Dominica ( Hillsborough Estate )

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Dominica ( Hillsborough Estate )
Series Title:
Caribbean Volunteer Expeditions : drawings and reports, 1990 - 2012
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Language:
English
Creator:
Caribbean Volunteer Expeditions
Hersh, Anne
Gulbran, Nea
LaRochelle, Jim
Spurlock, Beau
Taylor, Bob
Whitcomb, Bruce
Whitcomb, Nancy
Publisher:
Caribbean Volunteer Expeditions
Place of Publication:
Corning, NY
Publication Date:

Record Information

Source Institution:
Caribbean Volunteer Expeditions
Holding Location:
Caribbean Volunteer Expeditions
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution.
System ID:
AA00012428:00024


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

SURVEYED DRAWN CHECK DATE BY BY BY : : : : Gaetan Seaman ............................ LEGEND COORD. ORIGIN DATUM SCALE All measurements are in feet : : : Gaetan Seaman Aug. 2003 False Assumed 1"=30' SURVEY OF OLDMILL COMPOUND AT HILLSBOROUGH ESTATE ELECTRIC POLE SURVEY STATION 1. 6. 7. 12. 11. 32. 5. 10. 13. 3. 28. 29. 31. 26. 27. 23. 25. 14. 16. 15. 16. 24. 19. 21. 20. 17. 46. 47. 42. 41. 40. 44. 45. 43. 1. 35. 36. 34. 39. 38. 37. 4. 33. 4. 8. 9. 18. 22. 30. MAP OF FARM EQUIPMENT & MACHINERY (PLEASE SEE APPENDIX I FOR DESCRIPTION OF NUMBERED ITEMS) PREPARED BY CARIBBEAN VOLUNTEER EXPEDITIONS, JANUARY 2004 USING SURVEY BASE BY OTHERS.


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EHVYP0NHJ_RQLHAY INGEST_TIME 2012-10-18T17:39:12Z PACKAGE AA00012428_00024
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

1 Recommendations and Master Plan for Hillsborough Estate Dominica, West Indies Caribbean Volunteer Expeditions January 4-9, 2004 Project Team Anne Hersh, AIA Ned Gulbran, ASLA Jim LaRochelle Beau Spurlock, ASLA Bob Taylor Bruce Whitcomb Nancy Whitcomb

PAGE 2

2 TABLE OF CONTENTS PART I – PROJECT BACKGROUND PAGE 3 PART II – SITE FEATURES PAGE 6 PART III – STRUCTURES PAGE 15 PART IV – CONCLUSION PAGE 24 APPENDIX A Inventory of Historic Machinery

PAGE 3

3 PART 1 PROJECT BACKGROUND Caribbean Volunteer Expeditions (CVE) is a non-prof it group which brings volunteers to the Caribbean to work on a variety of historic pres ervation projects. The Rolle family, owners of the Hillsborough Estate, asked Caribbean Volunteer Expeditions to make recommendations on developing the site as a heritag e and educational destination. CVE’s Anne Hersh, an architect in the West Indies, and the team of volunteers assembled in January, 2004 to work on the development of the Master Plan in consultation with property owners. This report is a summary of CVE’s findings and reco mmendations to be used in conjunction with the Master Plan and architectural drawings. History Hillsborough Estate consists of approximately 300 a cres of land on the leeward (western) side of the island. The estate is situated on the southern bank of the Layou RiverDominica’s largest, and includes beachfront propert y at the river’s mouth. The estate was established in the 1770’s and owned by the Greg g family until the 1920’s, when the Rolle family purchased the land, and continued coco a, tobacco, and coconut production. The ten acre complex of industrial buildings known as the “Yard” is the historic and present centre of the Estate, and is where most of the cocoa and coconut processing takes place. Consequently, the attention of the report w ill be on this area. Figure 1 Layou River valley, looking west toward the Caribbean Sea. The historic centre of the Estate is located on the south bank of the river, i mmediately upstream from the bridge. The buildings within the Yard consist of remains of the watermill, boiling house and distillery as well as several auxiliary buildings. Several of the buildings suffered heavy

PAGE 4

4 damage from Hurricane David in 1979, yet remain sta nding to this day in various states of ruin. The structures also include a stone aqueduct and re lated water system in a relatively good state of conservation; a distillery, equipped with vats, tanks and related equipment, with walls, cooling tank, roof and nearby chimney suffic iently intact as to allow for authentic restoration and reconstruction; the ruins of buildi ngs thought to have been a slave hospital and overseers offices; and a solar drying house for copra (still in use today).. Water was diverted by aqueduct from a Layou River t ributary to power the water mill, which has an iron water wheel dating from 1869. Th e wheel turned mechanical rollers (1853) which crushed the sugar cane. Manufactured in England and Scotland, these two pieces of machinery were products of the Industrial Revolution, a time when the best and latest farm technology was being shipped to the Wes t Indies. The production of rum was also an important enterpr ise, as evidenced by the large store house with barred windows (see Building A below). This building would serve to securely hold barrels of rum prior to shipment, at which time the barrels would be rolled down a cobblestone boat ramp to the river, and then taken by launch to ships anchored at the mouth. In the 1880s island sugar production declined becau se it was cheaper for importers to purchase it elsewhere. Hillsborough Estate, like o thers, responded to the market change by retrofitting the cane processing equipment to ha ndle lime juice production. The growing of limes became an important agricultural e ndeavor and lime juice was exported to England to be finished as a cordial and for othe r uses. In the early twentieth century the estate diversifi ed into tobacco production and a large building was constructed for the curing of tobacco, which is still in use today. Cocoa production was also very important and buildings as sociated with cocoa processing are intact and are presently in use. In fact, the coco a drying platform is considered to be the last in operation on Dominica. The production of co pra continues, supplied by the numerous coconut palms on the property. Hillsborough Estate embodies much of the agricultur al history of the island, having in its time produced sugar cane, coffee, cocoa, tobacco, a nd limes. Not only a static reminder of the past, it remains a dynamic and genuine examp le of a Dominican estate because of its continued use. By inviting the public to tour Hillsborough Estate, tourists from abroad and Dominicans alike can view and appreciate the ar chitectural and agricultural history of the island, while enjoying the outdoor activities a nd sampling local products that set the island apart.

PAGE 5

5 Opportunities for the Development of the Site The site has the potential to be developed for many uses. The historical and educational potential can be complemented with retail, recreati onal, and other tourist amenities. A. Agricultural Heritage The Rolle family envisions extensive educational us e of the property with displays of the building and machinery used for sugar, lime, cocoa, and other agricultural products. The site will comprise historical buildings, stabilized ruins, working historical equipment and artifacts with written interpretation so that visit ors may follow a self-guided tour of the property. Demonstration fruit and produce gardens are also planned. Current agricultural processes such as copra drying and coc oa processing will continue and will be open to public viewing. B. Restaurant Along with the heritage displays, there is an oppor tunity to create other tourist amenities including a restaurant and multipurpose area for ed ucational demonstrations, conferences, or theatrical performances. C. Retail Shops The site will also feature retail shops featuring a gricultural products of Dominica: hot sauces, fruits, rum, and juices. Books related to nature, history and agriculture will also be featured. Furthermore, crafts and other locally made items will appeal to tourists. D. Recreational Opportunities Recreational activities can also be incorporated in to the site. The site is on the Layou River, and the beach is nearby. The Rolles present ly operate a tour company featuring hiking, tubing, kayaking. Some of these tours can include this site. E. Typical Workers Housing and Gardens An unique and interesting feature can also include a typical workers dwelling, and garden used by Dominicans, with typical domestic an imals, such as chickens, goats, pigs. These will also appeal to children visiting the sit e.

PAGE 6

6 PART II SITE FEATURES Entry to Site Entry to the historic center of the Estate is curre ntly via the farm road, a public right-ofway immediately to the south of the existing Texaco filling station. This road should be maintained as an access road for the Tobacco Building, Container Shed, and the estate’s upriver agricultural areas. Visitors will then access the site by an expanded entry that is slightly to the south of the Layou River bridge. Currently there is an access point in this area, however, the master plan shows the new entrance approximately ten feet to the south. The reason for this shift is to allow visitors entering and exiting the parking lot better visibility of southbound traffic crossing the bridge. In order to make this entrance shift, the existing workers’ house (Building L) must be moved to an alternate location such as adjacent to the demonstration garden. Parking/Drop-Off It is expected that 75% of visitors to the Estate w ill arrive by tour bus and unload at the Agricultural Production and Storage Building by usi ng a proposed circular drop-off. 25% of the visitors are expected to arrive by their own vehicles and will need room for parking. Six parking spaces are proposed adjacent to the bridge embankment, with another six spaces in front of the Ag. Production/S torage Building. The drop-off and parking spaces should remain unpaved in order to ma intain the rural and agricultural character of the property. In addition, by not pav ing the vehicular area, alterations to the parking number and configuration could be made if m ore space is needed. Some grading of the earth may be necessary, to keep water from p ooling in the middle of the parking area during heavy rainstorms. Ticketing/Admission The proposed circular drop-off area would be next t o the covered portion of the Rum Storage/Visitors’ Center. This would permit a roof ed area under which visitors could load and unload during inclement weather. In the w est section of this building, a desk/office area could serve as a ticket and gift s hop counter. A visitor could enter, purchase tickets, a Hillsborough Estate guide book, and Dominican souvenirs at the same cash register. This would permit one employee to p erform multiple tasks, thus reducing operational costs. View of current entry to Historic Yard from road. Filling Station and Layou River bridge are visible at left.

