Three year progress report, National committee for the conservation of manpower in war industries

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Material Information

Title:
Three year progress report, National committee for the conservation of manpower in war industries Men, minutes and victory
Portion of title:
Men, minutes and victory
Physical Description:
iv, 23, 1 p. : illus. (incl. map) diagrs. ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Committee for the Conservation of Manpower in War Industries
United States -- Division of Labor Standards
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Labor, Division of Labor Standards
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Working class -- Accidents -- Prevention   ( lcsh )
Industrial safety   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Reproduced from type-written copy.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004978627
oclc - 41198592
System ID:
AA00012235:00001


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l. ~;- NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR THE CONSERVATION
SI OF MANPOWER IN WAR INDUSTRIES


CYRIL AINSWCRTH
Assistant Secretary, AmericanStand-
ards Association, New York, N. Y.

W. H. CAMERON
Evanston, Ill.

JOHN P. COYNE
President, Building and Construc-
tion Trades Department, American
Federation of Labor, Washington, D. C.

R. E. DONOVAN
Chief Safety Engineer, Standard
Oil Company of California, San
Francisco, Calif.

JOHN P. FREY
President, Metal Trades Department,
American Federation of Labor, Wash-
ington, D. C.

CLINTON S. GOLDEN
Assistant to the President, United
Steel Workers of America, Pitts-
burgh, Pa.

WILLIAM H. IVEY
Birmingham, Ala.

THOMAS P. KEARNS
Superintendent, Division of Safety
and Hygiene, Industrial Commission,
Columbus, Ohio

LEWIS E. MAC BRAYNE
Executive Vice President, Massa-
chusetts Safety Council, Boston,
Mass.

T. 0. MEISNER
Director of Safety, American Can
Co., Chicago, Ill.

CHARLES A. MILLER
Assistant to Manager, The Texas Co.,
Houston, Tex.


HERBERT W. PAYNE
Vice President, Textile Workers
Union of America, New York, N. Y.

ERIC PETERSON
General Vice President, Inter-
national Association of Machinists,
New York, N. Y.

E. G. QUESNEL
Director of Safety, The Borden
Company., New York, N. Y.

KATHERINE ELLICKSON
Assistant Director of Research,
Congress of Industrial Organiza-
tions, Washington, D. C.

R. R. SAYERS, M. D.
Director, Bureau of Mines, U. S.
Department of the Interior, Wash-*
ington, D. C.

CARL L. SMITH
Managing Director, Cleveland Safety
Council, Cleveland, Ohio

L. METCALFE WALLING
Administrator, Wage and Hour and
Public Contracts Divisions, U. S.
Department of Labor, New York, N. Y.

RALPH E. WALTER
Safety Director, Nebraska Power Co.,
Omaha, Nebr.

W. H. WINANS
Industrial Relations Department,
Union Carbide Co., New York, N. Y.

V. A. ZIMMER
Director, Division of Labor Stand-
ards, U. S. Department of Labor,
Washington, D. C.









U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
DIVISION OF LABOR STANDARDS
WASHINGTON

NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR THE
CONSERVATION OF MANPOWER THREE-YEAR PROGRESS REPORT
IN WAR INDUSTRIES


The Secretary of Labor:

This pamphlet is a report of the job safety campaign of the Na-
tional Committee for the Conservation of Manpower in War Industries.
When you appointed the Committee, some 3 years ago, you pointed out that
industrial manpower, a vital resource in our production program, was
liable to wastage in a number of ways, and that one of the chief causes
of this wastage was in industrial injuries. Since the control of job
injury is a local problem, which rests squarely upon plant management,
and since a quarter century of organized safety effort had resulted in
the development of practical methods of accident and disease prevention,
the program set forth was designed to bring directly to plant management
the will to safety, a knowledge of basic safety methods, and expert as-
sistance in initiating safety programs. The program of the Committee
has been broadened in the 3 years that followed, but it still adheres to
its basic purpose, to attack the accident problem where it exists, in
the plants and shops which are producing the supplies and materials of war.

