Catalyst for rural development

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Material Information

Title:
Catalyst for rural development
Physical Description:
6 no. : ; 24-27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Office of Information
Publisher:
Office of Information, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
irregular
completely irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Rural development -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
No. 1 (Feb. 1972)-no. 6 (Jan. 1973).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004891869
oclc - 21086895
Classification:
lcc - HT401 .C38
System ID:
AA00012198:00001


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ca~M 1972,

RUA MRIA T POL N FITS DEVELOPMNT

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faciiis sucr ho asve trasprtaon, utilnities sewer atind wae sysem, andte
recre opuationo 1, and lad s planing with allpuato of these thr is popl buil
ning throuh proram of education and heath arg.ndtii voluneer l~aeadershi in
preahng out th ousn les pillx pes oplle.epubnwee naeaefml
Itom is mos imprtant ls toa re membr thliat sucessfu rur aldvlopentei re-a
development, peosple omk builing comunity facility iproetolvemn and enirn

met urality. efiiency in n of theseeooi arveaswllben therew limtingfto
inr ar commniys fulfillmosent.arcltr.I salodvlpigc~n

Whceain, you lokatd the slnize. ofthets ahea of uhse and te asolread over-
to hav og encourage mo e ucitizen partiipation in volunteer moemdentsh to

met the neest iofruraltt America. htsccsfl ua dvlpmn

Ieeomnt allof te ruraldi communities that It have kow te peopl who niven
therel wuanitto deiidetec director of their futre.s Thl eherurl citizn's basct

desireno too seve couped withhiiso of the takaedeo stiny ofhis ownad commuit
provin Fdea oporunity and challenge fr leaders hip for allofus, who are dedi-
atedto the edevlpmn of rural America.




Working with all of you toward our common goal of enriching quality of
life in rural America is an opportunity which I look forward to with great
enthusiasm.
UNIV. OF. F LH UB- --ar~

WILLIAM ERWIN
Pi'JLDeputy Under Secretary
for Rural Development

Ul.S. DEPrOMlTOS~f

US DEATETO GIUTURE OFFICE OF INFORMATION / WASHINGTON D.C. 20250









*, -"2- B

I. P~E _:~FlIN FROM DESPAIR
IS- 50035:l~ IIN TULIr, TEXAS

Business in T'ulia, Texas, slowly withered away. In the downtown sec-
tion, 25 commlllercal and business buildings stood abandoned and shuttered.

"Sunset Additi~n,"' a dilJpidated slum occupied mostly by Negro families,
b:: 'ted an entire section on the "wrong side" of the tracks.

Services from the town languished as the tax base dwindled and commu-
nity activity retreated to the most basic and necessary functions.

Finally, the problems of the town became too large to ignore. Local
leaders realized that if their town was to prosper, or perhaps even continue
to exist, they would have to act decisively.

They confered with housing specialists of the farmers Home Administration
who found Sunset Addition Leyon: hope of rehabilitation. In exploring alter-
nate solutions, the town leaders learned that Farmers Home could make new
bome loans to low-income families if suitable building sites were available.

Government leaders, civic organizations, and private citizens soon
.eed that ii-i financed homes could be built on any suitable site in town.
Within months, the first houiJ;n, construction started, and the families of
Sunset Addition began moving into Tulia. Spanish surname and white families
soon followed and applied for similar housing loans. The Tulia housing boom
developed.

Within two years, the Tulia office of the farmers Home Administration
approved 286 housing loans for a total of $3.5 million dollars. All homes
are individually built, many with brick veneer. Most of them have three
bedrooms, but some for larger families have four bedrooms, and others for
senior citizens have two bedrooms. culders have kept the average construc-
tion cost at about $13,500.

As families move from dilapidated shacks to new homes, the old houses
are demolished, either voluntarily by owners, or by official city council
conde .nation. The cleared ground is used for new building sites.

Vacant and unsightly areas of the town are steadily being upgraded,
improved, and beautified through construction of new homes. Homes financed
by Farmers Home compared favorably with more expensive, conventional housing
as they stand side-by-side throughout the town.

The influx of construction money, plus new tax revenues have spurred
business activities in the town and employment is up.



Elow of people out of the rural South during the 1950's slowed to a
:1-tricl t15 next decade. F-our million more people left the area than moved
in between 1950 and 1.' 0, but during 1960-70 out-migration dropped bO percent
to 1.5 million and the South's total population actually grew nearly 6 per-
cent. Total outmigration from the rest of rural America did not slow as
mud-. .: population turnaround in the rural South is spotlighted in the
April Farm Index. A limited number of cingle copies of this monthly U.S.
artment of Agriculture publication is avrailab~le by writing the Editor,
iarm Index, OMS Information, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington,









STAND TALL--AND PAY AllfullION TO ri'~AILC


Driver education, ._... Jui..y a trivial ;-- :-1.' of adult: training, is a
vital part of the new community development progran: sponsored by th~e South
Carolina rural electric system.