PAGE 7

7 View of Yard, looking west. Overgrown cobblestone paving can be seen at right. Pathways As there is a significant amount of existing stone paving among the older buildings, it is recommended that similar stone paving be used in areas that must be paved. The proposed patio behind the restaurant adjacent to the river will need paving. Another is a pedestrian connection to the front of the Visitor Centre (Building A) to the intersection of the existing stone paving in the center of the site. The farm road could receive some gravel leading to the Demonstration Plots and the Pig Pens, as there are some muddy portions after heavy rains. Most pathways between buildings, howe ver, should be left grassed as the ground is fairly well drained. There has been disc ussion about providing a hiking and mountain biking route at the eastern end of the Estate, continuing down to the historic centre, and on to the coast along the Layou River. This could easily be achieved by using the existing public road that traverses the Estate. Some low areas of the road may need to be filled and graveled to keep them passable during heavy rains. This connection to the interior of the island should be publicized in a Hillsborough Estate guide as well as in tourism offices. Landscaping Since Hillsborough Estate has been in constant oper ation for over two hundred years, it is unlikely that there were ever many trees and shrubs within the main working areas of the Estate. In keeping with the original character of the property, landscaping can be kept to a minimum. However, there should be a few large sh ade trees provided for shade and shelter from rain. Please refer to the Master Plan for suggested locations. In addition, shade trees should be planted next to the parking s paces to keep parked automobiles cool. Another function of landscaping is to screen unsigh tly views from the visiting public. Once visitors have entered the Estate, views of the Texaco station and of the Vehicle Maintenance Shed should be screened by trees and sh rubs as best as possible. Layou River Valley, looking east from Hillsborough Estate Great house.

PAGE 8

8 Tobacco Storage Building (Bldg. N) For visitors traveling north from Roseau, the large trees and royal palms that are planted along the road give an impressive sense of entry to the Estate. A combination of trees and royal palms should be planted to continue this theme along the length of the road frontage of the Estate. The kinds of trees and shrubs used for landscaping should be consistent with what has always been used on Dominica and should come from D ominican nurseries. For example, royal palms shipped from Florida would not be the same species as those grown on the island. Based on conversations with Mr. Phi llip Rolle, trees such as saman and cedar, which have been used historically on the Est ate, may be good choices. Additionally, fruit trees could serve a dual purpos e by being planted for shade throughout the property. Excess Vegetation Weeds, grasses, and tree seedlings that sprout next to the building and between stone joints should be regularly cleared. Large shade tr ees such as the mango at the rear of the Store Room/Restaurant building should be preserved and large shrubs such as the croton that are between the farm road and the stone wall a re very attractive, and should be kept in place. Treatment of Severely Ruined Buildings Buildings which have deteriorated to a point at whi ch very little remains of the structure, such as the one whose foundations exist behind the Old Store Room, should be left in place, as they provide a hint of what the original structure may have been. Since few historical photographs exist of some buildings, cle aring and archeological excavation of this site may provide insight into the uses and ori ginal layout of this corner of the Estate. At a minimum, foundation walls should be kept clear of woody seedlings which can cause the walls to deteriorate further. Additional foundations and ruins not identified in this report should receive similar treatment. Treatment of Tobacco Storage Building and Vehicular Storage Shed This area is the main utilitarian section of the es tate and sees a good deal of activity every day centered around the maintenance and storage of the Wacky Rollers tour vehicles. Although visitors to the Estate will be somewhat se parated from this area, the occasional individual may choose to go to the rear of the buil dings, located along the farm road. For this reason, it is important to clear the abandoned vehicles and equipment that are currently between the two buildings and the road. In addition, it is recommended that some screening of the vehicular maintenance activities be provided. This could be achieved by narrowing the entrance between the two buildings and providing landscaping adjacent to the entrance. (Please see Master Plan) Additionally, wooden gates could be

PAGE 9

9 provided between the buildings to completely hide v iews to the maintenance and storage of vehicles. Placement of Farm Equipment The Estate possesses many large pieces of farm mach inery that help tell the story of agricultural practices on Dominica and, consequentl y, of the nation’s history. The large grinders, boilers, and condenser underline the impo rtance of sugarcane and limes to the island. For this reason, displays of machinery sho uld be an important component of the Hillsborough Estate tour. Historic farm equipment that is not in use can be displayed in two ways. The first is to leave large pieces of eq uipment that will not be adversely affected by the weather outside in specific areas t o serve as “industrial sculptures”. The more delicate equipment should be inside the Visito r Center/ Rum Store Room, where accompanying written descriptions, as in a museum. The restaurant could also display a few pieces on the walls and among the dining tables Additional recommendations regarding the equipment can be found in Appendix A. River Access Clearly, the Estate’s location along the Layou River is an advantage from an agricultural standpoint. However, it also increases the tourist potential for the site. Wacky Rollers presently uses the Layou for tubing and kayaking, passing by the Estate’s historic centre just prior to completing the tour. Revenue from tubers and kayakers could be maximized by taking them ashore at the old ramp and allowing them to tour the grounds, shop, andeat at the restaurant. They could then continue in their tubes to the mout h of the river, where they could enjoy the beach and sea. Items that they bought at the c entre could be bagged and waiting for them when they are ready to leave the beach. Tubing on the Layou River adjacent to Hillsborough Estate. View looking down overgrown cobblestone ramp to riv er.

PAGE 10

10 Outdoor Gathering Areas Because of the Estate’s open nature, gathering areas abound throughout the property. One outdoor space that should be developed is an uncovered patio between the proposed restaurant and the river. The patio should be immediately adjacent to the building, which would permit diners to view the rushing water, but would allow them to go inside in the event of rain. This area could be connected to the main cobblestone paving of the centre by a path around the east side of the restaurant. Aqueduct One of the interesting features of the Estate is th e presence of an aqueduct that originally brought water to the buildings of the Estate. Wate r was diverted from a tributary of the Layou River, upstream from the historic centre, and was channeled by a trough carved out of the steep rock cliffs that line the south si de of the farm road and the Layou. As the aqueduct nears the mill, the channel is concrete. This feature of the Estate was very important to the operation of the crushing machiner y, and therefore the processing of sugarcane and limes. For this reason, efforts shou ld be made to preserve the integrity of the channel and display it as an exhibit that furth er shows how the Estate works. Most vegetation and debris should be removed from the ch annel, in order to make it more visible to visitors. Heavy equipment should not be used to carry out this work, in order to protect the original configuration of the aqueduct. Because the aqueduct parallels the farm road for much of its length, access is very ea sy, and visitors could be encouraged to follow the aqueduct upstream to the upper portions of the Estate, and to connect with future networks of trails in Dominica’s interior. Demonstration Agricultural Plots As the Estate is primarily used for agriculture, th ere should be demonstration plots that showcase the crops that were historically grown on site, as well as those being produced today. It may also be appropriate to display other plants that are grown in the West Indies. Many visitors from temperate climates have never seen breadfruit, sorrel, and nutmeg, and would enjoy seeing plants whose product s they regularly consume. Signage is very important and could include the local and s cientific names of plants, their uses, and how they are cultivated. Having a tasting stat ion where visitors could sample the foods would be an option in this location, or in th e restaurant or gift shop. In addition, traditional Dominican livestock could be placed on exhibit. The location of the existing pig pen is ideal for this purpose, as it is directly across the farm road from the Proposed outdoor dining area between Storage Building (Bldg. F.) at left and Layou River.

PAGE 11

11 demonstration plots. Small children would find thi s element of the tour particularly appealing. Overall Connection to Upper Section of Estate and t o Mouth of Layou River Hillsborough Estate encompasses several diverse landscapes which make it very unique. Traveling along its length, one encounters hilly terrain, cliffs, river views, groves, pastureland, and beaches. In addition, it possesses the historic buildings which make it particularly interesting to explore. Using the existing farm road, along with the highway, one can easily walk, bike, or ride on horseback from the sea to the upper portions of the Estate. From that point, connections could be made to other hiking trails on the island. Most of the road upstream from the Yard offers lovely views of the river and of the cliffs, and should be considered as part of the tour of the Est ate. The old aqueduct runs parallel to the road in this location, and the large mango trees offer a good deal of shade, making it a comfortable walk. View looking west along farm road. Tobacco Storage Building is at left

PAGE 12

12 Signage As with any historical site, written interpretation of buildings, objects, and the land will allow visitors to get the complete story of Hillsbo rough Estate. The physical size of signs for the identification of buildings should be kept small and as unobtrusive as possible. Visitors should just be able to identify the building by a sign when they are a few feet from the walls. The location for these signs are often most effective next to doorways. Either wall-mounted or freestanding signs could be used. Detailed information about each building could be provided in a pamphlet or by a written description inside each building. Above and below are several examples of signs at Fort King George in Darien, Georgia. Example of simple identification sign.

PAGE 13

13 Children’s Activities As mentioned above, children would find farm animal s particularly interesting, especially if they could feed and pet them. Also, most childr en enjoy water, so the presence of the Layou River is an asset. Opportunities for rafting fishing, and swimming could be provided for visitors with children, in conjunction with admission to the site. These elements would not need to be developed at first, b ecause many children would simply enjoy climbing on ruins and investigating the large pieces of machinery contained in the Yard. Example of drawing showing reconstruction of histor ic building. Example of informational sign showing historical v iew of sawmill.

