Profiles of the sentenced inmates at Her Majesty's Prison, Fox Hill, Nassau Bahamas

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Material Information

Title:
Profiles of the sentenced inmates at Her Majesty's Prison, Fox Hill, Nassau Bahamas
Abbreviated Title:
Profiles of the sentenced inmates at Her Majesty's Prison
Physical Description:
38 p. : col. ill.; 22 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Minnis, Jessica.
Gibson, Tonya.
Pintard-Newry, Yvette.
Stevenson, Michael.
Symonette, E'Thegra.
Publisher:
College of The Bahamas
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas.
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Prison.   ( lcsh )

Notes

General Note:
A report on the profiles of prison inmates at Her Majesty's Prison Fox Hill, Nassau Bahamas.

Record Information

Source Institution:
College of The Bahamas
Holding Location:
College of The Bahamas
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution.
System ID:
AA00012377:00001


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Full Text

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PROFILE OF THE SENTENCED INMATES AT HER MAJESTY’S PRISON FOX HILL, NASSAU, THE BAHAMASMs. Jessica Minnis Mrs. E’Thegra Symonette Mr. Michael Stevenson Mrs. Yvette Pintard Newry Mrs. Tonya Gibson

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Purpose Of StudyDetermine the profile of the sentenced inmate at Her Majesty’s prison. More specifically, the focus was on identifying common characteristics of the inmate in the following areas: • Demographics • Background • Criminal History and Involvement • Prison Culture and Society • Inmate Self Perceptions

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Purpose Of Study Cont.Determine any significant similarities or differences in the profile of the inmates found in the present study with the studies by: • The National Crime Commission in 1998; and • The Research Unit, Her Majesty’s Prison in 2009.

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Purpose Of Study Cont .• Having knowledge of the profile of the inmate should contribute to understanding of the causes of crime and consequences of incarceration in The Bahamas. • A clearer profile of the offender could enhance appropriate responses to crime and modify early intervention strategies.

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Methodology• The survey consisting of 84 questions was administered during the Spring Semester 2010. • There were 783 sentenced inmates at the time of the study, and a purposive stratified random sample was used. • The planned sample size was 400 inmates. 345 questionnaires were administered. 336 was the final sample of the study. • The data were collected during the May July 2010.

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Limitations• Illiteracy challenges • Surveys administered to inmates from other sources • Administrative delays • Security Issues • Length of time in administering the survey

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FindingsSelected findings: • Demographics of the inmate • Background • Inmate self perceptions

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Sample DistributionThe 336 participants in this study were drawn from: • 46% Maximum Security • 37% Medium Security • 10% Minimum Security • 5% Female Prison • 2% Remand Centre

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Demographics Of Sample Population • 95% of respondents were male.• 5% were female. • 1% were transgender• 44% of respondents were 20 30 years old• 5% were under 19 years • 37% were 31 45 years • 13% were over 45 years • 98% of respondents were Black. • 1 % white. • 1% Hispanic. • 0.3% other race

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Demographics Of Sample Population Cont.• 80% of the respondents were single• 12% were married• 93% of the respondents were born in The Bahamas• 3% were born in Jamaica • 2% were born in Haiti • 1% were born in America• 54% of the respondents grew up in New Providence .• 23% grew up in the Family Islands • 17% grew up in Grand Bahama • 6% grew up outside of The Bahamas

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Place of ResidenceThe respondents who grew up in New Providence: • 30% lived in the Grove area • 27% in the Central area • 15% lived in the South Eastern District of New Providence • 11% in the North Eastern area

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Mother’s place of birth• 82% The Bahamas • 8% Haiti • 5% Jamaica • 3% Turks and Caicos • 2% Other countries • 1% Not known

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Father’s Place of birth• 81% The Bahamas • 7% Haiti • 5% Jamaica • 4% Turks and Caicos • 2% Other countries • 1% Not known

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Family household, while growing up• 40% lived with their mother • 36% lived with both parents • 0.3% lived with father only • 13% lived with their grandparents