Three years ago there was no shortage of manpower, but to those who
read the lessons of the past the present shortage was inevitable. And
it is not least among the Committee's accomplishments that its cry for
safety, unheeded qt first amid the clamor for speed at any cost, is now
a national crusade, echoed daily in the press and on the air. But the
Committee has other, more tangible, accomplishments to its credit and
despite a general rise in work injuries--a phenomenon beyond the control
of the National Committee or any other safety group--evidence points to
a definite improvement in those plants which have taken advantage of the
Committee's services.

Within every industrial establishment there are four groups which
have either a direct responsibility for safety, or an immediate concern
with its effectiveness. Management, top operating personnel, supervisors,
and workers--each has a definite part to play in any plant safety pro-
gram. And for each, the Committee has fashioned definite services. To
management in more than 20,000 war plants the Committee's Special Agents
have brought their personal services. Two-thirds of a million copies
of publications--dealing with the fundamentals of safety organization
and the handling of specific safety problems--have been distributed to
management, operating personnel, and supervisors. Three million copies
of a little booklet listing practical tips on safe work practices have
reached war workers, through either their employers or their unions.





'00 *S
















Some 40,000 key supervisors have completed the National Committee-Office
of Education safety training course, and thousands of foremen are already
enrolled in a recently launched course on foremen safety training. The
campaign of direct-worker education has been stepped up--on the air, in
the press, and on the screen. Unions are playing an increasingly effec-
tive part in accident prevention.

It is not surprising that with management and men in many plants
convinced of the value and practicability .of safety, the Committee is
receiving more and more requests for specific service on definite prob-
lems. This is the kind of service that is productive of tangible re-
sults, and the record of accomplishment during the next year should -
reflect improved safety.performance in a large number of plants. But
unfortunately, the majority of plants in the country still are doing
little or no effective safety work, and the will to safety must be in-
stilled in their managements before the groundwork for progress can be
laid. This is the unfinished business of the National Committee--and
its challenge.


Cyril Ainsworth Thomas P. Kearns Katherine Ellickson
W. H. Cameron Lewis E. Mac Brayne R. R. Sayers, M. D.
John P. Coyne T. 0. Meisner Carl L. Smith
R. E. Donovan Charles A. Miller L. Metcalfe Walling
John P. Frey Herbert W. Payne Ralph E. Walter
Clinton S. Golden Eric Peterson W. H. Winans
William H. Ivey E. G. Quesnel V. A. Zimmer







MANAGEMENT. .














Its. Responsibility for Safety

The primary responsibility for safety rests squarely on the shoulders
of top management. Management has a legal responsibility for safety-
to provide a "safe and healthful" workplace; a moral responsibility for
safety-to protect the lives, limbs,.and health of its employees; a finan-
cial responsibility for safety to safeguard the plant owners from
wastage of funds in the compensation, medical, and indirect costs of pre-
ventable injuries. And most important, in these times, management has a
patriotic obligation to speed production by efficiently utilizing and
guarding the dwindling supply of war workers and by preventing the loss
of time, life, and skills which result from work injury.


National Committee Service

Assistance in Meeting the Responsibility
The keystone of the National Committee program is the bringing to war
plant management the will and the knowledge necessary to the establish-
ment of a sound and going plant safety program. As means to this end,
the Committee makes available to management-

1. Personal Consulting Service-The personal services of some
600 volunteer safety agents practical men in the em-
ploy of private industry who call upon management for
the purpose of stimulating interest in safety and assisting
in the establishment, expansion, or improvement of a plant
safety program.

2. Printed Material--Publications which point up the need for
and value of safety, explain the services of the National
Committee, and outline the fundamentals of a sound safety
program.






PERSONAL CONSULTING SERVICE. .






An Outline

The Reason--Industrial safety is a vital and necessary part of modern
production that can no more be learned solely from books than can any
other phase of production technology. The essence of the personal con-
sulting service is to place at the disposal of war plant management the
services of a qualified industrial safety technician, to help in an un-
derstanding of safety's place in production and to assist in fashioning
and installing a workable plant program.

The Plan--From information gathered in Washington, the chairmen of State
branch committees are provided with the names of plants engaged in war
work on Government contract. On the basis of these data, supplemented
by information developed locally, the State Chairmen assign to Special
Agents the job ofgetting in touch withcontract plants in their locality.
The agents call upon the assigned plants, outlining to management the
need for constant attention to the problem of safety, and offering to
assist in an appraisal of plant conditions, the development of a pro-
gram designed to fit the plant needs, or solving some particular problem.