PAGE 14

14 Accommodations Although providing accommodation is not essential t o the success of Hillsborough Estate as a historical attraction, it can be considered as a later phase. Two locations of the Estate are particularly conducive to development as an inn or hotel site, and each has its own distinct character. The first location is at the eastern end of the Est ate, near the existing greenhouse. This site would be a good location for a forested lodgetype inn, where guests could hike, mountain bike, and swim in the river. Access to th e beach would be only a short bike ride away. Since few visitors come to Dominica loo king for large resort-type hotels, there should be emphasis placed on seclusion and in corporation of nature into the layout of the inn. Multiple cottages are preferable, rath er than all rooms in one large building. Architecture of the buildings should be traditional West Indian in character, perhaps borrowing some architectural elements from some of the existing historic buildings on the Estate. Utilization of wood and stone is prefe rable to modern concrete construction. If concrete is used, it should be covered with a su itable natural-looking veneer. Roofs could be of corrugated galvanized metal. Although the character of the inn should be rustic, there should be special emphasis placed on providing all of the comforts of a modern hotel, especially if catering to an up-marke t clientele. Televisions and telephones are not absolutely necessary in private rooms, howe ver there should be a common television and telephone area in the inn for guests ’ use. Similarly, internet access should be provided in a specific area of the inn, or prefe rably, in-room. The second location for an inn is close to the sea. As above, the character of the buildings should be West Indian. Multiple small bu ildings and cottages should make up the complex in order to maintain privacy and to les sen the visual and environmental impact on the coastline. The location does not hav e to be directly on the beach, but the Sea should be visible from multiple areas of the co mplex, particularly the restaurant and other common areas. Efforts should be made to buff er the inn from any noise and views of traffic traveling along the coast road. Utilities New electric and telephone lines should be buried w ithin the historic centre of the Estate. If possible, existing lines should be buried, altho ugh it is not essential at first. The kitchen and all washrooms should be placed on a sep tic system to ensure that water quality of the Layou River is maintained. Lighting Lighting should be kept to the minimum necessary to serve the site after dark. It is likely that the majority of nighttime visitors will be tho se who wish to eat at the restaurant, or attend events held in the restaurant building. The refore, low level patio lighting, a few up-lights beneath trees around the parking area, an d perhaps a few accent lights to illuminate the facades of the structures would be a ll that is necessary to create a memorable ambiance for the guest.

PAGE 15

15 PART III. STRUCTURES A. Visitor Center (Former Storage Building) Description: The building (90 feet by 40 feet) had been used for rum and general agricultural storage. A more recent addition to the north of about 16 feet now houses vehicles and a boat. The building has stone walls which have been parged with Portland cement, and the new section is parged block. The roof is framed with wood with galvanized sheeting, and has a ventilation strip at the ridge. There is also a large overhang supported with brackets. Recommendations: This building is underutilized for agricultural pur poses, and is located near the visitor entry to the site. It would be a good area for admi ssions, visitor center, administration, display, and shops. The more recent block walls on the north should be removed; the roof can remain for a covered patio. A ticket cubicle and office could be located on the east end. As the first building visitors encounter, it can house a small m useum with educational materials, basic history, display items, and photographs to in troduce the visitor to the estate. Descriptions of the sea and bathing facilities, hik ing, and river opportunities can also be available in this area. This building is also a good location for shops-sel ling agricultural, educational and other products to tourists. The windows on the south can be enlarged to doors f or easier access to the building. In the interior, the dry wall should be removed to exp ose the wood rafters. The gable ends, now covered with asphalt shingles should be replace d with wallaba shingles. The corrugated roofing appears to be in good condit ion, but could be painted. There are now in place attractive wood shutters on the window s and doors. These could be used for the new openings as well.

PAGE 16

16 B. Agricultural Processing and Storage Building Description: This 75’ x 22’ building is currently used for storage and for cocoa processing. The building is one story with stone and concrete block walls with large openings. The stone walls on the south are about 5 feet high with an open wood or metal screening above. The north side has screening as well as corrugated metal between concrete piers. The roof is an unsymmetrical gable shape framed with wood rafters and covered with galvanized metal. Recommendations: The building is now being used for agriculture at H illsborough, and needs to remain for functional reasons. During cocoa processing, the bu ilding can be open for visitors to view this process. The block and stone should be patched, plastered an d painted. Galvanized metal on walls should be removed. New screening and wood slats sho uld be replaced. Further work can include new rafters and metal roofing. C. Solar Drying Building Description: This recent building, 28 feet long by 15 feet wide, is used for drying copra. The building will continue to be used for current agricultural purposes. The building has fiberglass roofing in a curved shape above a concrete base. Recommendations: The building should remain as is.

PAGE 17

17 D. Cocoa Dryer Description: This is an excellent example of a cocoa drying building. The building includes an 18’ by 38’ area covered by a steep gable roof. Wood trays roll out on metal rails to the south of the covered area. There are two sets of rails about 53 feet long. Recommendations: The building needs to remain for cocoa drying, and again could be a feature for visitors t o witness this agricultural process. The building is in serviceable condition and minor repa irs should be make to improve the aesthetics. E. Restaurant and Multipurpose Buildings (Old Sugar Factory Building and Rum Still and F. Storage Building) Description: These buildings are no longer used for agricultural endeavors; the old sugar factory building and rum still are one of the most interest ing buildings on this site displaying elements of the sugar process of the past. There a re six coppers with fire tunnels below on the west side. Part of the building, was used f or storage and has a basement. The rum still is on the west, and the chimney is in tact. Parts of the metal distillation equipment remain. The sugar factory building is con nected to a large storage building which forms a T shape. The storage building is abo ut 70 feet by 30 feet and is more recent. The stone walls of the factory, with large rectangular stones forming the corners, had originally been white washed. The floor next to the coppers is terra cotta tile and brick. The roof was in poor condition and was recently removed. The storage building has parged stone walls, wood rafters and corrugated metal roofing with a ventilation cupola at the ridge and three dormers. The building is currently filled with all sorts of machinery, building

PAGE 18

18 and agricultural materials, which should be removed There may also be historical equipment in this area which should be saved for di splay and interpretation. Recommendations: This complex of buildings, next to the river, can b e developed into a multipurpose area for dining as well as other events. The more recent concrete wall separating the two buildings should be removed. A simple kitchen at t he northwest corner of the factory building can serve both the patio and dining areas. A bar area overlooking the coppers could also be a feature. The large storage building can be a dining area (se rving about 110 people). As a large open area, other eve nts such as presentations, theatrical, or musical event s could occur here. The building can also be part museum wi th displays and pictures, photographs and signage explaining the sugar processing operation of the pa st. A patio and deck on the river side would be an attr active place for additional dining. The copper area of the factory building needs to be cleaned up, and should remain mainly as a display feature. A hip roof and new galvanized should be installed o n the building and work on this has already begun. A new wood floor needs to be installed over the basement. The flooring near the coppers needs to be cleaned a nd repaired. Some pointing work has already been done to help stabilize the walls. The rum still and exterior walls and openings should be cleaned up and repaired. The steps to the rum still can become a new access point from the ramp leading to the boat access at the ramp to the river. The storage building once had a wood floor and this should be replaced. The walls need to be patched and painted. The roof rafters appear to be in poor condition. New rafters as well as new galvanized should be ins talled. Some of the windows have large wood shutters; these should be replaced in th e same style as is currently being used. On the river side, all the windows can be lengthene d into doors for easier access to the patio.

PAGE 19

19 G. Shed and H. Water Wheel Description: At the west end of the site, is the waterwheel which was housed in a building. The wheel and much of the machinery remain. The stone walls of the building at the wheel remain. Next to the water wheel is another storage shed with low stone walls and a dilapidated wood framed roof with metal sheeting. Recommendations: The water wheel is one of the unique attractions of this estate. We recommend repairing the water wheel and repairing part of the aqueduct so that the wheel could turn again. The crushing machinery, now frozen, could be brought back to working condition. The storage building can house additional machinery and displays related to sugar or lime processing. The walls of both buildings need to be patched, and pointed. Both buildings need new roofs made of wood rafters and corrugated metal. Ia; Ib; Ic; Id Toilets, Display and Shops (Former latrine, hospital, kitchen, offices) Description: This complex to the southwest of the factory and storage buildings contains the remains of four structures. The one at the west was reportedly a hospital at one point. Clearing revealed the remains of a kitchen facility and toilet. The owners reported that one of the buildings was used for an office. Two of the structures were two story with stone bases and former wood second stories, and five sets of staircases remain. Two of the buildings were one st ory. Remnants of the wood rafters and rusty galvanized roofing remain.

PAGE 20

20 Recommendations: These small buildings are a contrast to the larger agricultural structures and should be restored. We recommend that the building to the southeast be used for toilet rooms for the restaurant and general public visiting the site. Other uses can include more shops, display or a caretakers dwelling. The stone walls need to be stabilized, and re-pointed. The upper floors of the former two story structures can be rebuilt with wood studs and lapboard siding. Hip wood framed roofs with galvanized corrugated sheeting wo uld be typical. J. Ruin with Chimney Description This building is 15 feet wide and 38 feet long. There is a stone chimney at the west end. The walls consist of stone up to three feet, and presently have metal sheeting above. There is also a boiler nearby. The roof is a gable and has metal roofing. Recommendations: Further archeological and historical investigation is required here. The stone walls sh ould be pointed, and repaired. The upper walls and roof rafters probably need to be re built at some point. New galvanized roofing and new siding should be applied.

PAGE 21

21 K. Ruin Description: This building had high walls, and is 25 feet by 19 feet, which might have had to do with a drying process. Recommendations: Further historical and archeological investigation is needed to determine the former uses of the building. The walls should be cleared, and vegetation which is damaging the walls needs to be removed. L. Workers Cottage Description: This 16 by 10 wood chattel house is typical of residences of Dominica and the Caribbean of about 100 years ago. The building has wood shingles on the walls, metal roofing, and wood shutters. Recommendations: The building can serve as an example of worker’s housing, and can be a feature for visitors to see how people used to live. We recommend locating it near the garden area. The building, however, is in very poor condi tion. It may be possible to rebuild the roof, floor, add new wood shingle, and new shutters M. Animal Pens Description: This building of about 93 feet long by 15 feet wide had animal pens. The walls are stone, block, and concrete, and appear to have been built over time. There is no roof now, but apparently there had been a shed roof. Recommendations: This building can be used for a few animal pens in conjunction with the workers house and demo nstration garden area. The building should be cleaned up; the walls should be stabilized. A roof can be added over part of the building.