Urban employers balk at hirI:., rural workers unicxe they can drive.
When a carpool has only one driver and he is away for reasor, t:.ey lose
at least four workers that day.

Attention to such details as driver education is one of the rcdsons
Stand Tall is succeeding in community development in South earol~ina. It is
one of the reasons the Rural Electrification Administration is its
borrowers nationwide to adapt such a p: -:am to their communities.,

No item which will upgrade rural life is :e !0ctea in the Stand Tall
program, initiated about 18 months ago. by the South, Carolina Clectric Co-
operative Association, Inc. Furthermore, the poor are involved in each
community's program from its inception.

As a community forms a Stand Tall commission, nothing is left to chance.
From the start, the local group receives assistance from the Statewide Stand
Tall organization--step by step guidelines, so~.-- 'ions for moot:;-..-.agendas,
forms on which to report progress, survey forms, and other guidance. A
fulltime development specialist from the local electric co-op acts as the
commission chairman's assistant.

The cooperatives make surveys, help establish nonprofit industrial
development corporations and handle other special problems for the community.

One of the great stumbling blocks of community devel:.*~ it, duplication
of effort, is minimized by outi~nin:-~ each commission project in advance.
Another important detail.

Stand Tall's aim is any State's aim: to make the State's rural areas
attractive industrial bases, offering not only water and '.Uw---.L treatment but
better education, housing, medical centers, better roads, job training,
recreation and an improved environment.

Worthy goals in any State, yes, but Stand Tall has Gone beyond the
talk.ing~stage. Detail by detail, the., are developing their communities.

As of February 1972, 15 rural electric cooperatives were involved in
this program as sponsors of 16 Stand Tall Commission o ~anizations. For
further information, contact Robert D. Bennett, Ex. Vice Pres., or Al Ballard,
Director of Industrial and Community Development, South Carolina Electric
Cooperative Association, Inc., 808 Knox Ab~bott _rive, Cayce, South Carolina
290331. REA offers a colorful booklet on the prc:,ram~, ACTION NOW--TOTAL
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT THRU CO-OP LEADEERF'-iP.

WHAT ARE YOU PLANN~ING~ ~FOR CLIN_~TYI FAIi;?

H-ousing exhibits for county fairs were put together by a multi-gerncy
team in Pennsylvania last year. Tab~le-size scale models of homes Us..;nedd
by the: Forest Service were -iccompanarired by technical, information provided
by the Extension Service and Farmers Home Administration. Considerable
public interest brought many inquiries for literature and detailed house plans.
For details, see a local Forest Service official or write The Northeastern
Office of the For~est Service at 6816 Market St., Upper :-at.i. ., Fe-r.;,_lvania.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

\MllllllI\\M INI~rlll l illlAI
3 1262 08740 0007
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
O F FICE O F IN FORMAT ION
WASH1INGTON, D. C.20250
POSTAGE AND FEES PAID
OFFICIAL BUSINESS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF
AGRICULTURE













FAMERLF: MARKETS LFFPaiA IN NE;W MEXICO

Thanks to the League of Women Voters in Los Alamos, N.M. the farmers of
small acreages began to increase their income in 1970 by selling fresh
vegetables at a local farmers market.

Members of the League, noticing farmers were selling vegetables beside
the road and from door-to-door, located a parking lot for their use each
Thursday and promoted the new Los Alamos Farmers Market. The Extension
Service and other USDA agencies helped the farmers with problems such as
better vegetable varieties, irrigation and insect and disease control.
38 farmers participated the first year, more the next.

In 1971, the League of Women Voters in Santa Fe sponsored a new Farmers
Market for that city, and this year a group called the Friends of Taos Valley
will sponsor a Farmers Market in Taos, N.M.

SLIDE PFELENlTTATIN AIDS EN;'.'HONENT~l; AL CLEAN-UP

Environmental Thrust is the subject of a new full color, 50-frame slide
set and filmstrip released by the U. S. Department of Agriculture.

It was prepared to help inform the public about the resources available
through the national network of USDA offices to help challenge pollution,
ugliness and blight, discussing subjects such as soil and water pollution
control, housing, waste disposal, and cost-sharing programs for planting
trees and shrubs. A cassette carrying music and dialogue helps tell the
story in an informal treatment.

The filmstrip can be ordered for $5.50 from Photo Lab, Inc., 3825
Georgia Avenue, N.W., We. ,:liston, D.C. 20011. Order the slide set for
$13.00 from Photography Division, Office of Information, U. S. Department of
Agriculture, Washington, D.C. 20250. The cassette is available from either
source for $3.

". AL DEVELCF:El1l MOVIE AVAILABLE

A 26 1/2-minute color movie on rural development has been completed by
the Cooperative Extension Service of New Mexico State University and the
Extension Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Narrated by Chet
Huntley, "What Do You Want" is designed to help people decide what kind of
development thywant i hi omnt.I a eprhsdfr$9
from Ban deliertr Films, 2001 Gold S.E.,i~oh~d~ ii"iii Albuquerq e, N.M. sd o $




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