The Men--The volunteer field force Special Agents, State Chairmen,
and Regional Representatives are practical safety men currently
employed in private industry. With a combined safety experience of
8,000 years they represent an effective "task force" in the fight against
job injuries.

The Material--In addition to their own knowledge and .safety experience,
the Special Agents have behind them the consultant services of experts
in various specialized phases of safety and health and the full-time
services of the safety and health staff of the Division of Labor Stan-
dards. Som.. of the information developed has been put in printed form
and issued as special bulletins of the Division.












PERSONAL CONSULTING SERVICE
A SUMMARY


PLANTS TO BE
SERVICED


JULY -JUNE
1940 -41


JULY-JUNE


JULY- JUNE
1942 -43


LLLLLLL L LLLI


I I I J


1I)I


EACH SYMBOL REPRESENTS 2,000 UNITS






PUBLICATIONS .


Safeguarding Manpower For
Greater Production

The Importance of Safe Working Conditions in
Maintaining and Incresaing Industrial Output
for National Defnse


What Would You
Pay for
s8,$@ YEARS'

EXPERIENCE?






TOP OPERATING PERSONNEL...



PlnT S Hflft[ -- PIifliT SMY f'
Efifl6 f DIRECTOR SUPT I DIRECTOR




Functions and Responsibilities
Top operating personnel plant engineers, personnel directors,
plant superintendents, safety directors is typical of the staff
officials who management holds responsible for plant operation, quality
of product, safe and continuous operation. The plant engineer makes sure
that new processes and new machines are set up and equipped to safeguard
the operators. The personnel office acquaints new employees with the
plant safety program and trains them in safe work practices. The plant
superintendent checks to make sure that the safety equipment is used and
the work carried on in a safe manner. The safety director coordinates
the safety activities of the others and assists in handling technical
safety matters.

National Committee Service

Assistance in Fulfilling Functions in Safety
The National Committee assists operating personnel in fulfilling its
safety functions by providing services designed to improve the general
understanding of the field of industrial safety and its basic methods,
and to give technical information on specific safety problems.
1. Safety Training-Through a 96-hour evening course in the
fundamental principles and basic methods of safety, the
Committee assists operating officials in gaining a better
understanding of safety assists management in devel-
oping men and women qualified to carry out the safety program.
2. Personal Consulting Service-The Special Agents assist and
advise in the development of educational campaigns, plant
surveys, and safety instruction, and in solving special
problems.
3. Printed material-A series of special bulletins and re-
prints on such technical subjects as welding, machine guard-
ing, industrial sanitation, industrial lighting, and the
safe handling of hazardous substances.
s5648 0 44 2 5






TRAINING SAFETY LEADERS. .



The Courses
Set up under the Engineering, Science, Management War Training Program of
the U. S. Office of Education, the courses are designed to train key industrial
supervisors in the fundamentals and basic methods of industrial safety. They
are conducted in centers of war production under the sponsorship of local
colleges of engineering whose standards have the approval of the Office of Edu-
cation. Classes are held in the evening, at locations convenient to the mem-
bers. The standard course consists of two 3-hour sessions a week for a period
of 16 weeks. The instructors are practical safety men drawn from local indus-
try--in many cases, Special Agents of the National Committee. The cost, save
for the expense to students of necessary text material, is defrayed by the
Office of Education. The course outline, much of the basic text material, and
supplementary data for the guidance of instructors, were developed by the safety
staff of the Division of Labor Standards.


Material Prepared by Washington Office















SAFETY ENGINEERING WAR TRAINING

July 1941 June 1943


JULY 1942
- JUNE 1943


EACH SYMBOL REPRESENTS 2,000 GRADUATES



EACH SYMBOL REPRESENTS 100 CLASSES


COLLEGES PARTICIPATING
JULY-DEC
f94 1


JAN-JUNE .. .
1942 :: L

JULY-1942
-JUIE-1943* -


EACH SYMBOL REPRESENTS 10 COLLEGES






PUBLICATIONS....


uPREVENTIo 1OF
PREVENTION OF


IT,1


Safe Handling-of
NITRIC ACID


SP-l.s Bolkim No 0


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
FRANCES PERKINS, SAecrDor
DIVISION OF LABOR STANDARDS
V0int A DONE D.11o


.,4





SHOP SUPERVISORS. ..