PAGE 22

22 N. Tobacco Storage Building Description: This large two story building has a more recent front section added onto old stone walls. The present building was used for tobacco processing and is presently used for agricultural storage related to tobacco. Recommendations: This building could remain as is, and continue its present uses. We do not see this part of the site being open to the public at t his point. O. Vehicle and Container Storage Building Description: Across from the Tobacco Storage Building is an open building housing containers, vehicles, and equipment used by the owner’s tour company. Recommendations: The building serves a current purpose and should remain as is. Views from the farm road should be screened by fencing and gates. For additional recommendations, please see “Treatment of Tobacco Storage Building a nd Vehicular Storage Shed” under Part II – Site Features. GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR REPAIR: Stone Walls It is important to clear all vegetation from stone walls, The roots are causing serious decay. The stone also needs to be stabilized; Old mortar should be removed, missing or dislodged stones should be repaired. New mortar hi gh in lime content should be used for pointing. Traditional whitewash should be applied.

PAGE 23

23 Figure 2-Remnants of old stucco and paint over ston e archway of mill house. Roofs Traditionally roofs were framed with wood members. These are generally missing, or in poor condition. The new construction should include new rafters, with a roof deck made from local boards, and then wood purlins, and galvanized corrugated roofing. ( In some cases the wood deck could be eliminated). There may be an advantage in painting all the roofs the same color to give continuity to the site. Doors and Windows Most buildings would have had heavy wood shutters, and we can still see much of the historic hardware and shutters in place. We suggest replicating these wood shutters and using a ppropriate hardware as well. Some openings presently have screening or corrugate d metal. This needs to be upgraded; in some cases wood slats were used for some protect ion and security and this feature could be used where operable shutters are not neede d. Ruins Some of the buildings do not necessarily have to be fully restored with new roofs and doors etc. However, the stone walls should be stab ilized, re-pointed, and a cap on top will protect the walls. It is most important to r emove all vegetation from these walls, and periodically remove any vegetation which might begin to grow.

PAGE 24

24PART IV – CONCLUSION The landscape, structures, machinery, and individua ls that make up Hillsborough Estate are an important component of Dominica’s ric h history. Many Dominicans and most visitors to the island have never learned its story, since the Estate has been an operating business for almost two hundred and fifty years. The vision of the Rolle family to transform it into a centre where locals and tour ists can dine, attend cultural events, hike, and learn about Dominican culture will result in an excellent destination for tourists, and an important heritage site for the nation. The proximity of the estate to Roseau and the cruise ship docks will allow convenient access for tourists who have a limited time in the country, and the unique location of the estate along the Layou River and Caribbean Sea support numerous and varied activities for adul ts and children. The Rolle family currently has an ecotourism-based business in the f orm of Wacky Rollers, and the development of the estate into a tasteful recreatio n centre and historic site is a logical progression. With added tourism generated from the redevelopment of the estate, the opportunity for more jobs for Dominicans will likel y follow, thereby ensuring that Hillsborough Estate remains a key part of the islan d’s economy, and history, for years to come.

PAGE 25

SURVEYED DRAWN CHECK DATE BY BY BY : : : : Gaetan Seaman ............................ LEGEND COORD. ORIGIN DATUM SCALE All measurements are in feet : : : Gaetan Seaman Aug. 2003 False Assumed 1"=30' SURVEY OF OLDMILL COMPOUND AT HILLSBOROUGH ESTATE ELECTRIC POLE SURVEY STATION 1. 6. 7. 12. 11. 32. 5. 10. 13. 3. 28. 29. 31. 26. 27. 23. 25. 14. 16. 15. 16. 24. 19. 21. 20. 17. 46. 47. 42. 41. 40. 44. 45. 43. 1. 35. 36. 34. 39. 38. 37. 4. 33. 4. 8. 9. 18. 22. 30. MAP OF FARM EQUIPMENT & MACHINERY (PLEASE SEE APPENDIX I FOR DESCRIPTION OF NUMBERED ITEMS) PREPARED BY CARIBBEAN VOLUNTEER EXPEDITIONS, JANUARY 2004 USING SURVEY BASE BY OTHERS.

PAGE 26

1 APPENDIX A – INVENTORY OF HISTORIC MACHINERY The antique machinery present within the Yard at Hi llsborough Estate reveals the mechanization of agriculture that took place in the British West Indies during the midnineteenth century. They also serve to highlight t he high value of the crops, since such machinery was expensive and difficult to transport from Britain. Most of the boilers, gears, and shafts are in relatively good condition and can be grouped together in a display, re-assembled if possible, or simply placed throughout the Yard area with a brief description of their former use. Machinery that is showing signs of serious deterioration due to the elements should be relocated indoors for display. In fact, smaller pieces of machinery and tools could be displayed on the walls and in the corners of the restaurant to reinforce the agricultural heritage of the build ing. Many of the large items such as the gears and the boiler have taken on a very picturesq ue look, and heighten the historic atmosphere of the Yard. The following inventory is to be used in conjunctio n with the Map of Farm Equipment & Machinery, which is a supplement to the report. It is inevitable that many historic items were overlooked due to heavy vegetation and poor vi sibility in some buildings; however, the following inventory should serve as a starting point for the clean-up of the Yard area. Item 1-Boiler Description: 12’L x 3’4”W Recommendation: Preserve in place to serve as “indu strial sculpture”, or group with other machinery to illustrate agricultural production pro cesses. Identify boiler with small signage. Other antique machine parts exist in the areas adjacent to the boiler. If enough of the parts exist, and adequate documentation is a vailable on how the machinery was originally assembled, restoration may be possible f or display purposes.

PAGE 27

2 Item 2-Pickup Truck & Truck Parts Description: Truck body and parts less than 25 yea rs old. Recommendation: Clear from property. Item 3-Batch Leaf Conditioning Machine Description: 8’L x 4’W, less than 50 years old. Recommendation: If these machines are no longer pr oduced, it may be worthwhile to clean and display in a covered area to illustrate t he more recent production history of the estate. Item 4-Yellow Plastic Storage Containers Description Recommendation: Clear from yard area/ public view

PAGE 28

3 Item 5-Bobcat & Associated Equipment inside Shed Description: Recommendation: Remove Bobcat from Yard and public view. Any items within shed that are greater than 50 years should be evaluated further to access historical significance and potential for display. Item 6-Steam Engine Description Recommendation: Preserve in place or group with it ems that served similar functions. Item 7-Roller with Gear Description: 8’L x 2’W Recommendation: Preserve in place or group with si milar items. Item 8-Large Gear Description: 8”W x 3’Dia., located in arched openin g Recommendation: Preserve in place or display in re staurant or museum. Item 9-Gear Description: 8”W x 4’Dia., located in arched openin g Recommendation: Preserve in place or display in re staurant or museum.

PAGE 29

4 Item 10-Old Military Truck Chassis Description: 12’L x 6’ W Recommendation: Remove from public areas. Item 11-Workers’ Quarters Description: Wood Frame, adjacent to Mill Recommendation: If not essential for the functioni ng of the estate, remove from public area. If it must remain, consider a more historica lly appropriate covering for the walls, such as wood siding, etc.

PAGE 30

5 Item 12-Shed Description: Corrugated Metal Siding, 5’ x 4’ Recommendation: If not in use, consider removing f rom public area. Item 13-Piping in Old Store Room* Description: Galvanized irrigation? pipes Recommendation: Remove from public areas Item 14-Miscellaneous Wood Members Description: 8’W x 24’L Recommendation: Store in dry areas for future re-u se in building restoration. Item 15-Wood Description Recommendation: Store in dry area for future re-use Item 16-Rusted Corrugated Metal Description Recommendation: Discard.

PAGE 31

6 Item 17-Land Rover Description: Rusted, Plate #1655 Recommendation: Remove from public view. Item 18-Ford Tractor Truck Description: Model # CL 9000 Recommendation: Remove from public view. Item 19-Rusted Barrel Bands Description: Two Piles, Up to 6’ Dia. Recommendation: Store indoors and preserve for bar rel re-assembly. Item 20-Metal Round with gears (Dryer Screen*) Description: At top of steps, broken Recommendation: Discard. Item 21-I-Beam Description: Recommendation: Remove from public view. Item 22-Metal Shaft Description: Standing by wall Recommendation: Remove from public view. Item 23-Shipping Container, Concrete Ramp Description: Recommendation: Remove from Yard. Item 24-Tractor Axle and Wheels Description: Recommendation: Discard or remove from view. Item 25-Storage Tanks on Trailer Description: 9’L x 4’ W Recommendation: Remove from public view.

PAGE 32

7 Item 26-Metal Farm Equipment Description: 5’ x 5’* Recommendation: Possibly antique, clean-off and th en assess. If greater than 50 years old, preserve for display purposes. Item 27-Metal Pans with Sieve Description: In pile, 3’L x 40” W, age undetermine d. Recommendation: Clean and preserve for potential d isplay. Item 28-8”x 8”x27’L Wood Members Description: Under corrugated metal roofing Recommendation: Store in dry area for re-use in bu ilding restoration. Item 29-Shaft Description: 7’L x 8” Dia. Recommendation: Clean and preserve for display/reassembly if part of historic machinery (50 years old or greater). Item 30-Metal Debris Description: Pile, 8’L x 3’W Recommendation: Clean, determine if part of histor ic machinery. Item 31-Hops Shed Description: 16’ x 20’ Recommendation: Remove to accommodate restaurant r edevelopment. Item 32-Debris and Equipment within Old Mill Factor y Building a. Aluminum Boxes: Remove from public view. b. Oil Drums: Discard or remove from public view. c. Cement Mixer: Remove from public view. d. Three Rollers with Gears: Preserve for future disp lay. e. Metal Wheel with Shaft & Gears: Preserve for futur e display. f. Two Small 7” Rollers with Gears & Hand Crank: Pres erve for future display. Item 33-Cylinder Filled with Concrete Description: 30” L x 2’ Dia. Recommendation: Remove from public view. Item 34-Old Tractor Description: Scattered over 20’ wide area Recommendation: If tractor is antique, consider pr eserving. Item 35-Debris Description: Metal rebar, cardboard, & grass clippi ngs Recommendation: Discard

PAGE 33

8 Item 36-Condensing Coil & Old Still Parts Description: 3” Diameter pipe Recommendation: Preserve for future display. Item 37-Evaporator/Boiler Description: 4’H x 38”W Recommendation: Preserve for future display. Item 38-Boiler Cover Description: 8’Hx10’ Diameter at base Recommendation: Preserve for future display. Item 39-Cast Iron Piece Description: 2’ x 2’ Recommendation: Preserve for later use. Item 40-Cast Iron Plate Description: 3’ x 3’ Recommendation: Preserve for later use. Item 41-Plow & Debris Description: 4’ x 6’ area Recommendation: Preserve for display. Item 42-Large Cast Iron* Pot* Description: 8’ Diameter x 43” depth, imprinted “?_ _England” inside lip Recommendation: Preserve for display. Item 43-Conveyor Description: 26’L x 30”W Recommendation: Clean. Like the Conditioning Mach ine (Item #3) it could be on display as a more modern agricultural production im plement. Item 44-Kwik-Way Surface Grader Description: Recommendation: Remove from public view. Item 45-Metal Cylinder & Isuzu Tailgate Description: 22”x28” Cylinder filled with concrete Recommendation: Remove from public view. Item 46-Truck Chassis Description: Recommendation: Remove from public view.