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School type• Public school: 79% • Some public and some private: 13% • Private school: 8% • 1% indicated no school

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Highest Level of Education Completed• 68% between 10th 12thgrade • 18%: between 7th 9thgrade • 6% : Some college education • 4% : Technical/vocational training • 2%: 6thgrade or less level of education

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Failing at school54% had dropped out of school48% were expelled from school for: • Fighting: 33% • Bad behaviour: 22% • Drugs: 11% • Disrespect for authority: 8%

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Reasons for dropping out of school• Bad behaviour: 18% • Had to work to support family: 18% • Other reasons: 16% • Did not like school: 14%

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Recent Employment• 62% were employed in semi skilled jobs • 21% were employed in unskilled occupations • 11% were employed in skilled occupations • 4% were unemployed • 1 % were employed in professional occupations

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Duration of employment• 45% were employed between 1 5years • 33% were employed for less than a year • 12% were employed between 6 10 years • 10% were employed between 11+ years • 1% were not employed

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Place of Employment• 73% were employed in the private sector • 22% were self employed • 5% were employed in the Government sector • 0.3% indicated that they were unemployed

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Primary source of Income prior to Incarceration• 59% of the respondents were employed at the time of their incarceration • 55% legal employment • 15% Spouse/Family/Friends • 11% Other source • 7% Under the table • 5% indicated that they had no income • 3% National Insurance • 2% Social Services • 1% indicated drugs

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Abuse or mistreatment• 31% were abused or mistreated Person Who Committed the Abuse • Parents/Guardians 47% • Other 19% • An adult living with them 11% • A brother, girlfriend or teenager living with them 11%

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Forms of Abuse• Physical 42% • Emotional 23% • Neglect 19% • Sexual 10%

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Violence In The HomeEver Witnessed Violence in the Home:49% had witnessed violence in the homeType of Violence Witnessed in the Home:• Physical 66% • Emotional 18% • Other 8% • Sexual 5% • Murder 3%

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Person who committed the violence in the home• Family Member: 62% • Spouse/Partner: 17% • Other ( e.g. stepfather, parents, mothers boyfriend): 13% • Friend: 8%

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Qualitative analysis

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Focus on1. What are some of the reasons you believe caused you to commit your crime? 2. What do you believe are the underlying causes of crime in The Bahamas?

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Focus 1 – Reasons given for their crime 247 inmates responded to the question 13 codes were deployed to categorize responses

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40% Of RESPONDENTS INDICATED AN ECONOMIC REASON AS THE CAUSE OF THEIR CRIME.

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Focus 2Underlying causes of crime• 284 inmates responded to the question. • 61 response categories were created to code the responses. • 419 responses were coded. Many inmates indicated a combination of factors

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Some of the response categories :• Economic • Education • Gangs • Government • Lack of opportunity • Neglect of youth • Peer Association • Institutional Labeling • Envy • Selfishness • Lack of respect • Supernatural • Criminal records • Self esteem • Culture • Drugs • Laziness • Revenge • Conflict resolution • Prison violence • Anger • Lack of will power • Following fashion • Poor leadership • Class based selective enforcement …

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Key findings• 34% of the responses indicated an aspect of the economy as the underlying cause of crime in The Bahamas. • Consistent with the earlier finding of 40% of respondents who indicated an aspect of the economy as the cause of their crime.

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Interpreting a response as an economic factor For the purposes of the study, an economic reason/factor was defined as any statement that • (1) indicated any level of material want or needs; or • (2) registered any concern about the means of attaining material wants or needs.

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Inmate understanding of the ‘economic’causes of crime Absolute Deprivation Relative Deprivation Deprivation that is capable of being measured with reference to a fixed minimal material standard or absolute threshold. Deprivation that is rooted in discontent that accompanies the experience of perceived inequality.

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• Of the 98 respondents who gave an economic response to the question concerning the cause of their crime, almost half expressed it in terms of absolute deprivation ; the other half in terms of relative deprivation.

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ConclusionFurther lines of inquiry based on profile data: Economy and crime Restorative Justice possibilities Education policy regarding school discipline Gender and crime