Functions and Responsibilities

The foreman bears direct responsibility for performance on the pro-
duction line. Through him must flow all of the management plans for
quantity and quality of product and for the safety of the men. From him
must come reports on the practical workings of ideas, techniques, and
campaigns. He, his line subordinates assistant foremen and lead-
men and his safety coworkers committeemen have a vital
part to play in the plant safety program. They have the job of seeing
that safety equipment is used, that tools and equipment are in safe working
condition, that safe work practices are followed. They must report back
to management the practical operation of new ideas and equipment and
submit recommendations for necessary changes. Without the active support
of supervisors the most elaborately conceived and carefully worked out
program of safety is doomed to failure.



National Committee Service to Supervisors

The National Committee renders direct service to foremen, assistant
foremen, leadmen, and safety committeemen, in the following three ways:

1. Safety Training-in addition to the training course for
key supervisors, the National Committee has worked out a
special course for the training of foremen in the details
of safety as it applies to their own work.

2. Personal Assistance-Upon request of management the Special
Agents work directly with foremen as a group, outlining
their safety functions and discussing practical ship problems.

3. Printed Material-A series of publications prepared by or
in collaboration with the Division of Labor Standards upon
specific safety functions of shop supervisors.






SAFETY MANAGEMENT FOR FOREMEN. .




OUTLINE FOR 20- HOUR
FOREMEN'S SAFETY COURSE The Course

[1-MANAGEMENT a SUPERVISORY
RESPONSIBILITY A 20-hour course on safety in foremanship,
2- ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION designed especially for in-plant training.
3-MACHINE SAFEGUARDING The important safety functions of industrial
4-HOUSEKEEPING AND ORDER supervisors are covered in ten 2-hour ses-
5-HANDLING MATERIALS sions, each session being devoted to one
6-SAFETY CLOTHING major subject. The course outline and
7-FIRST AID basic text materials were developed by the
8- SAFETY FUNDAMENTALS IN safety staff of the Division of Labor Stan-
FOREMANSHIP dards. The course may be given in con-
9-PLANT INSPECTION junction with or independently of the films
10-PRODUCTION WITH SAFETY listed below






The Films

A set of ten 20-minute sound-slide films developed
jointly by the U. S. Department of Labor and the
National Safety Council for use in conjunction
with the course. Each film is tied in with the
course session of the corresponding number.

I. FOLLOW THE LEADER 6. RIGHT DRESS
2. CAUSE AND CURE 7. DOCTOR'S ORDERS
3. GUARD DUTY 8. PRINCIPLES AND INTEREST
4. SAFETY IS IN ORDER 9. STOP, LOOK AND LISTEN
5. BRAINS BEAT BRAWN 10. PRODUCTION WITH SAFETY






PUBLICATIONS....


SAFETY SPEEDS PRODUCTION-A 20-page pamphlet addressed
to supervisors, outlining their functions in instructing,
supervising and checking for safety Prepared with the
assistance of Special Agents and other industrial safety men.






SAFETY ON THE JOB
FOR
THE NEW EMPLOYEE




Bulletin No.8



Training
Within Industry









SAFETY ON THE JOB FOR THE NEW EMPLOYEES'-
A 4-page multilithed folder outlining the methods
of weaving safety into the process of job induct ion.
Prepared by the National Committee and issued as
bulletin R-Aof the Training-Within-Industry Ser-
vice, War Manpower Commission.



A GUIDE TO THE PREVENTION OF WEIGHT-LIFTING
INJURIES-A 20-page pamphlet covering the fundamentals
of weight-lifting safety. Addressed to management and
supervisors, it stresses use of mechanical equipment
and careful selection, training and supervision of em-
ployees in manual work. Prepared with assistance of
industrial physicians, safety and personnel directors.


OSafeft
| ODUeCos
FPROo<'Cro


I Me s S IUE I


PREVENTION OF
PREVENTION OF


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UNITED STATES DIPARTMWNT OF
Dovn or LST 5tB9
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WORKERS. .