PAGE 34

9 Item 47-Equipment Parts within Mill House Description: All parts not inventoried. Recommendation: Sort through items, preserve any machinery, tools that are greater than 50 years old, that are unique, or are an integ ral part of the modern production processes.



PAGE 1

1 APPENDIX A – INVENTORY OF HISTORIC MACHINERY The antique machinery present within the Yard at Hi llsborough Estate reveals the mechanization of agriculture that took place in the British West Indies during the midnineteenth century. They also serve to highlight t he high value of the crops, since such machinery was expensive and difficult to transport from Britain. Most of the boilers, gears, and shafts are in relatively good condition and can be grouped together in a display, re-assembled if possible, or simply placed throughout the Yard area with a brief description of their former use. Machinery that is showing signs of serious deterioration due to the elements should be relocated indoors for display. In fact, smaller pieces of machinery and tools could be displayed on the walls and in the corners of the restaurant to reinforce the agricultural heritage of the build ing. Many of the large items such as the gears and the boiler have taken on a very picturesq ue look, and heighten the historic atmosphere of the Yard. The following inventory is to be used in conjunctio n with the Map of Farm Equipment & Machinery, which is a supplement to the report. It is inevitable that many historic items were overlooked due to heavy vegetation and poor vi sibility in some buildings; however, the following inventory should serve as a starting point for the clean-up of the Yard area. Item 1-Boiler Description: 12’L x 3’4”W Recommendation: Preserve in place to serve as “indu strial sculpture”, or group with other machinery to illustrate agricultural production pro cesses. Identify boiler with small signage. Other antique machine parts exist in the areas adjacent to the boiler. If enough of the parts exist, and adequate documentation is a vailable on how the machinery was originally assembled, restoration may be possible f or display purposes.

PAGE 2

2 Item 2-Pickup Truck & Truck Parts Description: Truck body and parts less than 25 yea rs old. Recommendation: Clear from property. Item 3-Batch Leaf Conditioning Machine Description: 8’L x 4’W, less than 50 years old. Recommendation: If these machines are no longer pr oduced, it may be worthwhile to clean and display in a covered area to illustrate t he more recent production history of the estate. Item 4-Yellow Plastic Storage Containers Description Recommendation: Clear from yard area/ public view

PAGE 3

3 Item 5-Bobcat & Associated Equipment inside Shed Description: Recommendation: Remove Bobcat from Yard and public view. Any items within shed that are greater than 50 years should be evaluated further to access historical significance and potential for display. Item 6-Steam Engine Description Recommendation: Preserve in place or group with it ems that served similar functions. Item 7-Roller with Gear Description: 8’L x 2’W Recommendation: Preserve in place or group with si milar items. Item 8-Large Gear Description: 8”W x 3’Dia., located in arched openin g Recommendation: Preserve in place or display in re staurant or museum. Item 9-Gear Description: 8”W x 4’Dia., located in arched openin g Recommendation: Preserve in place or display in re staurant or museum.

PAGE 4

4 Item 10-Old Military Truck Chassis Description: 12’L x 6’ W Recommendation: Remove from public areas. Item 11-Workers’ Quarters Description: Wood Frame, adjacent to Mill Recommendation: If not essential for the functioni ng of the estate, remove from public area. If it must remain, consider a more historica lly appropriate covering for the walls, such as wood siding, etc.

PAGE 5

5 Item 12-Shed Description: Corrugated Metal Siding, 5’ x 4’ Recommendation: If not in use, consider removing f rom public area. Item 13-Piping in Old Store Room* Description: Galvanized irrigation? pipes Recommendation: Remove from public areas Item 14-Miscellaneous Wood Members Description: 8’W x 24’L Recommendation: Store in dry areas for future re-u se in building restoration. Item 15-Wood Description Recommendation: Store in dry area for future re-use Item 16-Rusted Corrugated Metal Description Recommendation: Discard.

PAGE 6

6 Item 17-Land Rover Description: Rusted, Plate #1655 Recommendation: Remove from public view. Item 18-Ford Tractor Truck Description: Model # CL 9000 Recommendation: Remove from public view. Item 19-Rusted Barrel Bands Description: Two Piles, Up to 6’ Dia. Recommendation: Store indoors and preserve for bar rel re-assembly. Item 20-Metal Round with gears (Dryer Screen*) Description: At top of steps, broken Recommendation: Discard. Item 21-I-Beam Description: Recommendation: Remove from public view. Item 22-Metal Shaft Description: Standing by wall Recommendation: Remove from public view. Item 23-Shipping Container, Concrete Ramp Description: Recommendation: Remove from Yard. Item 24-Tractor Axle and Wheels Description: Recommendation: Discard or remove from view. Item 25-Storage Tanks on Trailer Description: 9’L x 4’ W Recommendation: Remove from public view.

PAGE 7

7 Item 26-Metal Farm Equipment Description: 5’ x 5’* Recommendation: Possibly antique, clean-off and th en assess. If greater than 50 years old, preserve for display purposes. Item 27-Metal Pans with Sieve Description: In pile, 3’L x 40” W, age undetermine d. Recommendation: Clean and preserve for potential d isplay. Item 28-8”x 8”x27’L Wood Members Description: Under corrugated metal roofing Recommendation: Store in dry area for re-use in bu ilding restoration. Item 29-Shaft Description: 7’L x 8” Dia. Recommendation: Clean and preserve for display/reassembly if part of historic machinery (50 years old or greater). Item 30-Metal Debris Description: Pile, 8’L x 3’W Recommendation: Clean, determine if part of histor ic machinery. Item 31-Hops Shed Description: 16’ x 20’ Recommendation: Remove to accommodate restaurant r edevelopment. Item 32-Debris and Equipment within Old Mill Factor y Building a. Aluminum Boxes: Remove from public view. b. Oil Drums: Discard or remove from public view. c. Cement Mixer: Remove from public view. d. Three Rollers with Gears: Preserve for future disp lay. e. Metal Wheel with Shaft & Gears: Preserve for futur e display. f. Two Small 7” Rollers with Gears & Hand Crank: Pres erve for future display. Item 33-Cylinder Filled with Concrete Description: 30” L x 2’ Dia. Recommendation: Remove from public view. Item 34-Old Tractor Description: Scattered over 20’ wide area Recommendation: If tractor is antique, consider pr eserving. Item 35-Debris Description: Metal rebar, cardboard, & grass clippi ngs Recommendation: Discard

PAGE 8

8 Item 36-Condensing Coil & Old Still Parts Description: 3” Diameter pipe Recommendation: Preserve for future display. Item 37-Evaporator/Boiler Description: 4’H x 38”W Recommendation: Preserve for future display. Item 38-Boiler Cover Description: 8’Hx10’ Diameter at base Recommendation: Preserve for future display. Item 39-Cast Iron Piece Description: 2’ x 2’ Recommendation: Preserve for later use. Item 40-Cast Iron Plate Description: 3’ x 3’ Recommendation: Preserve for later use. Item 41-Plow & Debris Description: 4’ x 6’ area Recommendation: Preserve for display. Item 42-Large Cast Iron* Pot* Description: 8’ Diameter x 43” depth, imprinted “?_ _England” inside lip Recommendation: Preserve for display. Item 43-Conveyor Description: 26’L x 30”W Recommendation: Clean. Like the Conditioning Mach ine (Item #3) it could be on display as a more modern agricultural production im plement. Item 44-Kwik-Way Surface Grader Description: Recommendation: Remove from public view. Item 45-Metal Cylinder & Isuzu Tailgate Description: 22”x28” Cylinder filled with concrete Recommendation: Remove from public view. Item 46-Truck Chassis Description: Recommendation: Remove from public view.

PAGE 9

9 Item 47-Equipment Parts within Mill House Description: All parts not inventoried. Recommendation: Sort through items, preserve any machinery, tools that are greater than 50 years old, that are unique, or are an integ ral part of the modern production processes.



