within the group well in advance, stick to a calendar for your projects together, and take full advantage of the wiki's editing and revision features to im prove the quality of the group's collective writing K eep in mind that the wiki environment includes audit trailing functions that enable me to track the frequency and extent of every student's written contributions to her or his workgroup project In the event that a student within a workgroup fails to participate in the group's efforts or to otherwise fulfill her or his obligations to the group, I reserve the right to reduce that student 's grade on a given assignment and, in some cases, to adjust t he rest of the group's grade on the assignment accordingly If for any reason you feel that members of your group are not efficiently or appropriately working together, I encourage you to alert me to such difficulties through private emails or conversation as soon as possible.

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LIT 3400 Syllabus (Fall 2012) 8 of 12 Privacy of grades and other assessments of your performance The guiding principal of our uses of the wiki in this course is one of peer access : in brief others in the course will be able to review much of your written work and many of your exchanges with me regarding your work T hey will be able and encouraged to comment on your work and these exchanges, with the aim of enlarging our shared understan ding of the texts and critical theoretical problems we will discuss This public aspect of your contributions to the wiki does not include my grading of your individual performance in the course I have designed the course and grading methods to insure that such evaluations of your work a re known only to the two of us, and will be communicated only by channels that will guarantee your privacy in this regard Grades for group projects will communicated by way of similarly privileged chan nels ; only the members of each group and I know that group's grade for a given project Should it become necessary that I adjust a student's grade because of poor performance in a group project, only that student will be notified of the change. Our uses of online resources in this course will adhere to the University's posted policies on student data security, confidentiality, and privacy. As a student, you have defined obligations under these policies with regard to your online conduct. See < https://lss.at.ufl.edu/home/privacy/ > for a complete description of these policies. Resolving date conflicts for assignments. It is essential that you notify me immediately after the assignment of the individual critical responses group projects and gro up presentations if these conflict with other commitments you may have (For example, if the due date falls on a religious holiday ) If you wait to notify me of such conflicts I may not be able to change your assignments and your grade may be adversely aff ected as a result. Policy on academic honesty The University community's policies and methods regarding academic honesty, your obligations to me and mine to you with regard to academic honesty, are clearly spelled out in the UF Student Honor Code, which is available online at < http://www.dso.ufl.edu/sccr/honorcodes/honorcode.php > Academic dishonesty in any form will not be tolerated in this course. Examples of academic dishonesty include but are not limited to: Possessing, using, or exchanging improperly acquired written or oral information in the preparation of graded assignments submitted for this course. Substitution of material that is wholly or substantially identical to that created or published by another individual or individuals.

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LIT 3400 Syllabus (Fall 2012) 9 of 12 False claims of performance or work submitted by a student for requirements of this course. Collaborative work that is required for this course does not fall within any of the forbidden categories listed above. H onest completion of collaborative work does require that you adhere to well defined practices that acknowledge the contributions of others in a forthright and precisely documented manner I will review these practices in class before the first graded assignment. I am obliged to act on any suspected act of academic misconduct. This may include a reduced or failing grade for the course as a whole or other disciplinary proceedings, as per the recommendation of the Dean of Students. If you have any concern that you may not have made appropriate use of th e work of others in your research or writing for this course, please confer with me before you submit the assignment. You should retain all graded materials that you receive from me until you receive your final course grade. Course calendar (W) 22 Aug Course introduction ( no assigned reading ) (F) 24 Aug Introduction to course wiki ( no assigned reading ) (M) 27 Aug Review of course wiki & signature reading assignment ( no assigned reading ) (W) 29 Aug Genette, "Introduction," "The Publisher's Peritext" (F) 31 Aug Genette, "The Name of the Author;" Jackson, "Introduction, or Preface," "Pseudonyms," "Heteronyms" (M) 3 Sept No class meeting (Labor Day) (W) 5 Sept Genette, "Titles; Jackson, "Titles" (F) 7 Sept Genette, "The Please Insert," "Dedications and Inscriptions," "Epigraphs;" Jackson, "Blurbs," "Dedications," "Epigraphs" (M) 10 Sept In class case studies

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LIT 3400 Syllabus (Fall 2012) 10 of 12 (W) 12 Sept Genette, "The Prefatorial Situation," "The Functions of the Original Preface," "Other Prefaces, Other Functions;" Jackson, "Prefaces, In troductions, Forewords ," "First Lines" (F) 14 Sept Genette, "Notes;" Grafton, "Footnotes: The Origin of a Species;" Jackson, "Footnotes" (M) 17 Sept In class case studies (W) 19 Sept Genette, "The Public Epitext," "The Private Epitext," "Conclusion" (F) 21 Sept Jackson, "Marginalia ; Sherman, "Used Books" (M) 24 Sept Field trip to UF's Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica (1/2 of class will attend, assigned reading TBA) (W) 26 Sept Field trip to UF's Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica (1/2 of class will attend, assigned reading TBA) (F) 28 Sept Debriefing of Price Library field trip Questions for midterm exam are posted to wiki (M) 1 Oct Jackson, "Follies," Imaginary Books, Imaginary Authors" (W) 3 Oct Introduction to "The Art of Google Books" ( assigned reading TBA ) (F) 5 Oct Debriefing of midterm exam First draft of completed midterm exam due (due date) (M) 8 Oct Jackson, "Indexes," "Index Nominum ;" Ballard, "The Index" (W) 10 Oct Jackson, "I.D.," "Last Words," "Appendix "Bibliographies," "Afterword" (F) 12 Oct Assigned reading TBA Midterm exam wiki pages locked, 5 PM (close date) (M) 15 Oct In class case studies

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LIT 3400 Syllabus (Fall 2012) 11 of 12 (W) 17 Oct Debriefing of "Art of Google Books" projects First drafts of collaborative "Art of Google Books" projects due (due date) (F) 19 Oct Field trip to UF's Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature (1/2 of class will attend, assigned reading TBA) (M) 22 Oct Field trip to UF's Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature (1/2 of class will attend, assigned reading TBA) (W) 24 Oct Debriefing of Baldwin Library field trip (F) 26 Oct In class discussion of collaborative Baldwin Library workgroup project (I recommend that workgroups begin work on the project ASAP after this date) Collaborative "Art of Google Books" projects are locked (close date) (M) 29 Oct Defoe, Robinson Crusoe ( Penguin/Richetti edition ) (W) 31 Oct Defoe, Robinson Crusoe ( Penguin/Richetti edition ) (F) 2 Nov Defoe, Robinson Crusoe ( Penguin/Richetti edition ) (M) 5 Nov In class case studies (W) 7 Nov Assigned reading TBA (F) 9 Nov No class meeting (UF Homecoming) (M) 12 Nov No class meeting (Veterans Day) (W) 14 Nov Assigned reading TBA (F) 16 Nov Assigned reading TBA (M) 19 Nov First draft s of collaborative Baldwin Library projects due (due date) (W) 21 Nov No class meeting (Thanksgiving) (F) 23 Nov No class meeting (Thanksgiving)

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LIT 3400 Syllabus (Fall 2012) 12 of 12 (M) 26 Nov In class case studies Questions for final exam posted to the wiki (W) 28 Nov C ollaborative Baldwin Library projects are locked (close date) In class r eview of Baldwin Library projects (F) 30 Nov In class r eview of Baldwin Library projects (M) 3 Dec In class r eview of Baldwin Library projects (W) 5 Dec Final class meeting First draft of final exam due (due date) (W) 12 Dec Final exam wiki pages are locked, 5 PM (close date)