The W orker's Stake in Safety

THE INDIVIDUAL worker has a direct and personal stake in safety. To the
Nation, safety means a smoother, more constant flow of the arms and equip-
ment essential to victory. To plant management it means a saving in com-
pensation and medical bills and related costs. But to the worker safety
means a longer life, a whole body and unimpaired earning capacity, a full
pay envelope instead of a compensation check. Despite more liberal work-
men's compensation laws and improved restorative medicine, the worker is
still the primary victim of industrial accidents. He is the primary
beneficiary of industrial safety.

THE UNION-an association of individual workers banded together for mutual
protection-reflects the personal stake in safety of its individual mem-
oers. Organized labor has made great strides in improving the conditions
under which American men and women toil, in gaining for them a larger
share of the fruits of production, in gaining for them protection against
the vicissitudes of modern economic life. But of what value are high
wages, shorter hours, old age and unemployment benefits to the worker
who is maimed for life by an accident, or to the family of a worker who
who has been killed at work? Organized labor has already contributed to
organized safety. Its force was solidly behind the drive for workmen's
compensation laws, the enactment of which gave impetus to safety by holding
management responsible for at least a share of the financial burden of
job-injury. Labor helped inaugurate and has supported State safety codes
and inspection services. It can and is helping its individual members
to better understand the need for working safely always and for taking a
direct and active part in plant safety programs.






SAFETY SERVICE FOR LABOR. ..


Publications

For the Individual--A pocket-sized publication listing practical tips
on how to stay safe on the job. A basic guide to safe work practices.

For the Union--Two publications devoted to outlining sound and practi-
cal methods for union participation in plant safety programs. Good
material for the union which wants to do something tangible for the
protection of its members against job accidents.



Safety Training for Union Officials
Sound planning and action in any field of union endeavor must rest upon
knowledge and information. The 96-hour safety training courses are open
to union officials who are in a position to take a direct part in the
national campaign against job injuries.


Direct Informational Service
The services of National Committee Special Agents and full-time safety
personnel of the Division of Labor Standards are available to unions in
developing a program or investigating some special safety problem.
Union requests for information lead to the publication of Special Bul
letin No. 5, "Control of Welding Hazards," and to an investigation
into the health hazards involved in the making and fabrication of syn-
thetic rubber which is now under way.


General Educational Work
A rounded program of safety education for war plant workers developed
by the Committee and carried out with the assistance of other Government
agencies and private organizations, including a series of newspaper re-
leases covering important safe work practices, a Nation-wide radio
campaign, and a set of motion pictures covering the fundamentals of job
safety.







PUBLICATIONS. .



Labor and Safety on the Job

THE WORKER' S SAFETY AND WAR i' N.,,.o .n,
PRODUCTION and LABOR AND
SAFETY ON THE JOB.-A 10-page
pamphlet outlining the need for
safety and listing practical tips
on safe work practices. Special
Bulletin No. 2 for distribution
through management; "Labor and
Safety on the Job" for use by
unions.


JOINT SAFETY COMMITTEES AT WORK. -A guide toeffec-
tive union safety activity through joint labor-management
safety committees. Based upon a study of committee work in
several important war plants, the bulletin will prove of
great value to local unions and union comnnitteemen.


LABOR SAFETY SERVICE. A 14-page booklet pre-
pared by the Labor members of the National Committee,
stressing the needformore direct participation by
unions in industrial safety, outlining effective
safety activities, and giving examples of how unions
have used the safety services of the Department of
Labor.


A REPORT BY THE LABOR MEMBERS
of the
NATIONAL COMMITTEE for the
CONSERVATION of MANPOWER in WAR INDUSTRIES







U 5I OEPlWnilT l ] DiCo La IATU gau1
D690"O 49 Te/a


*A HI POR T
OF UNION
PARTICIPATION


JOINT SAFETY
COMMITTEES




nOlll SiACS 0iPMMiN I 11T11 E -
1111 1 1 11 111 OF S IIII












PRESS






The educational program of the National Committee has always re-
ceived assistance from newspaper accounts of local accidents, often tied
in with comments by Special Agents, and reports of safety meetings, ad-
dresses and campaigns arising out of committee activity. The National
Committee last spring prepared a series of press releases stressing the
importance of safe work practices. Sent out through the Office of War
Information, the releases have been received most favorably by both the
press, regular and labor, and the readers. Each release deals with a
specific phase of safe work practices and each is illustrated by one of
the cartoons reproduced below. The press-educational campaign is being
continued on a local basis by the field organization.




