PAGE 1

1 Recommendations and Master Plan for Hillsborough Estate Dominica, West Indies Caribbean Volunteer Expeditions January 4-9, 2004 Project Team Anne Hersh, AIA Ned Gulbran, ASLA Jim LaRochelle Beau Spurlock, ASLA Bob Taylor Bruce Whitcomb Nancy Whitcomb

PAGE 2

2 TABLE OF CONTENTS PART I – PROJECT BACKGROUND PAGE 3 PART II – SITE FEATURES PAGE 6 PART III – STRUCTURES PAGE 15 PART IV – CONCLUSION PAGE 24 APPENDIX A Inventory of Historic Machinery

PAGE 3

3 PART 1 PROJECT BACKGROUND Caribbean Volunteer Expeditions (CVE) is a non-prof it group which brings volunteers to the Caribbean to work on a variety of historic pres ervation projects. The Rolle family, owners of the Hillsborough Estate, asked Caribbean Volunteer Expeditions to make recommendations on developing the site as a heritag e and educational destination. CVE’s Anne Hersh, an architect in the West Indies, and the team of volunteers assembled in January, 2004 to work on the development of the Master Plan in consultation with property owners. This report is a summary of CVE’s findings and reco mmendations to be used in conjunction with the Master Plan and architectural drawings. History Hillsborough Estate consists of approximately 300 a cres of land on the leeward (western) side of the island. The estate is situated on the southern bank of the Layou RiverDominica’s largest, and includes beachfront propert y at the river’s mouth. The estate was established in the 1770’s and owned by the Greg g family until the 1920’s, when the Rolle family purchased the land, and continued coco a, tobacco, and coconut production. The ten acre complex of industrial buildings known as the “Yard” is the historic and present centre of the Estate, and is where most of the cocoa and coconut processing takes place. Consequently, the attention of the report w ill be on this area. Figure 1 Layou River valley, looking west toward the Caribbean Sea. The historic centre of the Estate is located on the south bank of the river, i mmediately upstream from the bridge. The buildings within the Yard consist of remains of the watermill, boiling house and distillery as well as several auxiliary buildings. Several of the buildings suffered heavy

PAGE 4

4 damage from Hurricane David in 1979, yet remain sta nding to this day in various states of ruin. The structures also include a stone aqueduct and re lated water system in a relatively good state of conservation; a distillery, equipped with vats, tanks and related equipment, with walls, cooling tank, roof and nearby chimney suffic iently intact as to allow for authentic restoration and reconstruction; the ruins of buildi ngs thought to have been a slave hospital and overseers offices; and a solar drying house for copra (still in use today).. Water was diverted by aqueduct from a Layou River t ributary to power the water mill, which has an iron water wheel dating from 1869. Th e wheel turned mechanical rollers (1853) which crushed the sugar cane. Manufactured in England and Scotland, these two pieces of machinery were products of the Industrial Revolution, a time when the best and latest farm technology was being shipped to the Wes t Indies. The production of rum was also an important enterpr ise, as evidenced by the large store house with barred windows (see Building A below). This building would serve to securely hold barrels of rum prior to shipment, at which time the barrels would be rolled down a cobblestone boat ramp to the river, and then taken by launch to ships anchored at the mouth. In the 1880s island sugar production declined becau se it was cheaper for importers to purchase it elsewhere. Hillsborough Estate, like o thers, responded to the market change by retrofitting the cane processing equipment to ha ndle lime juice production. The growing of limes became an important agricultural e ndeavor and lime juice was exported to England to be finished as a cordial and for othe r uses. In the early twentieth century the estate diversifi ed into tobacco production and a large building was constructed for the curing of tobacco, which is still in use today. Cocoa production was also very important and buildings as sociated with cocoa processing are intact and are presently in use. In fact, the coco a drying platform is considered to be the last in operation on Dominica. The production of co pra continues, supplied by the numerous coconut palms on the property. Hillsborough Estate embodies much of the agricultur al history of the island, having in its time produced sugar cane, coffee, cocoa, tobacco, a nd limes. Not only a static reminder of the past, it remains a dynamic and genuine examp le of a Dominican estate because of its continued use. By inviting the public to tour Hillsborough Estate, tourists from abroad and Dominicans alike can view and appreciate the ar chitectural and agricultural history of the island, while enjoying the outdoor activities a nd sampling local products that set the island apart.

PAGE 5

5 Opportunities for the Development of the Site The site has the potential to be developed for many uses. The historical and educational potential can be complemented with retail, recreati onal, and other tourist amenities. A. Agricultural Heritage The Rolle family envisions extensive educational us e of the property with displays of the building and machinery used for sugar, lime, cocoa, and other agricultural products. The site will comprise historical buildings, stabilized ruins, working historical equipment and artifacts with written interpretation so that visit ors may follow a self-guided tour of the property. Demonstration fruit and produce gardens are also planned. Current agricultural processes such as copra drying and coc oa processing will continue and will be open to public viewing. B. Restaurant Along with the heritage displays, there is an oppor tunity to create other tourist amenities including a restaurant and multipurpose area for ed ucational demonstrations, conferences, or theatrical performances. C. Retail Shops The site will also feature retail shops featuring a gricultural products of Dominica: hot sauces, fruits, rum, and juices. Books related to nature, history and agriculture will also be featured. Furthermore, crafts and other locally made items will appeal to tourists. D. Recreational Opportunities Recreational activities can also be incorporated in to the site. The site is on the Layou River, and the beach is nearby. The Rolles present ly operate a tour company featuring hiking, tubing, kayaking. Some of these tours can include this site. E. Typical Workers Housing and Gardens An unique and interesting feature can also include a typical workers dwelling, and garden used by Dominicans, with typical domestic an imals, such as chickens, goats, pigs. These will also appeal to children visiting the sit e.

PAGE 6

6 PART II SITE FEATURES Entry to Site Entry to the historic center of the Estate is curre ntly via the farm road, a public right-ofway immediately to the south of the existing Texaco filling station. This road should be maintained as an access road for the Tobacco Building, Container Shed, and the estate’s upriver agricultural areas. Visitors will then access the site by an expanded entry that is slightly to the south of the Layou River bridge. Currently there is an access point in this area, however, the master plan shows the new entrance approximately ten feet to the south. The reason for this shift is to allow visitors entering and exiting the parking lot better visibility of southbound traffic crossing the bridge. In order to make this entrance shift, the existing workers’ house (Building L) must be moved to an alternate location such as adjacent to the demonstration garden. Parking/Drop-Off It is expected that 75% of visitors to the Estate w ill arrive by tour bus and unload at the Agricultural Production and Storage Building by usi ng a proposed circular drop-off. 25% of the visitors are expected to arrive by their own vehicles and will need room for parking. Six parking spaces are proposed adjacent to the bridge embankment, with another six spaces in front of the Ag. Production/S torage Building. The drop-off and parking spaces should remain unpaved in order to ma intain the rural and agricultural character of the property. In addition, by not pav ing the vehicular area, alterations to the parking number and configuration could be made if m ore space is needed. Some grading of the earth may be necessary, to keep water from p ooling in the middle of the parking area during heavy rainstorms. Ticketing/Admission The proposed circular drop-off area would be next t o the covered portion of the Rum Storage/Visitors’ Center. This would permit a roof ed area under which visitors could load and unload during inclement weather. In the w est section of this building, a desk/office area could serve as a ticket and gift s hop counter. A visitor could enter, purchase tickets, a Hillsborough Estate guide book, and Dominican souvenirs at the same cash register. This would permit one employee to p erform multiple tasks, thus reducing operational costs. View of current entry to Historic Yard from road. Filling Station and Layou River bridge are visible at left.

PAGE 7

7 View of Yard, looking west. Overgrown cobblestone paving can be seen at right. Pathways As there is a significant amount of existing stone paving among the older buildings, it is recommended that similar stone paving be used in areas that must be paved. The proposed patio behind the restaurant adjacent to the river will need paving. Another is a pedestrian connection to the front of the Visitor Centre (Building A) to the intersection of the existing stone paving in the center of the site. The farm road could receive some gravel leading to the Demonstration Plots and the Pig Pens, as there are some muddy portions after heavy rains. Most pathways between buildings, howe ver, should be left grassed as the ground is fairly well drained. There has been disc ussion about providing a hiking and mountain biking route at the eastern end of the Estate, continuing down to the historic centre, and on to the coast along the Layou River. This could easily be achieved by using the existing public road that traverses the Estate. Some low areas of the road may need to be filled and graveled to keep them passable during heavy rains. This connection to the interior of the island should be publicized in a Hillsborough Estate guide as well as in tourism offices. Landscaping Since Hillsborough Estate has been in constant oper ation for over two hundred years, it is unlikely that there were ever many trees and shrubs within the main working areas of the Estate. In keeping with the original character of the property, landscaping can be kept to a minimum. However, there should be a few large sh ade trees provided for shade and shelter from rain. Please refer to the Master Plan for suggested locations. In addition, shade trees should be planted next to the parking s paces to keep parked automobiles cool. Another function of landscaping is to screen unsigh tly views from the visiting public. Once visitors have entered the Estate, views of the Texaco station and of the Vehicle Maintenance Shed should be screened by trees and sh rubs as best as possible. Layou River Valley, looking east from Hillsborough Estate Great house.