The air waves, too, are carrying to the war workers of America the
story of safety and tips on safe work practices. During the first 3
months of the National Committee's intensive radio campaign more than
350 safety programs were broadcast by stations throughout the country.

There are a variety of different programs, all pointed to stimu-
lating the worker as an individual and as a union member to
work carefully and to take an active part in his plant safety program.

There is the 5-minute interview of a Special Agent, devoted to safe
practices in machine operation, in the use of tools and equipment, in
dress and personal conduct, and in good housekeeping. There are the
15-minute discussion programs; some covering the accident problem as a
whole and stressing the workers part therein. This type features a
Committee representative, a State labor official, and a representative
of industry. Others cover the National Committee program from the
labor angle featuring a representative of organized labor. A new
development worked out by several larger stations is a 15-
minute program featuring interviews with safety men, plant physicians,
supervisors and workers in local war plants and teaching a safety lesson
by dramatizing recent accidents in those plants. And, not counted among
the 350 programs, there are the 30-second spot announcements, used to
"plug" a single safe practice rule at station breaks.

A number of plants have rebroadcast these forceful pleas for safe
operations over their public address systems with marked effect on the
safety consciousness of their employees.





















Sight sound action the magic of the sound motion pic-
ture has been added to the National Committee's worker education campaign.
From scripts prepared by the Division of Labor Standards a leading pro-
ducer of motion picture shorts is filming a series of 26 1-minute
subjects on job safety. Designed for screening in commercial theatres
on a sponsorship basis, each short deals with one phase of job safety,
setting forth the safe practice and portraying dramatically the reasons
for its importance. Safe machine practice o o safe clothing per-
sonal protective equipment safe handling practices first aid
. use of machine guards .these are a few of the subjects covered.
Here is a brief description of the film on machine guards, with full
narration.




ON GUARD

Action--Opening with a shot of a boxer dropping his guard and being
knocked out, the film contrasts the danger of modern machinery to the
punch packed by a championship fighter, then reviews briefly various
types of machinery safeguards.

Narration--Keep that chin covered! One second off guard may mean .
a quick trip to the canvas. Yes sir! This boy's punch sure packs a
sleeping powder, but it's gentle compared to the metal-bending wallop
of this press, or the biting, cutting action of a miller or power saw.
It takes many punches to make a fighter groggy, but one unguarded sec-
ond with a machine may mean this! Engineers have developed methods of
covering the danger points, of feeding machines, and of operating them
in such a way as to keep your hands out of danger. Use these safe-
guards; they were devised for your protection. Be smart, stay on guard,
so you'll be in there punching when the final bell rings and victory
is ours.






COMMITTEE PROGRAM BEARS FRUIT


The end of all industrial safety activity is a reduction in the number
of time-wasting, skill-destroying injuries. The ultimate test of the
effectiveness of any program is, then, the extent to which it succeeds
in accomplishing this end.




Reduced Frequency Rates

Plant accident experience is measured in terms of frequency rates--the
number of injuries per million man-hours of exposure. The vast majority
of plants in the United States have never before computed their rates,
nor have most of them maintained records upon which rates may be com-
puted. However, 4,377 of theplants contacted by the National Committee
during the first 30 months of its existence had records which could be
used in comparing experience before and after committee service. 74.2
percent of the reporting plants experienced a decrease in accident
frequency; 4.8 percent reported no change; and the remaining 21 percent
continued to show an upward trend. The extent of the rate reduction is
indicated by the experience of a number of individual plants recorded on
pages 22 and 23.


Improved Safety Report

For the majority of plants serviced those which maintained no ac-
cident records the sole criterion of progress is the extent to
which they have undertaken to put to use those tools of safety which
eventually result in lowered accident rates. Improvement in safety
effort is indicated by the following table.


BENEFICIAL CHANGES IN PLANT SAFETY WORK
RESULTING FROM NATIONAL COMMITTEE SERVICE
Plants Contacted J.uly-December, 1942
Number of Percent of
Nature of change
plants plants contacted
Initiation of Safety Progtam.............. 956 018
Intensification of plant safety program... 1,293 .24
Employment of full-time safety engineer... 257 .05
Employment of part-time safety engineer... 339 .06
Organization of plant safety committees... 832 .15
Enrollment of supervisors in
safety training courses ............. 1,453 .27





Freqaenrc Rate Reductions i
Visited by Special A
1942-
Establisbment Contacted :
W- Li- Corragated Box Co. (Corrqgate6d Boxes)
Plilabelplia, PeFnnsgIlueria.
Average Frequenc R &r Corru~ated Box I r
Averefeqluear3C radfe 76r -fbis plarn
October -


) Typical Plants
gernts




srg 32.3

130.6


November- 48.8
December- 34.2

Z--Ajax Metal Co. (Smelt-irg an6 Rlning)
Philaaelphia, Pennsylvaria .
Average freqcemcg Ra+e r 5rrmeltinr S'6 Rfin IndusItr- 279
Averae.frecquerncy rte .br this plan
October- 91.2
November- 699
December- -16.4

5-- HD. Lee Mercanti le Co.C(Mens Clothing)
Trerd-on. (New Jersey-
Average Frequency RaIe for Men's Clothing Industrg 9.5
Avera efrequencg rate for this plant
October 34.4
Ntovember- 2M.4
December- 11.7

4-Wisconsin Appleton Co.(Forundrg)
South Milwaukee, Wisconsirn .
Average Trequency Ratejfr founory In6cdustr -- 47.0
Averagerei-quency rarejbr fl plaint


October --
November -


136.7


75.J


December- No lost time accidents

5--1ru2nswick Pulp and Paper Co. (PaIp)
Truanswich. Georgia .
Average Frequercy Raife br Pulp lrndastry 242
Averae freqaeranc rafej r this plani-


October -
November-


75.8


IZ6.T


December- 0 9.8


20








Tread in Frequencg Ra5te or Certain Plants
Visited bg Special Agents
-1942-
Establishment Contacted:
I St Louis Steel Costing Co. (foundrg)
St Louis, Missouri .
Averaefrequencg rate for Foun6rg lr6ustry 47
Average frecaenc9 rate$fr tbis ant
October 92.6
'lovember- 32.4
December- 16.7
2-Globe 5bipbuil6iq. Co C5 hipbaildirg)
Superior, Wiscon.si 2.
Average Freqaenc9 Rate_7or Shipbail6dir Inldasti-ry- 6.4
Avera-e fjiqure rateIyr + is lan
October -- 84.3
November- 44.3
December- 42.1
3-Electric WJbeel Co (Forgirgs)
Quincy, Illinois.
Average f raenc9 Ratefor forjir2gs Industry- 44.5
Averag-efj'quen ratebr bis lant-
October 65.0
November- 688
December- 2zo.o
4- Souiheasterr2 Shipbuil6ing Corp. (Shipbuilding)
Savannah.Georgia. __
Average Feqencg Patebfr Shipbail ingj z4
Auereagrequen ratebfr ihas plart-
October 58.7
A ouember- 42.4
December- 58.7
5-Mu-skeon Piston Ring Co (Foondry)
Sparta, M icbigo r..
Average frequeocyg Raftebr Foundry Industrg 4
Averaefrqruerxc bor this plant
October 105.
November- 38.8
December (Ho 1ost time aeeident5)







COOPERATION WITH OTHER AGENCIES....


Cooperation is the keystone of successful safety effort, and the
National Committee, whose program is essentially the activation of
existing safety knowledge, has always worked to the fullest possible extent
with other agencies concerned with or interested in safety.

Government
Federal--The Committee has worked closely with such operating
agencies as the War and Navy Departments and the Maritime Com-
mission--assisting in the development of safety programs and pro-
viding safety material--and with such service agencies as the War
Production Board, War Manpower Commission, U. S. Public Health
Service, Office of Defense Transportation, and other bureaus within
the Department of Labor.
State--The Committee has also worked closely with State labor depart-
ments in the establishment of good standards of safety engineering.
Special Agents have helped wherever there was a need for safety pro-
motion. The States have made wide use of printed material issued
by the Committee.