PAGE 8

8 Tobacco Storage Building (Bldg. N) For visitors traveling north from Roseau, the large trees and royal palms that are planted along the road give an impressive sense of entry to the Estate. A combination of trees and royal palms should be planted to continue this theme along the length of the road frontage of the Estate. The kinds of trees and shrubs used for landscaping should be consistent with what has always been used on Dominica and should come from D ominican nurseries. For example, royal palms shipped from Florida would not be the same species as those grown on the island. Based on conversations with Mr. Phi llip Rolle, trees such as saman and cedar, which have been used historically on the Est ate, may be good choices. Additionally, fruit trees could serve a dual purpos e by being planted for shade throughout the property. Excess Vegetation Weeds, grasses, and tree seedlings that sprout next to the building and between stone joints should be regularly cleared. Large shade tr ees such as the mango at the rear of the Store Room/Restaurant building should be preserved and large shrubs such as the croton that are between the farm road and the stone wall a re very attractive, and should be kept in place. Treatment of Severely Ruined Buildings Buildings which have deteriorated to a point at whi ch very little remains of the structure, such as the one whose foundations exist behind the Old Store Room, should be left in place, as they provide a hint of what the original structure may have been. Since few historical photographs exist of some buildings, cle aring and archeological excavation of this site may provide insight into the uses and ori ginal layout of this corner of the Estate. At a minimum, foundation walls should be kept clear of woody seedlings which can cause the walls to deteriorate further. Additional foundations and ruins not identified in this report should receive similar treatment. Treatment of Tobacco Storage Building and Vehicular Storage Shed This area is the main utilitarian section of the es tate and sees a good deal of activity every day centered around the maintenance and storage of the Wacky Rollers tour vehicles. Although visitors to the Estate will be somewhat se parated from this area, the occasional individual may choose to go to the rear of the buil dings, located along the farm road. For this reason, it is important to clear the abandoned vehicles and equipment that are currently between the two buildings and the road. In addition, it is recommended that some screening of the vehicular maintenance activities be provided. This could be achieved by narrowing the entrance between the two buildings and providing landscaping adjacent to the entrance. (Please see Master Plan) Additionally, wooden gates could be

PAGE 9

9 provided between the buildings to completely hide v iews to the maintenance and storage of vehicles. Placement of Farm Equipment The Estate possesses many large pieces of farm mach inery that help tell the story of agricultural practices on Dominica and, consequentl y, of the nation’s history. The large grinders, boilers, and condenser underline the impo rtance of sugarcane and limes to the island. For this reason, displays of machinery sho uld be an important component of the Hillsborough Estate tour. Historic farm equipment that is not in use can be displayed in two ways. The first is to leave large pieces of eq uipment that will not be adversely affected by the weather outside in specific areas t o serve as “industrial sculptures”. The more delicate equipment should be inside the Visito r Center/ Rum Store Room, where accompanying written descriptions, as in a museum. The restaurant could also display a few pieces on the walls and among the dining tables Additional recommendations regarding the equipment can be found in Appendix A. River Access Clearly, the Estate’s location along the Layou River is an advantage from an agricultural standpoint. However, it also increases the tourist potential for the site. Wacky Rollers presently uses the Layou for tubing and kayaking, passing by the Estate’s historic centre just prior to completing the tour. Revenue from tubers and kayakers could be maximized by taking them ashore at the old ramp and allowing them to tour the grounds, shop, andeat at the restaurant. They could then continue in their tubes to the mout h of the river, where they could enjoy the beach and sea. Items that they bought at the c entre could be bagged and waiting for them when they are ready to leave the beach. Tubing on the Layou River adjacent to Hillsborough Estate. View looking down overgrown cobblestone ramp to riv er.

PAGE 10

10 Outdoor Gathering Areas Because of the Estate’s open nature, gathering areas abound throughout the property. One outdoor space that should be developed is an uncovered patio between the proposed restaurant and the river. The patio should be immediately adjacent to the building, which would permit diners to view the rushing water, but would allow them to go inside in the event of rain. This area could be connected to the main cobblestone paving of the centre by a path around the east side of the restaurant. Aqueduct One of the interesting features of the Estate is th e presence of an aqueduct that originally brought water to the buildings of the Estate. Wate r was diverted from a tributary of the Layou River, upstream from the historic centre, and was channeled by a trough carved out of the steep rock cliffs that line the south si de of the farm road and the Layou. As the aqueduct nears the mill, the channel is concrete. This feature of the Estate was very important to the operation of the crushing machiner y, and therefore the processing of sugarcane and limes. For this reason, efforts shou ld be made to preserve the integrity of the channel and display it as an exhibit that furth er shows how the Estate works. Most vegetation and debris should be removed from the ch annel, in order to make it more visible to visitors. Heavy equipment should not be used to carry out this work, in order to protect the original configuration of the aqueduct. Because the aqueduct parallels the farm road for much of its length, access is very ea sy, and visitors could be encouraged to follow the aqueduct upstream to the upper portions of the Estate, and to connect with future networks of trails in Dominica’s interior. Demonstration Agricultural Plots As the Estate is primarily used for agriculture, th ere should be demonstration plots that showcase the crops that were historically grown on site, as well as those being produced today. It may also be appropriate to display other plants that are grown in the West Indies. Many visitors from temperate climates have never seen breadfruit, sorrel, and nutmeg, and would enjoy seeing plants whose product s they regularly consume. Signage is very important and could include the local and s cientific names of plants, their uses, and how they are cultivated. Having a tasting stat ion where visitors could sample the foods would be an option in this location, or in th e restaurant or gift shop. In addition, traditional Dominican livestock could be placed on exhibit. The location of the existing pig pen is ideal for this purpose, as it is directly across the farm road from the Proposed outdoor dining area between Storage Building (Bldg. F.) at left and Layou River.

PAGE 11

11 demonstration plots. Small children would find thi s element of the tour particularly appealing. Overall Connection to Upper Section of Estate and t o Mouth of Layou River Hillsborough Estate encompasses several diverse landscapes which make it very unique. Traveling along its length, one encounters hilly terrain, cliffs, river views, groves, pastureland, and beaches. In addition, it possesses the historic buildings which make it particularly interesting to explore. Using the existing farm road, along with the highway, one can easily walk, bike, or ride on horseback from the sea to the upper portions of the Estate. From that point, connections could be made to other hiking trails on the island. Most of the road upstream from the Yard offers lovely views of the river and of the cliffs, and should be considered as part of the tour of the Est ate. The old aqueduct runs parallel to the road in this location, and the large mango trees offer a good deal of shade, making it a comfortable walk. View looking west along farm road. Tobacco Storage Building is at left

PAGE 12

12 Signage As with any historical site, written interpretation of buildings, objects, and the land will allow visitors to get the complete story of Hillsbo rough Estate. The physical size of signs for the identification of buildings should be kept small and as unobtrusive as possible. Visitors should just be able to identify the building by a sign when they are a few feet from the walls. The location for these signs are often most effective next to doorways. Either wall-mounted or freestanding signs could be used. Detailed information about each building could be provided in a pamphlet or by a written description inside each building. Above and below are several examples of signs at Fort King George in Darien, Georgia. Example of simple identification sign.

PAGE 13

13 Children’s Activities As mentioned above, children would find farm animal s particularly interesting, especially if they could feed and pet them. Also, most childr en enjoy water, so the presence of the Layou River is an asset. Opportunities for rafting fishing, and swimming could be provided for visitors with children, in conjunction with admission to the site. These elements would not need to be developed at first, b ecause many children would simply enjoy climbing on ruins and investigating the large pieces of machinery contained in the Yard. Example of drawing showing reconstruction of histor ic building. Example of informational sign showing historical v iew of sawmill.

PAGE 14

14 Accommodations Although providing accommodation is not essential t o the success of Hillsborough Estate as a historical attraction, it can be considered as a later phase. Two locations of the Estate are particularly conducive to development as an inn or hotel site, and each has its own distinct character. The first location is at the eastern end of the Est ate, near the existing greenhouse. This site would be a good location for a forested lodgetype inn, where guests could hike, mountain bike, and swim in the river. Access to th e beach would be only a short bike ride away. Since few visitors come to Dominica loo king for large resort-type hotels, there should be emphasis placed on seclusion and in corporation of nature into the layout of the inn. Multiple cottages are preferable, rath er than all rooms in one large building. Architecture of the buildings should be traditional West Indian in character, perhaps borrowing some architectural elements from some of the existing historic buildings on the Estate. Utilization of wood and stone is prefe rable to modern concrete construction. If concrete is used, it should be covered with a su itable natural-looking veneer. Roofs could be of corrugated galvanized metal. Although the character of the inn should be rustic, there should be special emphasis placed on providing all of the comforts of a modern hotel, especially if catering to an up-marke t clientele. Televisions and telephones are not absolutely necessary in private rooms, howe ver there should be a common television and telephone area in the inn for guests ’ use. Similarly, internet access should be provided in a specific area of the inn, or prefe rably, in-room. The second location for an inn is close to the sea. As above, the character of the buildings should be West Indian. Multiple small bu ildings and cottages should make up the complex in order to maintain privacy and to les sen the visual and environmental impact on the coastline. The location does not hav e to be directly on the beach, but the Sea should be visible from multiple areas of the co mplex, particularly the restaurant and other common areas. Efforts should be made to buff er the inn from any noise and views of traffic traveling along the coast road. Utilities New electric and telephone lines should be buried w ithin the historic centre of the Estate. If possible, existing lines should be buried, altho ugh it is not essential at first. The kitchen and all washrooms should be placed on a sep tic system to ensure that water quality of the Layou River is maintained. Lighting Lighting should be kept to the minimum necessary to serve the site after dark. It is likely that the majority of nighttime visitors will be tho se who wish to eat at the restaurant, or attend events held in the restaurant building. The refore, low level patio lighting, a few up-lights beneath trees around the parking area, an d perhaps a few accent lights to illuminate the facades of the structures would be a ll that is necessary to create a memorable ambiance for the guest.

PAGE 15

15 PART III. STRUCTURES A. Visitor Center (Former Storage Building) Description: The building (90 feet by 40 feet) had been used for rum and general agricultural storage. A more recent addition to the north of about 16 feet now houses vehicles and a boat. The building has stone walls which have been parged with Portland cement, and the new section is parged block. The roof is framed with wood with galvanized sheeting, and has a ventilation strip at the ridge. There is also a large overhang supported with brackets. Recommendations: This building is underutilized for agricultural pur poses, and is located near the visitor entry to the site. It would be a good area for admi ssions, visitor center, administration, display, and shops. The more recent block walls on the north should be removed; the roof can remain for a covered patio. A ticket cubicle and office could be located on the east end. As the first building visitors encounter, it can house a small m useum with educational materials, basic history, display items, and photographs to in troduce the visitor to the estate. Descriptions of the sea and bathing facilities, hik ing, and river opportunities can also be available in this area. This building is also a good location for shops-sel ling agricultural, educational and other products to tourists. The windows on the south can be enlarged to doors f or easier access to the building. In the interior, the dry wall should be removed to exp ose the wood rafters. The gable ends, now covered with asphalt shingles should be replace d with wallaba shingles. The corrugated roofing appears to be in good condit ion, but could be painted. There are now in place attractive wood shutters on the window s and doors. These could be used for the new openings as well.