Other
Organized Safety--Cooperation has been close between the Committee
and such outside organizations as the National Safety Council, local
safety councils, the American Society of Safety Engineers, and the
Aperican Standards Association. The Committee and the Council worked
together in the development of the new foremanship sound-slide
films. The local councils have distributed quantities of the special
bulletins and cooperated in establishing safety courses and locating
qualified instructors.

Labor--Organized labor has provided many members on both National
and State advisory committees, and local unions are making frequent
use of Committee services as well as calling attention to needed
types of service and information.
Industry--ljpon the cooperation of industrial management has rested
the entire plant visitation program, which could not be carried on
without the Special Agents. Individual plants have cooperated on
many occasions in providing information and technical assistance in
the preparation of printed material. Industry groups--chambers of
commerce and manufacturers' associations--have promoted use of the
Committee's services and participated in its program.
22







THE NATIONAL COMMITTEE

LOOKS AHEAD....


The vast majority of American plants are still without adequate
safety programs, and the work of the Committee must continue, at an
intensified rate if possible. Its services have reached less than one-
quarter of the estimated 90,000 war production plants; and at least 50
percent of the plants already contacted need additional service if they
are to be brought into line with good safety performance. The safety
training program, too, is far from completed. Despite the nearly 40,000
96-hour course graduates, this phase of the Committee program has reached
but 27 percent of plants visited, much of the enrollment having come
from larger establishments with existing safety programs. The foreman-
training courses are barely under way, and when several hundred thousand
war plant foremen have been trainedin the fundamentals of safety manage-
ment, they still must be taught the means of coaching their workers in
safe practices.

The record of accomplishment in those plants which have received
full benefit of Committee service testifies to the success of the basic
program. The problem now is that of bringing the program to bear upon
as many of the remaining plants as possible. The Committee realizes,
however, that, with its limited full-time staff and in view of thein-
creasing demands upon Special Agents from their own plants, the volume
of work cannot be increased measurably. The wisest course, therefore,
is to concentrate upon those plants producing highly essential war mate-
rial and having outstandingly bad accident records. The result will be
a falling off in the total number of plants reached but an increase in
the number of repeat visits and in the amount of service rendered to
each plant. Meanwhile, the missionary work formerly done by the Agents
will be taken up in some part by intensified general publicity and
through such cooperating agencies as the War and Navy Departments and
the National Safety Council. The result should be an overall increase
in general safety consciousness coupled with vastly improved safety per-
formance in important contract plants where the accident rate is highest.
In this way, the National Committee can utilize its limited resources
most effectively both in attacking the immediate problem of war plant
accidents'and in laying broad and firm foundations for industrial safety
in the post-war years.


23







NATIONAL COMMITTEE FIELD ORGANIZATION


Region Headquarters

I BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS
(80 Federal Street)

2 NEW YORK CITY. N. Y.
and (350 Madison Avenue)
3
Sub-heddquarters
PHILADELPHIA, PA.
(1129 Walnut Street)

4 CLEVELAND, OHIO
(207-209 Republic Bldg.)

5 BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA
(2225 Comer Building)

Sub-headquarters
BATH, SOUTH CAROLINA


6 CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
(104 South Michigan Blvd.)

7 HOUSTON, TEXAS
(300 Keller Bldg.)

8 SAN FRANCISCO. CAL.
(200 Bush Street)

9 OMAHA, NEBRASKA
(603 Electric Bldg.)


Representat zve

Lewis E. MacBrayne
Regional Representative

E. G. Quesnel
Regional Representative


Walter W. Matthews
Assistant Regional Rep.

Carl L. Smith
Regional Representative

William H. Ivey
Regional Representative


Raymond B. Stuckey
Assistant Regional Rep.

Theodore 0. Meisner
Regional Representative


Safety Staff
Paid Volunteer

2 21


5 119


3 140


Charles A. Miller 2 53
Regional Representative

R. E. Donovan 2 79
Regional Representative

Ralph E. Walter 2 57
Regional Representative
U S GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 1B4




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