PAGE 16

16 B. Agricultural Processing and Storage Building Description: This 75’ x 22’ building is currently used for storage and for cocoa processing. The building is one story with stone and concrete block walls with large openings. The stone walls on the south are about 5 feet high with an open wood or metal screening above. The north side has screening as well as corrugated metal between concrete piers. The roof is an unsymmetrical gable shape framed with wood rafters and covered with galvanized metal. Recommendations: The building is now being used for agriculture at H illsborough, and needs to remain for functional reasons. During cocoa processing, the bu ilding can be open for visitors to view this process. The block and stone should be patched, plastered an d painted. Galvanized metal on walls should be removed. New screening and wood slats sho uld be replaced. Further work can include new rafters and metal roofing. C. Solar Drying Building Description: This recent building, 28 feet long by 15 feet wide, is used for drying copra. The building will continue to be used for current agricultural purposes. The building has fiberglass roofing in a curved shape above a concrete base. Recommendations: The building should remain as is.

PAGE 17

17 D. Cocoa Dryer Description: This is an excellent example of a cocoa drying building. The building includes an 18’ by 38’ area covered by a steep gable roof. Wood trays roll out on metal rails to the south of the covered area. There are two sets of rails about 53 feet long. Recommendations: The building needs to remain for cocoa drying, and again could be a feature for visitors t o witness this agricultural process. The building is in serviceable condition and minor repa irs should be make to improve the aesthetics. E. Restaurant and Multipurpose Buildings (Old Sugar Factory Building and Rum Still and F. Storage Building) Description: These buildings are no longer used for agricultural endeavors; the old sugar factory building and rum still are one of the most interest ing buildings on this site displaying elements of the sugar process of the past. There a re six coppers with fire tunnels below on the west side. Part of the building, was used f or storage and has a basement. The rum still is on the west, and the chimney is in tact. Parts of the metal distillation equipment remain. The sugar factory building is con nected to a large storage building which forms a T shape. The storage building is abo ut 70 feet by 30 feet and is more recent. The stone walls of the factory, with large rectangular stones forming the corners, had originally been white washed. The floor next to the coppers is terra cotta tile and brick. The roof was in poor condition and was recently removed. The storage building has parged stone walls, wood rafters and corrugated metal roofing with a ventilation cupola at the ridge and three dormers. The building is currently filled with all sorts of machinery, building

PAGE 18

18 and agricultural materials, which should be removed There may also be historical equipment in this area which should be saved for di splay and interpretation. Recommendations: This complex of buildings, next to the river, can b e developed into a multipurpose area for dining as well as other events. The more recent concrete wall separating the two buildings should be removed. A simple kitchen at t he northwest corner of the factory building can serve both the patio and dining areas. A bar area overlooking the coppers could also be a feature. The large storage building can be a dining area (se rving about 110 people). As a large open area, other eve nts such as presentations, theatrical, or musical event s could occur here. The building can also be part museum wi th displays and pictures, photographs and signage explaining the sugar processing operation of the pa st. A patio and deck on the river side would be an attr active place for additional dining. The copper area of the factory building needs to be cleaned up, and should remain mainly as a display feature. A hip roof and new galvanized should be installed o n the building and work on this has already begun. A new wood floor needs to be installed over the basement. The flooring near the coppers needs to be cleaned a nd repaired. Some pointing work has already been done to help stabilize the walls. The rum still and exterior walls and openings should be cleaned up and repaired. The steps to the rum still can become a new access point from the ramp leading to the boat access at the ramp to the river. The storage building once had a wood floor and this should be replaced. The walls need to be patched and painted. The roof rafters appear to be in poor condition. New rafters as well as new galvanized should be ins talled. Some of the windows have large wood shutters; these should be replaced in th e same style as is currently being used. On the river side, all the windows can be lengthene d into doors for easier access to the patio.

PAGE 19

19 G. Shed and H. Water Wheel Description: At the west end of the site, is the waterwheel which was housed in a building. The wheel and much of the machinery remain. The stone walls of the building at the wheel remain. Next to the water wheel is another storage shed with low stone walls and a dilapidated wood framed roof with metal sheeting. Recommendations: The water wheel is one of the unique attractions of this estate. We recommend repairing the water wheel and repairing part of the aqueduct so that the wheel could turn again. The crushing machinery, now frozen, could be brought back to working condition. The storage building can house additional machinery and displays related to sugar or lime processing. The walls of both buildings need to be patched, and pointed. Both buildings need new roofs made of wood rafters and corrugated metal. Ia; Ib; Ic; Id Toilets, Display and Shops (Former latrine, hospital, kitchen, offices) Description: This complex to the southwest of the factory and storage buildings contains the remains of four structures. The one at the west was reportedly a hospital at one point. Clearing revealed the remains of a kitchen facility and toilet. The owners reported that one of the buildings was used for an office. Two of the structures were two story with stone bases and former wood second stories, and five sets of staircases remain. Two of the buildings were one st ory. Remnants of the wood rafters and rusty galvanized roofing remain.

PAGE 20

20 Recommendations: These small buildings are a contrast to the larger agricultural structures and should be restored. We recommend that the building to the southeast be used for toilet rooms for the restaurant and general public visiting the site. Other uses can include more shops, display or a caretakers dwelling. The stone walls need to be stabilized, and re-pointed. The upper floors of the former two story structures can be rebuilt with wood studs and lapboard siding. Hip wood framed roofs with galvanized corrugated sheeting wo uld be typical. J. Ruin with Chimney Description This building is 15 feet wide and 38 feet long. There is a stone chimney at the west end. The walls consist of stone up to three feet, and presently have metal sheeting above. There is also a boiler nearby. The roof is a gable and has metal roofing. Recommendations: Further archeological and historical investigation is required here. The stone walls sh ould be pointed, and repaired. The upper walls and roof rafters probably need to be re built at some point. New galvanized roofing and new siding should be applied.

PAGE 21

21 K. Ruin Description: This building had high walls, and is 25 feet by 19 feet, which might have had to do with a drying process. Recommendations: Further historical and archeological investigation is needed to determine the former uses of the building. The walls should be cleared, and vegetation which is damaging the walls needs to be removed. L. Workers Cottage Description: This 16 by 10 wood chattel house is typical of residences of Dominica and the Caribbean of about 100 years ago. The building has wood shingles on the walls, metal roofing, and wood shutters. Recommendations: The building can serve as an example of worker’s housing, and can be a feature for visitors to see how people used to live. We recommend locating it near the garden area. The building, however, is in very poor condi tion. It may be possible to rebuild the roof, floor, add new wood shingle, and new shutters M. Animal Pens Description: This building of about 93 feet long by 15 feet wide had animal pens. The walls are stone, block, and concrete, and appear to have been built over time. There is no roof now, but apparently there had been a shed roof. Recommendations: This building can be used for a few animal pens in conjunction with the workers house and demo nstration garden area. The building should be cleaned up; the walls should be stabilized. A roof can be added over part of the building.

PAGE 22

22 N. Tobacco Storage Building Description: This large two story building has a more recent front section added onto old stone walls. The present building was used for tobacco processing and is presently used for agricultural storage related to tobacco. Recommendations: This building could remain as is, and continue its present uses. We do not see this part of the site being open to the public at t his point. O. Vehicle and Container Storage Building Description: Across from the Tobacco Storage Building is an open building housing containers, vehicles, and equipment used by the owner’s tour company. Recommendations: The building serves a current purpose and should remain as is. Views from the farm road should be screened by fencing and gates. For additional recommendations, please see “Treatment of Tobacco Storage Building a nd Vehicular Storage Shed” under Part II – Site Features. GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR REPAIR: Stone Walls It is important to clear all vegetation from stone walls, The roots are causing serious decay. The stone also needs to be stabilized; Old mortar should be removed, missing or dislodged stones should be repaired. New mortar hi gh in lime content should be used for pointing. Traditional whitewash should be applied.

PAGE 23

23 Figure 2-Remnants of old stucco and paint over ston e archway of mill house. Roofs Traditionally roofs were framed with wood members. These are generally missing, or in poor condition. The new construction should include new rafters, with a roof deck made from local boards, and then wood purlins, and galvanized corrugated roofing. ( In some cases the wood deck could be eliminated). There may be an advantage in painting all the roofs the same color to give continuity to the site. Doors and Windows Most buildings would have had heavy wood shutters, and we can still see much of the historic hardware and shutters in place. We suggest replicating these wood shutters and using a ppropriate hardware as well. Some openings presently have screening or corrugate d metal. This needs to be upgraded; in some cases wood slats were used for some protect ion and security and this feature could be used where operable shutters are not neede d. Ruins Some of the buildings do not necessarily have to be fully restored with new roofs and doors etc. However, the stone walls should be stab ilized, re-pointed, and a cap on top will protect the walls. It is most important to r emove all vegetation from these walls, and periodically remove any vegetation which might begin to grow.

PAGE 24

24PART IV – CONCLUSION The landscape, structures, machinery, and individua ls that make up Hillsborough Estate are an important component of Dominica’s ric h history. Many Dominicans and most visitors to the island have never learned its story, since the Estate has been an operating business for almost two hundred and fifty years. The vision of the Rolle family to transform it into a centre where locals and tour ists can dine, attend cultural events, hike, and learn about Dominican culture will result in an excellent destination for tourists, and an important heritage site for the nation. The proximity of the estate to Roseau and the cruise ship docks will allow convenient access for tourists who have a limited time in the country, and the unique location of the estate along the Layou River and Caribbean Sea support numerous and varied activities for adul ts and children. The Rolle family currently has an ecotourism-based business in the f orm of Wacky Rollers, and the development of the estate into a tasteful recreatio n centre and historic site is a logical progression. With added tourism generated from the redevelopment of the estate, the opportunity for more jobs for Dominicans will likel y follow, thereby ensuring that Hillsborough Estate remains a key part of the islan d’s economy, and history, for years to come.